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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: As You Like It ACT/SCENE: 1.2 SPEAKER: Rosalind CONTEXT: With bills on their necks: “Be it known unto all men by these presents.” DUTCH: „Allen die dit zien of hooren lezen, saluut !” MORE: Standard start to a legal will. “Know all men by these presents” (these presents meaning present writings, these documents presented).
Bills=Legal notices, but specifically wills (Arden) Topics: law/legal, language, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
You have heard him swear downright he was.
CELIA
“Was” is not “is.” Besides, the oath of a lover is no stronger than the word of a tapster. They are both the confirmer of false reckonings. He attends here in the forest on the duke your father.

DUTCH:
Was is geen is; bovendien, de eed van een minnaar is niet meer waard dan de eed van een tapper; zij zijn beide de bekrachtiging van valsche rekeningen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Downright=Directly, without stopping short, without further ceremony, plainly
False=Not right, wrong, erroneous
Compleat:
Downright (plain and clear)=Eenvoudig and clear
Downright (plain or open)=Duidelyk of openhartig
A downright contradiction=Een rechtstrydede zaak

Topics: language, clarity/precision, truth, honesty

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
Or else she could not have the wit to do this. The wiser, the waywarder. Make the doors upon a woman’s wit, and it will out at the casement. Shut that, and ’twill out at the keyhole. Stop that, ’twill fly with the smoke out at the chimney.
ORLANDO
A man that had a wife with such a wit, he might say “Wit, whither wilt?”
ROSALIND
Nay, you might keep that check for it, till you met your wife’s wit going to your neighbor’s bed.

DUTCH:
Een man, die een vrouw had met zulk een geest,
mocht wel zeggen: „Geest, geest, waar wilt gij heen ?”

MORE:
Proverb: Wit, whither wilt thou?
Schmidt:
Wit=Intellect
Wayward=Capricious and obstinate
Check=Rebuke, reproof; “patience bide each check”.
Compleat:
Wayward=Kribbig, korsel, nors, boos
Check=Berisping, beteugeling, intooming

Topics: intellect, wisdom, marriage, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
Then, the whining school-boy with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then, a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden, and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then, the justice,
In fair round belly, with a good capon lined,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws, and modern instances,
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

DUTCH:
De hele wereld is een schouwtoneel en alle mensen zijn maar acteurs./
Heel de wereld is tooneel; En mannen, vrouwen, allen, enkel spelers.

MORE:
CITED IN IRISH LAW: Ellis v Minister for Justice and Equality & Ors [2019] IESC 30 (15 May 2019)
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “mewling and puking”: Lett v Texas, 727 SW 2d 367, 371 (Tex. Crim. App. 1987)

“Policies of shutting people away for life or for ages within life, in Shakespeare’s sense, may be appropriate depending on the gravity of the crime”.
Bubble reputation=empty, pointless reputation.Short-lived fame..
Referred to as The Seven Ages of Man monologue
This phrase is generally abbreviated to ‘All the world’s a stage’ nowadays

Reference to the “justice, in fair round belly with good capon lined”: from the North Briton, no. 64: “a justice of peace is a human creature; yet, for half a dozen of chickens, will dispense with the whole dozen of penal statutes. These be the basket-justices…”.
Wise saws=Sayings, precepts
Instances=Arguments or examples used in a defence

Burgersdijk notes:
Heel de wereld is tooneel enz. In Sh.’s schouwburg, de Globe, was de spreuk van Petronius (die onder keizer Nero leefde) te lezen: Totus mundus agit histrionem. De gedachte is meermalen uitgesproken, vroeger ook reeds door Sh. zelven in “den Koopman van Venetie”, 1. 1. Men herinnert zich ook Vondels:
„De weerelt is een speeltooneel,
Elk speelt zijn rol en krijght zijn deel.”
In zeven levenstrappen. De verdeeling van het leven in zeven bedrijven is reeds zeer oud en wordt aan Hippocrates toegeschreven; zij is in overeenstemming met het aantal planeten (zon, maan en vijf planeten).
En net geknipten baard. Van de snede, die den rechter past, in tegenstelling met den wilden, niet gekorten krijgsmansbaard.

Topics: still in use, cited in law, life, age/experience, invented or popularised

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
Upon a lie seven times removed.—Bear your body more seeming, Audrey.—As thus, sir: I did dislike the cut of a certain courtier’s beard. He sent me word if I said his beard was not cut well, he was in the mind it was. This is called “the retort courteous.” If I sent him word again it was not well cut, he would send me word he cut it to please himself. This is called “the quip modest.” If again it was not well cut, he disabled my judgment. This is called “the reply churlish.” If again it was not well cut, he would answer I spake not true. This is called “the reproof valiant.” If again it was not well cut, he would say I lie. This is called “the countercheck quarrelsome,” and so to “the lie circumstantial” and “the lie direct.”

DUTCH:
Die allen kunt gij ontduiken,
behalve de rechtstreeksche logenstraffing; en
ook die kunt gij ontduiken, met een „indien”.

MORE:
CITED IN UK LAW: McNally v Snap Heath Ltd [1998] UKEAT 1013_97_2306 (23 June 1998)
‘and had been met, to quote Shakespeare, by the “countercheck quarrelsome”‘.

Topics: law/legal, cited in law, truth, deceit

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
God ‘ild you, sir. I desire you of the like. I press in here, sir, amongst the rest of the country copulatives, to swear and to forswear, according as marriage binds and blood breaks. A poor virgin, sir, an ill-favored thing, sir, but mine own. A poor humor of mine, sir, to take that that no man else will. Rich honesty dwells like a miser, sir, in a poor house, as your pearl in your foul oyster.
DUKE SENIOR
By my faith, he is very swift and sententious.
TOUCHSTONE
According to the fool’s bolt, sir, and such dulcet diseases.

DUTCH:
[E]en arm maagdeken, heer, een leelijk schepseltjen, heer, maar van mij.

MORE:
Proverb: A fool’s bolt is soon shot (c. 1225)
Schmidt:
God yield you= God bless you
Swear=Take an oath (of innocence)
Forswear=Break one’s oath
Burgersdijk notes:
Naar den aard van de stompscherpe narrepijlen. According to the fool’s bolt. Een bolt was van een ronden knobbel aan het eind voorzien. Het antwoord van den nar ziet op het compliment van den hertog: he is very quick; „hij is zeer vlug, zeer gevat.” Men mag er het spreekwoord: A fool’s bolt is soon shot, K. Hendrik V , III. 7. 132 , mee in verband brengen.

Topics: still in use, proverbs and idioms, value, poverty and wealth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
…And in his brain,
Which is as dry as the remainder biscuit
After a voyage, he hath strange places crammed
With observation, the which he vents
In mangled forms. Oh, that I were a fool!
I am ambitious for a motley coat.
DUKE SENIOR
Thou shalt have one.
JAQUES
It is my only suit
Provided that you weed your better judgements
Of all opinion that grows rank in them
That I am wise

DUTCH:
Een noob’le nar! — Hij was weleer een hoov’ling,
En zegt, dat, zijn de vrouwen jong en schoon,
Zij ook de gaaf bezitten van ‘t te weten.
Zijn brein, zoo droog als restjens scheepsbeschuit,
Heeft hij gepropt met vreemde spreuken, vol
Opmerkingsgeest; en geeft die wijsheid lucht,
Verminkt, bij stukjens

MORE:
Elizabethans believed that the three main organsi were the heart, liver and brain. The brain had to be cool and moist to sleep; someone with a ‘cool and moist’ humour would be able to sleep, unlike a choleric person of hot and dry humour. A dry brain was believed to take longer to be impressed with information.
Provided . . . wise as long as you
disabuse yourselves of the prejudice
that I am a wise man.rank gross (homonym with grows),
often including foul smell

Topics: insult, intellect, reason, fashion/trends

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
And then he drew a dial from his poke,
And looking on it with lack-lustre eye

DUTCH:
En keek er op met somb’ren, doffen blik

MORE:
Lack was a favourite for Shakespeare for compound words. Lack lustre means lacking radiance, gloss or brightness (Latin lustrare). Other examples include lack-love, lack-beard and lack-brain.
Dial from his poke= (fob)watch from his pocket

Topics: invented or popularised, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Cry “holla” to thy tongue, I prithee. It curvets unseasonably. He was furnished like a hunter.
ROSALIND
Oh, ominous! He comes to kill my heart.
CELIA
I would sing my song without a burden. Thou bring’st me out of tune.
ROSALIND
Do you not know I am a woman? When I think, I must speak. Sweet, say on.

DUTCH:
Roep toch Hola !” tot uw tong, want die maakt ontijdig
kromme sprongen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Curvet=frolic
Unseasonably=At an improper time
Compleat:
Curvet (a certain motion, or gait of a horse)=Corbet, Eenluchtige sprong van een paerd, eerst met de voorste en dan met de agterlyke pooten in de lucht
Curvet=Springen (in the above sense)
Unseasonably=Ontydiglyk, t’ontyde

Topics: language, wisdom

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
These are counselors
That feelingly persuade me what I am.
Sweet are the uses of adversity,
Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous,
Wears yet a precious jewel in his head.
And this our life, exempt from public haunt,
Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
Sermons in stones, and good in everything.

DUTCH:
Dit leven, vrij van ‘s werelds woelen, vindt
In boomen tongen, spreuken in de sprengen,
In steenen lessen, goeds in ieder ding.

MORE:
“Sermons in Stones” is still in use.
Onions:
Feelingly=so as to be felt or leave an impression
Public haunt=A place much frequented (see also ‘public haunt of men’, Romeo & Juliet 3.1)
Compleat:
Feelingly=Gevoeliglyk
Haunt=Gewoonte, aanwendsel. He returns to his old haunt=Hij keert weer tot zyne oud nukken.
Reference to old proverb: “Adversity makes men wise”.
Reference to old idiom: “Full as a toad of poison”.
Burgersdijk notes:
De pad. Van den fabelachtigen steen, die naar het volksgeloof soms in den kop van een pad voorkwam, werd beweerd, dat hij vergif krachteloos maakte en een uitmuntend geneesmiddel was, vooral tegen den steen of het graveel. Fenton schrijft er van in zijne „Secrete Wonders of Nature” (1569):
That there is found in the heades of old and great toades a stone which they call Borax or Stelon: it is most commonly founde in the head of a hee toad, of power to repulse poysons, and that it is a most sovereigne medicine for the stone.

Topics: adversity, achievement, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
He that a fool doth very wisely hit
Doth very foolishly, although he smart,
Not to seem senseless of the bob. If not,
The wise man’s folly is anatomized
Even by the squand’ring glances of the fool.
Invest me in my motley. Give me leave
To speak my mind, and I will through and through
Cleanse the foul body of th’ infected world,
If they will patiently receive my medicine.

DUTCH:
Geef mij verlof,
Vrij uit te spreken, en ik zal de wereld,
Hoe voos, bedorven en onrein, doorzuiv’ren,
Als zij mijn midd’len maar geduldig neemt.

MORE:
Proverb:
Who is nettled at a jest seems to be in ernest
Schmidt:
Wisely=skilfully, successfully
Bob=A rap, a dry wipe
Senseless of the bob=Not to have felt the jibe
Squandering=Random
Motley=multicoloured jester outfit
Compleat:
Motley=Een grove gemengelde
Bob=Begekking, boert
To bob=Begekken, bedriegen, loeren, foppen

Topics: language, authority, wisdom

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Corin
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
Why, if thou never wast at court, thou never saw’st good manners; if thou never saw’st good manners, then thy manners must be wicked, and wickedness is sin, and sin is damnation. Thou art in a parlous state, shepherd.
CORIN
Not a whit, Touchstone. Those that are good manners at the court are as ridiculous in the country as the behavior of the country is most mockable at the court. You told me you salute not at the court but you kiss your hands. That courtesy would be uncleanly if courtiers were shepherds.

DUTCH:
[W]at aan het hof goede gedragingen zijn, is even belachlijk op het land, als de manieren van het land bespottelijk zijn aan het hof.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Salute=To greet each other by kissing
Parlous=Perilous

Topics: order/society, civility, status

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Amiens
CONTEXT:
I would not change it. Happy is your Grace,
That can translate the stubbornness of fortune
Into so quiet and so sweet a style.

DUTCH:
t Is u een groote zegen,
Mijn vorst, in ‘t harde vonnis van Fortuin
Een zin, zoo zacht en zoet, te kunnen lezen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Happy=Fortunate, lucky
Stubbornness=Roughness, harshness
Compleat:
Stubbornness=Hardnekkigheid, hansterrigheid

Topics: fate/destiny, adversity

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods
More free from peril than the envious court?

DUTCH:
Maakt niet gewoonte reeds dit leven zoeter Dan dat van glimp en praal?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Custom=habit, regular practice
Painted=Specious, feigned, unreal
Pomp=Magnificence, splendour
Reference to old proverb: Custom makes all things easy

Topics: custom, life, corruption, conspiracy

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Corin
CONTEXT:
No more but that I know the more one sickens, the worse at ease he is, and that he that wants money, means, and content is without three good friends; that the property of rain is to wet, and fire to burn; that good pasture makes fat sheep; and that a great cause of the night is lack of the sun; that he that hath learned no wit by nature nor art may complain of good breeding or comes of a very dull kindred.

DUTCH:
Hij die gebrek heeft aan geld, middelen en tevredenheid mist drie goede vrienden./Iemand die geen inkomsten, kapitaal en plezier in het leven heeft, mist drie goede vrienden./
Niet meer, dan dat ik weet, dat iemand, hoe zieker hij is, zich minder pleizierig voelt; en dat wie geen geld, geen goed en geen tevredenheid heeft, drie goede vrienden minder heeft.

MORE:

Topics: order/society, intellect, money, poverty and wealth, nature

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
Is not this a rare fellow, my lord? He’s as good at anything and yet a fool.
DUKE SENIOR
He uses his folly like a stalking-horse, and under the presentation of that he shoots his wit.
HYMEN
Then is there mirth in heaven
When earthly things, made even,
Atone together.

DUTCH:
Hij gebruikte zijn dwaasheid als camouflage om zijn wijsheden af te vuren./
Hij gebruikt zijn narrerij als een vogelaar zijn paard, en schuilt er achter om zijn pijlen af te schieten.

MORE:
Burgersdijk notes:
Als een vogelaar zijn paard. Like a stalking-horse. Een echt, opgezet, houten of geschilderd paard, waarachter de vogelaar wegschool; zoo schiet ook de nar zijn geest (his wit) af.

Topics: intellect, skill/talent, appearance

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
There is sure another flood toward, and these couples are coming to the ark. Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all tongues are called fools.
TOUCHSTONE
Salutation and greeting to you all.
JAQUES
Good my lord, bid him welcome. This is the motley-minded gentleman that I have so often met in the forest. He hath been a courtier, he swears.

DUTCH:
Daar komt een paar zeer vreemde beesten aan, die in alle talen den naam van narren dragen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Toward=In preparation and expectation, near at hand
Compleat:
Toward=Na toe
Motley=Een grove gemengelde

Topics: appearance, reputation, language, intellect

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
No, by mine honour, but I was bid to come for you.
ROSALIND
Where learned you that oath, fool?
TOUCHSTONE
Of a certain knight that swore by his honour they were good pancakes, and swore by his honour the mustard was naught. Now, I’ll stand to it, the pancakes were naught and the mustard was good, and yet was not the knight forsworn.
CELIA
How prove you that in the great heap of your knowledge?
ROSALIND
Ay, marry, now unmuzzle your wisdom.
TOUCHSTONE
Stand you both forth now: stroke your chins and swear by your beards that I am a knave.

DUTCH:
Hoe kunt gij dit uit den rijken schat van uw geleerdheid
bewijzen ?

MORE:
Schmidt:
To Forswear=To swear falsely, commit perjury
Unmuzzle=Free from restraint
Compleat:
To forswear one’s self=Eenen valschen eed doen, meyneedig zyn
To forswear a thing=Zweeren dat iets zo niet is

Topics: honour, promise, evidence, intellect

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
Truly, young gentlemen, though there was no great matter in the ditty, yet the note was very untunable.
FIRST PAGE
You are deceived, sir. We kept time. We lost not our time.
TOUCHSTONE
By my troth, yes. I count it but time lost to hear such a foolish song. God be wi’ you, and God mend your voices.— Come, Audrey.

DUTCH:
Neen, waarachtig, het is zoo; en ik kon ook wel beter acht slaan op mijn tijd, in plaats van naar zulk een mal liedjen te luisteren. Nu, God zegene u en verbetere uw stemmen!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Untunable=unharmonious, discordant
Compleat:
Untunable=Misluydend

Burgersdijk notes:
Zet u tusschen ons in. In ‘t Engelsch staat: sit i’ the middle. Zeker is dit wel een toespeling op het oud Engelsch zeggen: Hey diddle diddle, fool in the middle.

Topics: time, deceit

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
And so had I, but yet, for fashion sake, I thank you too for your society.
JAQUES
God be wi’ you. Let’s meet as little as we can.
ORLANDO
I do desire we may be better strangers.
JAQUES
I pray you mar no more trees with writing love songs in their barks.
ORLANDO
I pray you mar no more of my verses with reading them ill- favouredly.

DUTCH:
Ik hoop, dat wij meer en meer van elkaar vervreemden.

MORE:
Reading them ill-favouredly. See Sir John Harington’s Epigrams (1618)
‘Sextus, an ill reader’:
‘For shame poynt better, and pronounce it cleerer,
Or be no Reader, Sextus, be a Hearer’.
( Poynt= punctuate)

Topics: insult, relationship, civility

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
I have neither the scholar’s melancholy, which is emulation; nor the musician’s, which is fantastical; nor the courtier’s, which is proud; nor the soldier’s, which is ambitious; nor the lawyer’s, which is politic; nor the lady’s, which is nice; nor the lover’s, which is all these, but it is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and indeed the sundry contemplation of my travels, which, by often rumination, wraps me in the most humorous sadness.

DUTCH:
Ik heb noch de melancholie van den geleerde, die niets
dan naijver is, noch die van den musicus, die phantastisch,
noch die van den hoveling, die trotsch, noch die
van den soldaat, die roemgierig, noch die van den jurist,
die staatzuchtig …is;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Emulation=Rivalry; jealousy, envy, envious contention
Fantastical=Indulging the vagaries of imagination, capricious, whimsical
Politic=Prudent, wise, artful, cunning
Humorous=Sad
Compleat:
Emulation=Haayver, volgzucht, afgunst
Fantastical=Byzinnig, eigenzinnig, grilziek
Politick (or cunning)=Slim, schrander, doorsleepen

Topics: life, nature, skill/talent, identityemotion and mood

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
I will weary you then no longer with idle talking. Know of me then—for now I speak to some purpose—that I know you are a gentleman of good conceit. I speak not this that you should bear a good opinion of my knowledge, insomuch I say I know you are. Neither do I labour for a greater esteem than may in some little measure draw a belief from you to do yourself good, and not to grace me. Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things.

DUTCH:
Dan wil ik u niet langer met ijdele praatjens vermoeien. Verneem dus van mij, — want nu spreek ik niet zonder bedoeling, — dat ik u ken als een edelman van goed begrip.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Conceit = extraction, birth (“This cannot be gentlemen of good parts, of wit; for ‘their needs no magician to tell him this.'”).

Topics: status, reputation, integrity

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
I pray you, do not fall in love with me,
For I am falser than vows made in wine.
Besides, I like you not. If you will know my house,
‘Tis at the tuft of olives, here hard by.

DUTCH:
Ik bid u, word toch niet op mij verliefd;
Want valscher ben ‘k, dan eeden bij de wijnkan;
En voorts, ik mag u niet.

MORE:

Topics: deceit, appearance, truth, honesty

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Adam
CONTEXT:
Master, go on, and I will follow thee
To the last gasp, with truth and loyalty.
From seventeen years till now almost fourscore
Here livèd I, but now live here no more.

DUTCH:
Ik volg u, meester; ga slechts voor en bouw
Tot aan mijn jongsten snik vast op mijn trouw.

MORE:

Topics: truth, loyalty

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
OLIVER
And what wilt thou do—beg when that is spent? Well, sir, get you in. I will not long be troubled with you. You shall have some part of your will. I pray you leave me.
ORLANDO
I will no further offend you than becomes me for my good.
OLIVER
Get you with him, you old dog.
ADAM
Is “old dog” my reward? Most true, I have lost my teeth in your service. God be with my old master. He would not have spoke such a word.

DUTCH:
Ik zal u niet langer lastig vallen, dan in mijn belang
noodzakelijk is.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Become=to fit, suit. (Becomes me for my good=than I need to.)
Offend=Displease, mortify, affront; trespass on
Compleat:
Become=Betaamen
Offend=Misdoen, ergeren, aanstoot geeven, verstoordmaaken, beledigen

Topics: insult, status, work, value, ingratitude

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
By my troth, and in good earnest, and so God mend me, and by all pretty oaths that are not dangerous, if you break one jot of your promise or come one minute behind your hour, I will think you the most pathetical break-promise and the most hollow lover and the most unworthy of her you call Rosalind that may be chosen out of the gross band of the unfaithful. Therefore beware my censure, and keep your promise.

DUTCH:
Bij mijn eer en trouw, en in allen ernst, en zoo waar de Hemel mij bijsta, en bij alle kleine eeden, die niet gevaarlijk zijn, als gij een tittel van uw beloften breekt, of één minuut over uw uur komt, dan acht ik u den meest snoevenden eedverkrachter;

MORE:
Schmidt:
So God mend me, used as an oath

Topics: debt/obligation, time, contract, duty, promise

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
If it be true that good wine needs no bush, ‘tis true that a good play needs no epilogue. Yet to good wine they do use good bushes, and good plays prove the better by the help of good epilogues. What a case am I in then, that am neither a good epilogue nor cannot insinuate with you in the behalf of a good play! I am not furnished like a beggar, therefore to beg will not become me.

DUTCH:
Als goede wijn geen krans behoeft, dan kan een goed stuk een epiloog ontberen./
Is ‘t waar, dat goede wijn geen krans behoeft, even waar is het, dat een goed stuk geen epiloog behoeft maar waar goede wijn is, hangt men fraaie kransen uit, en goede stukken doen zich beter voor met behulp van goede epilogen.

MORE:
Proverb “Good wine needs no bush”
“A good bush” here refers to Ivy, which was hung out at vintners’ doors and in windows to advertise that the hostelry had a good wine.
Also from Sir John Harington’s Epigrams (1618)
“And with this prouerbe prou’d it labour lost:
Good Ale doth need no signe, good Wine no bush,
Good verse of praisers, need not passse a rush.”
Schmidt:
Insinuate=To ingratiate one’s self (in a bad sense); to intermeddle
Case=Situation, legal dilemma or actionable state

Topics: reputation, skill/talent, value

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
Come, shepherd, let us make an honourable retreat; though not with bag and baggage, yet with scrip and scrippage.

DUTCH:

Kom, scheper, een eervollen terugtocht! zoo niet met
pak en zak, toch met tasch en staf!

MORE:
Schmidt:
The necessaries of an army, only in the phrase “”with bag and b.”
Clear out bag and baggage=leave nothing behind
Scrippage=coins, contents of scrip (shepherds’s pouch)
Compleat:
March away bag and baggage=Met pak en zak weg trekken
Scrip (a budget or bag=Tasch

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Let us sit and mock the good housewife Fortune from her wheel, that her gifts may henceforth be bestowed equally.
ROSALIND
I would we could do so, for her benefits are mightily misplaced, and the bountiful blind woman doth most mistake in her gifts to women.

DUTCH:
Laat ons gaan zitten, en die nijvere huisvrouw met
dat wiel, Fortuin, door spot er van af jagen, opdat
voortaan haar gaven wat onpartijdiger worden uitgedeeld

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wheel: Attribute of Fortune, as the emblem of mutability

Burgersdijk notes:
Die nijvere huisvrouw. Alsof het rad of wiel van Fortuin een spinnewiel was. Zie ook „Antonius en
Cleopatra”, IV, 15.

Topics: fate/destiny, life, status, poverty and wealth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
Why, how now, Adam? No greater heart in thee? Live a little, comfort a little, cheer thyself a little. If this uncouth forest yield anything savage, I will either be food for it or bring it for food to thee. Thy conceit is nearer death than thy powers.

DUTCH:
Komaan, Adam, hoe is het? hebt gij niet meer hart
in ‘t lijf? Leef nog wat, verman u wat, vervroolijk u
wat! Als dit woeste woud iets wilds voortbrengt, zal
ik er spijs voor zijn, of het u als spijze brengen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Conceit=conception, idea, image in the mind
Power=vital organ, physical or intellectual function
Anything savage=game
Compleat:
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening

Topics: life, wellbeing, imagination, nature, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
But will my Rosalind do so?
ROSALIND
By my life, she will do as I do.
ORLANDO
Oh, but she is wise.
ROSALIND
Or else she could not have the wit to do this. The wiser, the waywarder. Make the doors upon a woman’s wit, and it will out at the casement. Shut that, and ’twill out at the keyhole. Stop that, ’twill fly with the smoke out at the chimney.

DUTCH:
Sluit voor een vrouwenvernuft de deur, en het gaat door het venster naar buiten; sluit dit toe en het kruipt door het sleutelgat; stop dit dicht, en het vliegt met den rook den schoorsteen uit.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wit=Intellect
Wayward=Capricious and obstinate
Check=Rebuke, reproof; “patience bide each check”.
Compleat:
Wayward=Kribbig, korsel, nors, boos
Check=Berisping, beteugeling, intooming

CITED IN US LAW:
American Gas Association v. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 912 F.2d 1496, 1516, (D.C.Cir. l990)(Williams, J.).

Topics: wisdom, intellect, skill/talent, cited in law

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Gentle cousin,
Let us go thank him and encourage him.
My father’s rough and envious disposition
Sticks me at heart. Sir, you have well deserved.
If you do keep your promises in love
But justly, as you have exceeded all promise,
Your mistress shall be happy.
ROSALIND
Gentleman,
Wear this for me—one out of suits with fortune
That could give more but that her hand lacks means.
Shall we go, coz?
CELIA
Ay. Fare you well, fair gentleman.
ORLANDO
Can I not say “I thank you”? My better parts
Are all thrown down, and that which here stands up
Is but a quintain, a mere lifeless block.

DUTCH:
Mijn beter deel
Ligt neergeveld, en wat nog overeind staat,
Is als een pop bij ‘t steekspel, roerloos, dood.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quintain=a post or figure set up for beginners in tilting to run at.

Burgersdijk notes:
Een pop bij ‘t steekspel. A quintain: een houten figuur, die vooral bij oefeningen in het toernooirijden als doel voor de lans diende. Volgens Douce was dit doel, in zijn meest volkomen vorm, een afgezaagde boomstam, waarop een menschelijke figuur geplaatst was, die aan den linkerarm een schild, in de rechterhand een zak met zand vasthield. De toernooiruiters poogden in galop met hun lans den kop of het lijf van de pop te treffen; mislukte dit en raakten zij het schild, dan draaide de pop snel om en gaf hun, tot groot vermaak der toeschouwers, een slag met den zandzak.

Topics: emotion and mood, civility, merit, promise, respect

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
He calls us back. My pride fell with my fortunes.
I’ll ask him what he would.—Did you call, sir?
Sir, you have wrestled well and overthrown
More than your enemies.

DUTCH:
Hij roept ons; met mijn rang ontvlood mijn trots. ‘k Vraag, wat hij wenscht. — Hebt gij geroepen, heer? Schoon was uw worst’ling en gij overwon’t. Niet vijanden alleen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Pride=Self-esteem, mostly in a bad sense, haughtiness, arrogance
Compleat:
Hovaardy, grootsheid, hoogmoed, trotsheid, verwaandheid.

Topics: fate/destiny, life

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Why, cousin! Why, Rosalind! Cupid have mercy, not a word?
ROSALIND
Not one to throw at a dog.
CELIA
No, thy words are too precious to be cast away upon curs.
Throw some of them at me. Come, lame me with reasons.

DUTCH:
Geen enkel; woorden zouden paarlen voor de honden
zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cast away=to throw away, waste or lavish
Lame=Disable me with reasons
Compleat:
To cast away care=Werp de zorg weg
Lame=Verlammen, lam maaken

Topics: language, value, reason

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
O, how full of briars is this working-day world!
CELIA They are but burrs, cousin, thrown upon thee in holiday foolery: if we walk not in the trodden paths our very petticoats will catch them.
ROSALIND
I could shake them off my coat: these burrs are in my heart.

DUTCH:
Neen, ook wel wat om mijns vaders kind. 0, hoe
vol distels is deze alledaagsche wereld!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Working-day (adjectively)=Common, ordinary, trivial vulgar
Burr=Rough head of the burdock
Foolery=Jesting, buffoonery
Compleat:
Burr=Kliskruid

Topics: status, order/society, custom

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
They shall be married tomorrow, and I will bid the duke to the nuptial. But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man’s eyes. By so much the more shall I tomorrow be at the height of heart-heaviness, by how much I shall think my brother happy in having what he wishes for.

DUTCH:
Hoe bitter is het in het geluk te kijken door de ogen van een ander./
Maar ach! hoe bitter is het, gelukzaligheid door eens anders oogen te zien!

MORE:
Schmiddt:
Heart-heaviness=Sadness

Topics: life, satisfaction, emotion and mood, envy

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
Oh, that’s a brave man. He writes brave verses, speaks brave words, swears brave oaths, and breaks them bravely, quite traverse, athwart the heart of his lover, as a puny tilter that spurs his horse but on one side breaks his staff like a noble goose; but all’s brave that youth mounts and folly guides.

DUTCH:
Ja, dat is een prachtig man; hij schrijft prachtige verzen, spreekt prachtige woorden, zweert prachtige eeden en breekt ze prachtig, dwars door, vlak voor het hart van zijn liefste, juist als een sukkelig tournooiruiter, die zijn paard maar aan de eene zijde spoort en als een adellijk uilskuiken zijn lans breekt. Maar alles is prachtig, als jeugd in den zadel zit en dwaasheid den teugel houdt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Brave=Fine, splendid, beautiful: O that’s a b. man! he writes b. verses etc.

Topics: language, courage, appearance

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Phoebe
CONTEXT:
And now I am remembered, scorned at me.
I marvel why I answered not again.
But that’s all one: omittance is no quittance.
I’ll write to him a very taunting letter,
And thou shalt bear it.

DUTCH:
Doch laat dit wezen; uitstel is geen afstel.
Ik schrijf hem nu een brief, vol spot en hoon;
En gij bezorgt dien, Sylvius, niet waar?

MORE:
“Quod differtur, non aufertur”. [What is deferred is not relinquished.]Found in Heywood’s Proverbs (1546):
“Leave off this ! Be it, (quoth he), fall wee to our food.
But sufferance is no quittans in this daiment.
No, (quoth she), nor misreckning is no payment.
But even reckoning maketh longfrendes; my frend.
For alway owne is owne, at the recknings end.
This reckning once reckned, and dinner once doone,
We three from them twaine, departed very soone. . “
1592 Arden of Fevers, ii. ii Arden escaped us. . . . But forbearance is no acquittance; another time we’ll do it of the claim.”
Schmidt:
Discharge from a debt, a quittance: “in any bill, warrant, quittance or obligation”.
Quittance=discharge from a debt, acquittance: “in any bill, warrant, q. or obligation”
Taunting=subst. scoff, insulting mockery
Compleat:
Quittance=Kwytschelding, kwytingsbrief, quitancie
To cry quitancie (or be even)=Met gelyke munt betaalen

Topics: law, /legal, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
Patience herself would startle at this letter
And play the swaggerer. Bear this, bear all.
She says I am not fair, that I lack manners.
She calls me proud, and that she could not love me
Were man as rare as phoenix. ‘Od’s my will,
Her love is not the hare that I do hunt.
Why writes she so to me? Well, shepherd, well,
This is a letter of your own device.

DUTCH:
Bij zoo iets stoof Geduld, zichzelf vergetend,
Als razend op; wie dit verdraagt, duldt alles.
Ze zegt: ik ben niet mooi, heb geen manieren,
Ben trotsch; kortom nooit zou zij mij beminnen,
Al ware een man zoo zeldzaam als de Phenix.

MORE:
Schmiddt:
Swaggerer=A blusterer, a bully
Startle=Intr. to move in a sudden alarm; to be frighted or shocked: “patience herself would s. at this letter”.
Compleat:
Swaggerer=Een snorker, pocher

Topics: patience, language

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
God ‘ild you, sir. I desire you of the like. I press in here, sir, amongst the rest of the country copulatives, to swear and to forswear, according as marriage binds and blood breaks. A poor virgin, sir, an ill-favored thing, sir, but mine own. A poor humor of mine, sir, to take that that no man else will. Rich honesty dwells like a miser, sir, in a poor house, as your pearl in your foul oyster.
DUKE SENIOR
By my faith, he is very swift and sententious.
TOUCHSTONE
According to the fool’s bolt, sir, and such dulcet diseases.

DUTCH:
[E]en arm maagdeken, heer, een leelijk schepseltjen, heer, maar van mij.

MORE:
Proverb: A fool’s bolt is soon shot (c. 1225)
Schmidt:
God yield you= God bless you

Burgersdijk notes:
Naar den aard van de stompscherpe narrepijlen. According to the fool’s bolt. Een bolt was van een ronden knobbel aan het eind voorzien. Het antwoord van den nar ziet op het compliment van den hertog: he is very quick; „hij is zeer vlug, zeer gevat.” Men mag er het spreekwoord: A fool’s bolt is soon shot, K. Hendrik V , III. 7. 132 , mee in verband brengen.

Topics: still in use, proverbs and idioms, value, poverty and wealth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything

DUTCH:
Gezicht en tanden, smaak en alles kwijt

MORE:

Topics: life, age/experience, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
But, mistress, know yourself. Down on your knees
And thank heaven, fasting, for a good man’s love,
For I must tell you friendly in your ear,
Sell when you can; you are not for all markets.
Cry the man mercy, love him, take his offer.
Foul is most foul, being foul to be a scoffer.

DUTCH:
Want hoor, wat ik als vriend in ‘t oor u zeg,
Sla toe bij ‘t bod; uw waar is niet gewild.
Snel, vraag vergiff’nis, ras zijn min gekroond!
Wie leelijk is, is ‘t leelijkst, als zij hoont.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cry mercy=Take mercy on
Scoffer=Mocker. Scoffer was used for political and religious abuse.
Compleat:
To scoff=Spotten, schimpen. To scoff at=Bespotten beschimpen.
Spotter=Een spotter, spotvogel, spreeuw

Topics: insult, marriage, value, ingratitude

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
The more pity that fools may not speak wisely what wise men do foolishly.
CELIA
By my troth, thou sayest true. For, since the little wit that fools have was silenced, the little foolery that wise men have makes a great show. Here comes Monsieur Le Beau.

DUTCH:
Inderdaad, gij hebt gelijk; want sedert het beetjen wijsheid, dat dwazen hebben, tot zwijgen gebracht werd, maakt het beetjen dwaasheid, dat wijzen hebben, een groote vertooning.

MORE:
Proverb:
The wise man knows himself to be a fool, the fool thinks he is wise
‘Silenced’ is probably a topical reference, either to new restraints imposed on theatrical companies or to the burning of satirical books in 1599.
Schmidt:
Foolery=Absurdity

Topics: intellect, wisdom, appearance

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Corin
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
Wilt thou rest damned? God help thee, shallow man. God make incision in thee; thou art raw.
CORIN
Sir, I am a true labourer. I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man’s happiness, glad of other men’s good, content with my harm, and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and my lambs suck.

DUTCH:
Vriend, ik ben een eerlijk daglooner; ik verdien mijn kost en mijn kleeding, draag niemand haat toe, benijd niemand zijn geluk, verheug mij in een andermans welvaren, en schik mij in mijn leed; en mijn grootste trots is, mijn ooien te zien grazen en mijn lammeren te zien zuigen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Make incision=Blood-letting
Onions:
Raw=Unripe, immature; inexperienced, unskilled, untrained

Burgersdijk notes:
God late u de schillen van de oogen vallen, God geneze u (door een operatie)! gij zijt rauw, d. i. niet toebereid, niet gaar.

Topics: preparation, skill/talent, work, honesty, integrity, envy

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
Speak you so gently? Pardon me, I pray you.
I thought that all things had been savage here,
And therefore put I on the countenance
Of stern commandment. But whate’er you are
That in this desert inaccessible,
Under the shade of melancholy boughs,
Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time,

DUTCH:
Spreekt gij zoo vriend’lijk, o vergeef mij dan!
Mij dacht, dat alles woest hier wezen zou;
En daarom nam ik toon en houding aan
Van ‘t barsch bevel.

MORE:
Onions:
Gentle =Used in polite address or as a complimentary epoithet; tame
Schmidt:
Put on a countenance=Give the apopearance
Compleat:
Gentle (mild or moderate)=Zagtmoedig, maatig
Genteel (or gallant)=Hoffelyk, wellevend; Genteel (that has a genteel carriage)=Bevallig

Topics: language, order/society

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
Peradventure this is not Fortune’s work neither, but Nature’s, who perceiveth our natural wits too dull to reason of such goddesses, and hath sent this natural for our whetstone, for always the dullness of the fool is the whetstone of the wits. How now, wit, whither wander you?

DUTCH:
Wie weet, misschien is ook dit niet het werk van Fortuin, maar van Natuur, die, bespeurende dat onze natuurlijke geest te bot is om over zulke godinnen te redeneeren, ons dezen botterik voor slijpsteen gezonden heeft; want steeds is de botheid van den nar de wetsteen der wijzen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Peradventure=perhaps
Compleat:
To whet a knife=een Mes wetten (of slypen)
Whet-stone=een Wetsteen, Slypsteen
Whetted=Gewet, gesleepen, scherp gemaakt.

Topics: fate/destiny, intellect, nature

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
WILLIAM
Ay, sir, I have a pretty wit.
TOUCHSTONE
Why, thou sayst well. I do now remember a saying: “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.” The heathen philosopher, when he had a desire to eat a grape, would open his lips when he put it into his mouth, meaning thereby that grapes were made to eat and lips to open.

DUTCH:
Zoo, goed gezegd! Ik herinner mij daar een spreuk:
„De dwaas denkt, dat hij wijs is, maar de wijze weet,
dat hij een dwaas is

MORE:
Proverb:
The wise man knows himself to be a fool, the fool thinks he is wise

Topics: intellect, appearance, wisdom, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
CELIA
My father’s love is enough to honour him. Enough. Speak no more of him; you’ll be whipped for taxation one of these days.
TOUCHSTONE
The more pity that fools may not speak wisely what wise men do foolishly.
CELIA
By my troth, thou sayest true. For, since the little wit that fools have was silenced, the little foolery that wise men have makes a great show. Here comes Monsieur Le Beau.

DUTCH:
Des te erger, als dwazen niet meer in hun wijsheid mogen zeggen, wat wijze lui in hun dwaasheid doen.

MORE:
Silenced’ is probably a topical reference, either to new restraints imposed on theatrical companies or to the burning of satirical books in 1599.
Whipping was a cruel punishment. In the days of Henry VIII an Act decreed that vagrants were to be carried to some market town, or other place, and there tied to the end of a cart, naked, and beaten with whips throughout such market-town, or other place, till the body should be bloody by reason of such whipping. The punishment was mitigated in Elizabeth’s reign, to the extent that vagrants need only to be “stripped naked from the middle upwards and whipped till the body should be bloody”.
Schmidt:
Whipped=Censure, satire, invective “You’ll be whipped for taxation one of these days”.
Foolery=Jesting, buffoonery

Topics: pity, wisdom, language, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
Thus we may see,” quoth he, “how the world wags.
‘Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
And after one hour more ’twill be eleven.
And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe,
And then from hour to hour we rot and rot,
And thereby hangs a tale.”

DUTCH:
En dit geeft dan een sprookjen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wag=To go one’s way
How the world wags=the way the world turns
Compleat:
To wag (to move or stir)=Schudden, beweegen

Topics: life, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
O good old man, how well in thee appears
The constant service of the antique world,
When service sweat for duty, not for meed.
Thou art not for the fashion of these times,
Where none will sweat but for promotion,
And having that do choke their service up
Even with the having. It is not so with thee.
But, poor old man, thou prun’st a rotten tree
That cannot so much as a blossom yield
In lieu of all thy pains and husbandry.

DUTCH:
Gij volgt niet, neen, de mode dezer dagen,
Nu niemand zwoegen wil, dan om wat winst,
En hij, die winst bekomt, in ‘t voordeel zelf
Zijn ijver smoort

MORE:
Schmidt:
Antic=(O. Edd. promiscuously antick and antique, but always accented on the first syllable), adj. belonging to the times, or resembling the manners of antiquity
Sweat=Toil, labour
Constant=Faithful
Choke up (Reflectively)=Oppress, make away with, kill
Meed=Reward, recompense, hire
Compleat:
Meed=Belooning, vergelding, verdiensten

Topics: duty, age/experience, work, loyalty, achievement, fashion/trends

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Amiens
CONTEXT:
Blow, blow, thou winter wind.
Thou art not so unkind
As man’s ingratitude.
Thy tooth is not so keen,
Because thou art not seen,
Although thy breath be rude.

DUTCH:
Blaas, blaas, gij winterwind!
Gij zijt niet valsch gezind,
Als menschenondank is;
En daar men nooit u ziet,
Zijt gij zoo schrikk’lijk niet,
Schoon zonder deerenis.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Rude=Harsh, rough, unpleasing to the sense. Although thy (the winter wind’s) “breath be r.”
Compleat:
Rude=Ruuw. Rudely (or coarsly)=Groffelyk

Topics: ingratitude, nature

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
We that are true lovers run into strange capers. But as all is mortal in nature, so is all nature in love mortal in folly.
ROSALIND
Thou speak’st wiser than thou art ware of.
TOUCHSTONE
Nay, I shall ne’er be ware of mine own wit till I break my shins against it.

DUTCH:
Gij spreekt wijzer, dan gij zelf gewaar wordt

MORE:
Schmidt:
Caper=A leap, a spring, in dancing or mirth: “we that are true lovers run into strange –s,”
Folly=”Remarkable passage: “so is all nature in love m. in folly,” (perhaps == human, resembling man in folly. Johnson: abounding in folly).
Compleat:
Caper=een Kaper, als mede een Sprong
Folly=Dwaasheid, zotheid, zotterny
Folly (Vice, excess, imperfection)=Ondeugd, buitenspoorigheid, onvolmaaktheid

Topics: love, wisdom, life, nature

PLAY: As you like it
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
Thus must I from the smoke into the smother,
From tyrant duke unto a tyrant brother

DUTCH:
Thans voort, uit smook naar ‘t hol, waar smoring wacht,
Uit vorstendwang in ‘s boozen broeders macht!

MORE:
Smother=suffocating smoke. (From the frying pan into the fire.)
See:
Shunning the smoke, he fell into the fire (Tilley 570)
Fumum fugiens, in ignem incidi
Fleeing from the smoke I fell into the fire

Topics: fate/destiny, relationship

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
And why not the swift foot of time? Had not that been as proper?
ROSALIND
By no means, sir. Time travels in diverse paces with diverse persons. I’ll tell you who time ambles withal, who time trots withal, who time gallops withal, and who he stands still withal.
ORLANDO
I prithee, who doth he trot withal?
ROSALIND
Marry, he trots hard with a young maid between the contract of her marriage and the day it is solemnized. If the interim be but a se’nnight, time’s pace is so hard that it seems the length of seven year.
ORLANDO
Who ambles time withal?
ROSALIND
With a priest that lacks Latin and a rich man that hath not the gout, for the one sleeps easily because he cannot study and the other lives merrily because he feels no pain—the one lacking the burden of lean and wasteful learning, the other knowing no burden of heavy tedious penury. These time ambles withal.
ORLANDO
Who doth he gallop withal?
ROSALIND
With a thief to the gallows, for though he go as softly as foot can fall, he thinks himself too soon there.
ORLANDO
Who stays it still withal?
ROSALIND
With lawyers in the vacation, for they sleep between term and term, and then they perceive not how time moves.

DUTCH:
de Tijd reist met verschillende personen in verschillenden gang. Ik kan u zeggen, met wie de Tijd den tel gaat, met wie de Tijd draaft, met wie de Tijd galoppeert en met wie hij stil staat.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Term=The time in which a court is held for the trial of causes. The legal year was divided into
terms with recesses in between.

Topics: time, lawyers, life, order/society

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
You must borrow me Gargantua’s mouth first: ’tis a word too great for any mouth of this age’s size. To say ay and no to these particulars is more than to answer in a catechism.

DUTCH:
Dan moet gij eerst Gargantua’s mond voor mij huren;
want dat woord is veel te groot voor een mond van het
hedendaagsche formaat.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Gargantua=Rabelais’ giant (giant with an enormous appetite}.
Particular=A single point, single thing; minute detail of things singly enumerated
Compleat:
Particular=Byzonder, zonderling, byzonderheid
I don’t remember every particular of it=Ik heb juist alle de byzonderheden daarvan niet onthouden

Burgersdijk notes:
Gargantua’s mond. De reus Gargantua, uit Rabelais’ beroemden satyrischen roman, die eens (Livre I, Ch, 38) saladeplanten, zoo groot als pruim- of noteboomen, waartussvhen zes pelgrims lagen te rusten, verzamelde, en toevallig de pelgrims ook meenam, de salade in een reuzenschotel klaar maakte en de arme drommels achtereenvolgens in den mond kreeg, zonder het te merken; zij moesten met hunne pelgrimsstokken rondspringen om niet tusschen zijne kiezen te geraken en niet met het drinken ingezwolgen te worden; gelukkig werden zij door hem, weder zonder dat hij er eenig vermoeden van had, met zijn tandenstoker uit hun benauwden toestand bevrijd.

Topics: language, reply

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
True is it that we have seen better days
And have with holy bell been knolled to church,
And sat at good men’s feasts and wiped our eyes
Of drops that sacred pity hath engendered.
And therefore sit you down in gentleness,
And take upon command what help we have
That to your wanting may be ministered

DUTCH:
We hebben betere dagen gekend

MORE:
Shakespeare is credited with coining the phrase “seen better days” but it had been recorded previously in a play by Sir Thomas More (1590).
The phrase, which at the time referred to those who come on hard times, is still in use although it is now also to describe objects that are past their best.
Schmidt:
Minister to=Administer (medicines), to prescribe, to order

Topics: still in use, invented or popularised, wellbeing

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
Such a one is a natural philosopher. Wast ever in court, shepherd?
CORIN
No, truly.
TOUCHSTONE
Then thou art damned.
CORIN
Nay, I hope.
TOUCHSTONE
Truly, thou art damned, like an ill-roasted egg, all on one side.
CORIN
For not being at court? Your reason.

DUTCH:
Waarachtig, gij wordt gebraden, evenals een slecht gebraden ei, aldoor aan éen kant.

MORE:

Topics: insult, order/society, status, civility

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Amiens
CONTEXT:
Under the greenwood tree,
Who loves to lie with me
And tune his merry note,
Unto the sweet bird’s throat;
Come hither, come hither, come hither.
Here shall he see No enemy
But winter and rough weather

DUTCH:
Al wie in ‘t groene woud
Van vredig leven houdt,
En graag een liedjen zingt,
Als ‘t vogelkeeltjen klinkt,
Die vlij’ zich hier neder, hier neder;
Niets, dat in ‘t veld
Hem grieft of kwelt,
Dan kou soms en ruw weder.

MORE:
Proverb: A bad bush is better than the open field
Meaning: lie down or tell lies, Shakespeare punning.
“Under the Greenwood Tree” hasbeen used since, e.g. Name of a song, Novel by Thomas Hardy,

Topics: still in use, nature, truth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
DUKE SENIOR
If he, compact of jars, grow musical,
We shall have shortly discord in the spheres.
Go seek him. Tell him I would speak with him.

DUTCH:
Wordt hij, gansch wanklank, muzikaal, dan dreigt
Der spheren harmonie ontstemd te worden

MORE:
Schmidt:
Compact = composed of
Jar = discord (as in jarring notes)
Spheres = planets, the universe
Compleat:
Jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
To jar (in music)=Uit de maat zyn
A string that jars=Een snaar die niet eenstemmig klinkt

Topics: insult, conflict

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
LE BEAU
What color, madam? How shall I answer you?
ROSALIND
As wit and fortune will.
TOUCHSTONE
Or as the Destinies decrees.
CELIA
Well said. That was laid on with a trowel.
TOUCHSTONE
Nay, if I keep not my rank—
ROSALIND
Thou losest thy old smell.

DUTCH:
Goed gezegd! dat werd daar nog wat aangevet!

MORE:
To lay it on with a trowel = to exaggerate, often with flattery.
audirankness
Rankness: the state of being overgrown and stinking, used of weeds.

Topics: flattery, invented or popularised, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
Well, time is the old justice that examines all such offenders, and let time try. Adieu.

DUTCH:
Nu, de Tijd is de oude rechter, die al zulke euveldaders
oordeelt; de Tijd moge uitspraak doen.

MORE:
Proverb: Time tries all things

Topics: judgment, time, offence, justice, law/legal

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
When a man’s verses cannot be understood nor a man’s good wit seconded with the forward child, understanding, it strikes a man more dead than a great reckoning in a little room. Truly, I would the gods had made thee poetical.

DUTCH:
Als iemands verzen niet begrepen worden en iemands geestigheid niet wordt bijgestaan door het voorlijke kind Verstand,

MORE:
Schmidt:
Reckoning (substantively)=the money charged by a host (a Bill)

Topics: intellect, understanding, skill/talent, language

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
You are full of pretty answers. Have you not been acquainted with goldsmiths’ wives and conned them out of rings?

DUTCH:
Gij zit vol puntige antwoorden; hebt gij soms goede
kennissen gehad onder goudsmidsvrouwen en ze van
ringen van buiten geleerd?

MORE:
Gold rings were inscribed with religious or inspirational messages or lines from poems (poesy rings). “Goldsmiths’ wives” indicates courtiers’ scorn for citizen taste.
Schmidt:
Pretty=Pleasing, neat, fine
Compleat:
Pretty (pleasant or agreable)=Aangenaam

Topics: reply, justification, reason

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
You have a nimble wit. I think ’twas made of Atalanta’s heels. Will you sit down with me? And we two will rail against our mistress the world and all our misery.

DUTCH:
Gij hebt een vlug vernuft; ik geloof, dat het van Atalanta’s
hielen gemaakt is. Wilt gij wat naast mij gaan zitten? dan zullen wij beiden eens uitvaren tegen onze meesteres de wereld en al onze ellende.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Atalanta, the daughter of Jasius, swift in running and to be won only by one who excelled her:
Rail=To use reproachful language, to scold in opprobrious terms
Compleat:
Nimble=Gaauw, knaphandig, snel

Topics: intellect

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
Farewell, Monsieur Traveler. Look you lisp and wear strange suits, disable all the benefits of your own country, be out of love with your nativity, and almost chide God for making you that countenance you are, or I will scarce think you have swam in a gondola.

DUTCH:
Vaarwel, signore Reiziger. Zorg vooral, dat gij lispelt en u uitheemsch kleedt, al wat er goed is in uw eigen land nietswaardig noemt, met het uur van uw geboorte overhoop ligt en bijna tegen den lieven God uitvaart, omdat hij u geen ander gezicht gegeven heeft;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Disable=To disparage, to undervalue
Countenance=Face, air
Compleat:
Disable=Onmagtig maaken, onvermogend maaken
Countenance=Gelaat, gezigt, uitzigt, weezen

Topics: language, appearance, value, ingratitude

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
O sir, we quarrel in print, by the book, as you have books for good manners. I will name you the degrees. The first, the Retort Courteous; the second, the Quip Modest; the third, the Reply Churlish; the fourth, the Reproof Valiant; the fifth, the Countercheck Quarrelsome; the sixth, the Lie with Circumstance; the seventh, the Lie Direct. All these you may avoid but the Lie Direct; and you may avoid that, too, with an ‘if’. I knew when seven justices could not take up a quarrel, but when the parties were met themselves, one of them thought but of an ‘if’, as ‘If you said so, then I said so’, and they shook hands and swore brothers. Your ‘if’ is the only peacemaker; much virtue in ‘if’.

DUTCH:
Zoo’n „indien” is de ware vredestichter; ontzachlijk
krachtig dat „indien”!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quarrel=To wrangle, to seek occasion of a fray, to pick a q+C68:G68uarrel.
Met=Had come together
Peace-maker=One who composes differences

“O Sir, we quarrel in print:: Ref. Fleming, A Panoplie of Epistles (1576), 357: Considering that whatsoever is uttered in such men’s hearing, must be done in print, as we say in our common proverb.

Burgersdijk notes:
Door een logenstraffing, zevenmaal herhaald. Hier en in het volgende wordt gezinspeeld op een boek, dat in 1595 in Londen werd uitgegeven, van Vincentio Saviolo, een schermmeester, waarschijnlijk uit Padua afkomstig en door Essex begunstigd. Het heet: „Vincentio Saviolo his Practise. In two Bookes. The first intreating of the use of the Rapier and Dagger. The second of honour and honourable Quarrels.” Van het tweede deel zegt de schrijver: A discourse most necessarie for all gentlemen that have in regard their honours, touching the giving and receiving of the Lie, where upon the Duello and the Combats in divers sortes doth insue, and many other inconveniences, for lack only of the trite Knowledge of honour and the contrary and the right understanding of wordes. Onder de hoofdstukken vindt men o. a.: What the reason is that the portie unto whom the lye is given ought to become Challenger: and of the nature of Lies; — Of the manner and diversitie of Lies; — Of Lies certaine; — Of conditionall Lies, enz.
Hier en daar ontleent Toetssteen het een en ander woordelijk uit dit boek; zoo leest men in het laatstgenoemd kapittel: „Conditionall lyes be such as are given conditionally; as if a man should saie or write these wordes: If thou hast saide that 1 have offered my Lord abuse, thou lyest; or if thou saiest so hereafter, thou shalt lye. Of these kind of lyes given in this manner often arise much contention in wordes whereof no sure conclusion can arise.” — Vandaar zegt Toetssteen dan ook „Ons twisten gaat naar de boeken”; er staat: in print, by the book: ,,zooals ‘t gedrukt is, naar het boek.”

Topics: law, language, civility, learning/education, dispute, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
DUKE SENIOR
Art thou thus boldened, man, by thy distress
Or else a rude despiser of good manners,
That in civility thou seem’st so empty?
ORLANDO
You touched my vein at first. The thorny point
Of bare distress hath ta’en from me the show
Of smooth civility, yet am I inland bred
And know some nurture. But forbear, I say.
He dies that touches any of this fruit
Till I and my affairs are answerèd.
JAQUES
An you will not be answered with reason, I must die.
DUKE SENIOR
What would you have? Your gentleness shall force
More than your force move us to gentleness.

DUTCH:
Doch vriend’lijkheid dwingt meer,
Dan ooit uw dwang tot vriend’lijkheid ons stemt.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb of the time: “There is a great force hidden in a sweet command” (1581).
Schmidt:
Empty: void, destitute; followed by in: “that in civility thou seemest so e.”
Vein=Disposition, temper, humour
Bare distress=A quibble
Inland: a word of a very vague signification, not so much denoting remoteness from the sea or the frontier, as a seat of peace and peaceful civilization; (perhaps opposed to mountainous districts as the seats of savage barbarousness and meaning the flat country)
Nurture=Good breeding, humanity

Topics: proverbs and idioms, order/society, language, civility, learning/education

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
Fare you well: pray heaven I be deceived in you!
CELIA
Your heart’s desires be with you!

DUTCH:
Uws harten wensch geworde u!

MORE:
Schmidt:
To deceive=To mislead themind, to cause to err. To be deceived in a person=mistaken about
Compleat:
You are deceived=Gy vergist u.
Heart’s desire=wat zyn hart begeert

Topics: life, fate/destiny, misc.

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
I do beseech your Grace,
Let me the knowledge of my fault bear with me.
If with myself I hold intelligence
Or have acquaintance with mine own desires,
If that I do not dream or be not frantic—
As I do trust I am not—then, dear uncle,
Never so much as in a thought unborn
Did I offend your Highness.
DUKE FREDERICK
Thus do all traitors.
If their purgation did consist in words,
They are as innocent as grace itself.
Let it suffice thee that I trust thee not.
ROSALIND
Yet your mistrust cannot make me a traitor.
Tell me whereon the likelihood depends.

DUTCH:
Kan mijn verraad uit uwen argwaan blijken?
Zeg mij ten minste, op welken schijn die rust.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Purgation=Clearing from imputation of guilt, exculpation. Used in theology (Purgatory and declaration of innocence oath) and as a legal term of proving of innocence.
Frantic=mad
Compleat:
Purgation (the clearing one’s self of a crime)=zuivering van een misdaad

Topics: hope/optimism, madness, offence, guilt

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