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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Diana
CONTEXT:

BERTRAM
How have I sworn!
DIANA
‘Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the Highest to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God’s great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill?

DUTCH:
Een tal van eeden maakt de trouw niet hecht;
Een eed, eenvoudig, waar en trouw, volstaat;
Men zweert slechts bij wat heilig is, vooral
Bij de’ Allerhoogste;


MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: truth, honesty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
That is not the duke’s letter, sir; that is an
advertisement to a proper maid in Florence, one
Diana, to take heed of the allurement of one Count
Rousillon, a foolish idle boy, but for all that very
ruttish: I pray you, sir, put it up again.
FIRST SOLDIER
Nay, I’ll read it first, by your favour..
PAROLLES
My meaning in’t, I protest, was very honest in the
behalf of the maid; for I knew the young count to be
a dangerous and lascivious boy, who is a whale to
virginity and devours up all the fry it finds.
BERTRAM
Damnable both-sides rogue !

DUTCH:

MORE:

Topics: honesty, loyalty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
SECOND LORD
Nay, good my lord, put him to’t; let him have his
way.
FIRST LORD
If your lordship find him not a hilding, hold me no
more in your respect.
SECOND LORD
On my life, my lord, a bubble.
BERTRAM
Do you think I am so far deceived in him?SECOND LORD
Believe it, my lord, in mine own direct knowledge,
without any malice, but to speak of him as my
kinsman, he’s a most notable coward, an infinite and
endless liar, an hourly promise-breaker, the owner
of no one good quality worthy your lordship’s
entertainment.

DUTCH:
Geloof mij, edel heer; naar mijn eigen onmiddellijke waarneming, zonder eenige de minste boosheid en om van hem te spreken als van een bloedverwant, hij is een erkende lafaard, een oneindige, grenzenlooze leugenaar, een, die om het uur zijn belofte breekt en geene enkele goede eigenschap bezit, die hem den omgang met uwe edelheid waardig kan maken.

MORE:

Topics: insult, reputation

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
O madam! yonder ‘s my lord your son with a
patch of velvet on ‘s face: whether there be a
scar under ‘t or no, the velvet knows; but ’tis a
goodly patch of velvet. His left cheek is a cheek
of two pile and a half, but his right cheek is worn
bare.
LAFEW
A scar nobly got, or a noble scar, is a good livery of honour; so belike is that.

DUTCH:
Een roemvol verworven schram, of een roemvolle schram, kleedt den adel goed en zoo doet waarschijnlijk ook deze.

MORE:

Patch of velvet: velvet patches were used to cover scars or marks (cicatrice)
Pile=Measure of the depth of velvet
Belike=As it seems, it should seem, I suppose

Compleat:
Her face was full of patches=Haar aangezigt was vol zwarte pleistertjes

Topics: appearance, dignity, honour

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Helen
CONTEXT:
Yet, I pray you: But with the word the time will bring on summer,
When briars shall have leaves as well as thorns, And be as sweet as sharp.
We must away; Our wagon is prepared, and time revives us:
All’s well that ends well; still the fine’s the crown;
Whate’er the course, the end is the renown.

DUTCH:
Komt, wij moeten heen ;
De wagen staat gereed; de tjd baart rozen;
Eind goed, al goed; aan ‘t einde hangt de kroon;
De loop zij zwaar, het einde brengt het loon.

MORE:

Objective achieved; problems experienced along the way can be forgotten.
Shakespeare didn’t invent this; the earliest known version in print is from the 13th century, in The proverbs and idioms of Hendyng.
Fine=End, conclusion
Revive=To bring again to life, to reanimate

Compleat:
In fine=Eindelyk, ten laatsten
CITED IN US LAW:
In Re San Juan Dupont Plaza Hotel Fire Litigation, 907 F.2d 4, 6 (1st Cir. 1990)(per
curiam); Collett v. State, 133 Ga. App. 318, 211 S.E.2d 198 (Ga. Ct. App: 1974).

Topics: cited in law, purpose, achievement, time, nature

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
He did love her, sir, as a gentleman loves a woman.
KING
How is that?
PAROLLES
He loved her, sir, and loved her not.
KING
As thou art a knave, and no knave. What an equivocal companion is this!
PAROLLES
I am a poor man, and at your majesty’s command.
LAFEU
He’s a good drum, my lord, but a naughty orator.

DUTCH:
Zooals gij een schelm en geen schelm zijt. Wat is dat een dubbeltongige kerel!

MORE:
Naughty (nichtig)=Worthless

Compleat:
Knave=Een guit, boef

Topics: truth, honesty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
Your lord and master did well to make his recantation.
PAROLLES
Recantation! My lord! My master!
LAFEU
Ay; is it not a language I speak?
PAROLLES
A most harsh one, and not to be understood without bloody succeeding. My master!

DUTCH:
Ja; is het geen verstaanbare taal, die ik spreek?

MORE:
Recantation=Disavowal or retraction
Bloody succeeding=Subsequent bloodshed
Harsh=Rough, rude, repulsive

Compleat:
Recant (Unsay) Recantation=Herroeping, Verzaaking
Harsh=Schor, ruuw, wrang, streng

Topics: regret, language

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Helena
CONTEXT:
When thou canst get the ring upon my finger which never shall come off, and show me a child begotten of thy body that I am father to, then call me husband: but in such a ‘then’ I write a ‘never.’ This is a dreadful sentence.

DUTCH:
Dit is een schrikk’lijke uitspraak.

MORE:
Dreadful sentence=Dismaying statement or appalling judgment (legal)

Topics: language, learning/education

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Bertram
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
I mean, the business is not ended, as fearing to hear of it hereafter. But shall we have this dialogue between the fool and the soldier? Come, bring forth this counterfeit module, he has deceived me, like a double-meaning prophesier.
SECOND LORD
Bring him forth: has sat i’ the stocks all night, poor gallant knave.
BERTRAM
No matter: his heels have deserved it, in usurping his spurs so long. How does he carry himself?

DUTCH:
Ik bedoel, dat de zaak nog niet ten einde is, daar ik vrees, er later nog wel van te zullen hooren .

MORE:
His heels have deserved it:
The ‘heels’ reference here is probably to the practice of baffling=originally a punishment of infamy, inflicted on recreant knights, one part of which was hanging them up by the heels (Nares). This practice is also referred to in 2.4 (Falstaff: If thou dost it half so gravely, so majestically, both in word and matter, hang me up by the heels for a rabbit- sucker or a poulter’s hare.)
Another punishment was ‘hacking’: chopping off the spurs of a knight when he was to be degraded.

Module=model (OED: “a person… eminently worthy of imitation; a perfect exemplar of some excellence”)
Double-meaning prophesier=Prophecies that can suggest one thing but interpreted to mean another (such as the witches in Macbeth)

Compleat:
Module (measure in architecture)=Model
To lay one by the heels (send to prison)=Iemand gevangen zetten
Stocks (pair of)=De Stok, daar men kwaaddoenders met de beenen insluit
Double (dissembling, treacherous)=Dubbelhartig, geveinst, verraaderlyk
Double-tongued=Tweetongig

Topics: punishment, deceit, fate/destiny

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Bertram
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
Damnable both-sides rogue !
FIRST SOLDIER
[Reads] ‘When he swears oaths, bid him drop gold, and take it;
After he scores, he never pays the score:
Half won is match well made; match, and well make it;
He ne’er pays after-debts, take it before;
And say a soldier, Dian, told thee this,
Men are to mell with, boys are not to kiss:
For count of this, the count’s a fool, I know it,
Who pays before, but not when he does owe it.
Thine, as he vowed to thee in thine ear,
PAROLLES.
BERTRAM
He shall be whipped through the army with this rhyme
in’s forehead.
SECOND LORD
This is your devoted friend, sir, the manifold
linguist and the armipotent soldier.

DUTCH:
Die vervloekte, dubbeltongige schurk!

MORE:
Scores=Takes (incurs) a debt

Topics: insult, offence, integrity, truth

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
Yet am I thankful if my heart were great
‘Twould burst at this. Captain I’ll be no more;
But I will eat and drink, and sleep as soft
As captain shall: simply the thing I am
Shall make me live. Who knows himself a braggart,
Let him fear this; for it will come to pass
That every braggart shall be found an ass.
Rust, sword! cool, blushes! and, Parolles, live
Safest in shame! being fool’d, by foolery thrive!
There ‘s place and means for every man alive.
I’ll after them.

DUTCH:
Wie zich pocher weet,
Hij lette op mij; dan ziet hij, dat in ‘t end
Elk pocher steeds als ezel wordt herkend.

MORE:
Braggart=Boaster
Found an ass=shown to be an ass
Shame=Dishonour, disgrace

Compleat:
Braggard or Braggadochio=Een pocher, Blaaskaak
Shame (reproach, ignominy)=Schande

Topics: truth, honesty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
His sole child, my lord, and bequeathed to my
overlooking. I have those hopes of her good that her education promises; her dispositions she inherits, which makes fair gifts fairer; for where an unclean mind carries virtuous qualities, there commendations go with pity; they are virtues and traitors too: in her they are the better for their simpleness; she derives her honesty and achieves her goodness.

DUTCH:
Ik heb alle verwachting van het goede, dat hare opvoeding belooft; de natuur, die zij geërfd heeft, maakt de schoone gaven, die opvoeding schenkt, nog schooner;

MORE:
Fated=Fateful (see also King Lear “The plagues that hang fated over men’s faults”, 3.2)
Go with pity=Accompanied by regret
Simpleness=Plainness, unrefined nativeness, innocence

Compleat:
Disposition (or Inclination)=Genegenheid, Lust
Disposition of mind=Gesteltenis van gemoed
Simple=Onbeschadigend, eenvoudig
Fated=Door ‘t noodlot beschooren

Topics: nature, learning/education, virtue, innocence, fate/destiny

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
Tis only title thou disdain’st in her, the which
I can build up. Strange is it that our bloods,
Of colour, weight, and heat, pour’d all together,
Would quite confound distinction , yet stand off
In differences so mighty. If she be
All that is virtuous, save what thou dislikest,
A poor physician’s daughter, thou dislikest
Of virtue for the name: but do not so:
From lowest place when virtuous things proceed,
The place is dignified by the doer’s deed:
Where great additions swell’s, and virtue none,
It is a dropsied honour. Good alone
Is good without a name. Vileness is so:
The property by what it is should go,
Not by the title.

DUTCH:
Ontspruit een edel doen uit lagen staat,
Die wordt verhoogd, geadeld door de daad;
Wie zwelt van trots, op deugd niet, maar op bloed,
Heeft waterzuchtige’ adel.

MORE:
Additions=Titles
Dignify=To give lustre to, to honour
Swell (swell us or swell is– debated)=Inflate
Dropsied= Diseased (with dropsy)
Dislike=Disapprove, regard with ill-will or disgust

Compleat:
Addition=Bydoening, byvoegsel
Dropsy=Waterzucht
Swell=Swellen, opblaazen; Uitzetten, grootr worden, oploopen; zwellen
Dislike=Mishaagen, misnoegen

Topics: virtue, order/society, status, dignity, status

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Away ! th’ art a knave.
CLOWN
You should have said, sir, before a knave th’ art a knave; that ‘s, before me th ‘rt a knave: this had been truth, sir.
PAROLLES
Go to, thou art a witty fool; I have found thee.
CLOWN
Did you find me in yourself, sir, or were you
taught to find me ?

DUTCH:
Loop, loop, gij zijt een schelmsche nar; ik heb u in
mijn zak

MORE:
In yourself=By your own efforts
Knave= Rascal, villain

Compleat:
Witty=Verstandig, vernuftig, schrander

Topics: truth, identity, independence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
Good alone
Is good without a name. Vileness is so:
The property by what it is should go,
Not by the title. She is young, wise, fair;
In these to nature she’s immediate heir,
And these breed honour: that is honour’s scorn,
Which challenges itself as honour’s born
And is not like the sire: honours thrive,
When rather from our acts we them derive
Than our foregoers: the mere word’s a slave
Debauched on every tomb, on every grave
A lying trophy, and as oft is dumb
Where dust and damn’d oblivion is the tomb
Of honour’d bones indeed. What should be said?

DUTCH:
Goed is goed,
Ook zonder hoogen naam; en slecht is slecht;
Alleen op wat hij is, gronde elk zijn recht,
Op titels niet.

MORE:
Idiom: “Let’s write good angel on the devil’s horn, ‘Tis not the devil’s crest”
Challenges itself=Urges as a right, makes a claim for itself

Topics: honour, merit, proverbs and idioms, good and bad, order/society

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
He will steal, sir, an egg out of a cloister: for rapes and ravishments he parallels Nessus: he professes not keeping of oaths; in breaking ’em he is stronger than Hercules: he will lie, sir, with such volubility, that you would think truth were a fool: drunkenness is his best virtue, for he will be swine-drunk; and in his sleep he does little harm, save to his bed-clothes about him; but they know his conditions and lay him in straw. I have but little more to say, sir, of his honesty: he has every thing that an honest man should not have; what an honest man should have, he has nothing.

DUTCH:
[H]ij heeft alles, wat een rechtgeaard man niet moest hebben; en van wat een deugdzaam man wel moet hebben, heeft hij niets.

MORE:
Egg=Eggs being worthless, of no value (so untrustworthy that he would steal something worthless from a sacred place)
Nessus=Centaur who attempted to rape Hercules’ wife
Professes=Claims (not to believe in)
Truth were a fool= To be honest is foolish (Proverb: ‘Honesty is a fool’)
Swine-drunk (Proverb: ‘As drunk as a swine’)

Topics: honesty, reputation, insult

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
What hope is there of his majesty’s amendment?
LAFEU
He hath abandoned his physicians, madam; under whose
practises he hath persecuted time with hope, and
finds no other advantage in the process but only the
losing of hope by time.
COUNTESS
This young gentlewoman had a father, —O, that
‘had’! how sad a passage ’tis! —whose skill was
almost as great as his honesty; had it stretched so
far, would have made nature immortal, and death
should have play for lack of work. Would, for the
king’s sake, he were living! I think it would be
the death of the king’s disease.

DUTCH:
Hij heeft aan zijne artsen hun afscheid gegeven, mevrouw, nadat hij onder hunne behandeling den tijd met hoop vervolgd had, en er op den duur geen ander voordeel van heeft, dan dat hij met den tijd de hoop verloor.

MORE:

Persecute=to afflict, to harass; not very intelligibly used.
Persecuted time with hope=Wasted his time hoping for a cure.

Compleat:
Persecute=Lastig vallen; vervolgen.

Topics: hope/optimism, remedy, time, trust, life, death

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
How called you the man you speak of, madam ?
COUNT
He was famous, sir, in his profession, and it was his great right to be so: Gerard de Narbon.
LAFEW
He was excellent indeed, madam: the king very
Lately spoke of him admiringly, and mourningly.
He was skilful enough to have liv’d still,
if knowledge could be set up against mortality.

DUTCH:
Hij was zeer beroemd, heer, in zijn vak, en met het volste recht: Gerard van Narbonne .

MORE:
His great right=His fully justified right, due to him.

Mortality=Subjection to death, necessity of dying

Compleat:
Mortality=Sterflykheid

Topics: death, life, skill/talent, legacy, merit

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
I did think thee, for two ordinaries, to be a pretty wise fellow: thou didst make tolerable vent of thy travel ; it might pass: yet the scarfs and the bannerets about thee did manifoldly dissuade me from believing thee a vessel of too great a burthen.
I have now found thee; when I lose thee again, I care not; yet art thou good for nothing but taking up, and that thou’rt scarce worth.
PAROLLES
Hadst thou not the privilege of antiquity upon thee –

DUTCH:
Ik hield u, nadat ik een paar maal met u aan een open tafel gezeten had, voor een redelijk verstandigen knaap; gij maaktet tamelijk veel ophef van uw reizen;
dit kon er mee door; maar die wimpels en vlaggen aan u weerhielden mij telkens, u voor een schip met al te
groote lading te houden.

MORE:
Ordinaries=Mealtimes
Banneret=Little flag
Taking up=Contradict

Compleat: :
Ordinary=Drooggastery, Gaarkeuken, Ordinaris
To eat ant an ordinary=In een ordinaris eten
Take up=Berispen; bestraffen

Topics: wisdom, appearance, discovery, understanding

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
My honour’d lady,
I have forgiven and forgotten all;
Though my revenges were high bent upon him,
And watch’d the time to shoot.

DUTCH:
Eed’le vrouw,
Vergeven heb ik alles en vergeten,
Hoe straf mijn toorn op hem gespannen waar’,
Den tijd voor ‘t schot bespiedend.

MORE:
Proverb: “Forgive and forget”

Bent=tension, straining (properly an expression of archery, but used tropically of mental dispositions)
Watch=To have in the eye, to observe closely for some purpose.

Compleat:
To be upon the watch=Op de wacht zyn
I have got the bent of his bow=Ik weet wel waar hy heen wil

Topics: mercy, revenge, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
I have seen a medicine
That’s able to breathe life into a stone,
Quicken a rock, and make you dance canary
With spritely fire and motion, whose simple touch
Is powerful to araise King Pippen, nay,
To give great Charlemain a pen in ‘s hand
And write to her a love-line.

DUTCH:
k Heb
Een arts gezien, die steenen leven inblaast,
Een rots bezielt, en u kan dansen doen
Met vuur en vaart, door handoplegging koning
Pepijn kan doen herrijzen, en aan Karel
Den Groote een pen zou drukken in de hand,
Dat hij een vers haar schreef.

MORE:
Canary dance was a ‘fiery wooing dance’ originating from or inspired by the dance and song of the Canary Islands.
Medicine=Physician
Araise=Raise from the dead

Compleat:
Arisen=Opgestaan, ontstaan

Burgersdijk notes:
Dansen doen. Het Engelsch noemt den dans: make you dance canary . Canary was een levendige Fransche dans; Shakespeare maakt er een werkwoord van in „Veel gemin, Geen gewin”.

Topics: emotion and mood, remedy

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
I will show myself highly fed and lowly taught:
I know my business is but to the court.

DUTCH:
Ik zal mij ten hoogste gevoed en diep geleerd betoonen. Ik weet, dat mijn zending maar naar het hof is .

MORE:
Allusion to the saying “Better fed than taught”
Business=That in which one is occupied, which engages his care and attention

Compleat:
“He is better fed than taught”=Hy is beter vegoed dan onderwezen
Business=Bezigheid, werk, zaak

Topics: order/society, learning/education

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
He that ears my land spares my team and gives me leave to in the crop; if I be his cuckold, he’s my drudge: he that comforts my wife is the cherisher of my flesh and blood; he that cherishes my flesh and blood loves my flesh and blood; he that loves my flesh and blood is my friend: ergo, he that kisses my wife is my friend. If men could be contented to be what they are, there were no fear in marriage;

DUTCH:
Als de mannen tevreden waren met te zijn wat ze zijn, zou niemand in het huwelijk iets duchten.

MORE:
Ears=Ploughs
To in=Gather, collect: “to in the crop”

Compleat:
To ear=Land bouwen
Cuckold=Hoorndraager
Drudge=Iemand die het vuilste en slobbigste werk doet

Topics: marriage, friendship, satisfaction

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
Here, take her hand,
Proud scornful boy, unworthy this good gift;
That dost in vile misprision shackle up
My love and her desert; that canst not dream,
We, poising us in her defective scale,
Shall weigh thee to the beam; that wilt not know,
It is in us to plant thine honour where
We please to have it grow. Check thy contempt.

DUTCH:
Gij, die en mijne gunst en haar verdienste
Minachtend boeien aanlegt, niet begrijpt,
Dat mijn gewicht, op haar te lichte schaal
Geworpen, haar den doorslag geeft, niet inziet,
Dat onze macht uw adel planten kan,
Waar wij zijn groei begeeren.

MORE:

Misprision=1) Contempt; 2) Mistake, wrong or false imprisonment
Desert=That which is due to a person; that which entitles to a reward, or demands a punishment
Plant=(Figuratively)= To give rise, to call into existence: “it is in us to p. thine honour where we please to have it grow,”
Defective=Lighter end (of the scale)

Compleat:
Desert=Verdienste

Topics: respect, ingratitude, value, authority

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
All is whole; Not one word more of the consumed time. Let’s take the instant by the forward top; For we are old, and on our quick’st decrees The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time steals ere we can effect them.

DUTCH:
t Is alles goed ;
Geen woord meer van ‘t verleed’ne. ‘t Oogenblik
Zij bij de voorhoofdslok door ons gegrepen;
Want wij zijn oud, en wat wij ras ontwerpen,
Besluipt de zachte onhoorb’re voet des tijds,
Eer ‘t is volvoerd .

MORE:
Take the instant by the forward top=Seize the moment (Proverb: ‘Take time (occasion) by the forelock, for she is bald behind’.)
Quickest= Most keenly felt

Topics: time, risk, caution, purpose, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
Be thou blest, Bertram ; and succeed thy father
In manners, as in shape! Thy blood and virtue
Contend for empire in thee; and thy goodness
Share with thy birthright ! Love all, trust a few,
Do wrong to none: be able for thine enemy
Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend
Under thy own life’s key: be checked for silence.
But never taxed for speech. What heaven more will
That thee may furnish, and my prayers pluck down,
Fall on thy head !

DUTCH:
Heb allen lief; schenk wein’gen uw vertrouwen;
Doe niemand onrecht; houd uw vijand eer
Door macht dan door haar uiting in bedwang;
Hoed als uw eigen leven dat uws vriends;
Dat men uw zwijgen, nooit uw spreken gispe!

MORE:
Proverb: Blood is inherited but Virtue is achieved
Proverb: Have but few friends though much acquaintance
Proverb: Keep under lock and key

Able= Have power to daunt (Be able for thine enemy)
Checked=Rebuked
Taxed=Blamed

Compleat:
Able=Sterk, robust
Check=Berispen, beteugelen, intoomen, verwyten
To tax (to blame)=Mispryzen, berispen

Topics: caution, trust, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEU
In a most weak—and debile minister, great power, great
transcendence: which should, indeed, give us a further
use to be made than alone the recovery of the king, as
to be—generally thankful.
PAROLLES
I would have said it; you say well. Here comes the king.
LAFEU
Lustig, as the Dutchman says: I’ll like a maid
the better, whilst I have a tooth in my head.
Why, he’s able to lead her a carranto.

DUTCH:
En lustigjes, lustigjes, zooals de Hollander zegt; nu mag ik de meisjes nog te meer lijden, zoolang ik een tand in mijn mond heb. Wel, ik acht hem in staat een coranto met haar te dansen.

MORE:
Lustig: Dutch word used by English writers in Shakespeare’s time (lustick, lustique).
Carranto (Coranto)=Lively dance (from French courant or couranto).

Compleat:
Coranto (Courant)=Een soort van een dans
Stout (lusty)=Lustig

Burgersdijk notes:
En lustigjes, lustigjes, zooals de Hollander zegt. De folio heeft: Lustique, as the Dutchman saies. Capell teekent bij deze plaats aan: ,In een oud stuk, dat groote verdiensten bezit, getiteld The Weakest goeth to the Wall, gedrukt in 1600, maar hoeveel vroeger en door wien geschreven, is mij onbekend, – komt een Hollander voor, Jacob van Smelt geheeten, die een mengelmoes van Hollandsch en onze taal spreekt en bij verschillende gelegenheden ditzelfde woord (lustick) gebruikt, dat in het Engelsch lusty is .”

Topics: life, age/experience

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
You have discharged this honestly; keep it to yourself. Many likelihoods informed me of this before, which hung so tottering in the balance that I could neither believe nor misdoubt. Pray you, leave me. Stall this in your bosom; and I thank you for your honest care. I will speak with you further anon.

DUTCH:
Uit allerlei omstandigheden had ik dit reeds vermoed, maar deze lagen zoo onzeker in de weegschaal, dat ik noch gelooven, noch twijfelen kon.

MORE:
Likelihoods=That from which a conclusion may be drawn, appearances, sign, indication
Misdoubt=Suspicion, diffidence, apprehension; have dounts as to

Compleat:
Likelihood=Waarschynelykheid
Totter=Schudden, waggelen
Titter-totter=Waggelen, gereen zyn om te vallen
Misdoubt=’t Onrecht twyffelen

Topics: honesty, suspicion, caution

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Countess/Clown
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
Truly, madam, if God have lent a man any manners, he may easily put it off at court: he that cannot make a leg, put off’s cap, kiss his hand, and say nothing, has neither leg, hands, lip, nor cap; and indeed such a fellow, to say precisely, were not for the court. But for me, I have an answer will serve all men.
COUNTESS
Marry, that’s a bountiful answer that fits all questions.
CLOWN
It is like a barber’s chair that fits all buttocks,the pin-buttock, the quatch-buttock, the brawnbuttock, or any buttock.

DUTCH:
COUNTESS
Nu voorwaar, dat is een rijk antwoord, dat voor alle vragen passend is.
CLOWN
Het is als een scheerdersstoel, die voor alle achterstevens passend is, voor de spitse, voor de platte, voor de ronde, kortom voor alle achterstevens.

MORE:

Make a leg=A bow, an obeisance made by drawing one leg backward
Lent=To bestow on, to endow with, to adorn, to arm with
Put off=Doff
Bountiful=Of rich contents, full of meaning
Quatch=Squat

Compleat:
To make a leg=Buigen
To put off one’s hat=Zyn hoed afneemen
Bountiful=Milddaadig, goedertieren

Topics: reply, reason, understanding, loyalty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
His good remembrance, sir, Lies richer in your thoughts than on his tomb; So in approof lives not his epitaph As in your royal speech.
KING
Would I were with him! He would always say—
Methinks I hear him now: his plausive words
He scatterd not in ears, but grafted them,
To grow there and to bear ;—” Let me not live,”
Thus his good melancholy oft began,
On the catastrophe and heel of pastime.
When it was out,—” Let me not live,” quoth he,
“After my flame lacks oil, to be the snuff
Of younger spirits, whose apprehensive senses
All but new things disdain; whose judgments are
Mere fathers of their garments; whose constancies
Expire before their fashions. This he wish’d;
I after him do after him wish too,
Since I nor wax nor honey can bring home,
I quickly were dissolved from my hive,
To give some labourers room.

DUTCH:
O, dat ik bij hem waar! Hij zeide steeds:
Mij is ‘t, als hoor ik hem; hij strooide niet
Zijn gulden taal in ‘t oor, maar entte er die,
Zoodat ze er vruchten droeg,

MORE:

Plausive=Pleasing, specious, plausible
Catastrophe, Heel=Both meaning end
Snuff=The burning wick of a candle, as darkening the flame or remaining after it.
Apprehensive=Imaginative

Compleat:
Plausible=Op een schoonschynende wyze
To snuff out a candle=Een kaars uitsnuiten
Apprehensive (sensible of)=Een ding gewaar worden

Topics: fashion/trends, language, reason, understanding, memory, legacy

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
HELENA
I do affect a sorrow indeed, but I have it too.
LAFEW
Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead,
excessive grief the enemy to the living.
COUNTESS
If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess
makes it soon mortal.

DUTCH:
Matige bejammering is het recht van den doode, overmatige droefenis de vijand van den levende.

MORE:
Affect=An outward show
Mortal=Deadly

Compleat:
Affect=Naäapen
Affectation=Gemaaktheid
Mortal=Sterflyk, doodelyk

Burgersdijk notes:
Als de levende een vijand is van droefenis. “If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess makes it soon mortal”. De gravin herhaalt en dringt aan, wat Lafeu gezegd heeft, dat Helena zich niet te zeer aan hare droefheid moet overgeven, met de smart niet to zeer in vijandschap moet leven, want dat overmaat van smart doodelijk is . Mortal is namelijk hetzelfde als deadly, fatal .(…)

Topics: death, grief, appearance, excess

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
Tell me thy reason why thou wilt marry.
CLOWN
My poor body, madam, requires it: I am driven on by the flesh; and he must needs go that the devil drives.

DUTCH:
Mijn arm lichaam, doorluchte vrouw, verlangt het; ik
word door het vleesch er toe gedreven; en wien de duivel aandrijft, die moet loopen.

MORE:
Proverb: Nowadays ‘needs must when the devil drives’ i.e. necessity compels, but Shakespeare meaning clearer that there’s no option

Compleat:
He must needs go that the devil drives=Hy moet wel loopen die door de duivel gedreven word

Topics: marriage, reason, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, necessity

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Mariana
CONTEXT:

Come, let’s return again, and suffice ourselves with
the report of it. Well, Diana, take heed of this
French earl: the honour of a maid is her name; and
no legacy is so rich as honesty.

DUTCH:
Geen nalatenschap is zo rijk als eerlijkheid./
De eer van een meisjen is haar schat, en geen erfenis is zoo rijk als haar goede naam.

MORE:
Honesty also used to mean virginty.
Suffice ourselves=Be satisfied with

Heed=Suspicious watch, caution

Compleat:
Honesety (chastity)=Kuisheid (also a plant)
Heed=Hoede, zorg, acht, toezigt

Topics: honour, honesty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Helena
CONTEXT:
Oft expectation fails and most oft there
Where most it promises, and oft it hits
Where hope is coldest and despair most fits.

DUTCH:
Verwachting faalt niet zelden, ‘t meest, wanneer
Zij ‘t meest belooft; en vaak maakt ze alles goed,
Als hoop, verkild, voor wanhoop wijken moet.

MORE:

To fit=To be convenient, to become: “oft it hits where hope is coldest and despair most –s,
Hope is coldest=Most hopeless

Compleat:
To fit=Passen, pas maasken, gereed maaken, voegen
You must fit your humour to it=Gy moet ‘er uw humeur toe schikken

Topics: hope/optimism, ambition, promise

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
My fear hath catched your fondness: now I see
The mystery of your loneliness, and find
Your salt tears’ head: now to all sense ’tis gross
You love my son; invention is ashamed,
Against the proclamation of thy passion,
To say thou dost not: therefore tell me true;
But tell me then, ’tis so ; for, look, thy cheeks
Confess it, th’ one to th’ other; and thine eyes
See it so grossly shown in thy behaviours,
That in their kind they speak it: only sin
And hellish obstinacy tie thy tongue,
That truth should be suspected. Speak, is ‘t so ?
If it be so, you have wound a goodly clew;
If it be not, forswear ‘t : howe’er, I charge thee,
As heaven shall work in me for thine avail,
To tell me truly.

DUTCH:
Slechts zonde
En wederspannige onwil boeit uw tong,
Dat die de waarheid heel’ .

MORE:
Proverb: In being your own foe, you spin a fair thread

Gross=Palpable
Grossly= Conspicuously
Clew=Ball of thread

Compleat:
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
You grossly mistake my meaning=Gy vergist u grootelyks omtrent myn meening
Clew=Een kluwen (garen)

Topics: truth, deceit, love, appearance, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Helena
CONTEXT:
Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky
Gives us free scope, only doth backward pull
Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull.

DUTCH:
Vaak vinden we in onszelf de hulp en baat,
Die wij den hemel vragen. ‘t Noodlot laat
Den weg ons vrij, en spert dien enkel dan,
Wanneer wij loom en traag zijn, zonder plan.

MORE:
Fated=Fateful (see also King Lear “The plagues that hang fated over men’s faults”, 3.2)

Compleat:
Fated=Door ‘t noodlot beschooren

Topics: independence, fate/destiny , remedy, satisfaction, achievement

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
Praising what is lost
Makes the remembrance dear. Well, call him hither;
We are reconciled, and the first view shall kill
All repetition: let him not ask our pardon;
The nature of his great offence is dead,
And deeper than oblivion we do bury
The incensing relics of it: let him approach,
A stranger, no offender; and inform him
So ’tis our will he should.

DUTCH:
Lofprijzingen van het verleden laten ons verdrinken in dierbare herinneringen./
‘t Verloor’ne hoog to roemen, Maakt ons ‘t herdenken dierbaar.

MORE:
The saying ‘Praising what is lost makes the remembrance dear’ is still used today.
‘The first view shall kill all repetition’ = after the first meeting the past will be forgotten
Incensing relics=Relics that “receive a perfuming with or offering of incense” (OED)

Compleat:
Praising=Pryzing
Remembrance=Gedachtenis, geheugenis

Topics: value, mercy, friendship, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Lavatch
CONTEXT:
In Isbel’s case and mine own. Service is no
heritage; and I think I shall never have the
blessing of God till I have issue o’ my body, for
they say barnes are blessings

DUTCH:
In Bella’s en mijn eigen zaak. Dienst is geen erfdeel, en ik geloof, dat ik Gods zegen nimmer bezitten zal, voor ik telgen mijns lichaams rijk ben; want het zeggen is, kinderen zijn een zegen .

MORE:
Proverb: Service is no inheritance

Barnes (bairns)=Children
Service=Place and office of a servant

Compleat:
Service=Dienstbaarheid
Service is no inheritance=Den dienst is geen erfgoed
Barn (or bearn)=Een kind

Topics: work, order/society, poverty and wealth, value

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
So like a courtier, contempt nor bitterness
Were in his pride or sharpness; if they were,
His equal had awaked them; and his honour.
Clock to itself, knew the true minute when
Exception bid him speak, and at this time
His tongue obeyed his hand: who were below him
He us’d as creatures of another place.
And bowed his eminent top to their low ranks.
Making them proud of his humility.
In their poor praise he humbled. Such a man
Might be a copy to these younger times,
Which, followed well, would demonstrate them now
But goers backward.

DUTCH:
Een man als hij kon onzen jong’ren tijd
Een voorbeeld zijn, dat, nagevolgd, zou toonen,
Hoe deze tijd teruggaat.

MORE:

Copy= Example
Equal=Equal ranking
Exception=Disapproval
Used=Treated

Compleat:
Equal=Wedergade
He made exception=Hy had er iets tegen te zeggen
To take exception=Zich over iets belgen

Topics: civility, life, age/experience, independence, order/society, respect, fashion/trends, understanding

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
The complaints I have heard of you I do not all believe; ’tis my slowness that I do not; for I know you lack not folly to commit them and have ability enough to make such knaveries yours.

DUTCH:
[D]e klachten, die ik over u hoorde, wil ik niet alle gelooven; ‘t is uit lankmoedigheid, dat ik het niet doe; want ik weet, dat het u niet aan dwaasheid ontbreekt om zulke streken te begaan, en dat gij handigheid genoeg hebt om ze uit te voeren .

MORE:
Slowness=Dullness of intellect or comprehension (OED)
Folly=Perversity of judgment, absurdity
Knaveries=Roguish tricks

Compleat:
Folly (vice, excess, imperfection)=Ondeugd, buitenspoorigheid, onvolmaaktheid
Knavery=Guitery, boertery

Topics: insult, offence, integrity, truth, trust, gullibility

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Helena
CONTEXT:
I am undone: there is no living, none,
If Bertram be away. ‘Twere all one
That I should love a bright particular star
And think to wed it, he is so above me:
In his bright radiance and collateral light
Must I be comforted, not in his sphere.
Th’ ambition in my love thus plagues itself:
The hind that would be mated by the lion
Must die for love.

DUTCH:
De hinde die zou willen trouwen met de leeuw zal zeker sterven van liefde./
De hinde, die den leeuw als gade wenscht, Komt om door liefde

MORE:
Proverb: One may point at a star but not pull at it

Radiance=Rays of light
Undone=Ruined
Plague=Punish

Compleat:
Undone=Ontdaan, losgemaakt
Plague=Plaagen, quellen

Topics: relationship, order/society, love, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
All is whole; Not one word more of the consumed time. Let’s take the instant by the forward top; For we are old, and on our quick’st decrees The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time steals ere we can effect them

DUTCH:
t Is alles goed ;
Geen woord meer van ‘t verleed’ne. ‘t Oogenblik
Zij bij de voorhoofdslok door ons gegrepen;
Want wij zijn oud, en wat wij ras ontwerpen,
Besluipt de zachte onhoorb’re voet des tijds,
Eer ‘t is volvoerd .

MORE:
Quickest= Most keenly felt
Decrees=Decisions

Topics: time, age/experience

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: First Lord
CONTEXT:
FIRST LORD
The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and
ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our
faults whipped them not; and our crimes would
despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues.

DUTCH:
Het weefsel van ons leven bestaat uit gemengd garen,
goed en slecht dooreen; onze deugden zouden trotsch
zijn, indien zij niet door onze ondeugden gestriemd werden; en onze slechtheid zou wanhopig zijn, als ze niet door onze deugden vertroost werd.

MORE:

Cherish=Comfort, encourage, console
Despair=Cause (us to) despair
Whipped (Metaphorically)= to lash with sarcasm, to have a lash at, to put to the blush

Compleat:
To put to the blush=Iemand eene kleur aanjaagen, beschaamd maaken
Cherish=Koesteren, opkweeken, streelen, aankweeken

Topics: life, virtue, good and bad

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
Then my dial goes not true: I took this lark for a bunting.
BERTRAM
I do assure you, my lord, he is very great in knowledge, and accordingly valiant.
LAFEW
I have then sinned against his experience and transgressed against his valour; and my state that way is dangerous, since I cannot yet find in my heart to repent. Here he comes ; I pray you, make us friends ; I will pursue the amity.

DUTCH:
Dan gaat mijn uurwerk niet goed. Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors.

MORE:
“The bunting is, in feather, size, and form, so like the skylark, as to require nice attention to discover the one from the other; it also ascends and sinks in the air nearly in the same manner; but it has little or no song, which gives estimation to the skylark.” (Johnson).

Burgersdijk notes:
Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors. De bedoelde gors, in het Engelsch bunting, is de grauwe gors, ook wel gierstvogel genoemd. Terwijl de leeuwrik zich hoog in de lucht verheft en aangenaam zingt, zet de gors zich op steenen palen, struiken of lage boomen en laat daar vaak zijn schor, bijna knarsend geluid hooren, dat nauwelijks een zang te noemen is. Het zeggen van Lafeu doet zien, hoe goed Sh. de vogels kende, want de gors en Ieeuwrik gelijken in kleur van gevederte veel op elkaar, en de gorzen, die in den herfst en den winter in troepen bijeen leven, worden, omdat zij dan zeer vet zijn, in Engeland en elders vaak gevangen en, onder den naam van leeuwriken, voor de tafel verkocht.

Topics: gullibility, appearance, offence, error, regret

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
Fare you well, my lord; and
believe this of me, there can be no kernel in this
light nut; the soul of this man is his clothes.
Trust him not in matter of heavy consequence;
I have kept of them tame, and know their natures.
Farewell, monsieur: I have spoken better
of you than you have or will to deserve at my
hand; but we must do good against evil.

DUTCH:
Vaarwel, mijn heer, en geloof mij, in deze vooze noot kan geen pit schuilen; de ziel van dezen mensch zit in zijn kleederen.

MORE:
Light nut=Lightweight
Consequence=Influence, importance

Compleat:
Consequence=Belang

Topics: status, merit, respect, good and bad, appearance

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
They say miracles are past; and we have our
philosophical persons, to make modern and familiar, things supernatural and causeless. Hence is it that
we make trifles of terrors, ensconcing ourselves
into seeming knowledge, when we should submit
ourselves to an unknown fear.

DUTCH:
Men zegt, dat de tijd der wonderen voorbij is; en wij hebben onder ons wijsgeerige koppen genoeg, die bovennatuurlijke en onverklaarbare dingen tot alledaagsche en gewone zaken maken.

MORE:

Modern=Common, everyday
Causeless=Without explanation
Supernatural=Not produced according to the laws of nature, miraculous:
Ensconcing=Sheltering
Unknown fear=Recognition of the inexplicable

Compleat:
Causeless=Zonder oorzaak
Seeming=Schynende
A man of great seeming piety=Een man van eene groote uitwendige vroomheid
Trifle=Kleinigheid

Topics: learning/education, caution, understanding, justification

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
Marry, you are the wiser man; for many a man’s tongue shakes out his master’s undoing: to say nothing, to do nothing, to know nothing, and to have nothing, is to be a great part of your title; which is within a very little of nothing.

DUTCH:
Het wijste, wat gij doen kunt, want menigen dienaar’s
tong praat zijn meester in het verderf. Niets zeggen,
niets doen, niets weten en niets hebben, maakt een
groot deel van uw waardigheid uit, die uit een zeer
klein deel van niets bestaat.

MORE:
Title=Intrinsic value, position
Undoing=Ruin

Compleat:
Undoing=Losmaaking, bederving
That was the undoing of him=Dat was zyn verderf

Topics: respect, order/society, ruin

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
‘Twas a good lady, ’twas a good lady: we may pick a thousand salads ere we light on such another herb.
CLOWN
Indeed, sir, she was the sweet marjoram of the salad, or rather the herb of grace.
LAFEW
They are not herbs, you knave; they are nose-herbs.
CLOWN
I am no great Nebuchadnezzar, sir; I have not much skill in grass.

DUTCH:
Zij was een good meisjen, een good meisjen; wij kunnen duizendmaal veldsalade zoeken, eer wij zulk een kruid weer lezen.

MORE:
Herb of grace=Rue
Nose-herbs= Scented flowers (nosegay)
Grass/grace pun: Nebuchadnezzar lost his sanity and “was driven from men and did eat grass as oxen”.

Compleat:
Nosegay=Een ruikertje, tuiltje
Burgersdijk notes:
Het genadekruid. “The herb of grace”. Een oogenblik later zegt de nar: “I have not much skill in grass”. De woordspeling met grace en grass was natuurljjk niet terug te geven .Het genadekruid is de wijnruit, Ruta graveolens. Verg. Richard II, 3.4.

Topics: virtue, reputation

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Helena
CONTEXT:
What I can do can do no hurt to try,
Since you set up your rest ‘gainst remedy.
He that of greatest works is finisher
Oft does them by the weakest minister:
So holy writ in babes hath judgment shown,
When judges have been babes; great floods have flown
From simple sources ; and great seas have dried
When miracles have by the great’st been denied.

DUTCH:
Brengt wat ik kan, geen baat, het schaadt ook niet,
Daar ge elke hoop in u hebt uitgewied .

MORE:
Current use: no harm in trying/it doesn’t hurt to try/never hurts to try

To set up one’s rest=To have fully made up one’s mind, to be resolved (taken from gambling, where the rest was a large sum wagered by a very confident player)

Topics: still in use, invented or popularised, achievement, hope/optimism

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
When thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast none, remember thy friends; get thee a good husband, and use him as he uses thee; so, farewell.

DUTCH:
Als gij tijd hebt, zeg dan uwe gebeden op, en hebt gij dien niet, denk dan aan uwe vrienden.

MORE:
“None” believed by some to be a misprint for “money”.
Use=Treat

Compleat:
Leisurably=By ledigen tyd

Topics: marriage, friendship, loyalty, civility

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
FIRST LORD
He has much worthy blame laid upon him for shaking
off so good a wife and so sweet a lady.
SECOND LORD
Especially he hath incurred the everlasting
displeasure of the king, who had even tuned his
bounty to sing happiness to him. I will tell you a
thing, but you shall let it dwell darkly with you.
FIRST LORD
When you have spoken it, ’tis dead, and I am the
grave of it.

DUTCH:
Als gij bet uitgesproken hebt, is het dood, en ik ben
het graf er van.

MORE:
Dwell darkly = it will go no further

Bounty=Hearty disposition to do one good, active benevolence

Compleat:
Dwell=Woonen, verblyven
Bounty=Goedertierenheid, mildheid
Tune=Stellen
Darkly=Duisterlyk

Topics: secrecy, trust

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Who cannot be crushed with a plot?
FIRST SOLDIER
If you could find out a country where but women were
that had received so much shame, you might begin an impudent nation. Fare ye well, sir; I am for France
too: we shall speak of you there.

DUTCH:
Wie kan niet door een complot vernietigd worden?

MORE:
Impudent=Shameless

Topics: conspiracy, loyalty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
Go to, sir; you were beaten in Italy for picking a
kernel out of a pomegranate; you are a vagabond and
no true traveller: you are more saucy with lords
and honourable personages than the commission of your
birth and virtue gives you heraldry. You are not
worth another word, else I’d call you knave. I leave
you.

DUTCH:
Gij zijt geen woord verder waard; anders zou ik u een schurk noemen.

MORE:
True traveller=Traveller with a government licence
Vagabond=Tramp
Commission=A warrant by which any trust is held, or power exercised
Heraldry=Rank and accomplishments
Knave=Rascal, villain

Compleat:
Vagabond=Een landlooper, schooijer, zwerver
Commission=Last, volmagt, lastbrief, provisie

Topics: insult, order/society, status, respect

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