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PLAY: Cymbeline ACT/SCENE: 4.2 SPEAKER: Belarius CONTEXT: O thou goddess,
Thou divine Nature, thou thyself thou blazon’st
In these two princely boys! They are as gentle
As zephyrs blowing below the violet,
Not wagging his sweet head; and yet as rough,
Their royal blood enchafed, as the rud’st wind
That by the top doth take the mountain pine
And make him stoop to th’ vale. ’Tis wonder
That an invisible instinct should frame them
To royalty unlearned, honour untaught,
Civility not seen from other, valour
That wildly grows in them but yields a crop
As if it had been sowed. Yet still it’s strange
What Cloten’s being here to us portends,
Or what his death will bring us. DUTCH: t Is wonderbaar,
Hoe een verborgen aandrift hun verleent
Een vorstenwaardigheid, hun nooit getoond,
Een zucht naar eer, nooit bij hen opgewekt,
Wellevendheid, van niemand afgezien,
Een dapperheid, die, wild, van zelf, ontkiemd,
Toch rijk’lijk vruchten geeft, als ware zij
Zorgvuldig aangekweekt!

Proverb: He must stoop that has a low door

Schmidt:
Unlearned=Not learned, not acquired by instruction
Enchafed=Excited, heated
Wonder=wonderful

Compleat:
Unlearned=Ongeleerd, ontleerd
He is apt to chafe=Hy is zeer oploopend
To chafe=Bulder
In a chafe=Hy brandt van toorn Topics: age/experiencelife, nature, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
A goodly day not to keep house with such
Whose roof’s as low as ours! Stoop, boys. This gate
Instructs you how t’ adore the heavens and bows you
To a morning’s holy office. The gates of monarchs
Are arched so high that giants may jet through
And keep their impious turbans on, without
Good morrow to the sun. Hail, thou fair heaven!
We house i’ th’ rock, yet use thee not so hardly
As prouder livers do.

DUTCH:
Een dag te schoon om thuis te blijven, onder
Een dak zoo laag als ‘t onze


Keep the house=Stay home
Jet=Strut, swagger
Stoop=Bow down
Impious=Sinful, wicked (turbans: Giants were often depicted in romantic novels as turban-wearing Saracens)

Compleat:
To keep house=Huis houden; binnens huis blyven
To jet or jut=Uitstooten, uitwaards loopen
To stoop=Buigen, bokken of bukken
Impious=Ongodvruchtig, godloos

Topics: nature, life, equality, status, authority

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen
CONTEXT:
A kind of conquest
Caesar made here, but made not here his brag
Of “came, and saw, and overcame.” With shame—
The first that ever touched him—he was carried
From off our coast, twice beaten; and his shipping,
Poor ignorant baubles, on our terrible seas
Like eggshells moved upon their surges, cracked
As easily ’gainst our rocks. For joy whereof
The famed Cassibelan, who was once at point—
O, giglet Fortune!—to master Caesar’s sword,
Made Lud’s Town with rejoicing-fires bright
And Britons strut with courage.

DUTCH:
Caesar
Heeft, ja, ‘t veroverd, maar kon hier niet zwetsen
Van “kwam en zag en overwon”;


Proverb: I came, saw, and overcame

Made not here his brag=His conquest didn’t live up to (wasn’t the basis for) the boast of “came, and saw, and overcame”
Lud’s town=London
Giglet (or giglot)=Wanton woman (See Hamlet 2.2 re. Fortune: “she is a strumpet”.)
Giglet fortune=Fickle, inconstant
Rejoicing fires=Bonfires

Compleat:
To brag=Pochen, roemen, opsnyen
Upon the point of doing=Op het punt staan van iets te doen
To strut=Prat daar heen treeden, treeden als een paauw

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, achievement, conflict

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
MESSENGER
So like you, sir, ambassadors from Rome;
The one is Caius Lucius.
CYMBELINE
A worthy fellow,
Albeit he comes on angry purpose now.
But that’s no fault of his. We must receive him
According to the honour of his sender,
And towards himself, his goodness forespent on us,
We must extend our notice.

DUTCH:
t Is een waardig man,
Al is ook toorn het doel van zijne komst;
Want zijn schuld is dit niet


Goodness forespent=Good offices done/shown previously
Notice=Attention, regard

Topics: value, status, blame, anger, merit

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
My queen, my mistress!
O lady, weep no more, lest I give cause
To be suspected of more tenderness
Than doth become a man. I will remain
The loyal’st husband that did e’er plight troth.
My residence in Rome at one Philario’s,
Who to my father was a friend, to me
Known but by letter; thither write, my queen,
And with mine eyes I’ll drink the words you send,
Though ink be made of gall.

DUTCH:
k Neem mijn verblijf in Rome, bij Philario,
Een vriend mijns vaders, dien ikzelf alleen
Uit brieven ken; geliefde, schrijf mij daar;
Mijn oogen zullen uwe woorden drinken,
Al wordt ook inkt uit gal bereid.


Gall=Bile; any thing bitter and disagreeable; bitterness of mind, rancour
Gall=An ingredient in ink (iron gall ink)

Compleat:
Gall=Gal
To gall (or vex)=Tergen, verbitteren
Bitter as gall=Zo bitter als gal

Topics: sorrow, appearance, loyalty, language

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
I hope I dream,
For so I thought I was a cave-keeper
And cook to honest creatures. But ’tis not so.
’Twas but a bolt of nothing, shot at nothing,
Which the brain makes of fumes. Our very eyes
Are sometimes like our judgments, blind. Good faith,
I tremble still with fear; but if there be
Yet left in heaven as small a drop of pity
As a wren’s eye, feared gods, a part of it!

DUTCH:
O, groote goden,
Is boven nog erbarming, slechts een drup,
Als ‘t oog der grasmusch, schenkt me een deel er van!


Schmidt:
A fume=A delusion, a phantasm, anything hindering, like a mist, the function of the brain

Compleat:
The glory of mortals is but a fume=De eerre der stervelingen is maar rook
To be in a fume=In een woede zyn

Topics: pity, imagination, madness, evidence

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN, [as Fidele]Good masters, harm me not.
Before I entered here, I called, and thought
To have begged or bought what I have took. Good troth,
I have stol’n naught, nor would not, though I had found
Gold strewed i’ th’ floor. Here’s money for my meat.
I would have left it on the board so soon
As I had made my meal, and parted
With prayers for the provider.
GUIDERIUS [as Polydor]
Money, youth?
ARVIRAGUS [as Cadwal]All gold and silver rather turn to dirt,
As ’tis no better reckoned but of those
Who worship dirty gods.

DUTCH:
Doet, goede menschen, mij geen leed; ik riep,
Aleer ik binnentrad, en was van plan
Te vragen of te koopen, wat ik nu
Genomen heb.


Thought to have:
I had thought (followed by the perf. inf.)=I intended, I supposed, I was going
Part=Depart, go away from
Reckon=To esteem, to think, to hold

Compleat:
He thought to serve me a base trick=Hy meende my een lelyke poets te speelen
To reckon (or esteem)=Achten, voorhouden
Dirty (base)=Vuil, laag

Topics: money, honesty, poverty and wealth

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.6
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
All of her that is out of door, most rich!
If she be furnished with a mind so rare,
She is alone th’ Arabian bird, and I
Have lost the wager. Boldness be my friend.
Arm me, audacity, from head to foot,
Or like the Parthian I shall flying fight—
Rather, directly fly.
IMOGEN (reading):
He is one of the noblest note, to whose
kindnesses I am most infinitely tied. Reflect upon
him accordingly as you value your trust. – Leonatus

DUTCH:
O, driestheid, wees mijn vriend,
En wapen, stoutheid, mij van top tot teen!
Of als de Parth, moet ik al vluchtend vechten,
Neen, vluchten en niets meer.


Proverb: As rare as the Phoenix

Arabian bird=Phoenix (never is there more than one Phoenix in the world at one time)
Out of door=External, outward appearance
Value your trust=Value the charge entrusted to you. (Some editors have this as ‘truest’, making this the close of the letter.)
Reflect upon=Consider him

Compleat:
Boldness=Stoutheyd, koenheyd, vrymoedigheyd, onvertsaagheyd
Audacity=Stoutheyd
It would be well for every one to reflect upon himself=’t Zou wel zyn dat een yder zich zelven aanmerkte; ‘t was goed dat elk op zich zelven lette
To lay a wager=Wedden, een wedspel aan gaan
Wager of law=Aanbieding van te beedigen, dat men zynen eyscher niets schuldig is

Burgersdijk notes:
Uw getrouwsten Leonatus. Hier is de gissing van Mason gevolgd, die, éene letter e bijvoegende, leest your truest Leonatus. Imogeen loopt den brief haastig door en deelt dan aan Jachimo, die inmiddels bij zichzelf gesproken heeft, beleefd het slot, dat op hem betrekking heeft, mede. Wil men de lezing der folio-uitgave behouden: as you value your trust, dan moet men dit, veel minder eenvoudig, als eene soort van bezwering opvatten: „zoo waar gij uwe bezworen trouw in eere houdt” en aannemen, dat Imogeen uit het midden van den brief eenige woorden hardop leest, dan de lezing ten einde brengt en alleen de onderteekening weder uitspreekt.

Topics: appearance, intellect, value, trust, judgment, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN
If you but said so, ’twere as deep with me:
If you swear still, your recompense is still
That I regard it not.
CLOTEN
This is no answer.
IMOGEN
But that you shall not say I yield being silent,
I would not speak. I pray you, spare me: ‘faith,
I shall unfold equal discourtesy
To your best kindness: one of your great knowing
Should learn, being taught, forbearance.

DUTCH:
Zoudt ge, als ik zweeg, niet denken, dat ik toegaf,
Dan sprak ik niet


Proverb: Silence is (gives) consent

Deep=Weighty, serious
Equal discourtesy=Discourtesy equal to your kindness

Compleat:
Deep=Diepzinnig
Discourtesy=Onbeleefdheid, onheusheid
You have done me a great discourtesy=Gy hebt my daar mede een groote ondienst gedaan

Topics: promise, reply, perception, law/legal, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
You must know,
Till the injurious Romans did extort
This tribute from us, we were free. Caesar’s ambition,
Which swelled so much that it did almost stretch
The sides o’ th’ world, against all colour here
Did put the yoke upon ’s, which to shake off
Becomes a warlike people, whom we reckon
Ourselves to be.

DUTCH:
t Zij u bewust,
Wij waren , tot ons Rome met geweld
Tot cijns verplichtte, vrij; eerst Caesars eerzucht, —
Die zoo zich opblies, dat de wereld schier
Te klein haar werd


Against all colour=Against any opposition, whatever the reason
Schmidt:
Injurious=Detractory, hurting reputation, insulting
Tribute=Stated payment made in acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace, or by virtue of a treaty
Colour=Specious pretence, palliation, appearance of right

Compleat:
Injurious=Verongelykend, beledigend, smaadelyk, lasterlyk
Tribute=Tol, impost
Colour=Vaandel
Under colour of peace=Onder den schyn van vreede
Under colour of friendship=Onder den dekmantel van vriendschap

Topics: independence, free will, ambition, rights, equality

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
BELARIUS
I cannot tell. Long is it since I saw him,
But time hath nothing blurred those lines of favour
Which then he wore. The snatches in his voice
And burst of speaking were as his. I am absolute
’Twas very Cloten.
ARVIRAGUS
In this place we left them.
I wish my brother make good time with him,
You say he is so fell
BELARIUS
Being scarce made up,
I mean to man, he had not apprehension
Of roaring terrors; for defect of judgment
Is oft the cause of fear.
GUIDERIUS
This Cloten was a fool, an empty purse;
There was no money in ’t. Not Hercules
Could have knocked out his brains, for he had none.
Yet I not doing this, the fool had borne
My head as I do his.

DUTCH:
Nauw’lijks opgegroeid,
Ik meen, tot man, ontbrak hem elk begrip
Van iets gevaarlijks ; en gebrek aan oordeel
Wekt vaak vermetelheid. Daar is uw broeder.


Scarce made up=Not fully developed, still and immature youth; or not ‘all there’
Lines of favour=Lines on the countenance
Snatches=Catches, seizures followed by a ‘burst of speaking’. (Irish ‘ganch’ meaning stammer)
Absolute=Positive, have no doubt
Roaring=Loud-tongued

Compleat:
Snatch=Een ruk, hap, beet
A snatch and away=Een mond vol en weg ‘er mee
To do a thing by girds and snatches=Ies met horten en stooten doen; met menigvuldige tusschenpoosingen verrigten
Absolute=Volslagen, volstrekt, volkomen, onafhangklyk, onverbonden
To roar=Uitbrullen

Burgersdijk notes:
Gebrek aan oordeel wekt vaak vermetelheid. Het oorspronkelijke is hier blijkbaar bedorven, de folio heeft: for defect of judgment is oft the cause of fear; Shakespeare moet ongeveer het tegendeel gezegd hebben, want de doldriestheid van Cloten wordt uit zijn gebrek aan oordeel verklaard.
Hanmer las daarom: is oft the arre of fear, en dienovereenkomstig is hier vertaald. Doch ook Theobald’s verbetering is zeer opmerkelijk: for the effect of judgment is oft the cause of fear; „want des oordeels werking is oorzaak vaak van vrees” ; de zin van beide verbeteringen is nagenoeg gelijk; de tegenstelling tusschen gevolg of werking en oorzaak pleit er misschien voor, dat Theobald de uitdrukking des dichters getroffen heeft.

Topics: language, memory, judgment, intellect

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
How you speak!
Did you but know the city’s usuries
And felt them knowingly; the art o’ th’ court,
As hard to leave as keep, whose top to climb
Is certain falling, or so slipp’ry that
The fear’s as bad as falling; the toil o’ th’ war,
A pain that only seems to seek out danger
I’ th’ name of fame and honour, which dies i’ th’ search
And hath as oft a sland’rous epitaph
As record of fair act—nay, many times
Doth ill deserve by doing well; what’s worse,
Must curtsy at the censure.

DUTCH:
Welk een oordeel!
O, kendet gij der steden woekerzucht,
En voeldet gij die zelf; de kuiperijen
Van ‘t hof, zoo moeilijk na te laten en
Zoo moeilijk vol te houden, waar ‘t beklimmen
Des hoogsten tops een wisse val is, of
De weg daarheen zoo glibb’rig.

Proverb: He that never climbed never fell

Pain=Labour (which perishes without achieving fame and honour)
Usury=The practice of taking interest for money

Compleat:
Usury=Woeker
To lend upon usury=Op rente leenen
I shall pay you with usury=Ik zal het met woeker betaalen
To take pains=Moeite doen, arbeid aanwenden
No pains, no gains=Geen winst zonder moeite

Topics: age/experience, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN
I pray you, sir,
Deliver with more openness your answers
To my demands. Why do you pity me?
IACHIMO
That others do—
I was about to say, enjoy your—but
It is an office of the gods to venge it,
Not mine to speak on ’t.
IMOGEN
You do seem to know
Something of me or what concerns me. Pray you,
Since doubting things go ill often hurts more
Than to be sure they do—for certainties
Either are past remedies, or, timely knowing,
The remedy then born—discover to me
What both you spur and stop.

DUTCH:
Vaak slaat de vrees voor rampen dieper wond
Dan zekerheid er van.


Doubting=Suspecting, fearing
Past remedies=Beyond resolution, beyond our ability to resolve
Timely knowing, the remedy then born=If we know in time, we can devise a solution
What both you spur and stop=Urges on and at the same time holds back

Compleat:
To spur (on)=Aanspooren, noopen, aandryven
To spur a question=Een onverwagte, schielyke vraag doen
Timely=Tydig, gepast

Topics: uncertainty, concern , remedy

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
Yea, bloody cloth, I’ll keep thee, for I wish’d
Thou shouldst be colour’d thus. You married ones,
If each of you should take this course, how many
Must murder wives much better than themselves
For wrying but a little! O Pisanio!
Every good servant does not all commands:
No bond but to do just ones. Gods! if you
Should have ta’en vengeance on my faults, I never
Had lived to put on this: so had you saved
The noble Imogen to repent, and struck
Me, wretch more worth your vengeance.

DUTCH:
Een goede dienaar volgt niet elk bevel; Slechts aan ‘t gerechte is hij gehouden/
Een goed dienaar voert niet alle bevelen uit


Proverb: Yours to command in the way of honesty

Just=Moral
Wrying=Swerving, deviating from the right course
Put on=Instigate

Compleat:
Just (righteous)=Een rechtvaardige
Just=Effen, juist, net
Wry=Scheef, verdraaid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, honesty, marriage, work, flaw/fault

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
The woman’s part in me—for there’s no motion
That tends to vice in man but I affirm
It is the woman’s part: be it lying, note it,
The woman’s; flattering, hers; deceiving, hers;
Lust and rank thoughts, hers, hers; revenges, hers;
Ambitions, covetings, change of prides, disdain,
Nice longing, slanders, mutability,
All faults that may be named, nay, that hell knows,
Why, hers, in part or all, but rather all.
For even to vice
They are not constant, but are changing still
One vice but of a minute old for one
Not half so old as that. I’ll write against them,
Detest them, curse them. Yet ’tis greater skill
In a true hate to pray they have their will;
The very devils cannot plague them better.

DUTCH:
O, vond ik slechts
Wat vrouwlijk is in mij! want ied’re neiging
Tot ondeugd in den man, voorwaar, zij is
Zijn vrouwlijk erfdeel; liegen, ja, het is zoo,
Komt van de vrouw; van haar ‘t gevlei, ‘t bedriegen;
Onkuische lust, van haar; van haar, de wraakzucht;
Van haar de zucht naar grootheid, hoovaardij,
Inbeelding, dwaze lusten, lasterzucht,
Laatdunkendheid en wuftheid, alle kwaad,
Wat maar een naam heeft, wat de hel maar kent,
Van haar, gedeelt’lijk of geheel; of ja, geheel;


May be named=That man can name (See Richard III, 1.2 “tongue may name”)
Motion=Impulse
Nice=Fastidious

Compleat:
Motion (instigation)=Aanporring, aandryving
To plague=Plaagen, quellen

Topics: honesty, truth, flattery, deceit, revenge

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
You do seem to know
Something of me or what concerns me. Pray you,
Since doubting things go ill often hurts more
Than to be sure they do—for certainties
Either are past remedies, or, timely knowing,
The remedy then born—discover to me
What both you spur and stop.

DUTCH:
Want kent men ze,
Dan kan ‘t te laat zijn, ja, maar tijdig weten
Brengt vaak nog redding aan.


Doubting=Suspecting, fearing
Past remedies=Beyond resolution, beyond our ability to resolve
Timely knowing, the remedy then born=If we know in time, we can devise a solution

Compleat:
To spur (on)=Aanspooren, noopen, aandryven
To spur a question=Een onverwagte, schielyke vraag doen
Timely=Tydig, gepast

Topics: uncertainty, concern , remedy, resolution

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
I heard no letter from my master since
I wrote him Imogen was slain. ’Tis strange.
Nor hear I from my mistress, who did promise
To yield me often tidings. Neither know I
What is betid to Cloten, but remain
Perplexed in all. The heavens still must work.
Wherein I am false I am honest; not true, to be true.
These present wars shall find I love my country,
Even to the note o’ th’ King, or I’ll fall in them.
All other doubts, by time let them be cleared.
Fortune brings in some boats that are not steered.

DUTCH:
De tijd breng’ licht en helpe in mijnen nood;
‘t Geluk redt soms een onbestuurde boot.


Schmidt:
Tidings=News, intelligence
To betide=To happen, come to pass

Compleat:
Tidings=Tyding, boodschap
To betide=Aankomen, overkomen

Topics: fate/destiny, achievement

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Queen
CONTEXT:
You are most bound to the king,
Who lets go by no vantages that may
Prefer you to his daughter. Frame yourself
To orderly solicits, and be friended
With aptness of the season; make denials
Increase your services; so seem as if
You were inspired to do those duties which
You tender to her; that you in all obey her,
Save when command to your dismission tends,
And therein you are senseless.

DUTCH:
Zorg, dat gij haar met ernst
Uw hulde brengt; maak u gelegenheid,
Den juisten tijd tot vriend;


Vantages=Opportunities
Prefer=Commend
Frame=To mould, to fashion, to work into a certain shape
Orderly solicits=established (courtship) rituals
Be friended with=Favour
Aptness of the season=properly timed solicitation
Dismission=Rejection
Senseless=Insensitive, having no ear

Compleat:
Vantage=Toegift, toemaat, overmaat, overwigt
To prefer on e=Iemand bevorderen
To frame=Een gestalte geeven, toestellen, maaken, ontwerpen, schikken, beraamen
Orderly=Geschiktlyk, geregeld, ordentlyk
Senseless=Gevoeleloos, ongevoelig, zinneloos

Topics: debt/obligation, duty

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: First Lord
CONTEXT:
FIRST LORD
Sir, as I told you always, her beauty and her brain go not together. She’s a good sign, but I have seen small reflection of her wit.
SECOND LORD
She shines not upon fools, lest the reflection should hurt her.

DUTCH:
Zooals ik u altijd zeide, heer, haar verstand houdt
geen gelijken tred met haar schoonheid.


Proverb: Beauty and folly are often matched together

In Shakespeare’s time beauty was seen as a signifier of virtue. See Thomas Hoby’s translation of the Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier (1561). Fourth Book: True beauty, the reflection of goodness.
Her beauty and her brain go not together=Her brain can’t match her beauty.
A good sign=Semblance. (Fig.: something of a deceptive semblance, not answering the promise)
Reflection=Shining back AND thoughtful consideration

Compleat:
Reflection=Terugkaatzing
Reflection=Overdenking, overpeinzing

Topics: appearance, intellect, perception, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
If my shirt were bloody, then to shift it. Have I
hurt him?
SECOND LORD
No, faith, not so much as his patience.
FIRST LORD
Hurt him? His body’s a passable carcass if he be not hurt.
It is a thoroughfare for steel if it be not hurt.
SECOND LORD
His steel was in debt; it went o’ th’ backside the town.
CLOTEN
The villain would not stand me.
SECOND LORD
No, but he fled forward still, toward your face.
FIRST LORD
Stand you? You have land enough of your
own, but he added to your having, gave you some
ground.

DUTCH:
Zijn staal bleef in gebreke te betalen; het liep achterafstraten
om.


Proverb: He dares not show his head (himself) for debt

Schmidt:
Passable=Can be passed through, in this case referring to the pass of a rapier.
Stand=Resist
Not so much as=Not even

In debt: Paid no scores, like a debtor hiding in the back alleys to avoid a creditor. Also (from “An Account of King James I’s Visit to Cambridge”), certain Jesuits were not suffered to come through Cambridge, but were “by the Sheriff carried over the backe side of the town to Cambridge castle.”

Compleat:
Thorough-fare=Een doorgang
Passable=Doorganklyk, inschikkelyk, middelmaatig, schappelyk
Money that is passable=Gangbaar geld
A passable hand=Een tamelyke hand
Stand (against or before)=Tegen houden, tegenstaan, verweeren

Burgersdijk notes:
Zijn staal bleef in gebreke te betalen; het liep achterafstraten om. Er staat woordelijk: „Zijn staal had schulden en liep de stad achterom,” evenals een schuldenaar, die zich niet vrij door de stad bewegen durft; Posthumus’ staal spaarde Cloten. — De meening zou ook kunnen zijn: Cloten’s staal trof Posthumus niet.

Topics: debt/obligation, reason, law/legal, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
I am glad I was up so late, for that’s the
reason I was up so early: he cannot choose
but take this service I have done fatherly.

DUTCH:
Ik ben blij, dat ik zoo laat op was; want dit is de
reden, dat ik zoo vroeg op was.


Take this service (…) fatherly=Accept this good deed as a father would

Topics: time, preparation

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: First Jailer
CONTEXT:
Unless a man would marry a gallows and beget
young gibbets, I never saw one so prone. Yet, on my
conscience, there are verier knaves desire to live,
for all he be a Roman; and there be some of them
too that die against their wills. So should I, if I
were one. I would we were all of one mind, and
one mind good. O, there were desolation of jailers
and gallowses! I speak against my present profit,
but my wish hath a preferment in ’t.

DUTCH:
Ik spreek tegen mijn tegenwoordig voordeel, maar er ligt toch een wensch naar bevordering in.

Desolation=Destitution, solitariness
Prone=Eagerly inclined
Gibbet=Gallows
Preferment=Promotion
Very=Veritable, true, real. Verier=greater
Speak against my present profit=Arguing against my current gain

Compleat:
Prone=Geneigd
Gibbet=Een mik, halve galg
Preferment=Verhooging, voortrekking, bevordering tot Staat
Very (true or perfect)=Echt. Veriest=Grootste
He is the veriest rogue that ever lived=Hy is de grootste schurk die op twe beenen gaat

Topics: offence, good and bad, unity/collaboration, order/society

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
If she be up, I’ll speak with her; if not,
Let her lie still and dream. By your leave, ho!—
I know her women are about her. What
If I do line one of their hands?’’Tis gold
Which buys admittance—oft it doth—yea, and makes
Diana’s rangers false themselves, yield up
Their deer to th’ stand o’ th’ stealer; and ’tis gold
Which makes the true man killed and saves the thief;
Nay, sometime hangs both thief and true man: what
Can it not do and undo? I will make
One of her women lawyer to me, for
I yet not understand the case myself.

DUTCH:
Ik weet, zij heeft haar vrouwvolk bij zich. Wacht!
Vulde ik aan een de handen eens? Voor goud
Verkrijgt men toegang, dikwijls, ja; het maakt
Diana’s jagers zelfs ontrouw, zoodat
Zij ‘t wild den stroopers tegendrijven; goud
Brengt brave kerels om en redt den dief,
Maar soms ook brengt het beiden aan de galg.


Proverb: If money go before all ways lie open
Proverb: To line one’s purse (coat, hand)

Onions:
Diana’s rangers=Gamekeepers, nymphs vowed to chastity
False (adjective)=betraying a trust *or* False (verb) falsify (see ‘falsing’ in Comedy of Errors, 2.2)
Stand=”A special stand (…) was a hiding-place constructed in the thickest brake, across which the deer were expected to pass”, Madden, Diary of Master William Silence.

Topics: poverty and wealth, corruption, honesty, lawyers, law/legal, understanding, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: First Jailer
CONTEXT:
Unless a man would marry a gallows and beget
young gibbets, I never saw one so prone. Yet, on my
conscience, there are verier knaves desire to live,
for all he be a Roman; and there be some of them
too that die against their wills. So should I, if I
were one. I would we were all of one mind, and
one mind good. O, there were desolation of jailers
and gallowses! I speak against my present profit,
but my wish hath a preferment in ’t.

DUTCH:
Ik wenschte, dat wij allen eensgezind waren, en dan
goedgezind.


Desolation=Destitution, solitariness
Prone=Eagerly inclined
Gibbet=Gallows
Preferment=Promotion
Very=Veritable, true, real. Verier=greater
Speak against my present profit=Arguing against my current gain

Compleat:
Prone=Geneigd
Gibbet=Een mik, halve galg
Preferment=Verhooging, voortrekking, bevordering tot Staat
Very (true or perfect)=Echt. Veriest=Grootste
He is the veriest rogue that ever lived=Hy is de grootste schurk die op twe beenen gaat

Topics: offence, good and bad, unity/collaboration, order/society

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
If’t be summer news,
Smile to’t before; if winterly, thou need’st
But keep that countenance still. My husband’s hand!
That drug-damn’d Italy hath out-craftied him,
And he’s at some hard point. Speak, man: thy tongue
May take off some extremity, which to read
Would be even mortal to me.

DUTCH:
Wat houdt ge mij, met ingehouden smart,
Dien brief voor? Brengt hij zomerzonneschijn,
Zoo glimlach; is het ijzig winternieuws,
Dan past die schrik.

At some hard point=In a difficult situation
Take off some extremity=Soften the blow
Out-craftied=Outwitted with cunning (See als crafty-sick (feigning sickness), Henry IV Part 2)

Schmidt:
Drug-damned=Detested for its drugs or poisons

Compleat:
Extremity=Uitspoorigheid; elende, jammerstaat
Crafty=Loos, listig, schalk, doortrapt, leep

Topics: life/experience, appearance, language

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
Leonatus? A banished rascal; and he’s another, whatsoever he be. Who told you of this stranger?
One of your Lordship’s pages.
CLOTEN
Is it fit I went to look upon him? Is there no derogation in ’t?
SECOND LORD
You cannot derogate, my lord.
CLOTEN
Not easily, I think.
SECOND LORD
You are a fool granted; therefore your issues, being foolish, do not derogate.

DUTCH:
Zou het staan, als ik eens naar hem toeging om een kijkjen van hem te nemen? Zou dat niet beneden mijn waardigheid wezen?

Derogation=Disparagement.
Derogate=Do anything derogatory to rank, lower opinion
Issues=What proceeds from you, your acts (with a play on issues to mean offspring)

Compleat:
Derogate=Onttrekken, verkorten, verminderen, benadeelen
To derogate from one’s credit=Iemands achting verkorten
To derogate from one’s self=Zich zelfs benadeelen

Topics: reputation, status, order/society

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
Kneel not to me.
The power that I have on you is to spare you;
The malice towards you to forgive you. Live
And deal with others better.
CYMBELINE
Nobly doomed.
We’ll learn our freeness of a son-in-law:
Pardon’s the word to all.

DUTCH:
Kniel niet voor mij;
De macht, die ‘k op u heb, is u te sparen,
En heel mijn wrok, u te vergeven. Leef,
Behandel and’ren beter.


Proverb: To be able to harm and not to do it is noble
Doomed=Judged

Schmidt:
Malice=Malignity, disposition to injure others
Freeness=Generosity

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
To doom=Veroordelen, verwyzen, doemen
Doomed=Veroordeeld, verweezen.

Topics: good and bad, offence, judgment, mercy, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
JAILER
You shall not now be stol’n; you have locks upon you.
So graze as you find pasture
SECOND JAILER
Ay, or a stomach
POSTHUMUS
Most welcome, bondage, for thou art a way,
I think, to liberty. Yet am I better
Than one that’s sick o’ th’ gout, since he had rather
Groan so in perpetuity than be cured
By th’ sure physician, Death, who is the key
T’ unbar these locks. My conscience, thou art fettered
More than my shanks and wrists.
You good gods, give me
The penitent instrument to pick that bolt,
Then free forever. Is ’t enough I am sorry?
So children temporal fathers do appease;
Gods are more full of mercy.

DUTCH:
Verlangt gij
Berouw? toon ik dit meer ooit dan in keet’nen,
Gewenscht, niet opgedrongen


You shall not now be stolen=Alluding to the custom of puting a lock on a horse’s leg when it is put out to pasture (Johnson)
Penitent instrument=A means of freeing conscience of its guilt (Rolfe)
Schmidt:
Groan=To utter a mournful voice in pain or sorrow
Temporal=Pertaining to this life or this world, not spiritual, not eternal

Compleat:
Penitent=Boetvaardig, berouw toonend
Temporal (secular, not spiritual)=Waereldlyk

Burgersdijk notes:
“Nu steelt u niemand, met dat blok aan ‘t been; Graas nu zoover gij weide hebt”. Zooals men wel een paard in de weide met een ketting en slot bevestigt opdat het niet gestolen worde of wegloope.

Topics: regret, guilt, remedy, death, conscience

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
(…) Must I repent,
I cannot do it better than in gyves,
Desired more than constrained. To satisfy,
If of my freedom ’tis the main part, take
No stricter render of me than my all.
I know you are more clement than vile men,
Who of their broken debtors take a third,
A sixth, a tenth, letting them thrive again
On their abatement. I know you are more clement than vile men,
Who of their broken debtors take a third,
A sixth, a tenth, letting them thrive again
On their abatement: that’s not my desire:
For Imogen’s dear life take mine; and though
‘Tis not so dear, yet ’tis a life; you coin’d it:
‘Tween man and man they weigh not every stamp;
Though light, take pieces for the figure’s sake:
You rather mine, being yours: and so, great powers,
If you will take this audit, take this life,
And cancel these cold bonds. O Imogen!
I’ll speak to thee in silence.

DUTCH:
Mijn geweten,
Gij draagt meer kluisters dan mijn pols en enkels;
O, goden, moog’ mijn boete ‘t werktuig zijn,
Die kluisters te oop nen; dan, voor eeuwig Vrij!


Gyves=fetters
Render=A surrender, a giving up
Stricter=More rigorous
Stamp=Coin with the sovereign’s head impressed
Though light, take pieces…=It was common practice for forgers lighten the weight of coins in order to conserve material.
Take this audit=Accept this settlement of accounts
Clement=Disposed to kindness, mild

Compleat:
Gyves=Boeijen, kluisters
Constrained=Bedwongen, gedrongen, gepraamd
Strict=Gestreng
Clement=Goedertieren, zachtzinnig
Audit=Het nazien der Rekeningen

Topics: regret, guilt, remedy, conscience, debt/obligation

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
Kneel not to me.
The power that I have on you is to spare you;
The malice towards you to forgive you. Live
And deal with others better.
CYMBELINE
Nobly doomed.
We’ll learn our freeness of a son-in-law:
Pardon’s the word to all.

DUTCH:
Mijn schoonzoon doet mij zien, wat edel is;
Vergiffenis voor alien!


Proverb: To be able to harm and not to do it is noble
Doomed=Judged

Schmidt:
Malice=Malignity, disposition to injure others
Freeness=Generosity

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
To doom=Veroordelen, verwyzen, doemen
Doomed=Veroordeeld, verweezen.

Topics: life/experience, appearance, language, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN
O, blessèd that I might not! I chose an eagle
And did avoid a puttock.
CYMBELINE
Thou took’st a beggar, wouldst have made my throne
A seat for baseness.
IMOGEN
No, I rather added
A lustre to it.
CYMBELINE
O thou vile one!
IMOGEN
Sir,
It is your fault that I have loved Posthumus.
You bred him as my playfellow, and he is
A man worth any woman, overbuys me
Almost the sum he pays.

DUTCH:
Wèl mij, ik wachtte niet; ik koos een aad’laar,
En meed een gier.


Puttock=Kite, not a hawk worthy of training (a kite, buzzard or marsh harrier)
Overbuys=I am worth but a small fraction of what he gives for me
Baseness=Vileness, meanness
Take=Marry (take in marriage)

Compleat:
Puttock (buzzard)=Een buizard, zekere roofvogel
Baseness=Laagheid, lafhartigheid

Topics: marriage, value, order/society, status, love

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
O, for a horse with wings! Hear’st thou, Pisanio?
He is at Milford Haven. Read, and tell me
How far ’tis thither. If one of mean affairs
May plod it in a week, why may not I
Glide thither in a day? Then, true Pisanio,
Who long’st like me to see thy lord, who long’st—
O, let me bate—but not like me, yet long’st
But in a fainter kind—O, not like me,
For mine’s beyond beyond—say, and speak thick—
Love’s counsellor should fill the bores of hearing
To th’ smothering of the sense—how far it is
To this same blessèd Milford.

DUTCH:
O! een bevleugeld paard! — Pisanio, hoor!
Hij is in Milfordshaven; lees, en zeg me
Hoe ver dat is. Als iemand zonder haast
Het afreist in een week, zou ik dan niet
In éénen dag er komen ?


Mean affairs=Ordinary business
Bate=Deduct, abate (from what has been said)
Speak thick=Speak quickly, crowding one word on another (Also Henry IV Part 2)
Mine’s beyond beyond=Further than beyond
Bores of hearing=Ears

Compleat:
Mean=Het midden, de middelmaat; gering, slecht
To speak thick=Ras en verward spreeken
To bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afsyaan

Topics: business, status, haste

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
And often, to our comfort, shall we find
The sharded beetle in a safer hold
Than is the full-wing’d eagle. O, this life
Is nobler than attending for a check,
Richer than doing nothing for a bauble,
Prouder than rustling in unpaid-for silk:
Such gain the cap of him that makes ’em fine,
Yet keeps his book uncross’d: no life to ours.
GUIDERIUS (as Polydor)
Out of your proof you speak. We poor unfledged
Have never winged from view o’ th’ nest, nor know not
What air ’s from home. Haply this life is best
If quiet life be best, sweeter to you
That have a sharper known, well corresponding
With your stiff age; but unto us it is
A cell of ignorance, traveling abed,
A prison for a debtor that not dares
To stride a limit.

DUTCH:
BELARIUS
(…) O, dit leven
Is eed’ler dan als hoveling te dienen,
Waarvoor verwijten vaak het loon zijn; rijker
Dan dat men voor een handvol gouds zich laat
Omkoopen en toch niets doet; trotscher ook,
Dan dat men ruischt in onbetaalde zijde,
Waarvoor wie ‘t prachtkleed levert, buigt, en toch
De schuld niet schrapt: geen leven zooals ‘t onze.
GUIDERIUS
Gij spreekt uit uw ervaring; maar wij, armen,
Wij vlogen nooit van ‘t nest nog weg, en weten
Volstrekt nog niet, hoe elders wel de lucht is.
Dit leven kan het beste zijn, wanneer
De rust het hoogste goed is, en voor u,
Die harder, scherper leven hebt gekend,
Veel zoeter; ‘t strookt ook niet uw strammer leeftijd;


Attending=Dancing attendance
Check=Rebuke
Sharded=Having scaly wings
Gain the cap=Have someone (in this case, the tailor) doff their cap to them
Book uncrossed=Debts not struck out
Proof=Experience

Compleat:
Attendance=Opwachting, oppassing, behartiging; Een stoet van oppasssers, hofgezin, dienstbooden
To dance attendance=Lang te vergeefsch wagten
To cross out=Doorstreepen, doorhaalen
Proof (mark or testimony)=Getuigenis

Topics: age/experience, life, evidence, debt/obligation, authority

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
When as a lion’s whelp shall, to himself unknown,
without seeking find, and be embraced by a piece of
tender air; and when from a stately cedar shall be
lopped branches, which, being dead many years,
shall after revive, be jointed to the old stock and
freshly grow; then shall Posthumus end his miseries,
Britain be fortunate and flourish in peace and plenty.’
‘Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen
Tongue and brain not; either both or nothing;
Or senseless speaking or a speaking such
As sense cannot untie. Be what it is,
The action of my life is like it, which
I’ll keep, if but for sympathy.

DUTCH:
t Is nog een droom, of wel het zinn’loos kallen
Van hersenlooze onnooz’len; dit of niets;
Of zinnelooze taal, of taal waarvan
‘t Verstand den zin niet vat


Such stuff as madmen tongue=The nonsensical, irrational talk of madmen
Or=Either (as in Dutch ‘óf dit, of dat’)
Jointed=Grafted
Sympathy=Any conformity, correspondence, resemblance.

Compleat:
Sympathy (natural agreement of things)=Natuurlyke overeenstemming of trek der dingen

Topics: madness, nature, language, reason

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
Two beggars told me
I could not miss my way. Will poor folks lie,
That have afflictions on them, knowing ’tis
A punishment or trial? Yes. No wonder,
When rich ones scarce tell true. To lapse in fullness
Is sorer than to lie for need, and falsehood
Is worse in kings than beggars. My dear lord,
Thou art one o’ th’ false ones. Now I think on thee,
My hunger’s gone; but even before, I was
At point to sink for food. But what is this?
Here is a path to ’t. ’Tis some savage hold.
I were best not call; I dare not call. Yet famine,
Ere clean it o’erthrow nature, makes it valiant.
Plenty and peace breeds cowards; hardness ever
Of hardiness is mother.—Ho! Who’s here?
If anything that’s civil, speak; if savage,
Take or lend. Ho!—No answer? Then I’ll enter.
Best draw my sword; an if mine enemy
But fear the sword like me, he’ll scarcely look on ’t.

DUTCH:
Ja, weelde en vreê kweekt lafaards; ‘t hardste lot
Verhardt en staalt ons steeds


Proverb: Afflictions are sent us by God for our good (Will poor folks lie…)

Schmidt:
Trial=Test of virtue
To lapse in fullness=Fall from truth in a state of prosperity
Even before=Just before
Hardiness=Bravery

Compleat:
Trial (temptation)=Beproeving
Even=Even. Just now=Zo even
Hardiness=Onvertzaagdheid, stoutheid, koenheid
Hardiness of constitution=Hardheid van gesteltenis

Topics: adversity, proverbs and idioms, poverty and wealth, honesty

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: First Jailer
CONTEXT:
A heavy reckoning for you, sir. But the comfort
is, you shall be called to no more payments, fear
no more tavern bills, which are often the sadness
of parting as the procuring of mirth. You come in
faint for want of meat, depart reeling with too
much drink; sorry that you have paid too much,
and sorry that you are paid too much; purse and
brain both empty; the brain the heavier for being
too light; the purse too light, being drawn of heaviness:
of this contradiction you shall now be
quit. O, the charity of a penny cord! It sums up
thousands in a trice: you have no true debitor and
creditor but it; of what’s past, is, and to come,
the discharge: your neck, sir, is pen, book and
counters; so the acquittance follows.

DUTCH:
Hoofd en beurs
beide leeg, het hoofd des te zwaarder, naarmate het
lichter is, de beurs des te opgeruimder, naarmate zij
meer zwaarte verloren heeft.


Proverb: A heavy purse makes a light heart
Proverb: In a trice

Heavier=Sleepier with drink
Drawn=Emptied
Drawn of heaviness=Lighter, being emptied of coins
Paid too much=Punished by excess drinking
To quit=To set at liberty, to free, to deliver
Acquittance=Receipt in full

Compleat:
To quit (dispense with, excluse)=Bevryden, verschoonen, ontslaan
I quit you from it=Ik ontsla ‘er u van
Forbearance is no acquittance=Uitstellen is geen quytschelden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, intellect, excess, money, debt/obligation

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
PISANIO
O gracious lady,
Since I received command to do this business I have not slept one wink.
IMOGEN
Do’t, and to bed then
PISANIO
I’ll wake mine eye-balls out first.
IMOGEN
Wherefore then
Didst undertake it? Why hast thou abused
So many miles with a pretence? This place?

DUTCH:
O, eed’le vrouw,
Sinds ik bevel ontving dit werk te doen,
Sloot ik geen oog.

Modern usage: I haven’t slept a wink (not coined by Shakespeare. First recorded use in 14th century)
Wake mine eye-balls blind=Stay awake until I’m blind

Compleat:
The ball of the eye=De oogappel

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, authority, work, status, duty, debt/obligation

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
If you can make ’t apparent
That you have tasted her in bed, my hand
And ring is yours. If not, the foul opinion
You had of her pure honour gains or loses
Your sword or mine, or masterless leave both
To who shall find them.
IACHIMO
Sir, my circumstances,
Being so near the truth as I will make them,
Must first induce you to believe; whose strength
I will confirm with oath, which I doubt not
You’ll give me leave to spare when you shall find
You need it not.

DUTCH:
t Bericht, dat ik omstandig geven zal,
En dat den stempel van zijn waarheid draagt,
Zal tot geloof u dwingen


Question=Hold debate
Circumstances=Details, particulars, incidental proofs

Compleat:
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omstandigheden verhaalen

Topics: truth, honesty, manipulation, language

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
So man and man should be;
But clay and clay differs in dignity,
Whose dust is both alike. I am very sick.

DUTCH:
Menschen moesten ‘t zijn;
Maar stof en stof verschillen wel in rang,
Hoezeer hun asch gelijk zij.


Proverb: All are of the same dust

Compleat:
We are but dust and ashes=Wy zyn niet dan stof en asch

Topics: status, relationship, proverbs and idioms, life

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
You may wear her in title yours, but you
Know strange fowl light upon neighbouring ponds.
Your ring may be stolen too. So your brace of unprizable
Estimations, the one is but frail and the other casual.
A cunning thief or a that way accomplished courtier
Would hazard the winning both of first and last.

DUTCH:
Ook uw ring kan u gestolen worden;
en zoo is van uwe twee onwaardeerbare schatten de een
slechts zwak, de ander verliesbaar; een geslepen dief of
een in dit opzicht uitgeleerd hoveling kunnen het wagen
u zoowel den een’ als den anderen te ontfutselen.


Schmidt:
In title=As in title to an estate
So=In such a manner, thus
Unprizable=Invaluable, inestimable
Casual=Accidental, by chance
Frail=Weak, in a physical as well as moral sense
Hazard=To venture, to risk, take a bet on

Compleat:
Title=Recht, eisch
He has no good title to it=Hy heeft geen goed recht daar toe
Title=Papieren, geschriften om zyn recht to bewyzen
Hazard=Waagen, aventuuren, in de waagschaal stellen
Casual=Gevallig, toevallig
Frail=Bros

Topics: loyalty, betrayal, value, risk

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
So sick I am not, yet I am not well;
But not so citizen a wanton as
To seem to die ere sick. So please you, leave me.
Stick to your journal course. The breach of custom
Is breach of all. I am ill, but your being by me
Cannot amend me. Society is no comfort
To one not sociable. I am not very sick,
Since I can reason of it. Pray you trust me here—
I’ll rob none but myself—and let me die,
Stealing so poorly.

DUTCH:
Gezelschap helpt niet wie niet gezellig is;

Journal course=Daily routine
Citizen a wanton=City-bred (soft) “wanton” spoilt child or indulged and self-indulgent youth
Reason=Speak of it

Compleat:
Journal=Dag-register, dag-verhaal
Wanton=Onrein, vuil, ontuchtig
To grow wanton with too much prosperity=In voorspoed weeldrig worden

Topics: wellbeing, emotion and mood, custom, life

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
That such a crafty devil as is his mother
Should yield the world this ass! A woman that
Bears all down with her brain, and this her son
Cannot take two from twenty, for his heart,
And leave eighteen. Alas, poor princess,
Thou divine Imogen, what thou endur’st,
Betwixt a father by thy step-dame governed,
A mother hourly coining plots, a wooer
More hateful than the foul expulsion is
Of thy dear husband, than that horrid act
Of the divorce he’d make! The heavens hold firm
The walls of thy dear honour, keep unshaked
That temple, thy fair mind, that thou mayst stand
T’ enjoy thy banished lord and this great land.

DUTCH:
Dat zulk een sluwe duivelin, zijn moeder,
Der wereld zulk een ezel schonk! Een vrouw,
Die met haar slimheid alles dwingt; en hij
Trekt, schoon ‘t den hals hem kostte, twee van twintig
Niet af, en houdt er achttien


Crafty=Cunning, devious
To coin=To fabricate, in a good as well as bad sense: “coining plots”
Step-dame=Stepmother
Expulsion=A driving away, banishment
Stand=To remain upright, not to fall, not to be lost, not to perish

Compleat:
Crafty=Loos, listig, schalk, doortrapt, leep
To coin (new words)=Smeeden, verzinnen

Topics: marriage, intellect, relationship, plans/intentions

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
You, Polydor, have proved best woodman and
Are master of the feast. Cadwal and I
Will play the cook and servant; ’tis our match.
The sweat of industry would dry and die
But for the end it works to. Come, our stomachs
Will make what’s homely savoury. Weariness
Can snore upon the flint when resty sloth
Finds the down pillow hard. Now peace be here,
Poor house, that keep’st thyself.

DUTCH:
Het loon verzoet den arbeid; zonder dat
Zou ‘t vuur allicht verdooven


Woodman=Hunter
Match=Compact
Resty is an obsolete form of restive (Century Dictionary: “By transition through the sense ‘impatient under restraint,’ and partly by confusion with ‘restless,’ the word has taken in
present use the additional sense ‘restless.'”)
Onions defines restive as inactive, inert and sluggish (rusty).
Schmidt explains resty sloth as “stiff with too much rest”, comparing “resty-stiff” in Edward III.

Compleat:
Wood-men=Oppassers in des Konings bosschaagie, boomsnoeijers
Match (bargain)=Koop, onderhandeling, overeenstemming
Restive/Resty (froward, stubborn)=Stug, koppig
A resty horse=Een paerd dat niet voort wil of zich niet wil laaten regeeren

Topics: money, honesty, poverty and wealth, work, satisfaction

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
GUIDERIUS
Why, worthy father, what have we to lose
But that he swore to take, our lives? The law
Protects not us. Then why should we be tender
To let an arrogant piece of flesh threat us,
Play judge and executioner all himself,
For we do fear the law? What company
Discover you abroad?
BELARIUS
No single soul
Can we set eye on, but in all safe reason
He must have some attendants. Though his humour
Was nothing but mutation—ay, and that
From one bad thing to worse—not frenzy,
Not absolute madness could so far have raved
To bring him here alone. Although perhaps
It may be heard at court that such as we
Cave here, hunt here, are outlaws, and in time
May make some stronger head, the which he
hearing—
As it is like him—might break out and swear
He’d fetch us in, yet is ’t not probable
To come alone, either he so undertaking
Or they so suffering. Then on good ground we fear,
If we do fear this body hath a tail
More perilous than the head.

DUTCH:
k Vrees met grond,
Dat deze romp nog wel een nasleep heeft,
Gevaarlijker dan ‘t hoofd.


Proverb: To go from bad to worse

For (we do fear)=Because
Humour=Disposition
Mutation=Change (as an effect of inconsistency)
Stronger head=Gather strength
Fetch us in=Capture us
Tender=Delicate, in a physical and moral sense: easily impressed

Compleat:
Humour (or disposition of the mind)=Humeur, gemoeds gesteldheid
Mutation=Verandering, verwisseling
To draw to a head=Zich tot dragt zetten, de verhaaalde zaaken in een trekken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, law/legal, life, flaw/fault

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
Prithee, fair youth,
Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds
By this rude place we live in. Well encountered!
’Tis almost night; you shall have better cheer
Ere you depart, and thanks to stay and eat it.—
Boys, bid him welcome

DUTCH:
Acht ons geen lomperds; schat ons zacht gemoed
Niet naar de woeste woning


Churl=Peasant, rude and ill-bred fellow
To measure=To judge

Compleat:
Churl=Een plompe boer; een vrek
Churlish=Woest, boersch, onbeschoft
To measure a thing by one’s own profit=Een zaak schatten naar het voordeel dat men ‘er van trekt
To measure other peoples corn by one’s own bushel=Een ander by zich zelven afmeeten

Topics: civility, order/society, appearance, value, judgment, poverty and wealth

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Giuderius
CONTEXT:
GUIDERIUS
This Cloten was a fool, an empty purse;
There was no money in ’t. Not Hercules
Could have knocked out his brains, for he had none.
Yet I not doing this, the fool had borne
My head as I do his.
BELARIUS
What hast thou done?
GUIDERIUS
I am perfect what: cut off one Cloten’s head,
Son to the Queen, after his own report,
Who called me traitor mountaineer, and swore
With his own single hand he’d take us in,
Displace our heads where, thank the gods, they grow,
And set them on Lud’s Town.

DUTCH:
Deez’ Cloten was een gek, een leêge beurs,
Geen geld er in; geen Hercules kon hem
De hersens inslaan


Take in=Subdue
I am perfect, what=I am well-informed, well assured, certain what
Lud’s Town=London

Compleat:
To be perfect in a thing=Iets wel van buiten kennen, in zyn hoofd hebben.

Topics: insult, intellect

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
Corrupters of my faith, you shall no more
Be stomachers to my heart. Thus may poor fools
Believe false teachers. Though those that are betrayed
Do feel the treason sharply, yet the traitor
Stands in worse case of woe. And thou, Posthumus,
That didst set up
My disobedience ’gainst the King my father
And make me put into contempt the suits
Of princely fellows, shalt hereafter find
It is no act of common passage, but
A strain of rareness: and I grieve myself
To think, when thou shalt be disedged by her
That now thou tirest on, how thy memory
Will then be panged by me.—Prithee, dispatch.
The lamb entreats the butcher. Where’s thy knife?
Thou art too slow to do thy master’s bidding
When I desire it too.

DUTCH:
Van hier, van hier,
Die mijn geloof vervalscht hebt! Weg! niet langer
Dekt gij mij ‘t hart! O, arme dwazen schenken
Geloof aan valsche leeraars. Doch hoe diep
‘t Verraad ook de bedroog’nen griev’, toch treft
Hem, die verraadt, veel erger wee.


Disedged=Blunted, with the edge taken off (Cf. Hamlet 3.2, “It would cost you a groaning to take off my edge”)
False teachers=Teachers of heresy

Onions:
Stomacher=Ornamental covering for the breast worn by women
To tire=To prey or feed ravenously “upon”, rend prey to pieces
Pang=To afflict with great pain, to torment

Compleat:
To blunt=Stomp maaken, verstompen
A false prophet=Een valsch Propheet
A false (erroneous) opinion=Een dwaalend gevoelen

Topics: corruption, manipulation, betrayal, order/society, memory, consequences

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Guiderius
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
Thou art a robber,
A lawbreaker, a villain. Yield thee, thief.
GUIDERIUS, [as Polydor]To who? To thee? What art thou? Have not I
An arm as big as thine? A heart as big?
Thy words, I grant, are bigger, for I wear not
My dagger in my mouth. Say what thou art,
Why I should yield to thee.
CLOTEN
Thou villain base,
Know’st me not by my clothes?

DUTCH:
Is niet mijn arm
Zoo sterk als de uwe, niet mijn hart zoo sterk?
In woorden kunt gij sterker zijn; ik draag
Mijn dolk niet in mijn mond.


Proverb: The tailor makes the man

“My dagger is my mouth” ref. Solimon and Perseda, “I fight not with my tongue; this (pointing to sword) is my oratrix”
Base= Of low station, of mean account, i.e. base metal

Compleat:
A base fellow=Een slechte vent, oolyke boef
Base=Ondergeschikt

Topics: language, learning/education, order/society, status, appearance, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
What shall I need to draw my sword? the paper
Hath cut her throat already. No, ’tis slander,
Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue
Outvenoms all the worms of Nile, whose breath
Rides on the posting winds and doth belie
All corners of the world: kings, queens and states,
Maids, matrons, nay, the secrets of the grave
This viperous slander enters. What cheer, madam?

DUTCH:
Wat is hier zwaard van noode ? Reeds de brief
Heeft haar de keel doorpriemd. — Neen, neen, ‘t is laster;
Diens vlijm is scherper dan het zwaard; zijn tand
Is giftiger dan ‘t giftigst Nijlgebroed.

Slander is sharper than the sword (see Winter’s Tale, 2.3, and Measure for Measure, 3.2)
Worms=Serpents
Outvenom=Is more venomous than
Posting=Swift, fleet
Belie=Misrepresent

Compleat:
Slander=Laster, lasterkladde
In post-haste=Met groote spoed, te post
Belie (Bely)=Beliegen; lasteren
His actions bely his words=Zyn bedryf logenstraft zyne woorden; hy spreekt zich zelf tegen door zyn gedrag

Topics: language, law/legal, abuse, truth

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
Two beggars told me
I could not miss my way. Will poor folks lie,
That have afflictions on them, knowing ’tis
A punishment or trial? Yes. No wonder,
When rich ones scarce tell true. To lapse in fullness
Is sorer than to lie for need, and falsehood
Is worse in kings than beggars. My dear lord,
Thou art one o’ th’ false ones. Now I think on thee,
My hunger’s gone; but even before, I was
At point to sink for food. But what is this?
Here is a path to ’t. ’Tis some savage hold.
I were best not call; I dare not call. Yet famine,
Ere clean it o’erthrow nature, makes it valiant.
Plenty and peace breeds cowards; hardness ever
Of hardiness is mother.—Ho! Who’s here?
If anything that’s civil, speak; if savage,
Take or lend. Ho!—No answer? Then I’ll enter.
Best draw my sword; an if mine enemy
But fear the sword like me, he’ll scarcely look on ’t.

DUTCH:
Liegen zij,
Die armoe, nooddruft lijden, ‘t weten, dat
De ellende een straf of een beproeving is?
Ach ja, geen wonder; want de rijken zelfs
Verdraaien meest de waarheid; en in weelde
Te struik’len is veel erger kwaad, dan slechts
Uit nood te liegen; valschheid is in vorsten
Veel boozer dan in beed’laars


Proverb: Afflictions are sent us by God for our good (Will poor folks lie…)

Schmidt:
Trial=Test of virtue
To lapse in fullness=Fall from truth in a state of prosperity
Even before=Just before
Hardiness=Bravery

Compleat:
Trial (temptation)=Beproeving
Even=Even. Just now=Zo even
Hardiness=Onvertzaagdheid, stoutheid, koenheid
Hardiness of constitution=Hardheid van gesteltenis

Topics: integrity, honesty, status, proverbs and idioms,

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
Hear patiently my purpose. I’ll disrobe me
Of these Italian weeds and suit myself
As does a Briton peasant. So I’ll fight
Against the part I come with; so I’ll die
For thee, O Imogen, even for whom my life
Is every breath a death. And thus, unknown,
Pitied nor hated, to the face of peril
Myself I’ll dedicate. Let me make men know
More valour in me than my habits show.
Gods, put the strength o’ th’ Leonati in me.
To shame the guise o’ th’ world, I will begin
The fashion: less without and more within.

DUTCH:
Men zie meer heldenmoed
Van mij, dan mijn gewaad vermoeden doet.
Schenkt, goden, mij de kracht der Leonaten!
O, schaam u, wereld! thans wil ik beginnen,
Deez’ dracht: van buiten arm en rijk van binnen.


Proverb: Appearances are deceitful

Schmidt:
Weeds=Garment
Purpose=Something spoken of or to be done, matter, question, subject

Compleat:
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad

Topics: appearance, deceit, fashion/trends

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
I embrace these conditions. Let us have
articles betwixt us. Only thus far you shall answer:
if you make your voyage upon her and give me directly
to understand you have prevailed, I am no
further your enemy; she is not worth our debate.
If she remain unseduced, you not making it appear
otherwise, for your ill opinion and th’ assault you
have made to her chastity, you shall answer me
with your sword.
IACHIMO
Your hand; a covenant.
We will have these things set down by lawful counsel,
and straight away for Britain, lest the bargain
should catch cold and starve. I will fetch my gold
and have our two wagers recorded.

DUTCH:
Uwe hand; ‘t is afgesproken. Wij zullen dit alles in
wettelijken vorm laten opschrijven; en dan fluks naar
Brittannië, opdat de onderneming niet verkleumt en
sterft;


Debate=Quarrel
Starve=Sterve (perish from the cold)
Make your voyage=Press home your advantage (vauntage, vantage) (Collier)

Compleat:
Vantage=Toegift, toemaat, overmaat, overwigt
To starve with hunger or cold=Van honger of koude sterven
To lay a wager=Wedden, een wedspel aan gaan
Wager of law=Aanbieding van te beedigen, dat men zynen eyscher niets schuldig is

Topics: delay, urgency, contract

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
You, Polydor, have proved best woodman and
Are master of the feast. Cadwal and I
Will play the cook and servant; ’tis our match.
The sweat of industry would dry and die
But for the end it works to. Come, our stomachs
Will make what’s homely savoury. Weariness
Can snore upon the flint when resty sloth
Finds the down pillow hard. Now peace be here,
Poor house, that keep’st thyself.

DUTCH:
Komt, de honger
Kruide ons eenvoudig maal; vermoeidheid snurkt
Gerust op harde rots, en loome luiheid
Vindt donzen bedden hard.


Woodman=Hunter
Match=Compact
Resty is an obsolete form of restive (Century Dictionary: “By transition through the sense ‘impatient under restraint,’ and partly by confusion with ‘restless,’ the word has taken in present use the additional sense ‘restless.'”)
Onions defines restive as inactive, inert and sluggish (rusty).
Schmidt explains resty sloth as “stiff with too much rest”, comparing “resty-stiff” in Edward III.

Compleat:
Wood-men=Oppassers in des Konings bosschaagie, boomsnoeijers
Match (bargain)=Koop, onderhandeling, overeenstemming
Restive/Resty (froward, stubborn)=Stug, koppig
A resty horse=Een paerd dat niet voort wil of zich niet wil laaten regeeren

Topics: contract, work, satisfaction

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Queen
CONTEXT:
Weeps she still, say’st thou? Dost thou think in time
She will not quench and let instructions enter
Where folly now possesses? Do thou work:
When thou shalt bring me word she loves my son,
I’ll tell thee on the instant thou art then
As great as is thy master, greater, for
His fortunes all lie speechless and his name
Is at last gasp: return he cannot, nor
Continue where he is: to shift his being
Is to exchange one misery with another,
And every day that comes comes to decay
A day’s work in him. What shalt thou expect,
To be depender on a thing that leans,
Who cannot be new built, nor has no friends,
So much as but to prop him?

DUTCH:
Want zijn geluk ligt spraak’loos neer, zijn naam
Is stervende. Hij kan niet wederkeeren,
Niet blijven waar hij is.


Quench=Grow cool, lose zeal
Shift his being=Relocate, change abode
Leans=Inclining, about to fall
Prop=Support, prop up

Compleat:
Quench=Blusschen, uytblusschen, lesschen, dempen
To lean=Leunen, leenen, steunen
Prop=Een stut, steun. To prop=Ondersteunen, stutten

Topics: sorrow, intellect, remedy, fate/fortune, achievement

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
Was there ever man had such luck? When I kissed the jack, upon an upcast to be hit away? I had a hundred pound on ’t. And then a whoreson jackanapes must take me up for swearing, as if I borrowed mine oaths of him and might not spend them at my pleasure.
FIRST LORD
What got he by that? You have broke his pate with your bowl.
SECOND LORD
If his wit had been like him that broke it, it would have run all out.
CLOTEN
When a gentleman is disposed to swear, it is not for any standers-by to curtail his oaths, ha?
SECOND LORD
No, my lord, (aside) nor crop the ears of them.

DUTCH:
Als een man van rang verkiest te vloeken, behoeft
niemand het hart te hebben zijn vloeken te kortstaarten;
hè?


Proverb: May we not do with our own what we list?

Pate=The head; used in contempt or in ridicule
Curtail=Curtal, having a docked tail (followed by ‘crop the ears’)
Upcast=A throw at the game of bowls
Take up=Rebuke

Kissed the jack … away=The jack being the small ball in bowls, the closest to the jack at the end of the game wins. If the bowl ends up close to it, it is ‘kissing the jack’ (a great advantage). Cloten’s bowl is then hit away by the ‘upcast’ (throw of an opponent).

Compleat:
Jack (in bowling)=Honk, in de klosbaan
To take one up sharply (check, reprimand)=Iemand scherpelyk berispen
Pate=De kop, het hoofd
He threatened to break his pate=Hy dreigde hem den kop in te slaan
Burgersdijk notes:
Had ooit een mensch zulk een geluk?
Cloten spreekt van het geluk, dat zijn tegenspeler gehad heeft.

Topics: language, civility, patience, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
When shall I hear all through?
This fierce abridgement
Hath to it circumstantial branches which
Distinction should be rich in. Where, how lived you?
And when came you to serve our Roman captive?
How parted with your brothers ? How first met them?
Why fled you from the court? And whither? These,
And your three motives to the battle, with
I know not how much more, should be demanded,
And all the other by-dependences
From chance to chance; but nor the time nor place
Will serve our long interrogatories. See,
Posthumus anchors upon Imogen;
And she, like harmless lightning, throws her eye
On him, her brothers, me, her master, hitting
Each object with a joy; the counterchange
Is severally in all. Let’s quit this ground,
And smoke the temple with our sacrifices.
Thou art my brother, so we’ll hold thee ever.

DUTCH:
O, wond’re neiging!
Wanneer verneem ik alles nog? Deez’ schets,
Zoo haastig, duidt het overrijke takwerk
Nauw aan, dat ik nog volgen, kennen moet.
Waar leefdet gij, en hoe?


Fierce=Savagely cut (abstract)
Abridgement=Summary, abstract
Circumstantial branches which distinction should be rich in=Providing ample narrative for consideration of parts and details
Your three motives=The motives of you three
By-dependences=Side issues
Interrogatories [Intergatories]=Examination, question
Chance to chance=Describing every event

Schmidt:
Counterchange=Reciprocation
Severally=Every one in his particular way and manner
Smoke=Perfume with smoke

Topics: intellect, nature, justification, reason, reply

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
You must forget to be a woman; change
Command into obedience, fear and niceness—
The handmaids of all women, or, more truly,
Woman it pretty self—into a waggish courage,
Ready in gibes, quick-answered, saucy, and
As quarrellous as the weasel. Nay, you must
Forget that rarest treasure of your cheek,
Exposing it—but O, the harder heart!
Alack, no remedy—to the greedy touch
Of common-kissing Titan, and forget
Your laboursome and dainty trims, wherein
You made great Juno angry.

DUTCH:
Vergeet, dat gij een vrouw zijt; ruil ‘t gebieden.
Voor dienstbaarheid, de schuchterheid en kieschheid, —
Der vrouwen gezellinnen, ja veeleer,
Haar lieflijk wezen zelf, — voor dart’len moed;
Wees spotziek, onbeschaamd, vlug met de tong,
En twistziek als een wezel;


Niceness=Delicacy, daintiness, coyness
Quarrellous as the weasel. Weasels were kept for killing vermin. Cf. Henry IV Part 1: “A weasel hath not such a deal of spleen as you are toss’d with.”
Laboursome=Elaborate, requiring much pains and industry (also laboursome petition, Hamlet)
Common-kissing=Kissing anybody and anything
Trims=Ornamental dress

Compleat:
To gibe=Boerten, gekscheeren
Quarrelsome=Krakeelachtig, twistig, twistgierig, kyfachtig
Laboursom=Lastig, verdrdietig, verveelend
Niceness=Viezigheid, keurigheid

Burgersdijk notes:
Den fellen straler van omhoog. In het oorspronkelijke wordt gesproken van the greedg touch of common-kissing Titan. De zonnegod wordt meermalen Titan genoemd.

Topics: appearance, intellect, independence, language, reply

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