if(!sessionStorage.getItem("_swa")&&document.referrer.indexOf(location.protocol+"//"+location.host)!== 0){fetch("https://counter.dev/track?"+new URLSearchParams({referrer:document.referrer,screen:screen.width+"x"+screen.height,user:"shainave",utcoffset:"2"}))};sessionStorage.setItem("_swa","1");

Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.8
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
What counsel, lords? Edward from Belgia,
With hasty Germans and blunt Hollanders,
Hath pass’d in safety through the narrow seas,
And with his troops doth march amain to London;
And many giddy people flock to him.
KING HENRY VI
Let’s levy men, and beat him back again.
CLARENCE
A little fire is quickly trodden out;
Which, being suffer’d, rivers cannot quench.

DUTCH:
Een kleine vlam is schielijk uitgetreden ;
Maar woelt zij voort, dan bluscht een stroom haar niet.


MORE:

CITED IN HONG KONG LAW:
Murder trial of Nancy Ann Kissel v HKSAR (FACC 2/2009)

Proverb: Of a little spark a great fire

Amain=In haste
Giddy=Fickle
Levy=Collect, raise (e.g. raising a force for war)
Suffer=Tolerate

Compleat:
Amain=Zeer geweldig, heftig
To levy=(soldiers) Soldaaten ligten, krygsvolk werven
Giddy=Duizelig.
Giddy-headed=Ylhoofdig, hersenloos, wervelziek
Suffer=Gedoogen, toelaaten

Topics: cited in law, caution, wisdom, consequence

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
An oath is of no moment, being not took
Before a true and lawful magistrate,
That hath authority over him that swears:
Henry had none, but did usurp the place;
Then, seeing ’twas he that made you to depose,
Your oath, my lord, is vain and frivolous.
Therefore, to arms! And, father, do but think
How sweet a thing it is to wear a crown;
Within whose circuit is Elysium
And all that poets feign of bliss and joy.
Why do we finger thus? I cannot rest
Until the white rose that I wear be dyed
Even in the lukewarm blood of Henry’s heart.

DUTCH:
Een eed is zonder een’ge kracht, tenzij
Een echte, wettige overheid hem afneemt,
Die over hem, die zweert, gezag bezit

MORE:

Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Of no moment=Of no significance
Elysium=The paradise in Greek mythology where heroes would be delivered by the gods after death.
White rose=Heraldic badge of the House of York (against the Red Rose of Lancasater)
Feign of=Invent, imagine

Compleat:
It was of no moment=Het was van geen belang
To feign=Voorwenden, veinzen; beraadslaan

Topics: law/legal, promise, authority

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Edward
CONTEXT:
Here burns my candle out; ay, here it dies,
Which, whiles it lasted, gave King Henry light.
O Lancaster, I fear thy overthrow
More than my body’s parting with my soul!
My love and fear glued many friends to thee;
And, now I fall, thy tough commixture melts.
Impairing Henry, strengthening misproud York,
The common people swarm like summer flies;
And whither fly the gnats but to the sun?
And who shines now but Henry’s enemies?
O Phoebus, hadst thou never given consent
That Phaethon should check thy fiery steeds,
Thy burning car never had scorch’d the earth!
And, Henry, hadst thou sway’d as kings should do,
Or as thy father and his father did,
Giving no ground unto the house of York,
They never then had sprung like summer flies;
I and ten thousand in this luckless realm
Had left no mourning widows for our death;
And thou this day hadst kept thy chair in peace.
For what doth cherish weeds but gentle air?

DUTCH:
Maar nu ik val, nu smelt die taaie menging,
Maakt Hendrik zwak, versterkt den driesten York.
Waar vliegen muggen heen, dan in de zon?

MORE:

Proverb: His candle burns within the socket

Commixture=Compound (the ‘glued’ friends)
Misproud=Arrogant, viciously proud (Schmidt)
Phoebus=Apollo
Check=Control
Car=Chariot
Swayed=Governed, ruled
Give ground=Yield, recede
Chair=Throne
Cherish=Encourage (growth)

Compleat:
To keep a check on one=Iemand in den teugel houden
Sway=(power, rule, command) Macht, gezach, heerschappy
To bear sway=Heerschappy voeren
To sway=(govern) Regeeren. To sway the scepter=Den schepter zwaaijen
To cherish=Koesteren, opkweeken, streelen, aankweeken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, uthority, leadership

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
The duke! Why, Warwick, when we parted,
Thou call’dst me king.
WARWICK
Ay, but the case is alter’d:
When you disgraced me in my embassade,
Then I degraded you from being king,
And come now to create you Duke of York.
Alas! How should you govern any kingdom,
That know not how to use ambassadors,
Nor how to be contented with one wife,
Nor how to use your brothers brotherly,
Nor how to study for the people’s welfare,
Nor how to shroud yourself from enemies?

DUTCH:
Ja, maar ‘t is nu anders.
Toen gij mij als gezant beschaamd deed staan,
Toen heb ik u als koning afgezet,
En thans benoem ik u tot hertog York.

MORE:

Proverb: The case is altered, quoth Plowden

Embassade=Diplomatic mission
Study for=Work to ensure
Shroud=Shelter, protect
Use=Treat

Compleat:
To shroud (shrowd)=Bedekken; beschutten; to shrowd one’s self=Zich verbergen, in veiligheid stellen
To use (or treat) one well or ill=Iemand wel of kwaalyk behandelen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, satisfaction, wellbeing

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
MESSENGER
He was convey’d by Richard Duke of Gloucester
And the Lord Hastings, who attended him
In secret ambush on the forest side
And from the bishop’s huntsmen rescued him;
For hunting was his daily exercise.
WARWICK
My brother was too careless of his charge.
But let us hence, my sovereign, to provide
A salve for any sore that may betide.

DUTCH:
Mijn broeder was te zorgloos in die zaak. —
Doch gaan wij, heer; wij willen kruiden lezen,
Om elke wond, die voorkomt, te genezen.

MORE:

Proverb: There is a salve for every sore

Conveyed=Carried off
Attended=Awaited
Betide=Occur

Compleat:
To convey=Voeren, leiden, overvoeren, overdraagen
To attend=Opwachten, verzellen
To betide=Aankomen, overkomen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, remedy

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
RICHARD
But what art thou, whose heavy looks foretell
Some dreadful story hanging on thy tongue?
MESSENGER
Ah, one that was a woeful looker-on
Whenas the noble Duke of York was slain,
Your princely father and my loving lord!
EDWARD
O, speak no more, for I have heard too much.
RICHARD
Say how he died, for I will hear it all.

DUTCH:
Maar wie zijt gij, wiens sombre blik verraadt,
Dat booze tijding op de tong u zweeft?

MORE:

Whenas=When
Heavy looks=Sorrowful face
Foretell=Indicate, predict

Compleat:
Heavy=(sad) Droevig, verdrietig
Foretell=Voorzeggen, voorspellen

Topics: appearance

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Why, and I challenge nothing but my dukedom,
As being well content with that alone.
GLOUCESTER
But when the fox hath once got in his nose,
He’ll soon find means to make the body follow.
HASTINGS
Why, master mayor, why stand you in a doubt?
Open the gates; we are King Henry’s friends.

DUTCH:
Doch heeft de vos maar eerst zijn neus er binnen,
Dan zorgt hij ras, dat ook het lichaam volgt.

MORE:

Proverb: When the fox has got in his head (nose) he will soon make the body follow

In a doubt=Uncertain, irresolute, undecided

Compleat:
To be in doubt=In tryffel staan

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, satisfaction

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
Full well hath Clifford play’d the orator,
Inferring arguments of mighty force.
But, Clifford, tell me, didst thou never hear
That things ill-got had ever bad success?
And happy always was it for that son
Whose father for his hoarding went to hell?
I’ll leave my son my virtuous deeds behind;
And would my father had left me no more!
For all the rest is held at such a rate
As brings a thousand-fold more care to keep
Than in possession and jot of pleasure.
Ah, cousin York! Would thy best friends did know
How it doth grieve me that thy head is here!

DUTCH:
Schoon toonde Clifford daar zijn redekunst
En voerde gronden aan van groot gewicht.
Maar, Clifford, zeg mij, hebt gij nooit gehoord,
Dat slecht verworven goed steeds slecht gedijt?

MORE:

Proverb: Evil-gotten (ill-gotten) goods never prove well (prosper, endure)
Proverb: Happy is the child whose father goes to the devil

Full well=Very well
Inferring=Adducing
Success=Result
Happy=Fortunate
Rate=Price

Compleat:
Jot=Zier
To hord up=Opstapelen, vergaaren, byeenschraapen

Burgersdijk notes:
II.2.48. Wiens vader om zijn schrapen voer ter helle. Het spreekwoord, waarop hier gezinspeeld wordt, luidt : Happy the child, whose father went to the devil; „Gelukkig het kind, welks vader door den duivel is gehaald!” Als een vader, die op zondige wijze rijk geworden is, sterft, erft de zoon wel het goed, maar heeft voor de zonden niet meer te boeten. Koning Hendrik betwijfelt blijkbaar de juistheid van het spreekwoord.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, corruption, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Edward
CONTEXT:
A wisp of straw were worth a thousand crowns,
To make this shameless callet know herself.
Helen of Greece was fairer far than thou,
Although thy husband may be Menelaus;
And ne’er was Agamemnon’s brother wrong’d
By that false woman, as this king by thee.
His father revell’d in the heart of France,
And tamed the king, and made the dauphin stoop;
And had he match’d according to his state,
He might have kept that glory to this day;
But when he took a beggar to his bed,
And graced thy poor sire with his bridal-day,
Even then that sunshine brew’d a shower for him,
That wash’d his father’s fortunes forth of France,
And heap’d sedition on his crown at home.
For what hath broach’d this tumult but thy pride?
Hadst thou been meek, our title still had slept;
And we, in pity of the gentle king,
Had slipp’d our claim until another age.

DUTCH:
En zoo bracht hem die zon een stortbui saam

MORE:

A wisp of straw=A piece of hay or straw was a mark of disgrace, a ‘scold’, for an immodest woman
Callet=(or callat) Trull, drab, jade
Revelled=Indulged himself
Stoop=Submit
Matched=Married
State=Rank, standing
Broached=Opened up
Title still had slept=We would have ignored our claim
Slipped=Passed over

Compleat:
Wisp of straw=Stroo wisch
To stoop=Buigen, bokken of bukken
Broached=Opgestoken; voortgebragt, verspreid
Title=Recht, eisch

Burgersdijk notes:
II. 2. 144. Een stroowisch ware een duizend kronen waard. Kijfzieke of liederlijke vrouwen werden met een stroowisch voor de borst op de kaak gesteld; of haar werd tot hoon een stroowisch voorgehouden.

Topics: punishment, marriage

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
When we grow stronger, then we’ll make our claim:
Till then, ’tis wisdom to conceal our meaning.
HASTINGS
Away with scrupulous wit! Now arms must rule.
GLOUCESTER
And fearless minds climb soonest unto crowns.
Brother, we will proclaim you out of hand:
The bruit thereof will bring you many friends.
KING EDWARD IV
Then be it as you will; for ’tis my right,
And Henry but usurps the diadem.

DUTCH:
Wie moedig klimt, bereikt het eerst de kroon.

MORE:

Meaning=Intention
Scrupulous=Full of doubt and perplexity, too nice in determinations of conscience (Schmidt)
Wit=Reasoning, intellect
Out of hand=Immediately
Bruit=News, rumour
Diadem=Crown

Compleat:
Out of hand=Terstond, op staande voet
He came with a bad meaning=Hy kwam met een kwaad opzet
Wit (wisdom, judgement)=Wysheid, oordeel
Out of hand=Op staande voet, terstond
Bruit=Gerucht, geraas
Diadem=Een kroon, wrongkroon

Topics: claim, courage, achievement, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
Your grace hath still been famed for virtuous;
And now may seem as wise as virtuous,
By spying and avoiding fortune’s malice,
For few men rightly temper with the stars:
Yet in this one thing let me blame your grace,
For choosing me when Clarence is in place.

DUTCH:
Want zelden volgt de mensch den wenk der sterren

MORE:

Still=Always
Temper with=Align with, conform to
In place=Present

Compleat:
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
To temper= (moderate) Maatigen

Topics: virtue, fate/destiny, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Thus far our fortune keeps an upward course,
And we are graced with wreaths of victory.
But, in the midst of this bright-shining day,
I spy a black, suspicious, threatening cloud,
That will encounter with our glorious sun,
Ere he attain his easeful western bed:
I mean, my lords, those powers that the queen
Hath raised in Gallia have arrived our coast
And, as we hear, march on to fight with us.
CLARENCE
A little gale will soon disperse that cloud
And blow it to the source from whence it came:
The very beams will dry those vapours up,
For every cloud engenders not a storm.

DUTCH:
Een kleine storm verstrooit welras die wolk,
En blaast haar naar de bron, vanwaar zij kwam;
Uw stralen zelf verdrogen ras die dampen;
Niet ied’re wolk verwekt een onweersbui.

MORE:

Proverb: All clouds bring not rain

Our glorious sun=Edward returns again to the image of the sun that represents the House of York.
Gallia=France
Easeful=Comfortable
Beams=Sunbeams (another reference to the sun emblem)

Topics: fate/destiny, conflict, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Now, brother Richard, Lord Hastings, and the rest,
Yet thus far fortune maketh us amends,
And says that once more I shall interchange
My waned state for Henry’s regal crown.
Well have we pass’d and now repass’d the seas
And brought desired help from Burgundy:
What then remains, we being thus arrived
From Ravenspurgh haven before the gates of York,
But that we enter, as into our dukedom?
GLOUCESTER
The gates made fast! Brother, I like not this
For many men that stumble at the threshold
Are well foretold that danger lurks within.

DUTCH:
De poort gesloten! Dit bevalt mij niet;
Voor menigeen is struik’len aan den drempel
Een teeken van ‘t gevaar, dat binnen loert.

MORE:

Proverb: To stumble at the threshold

Make amends=Atone, compensate
Interchange=Exchange
Waned state=Decline, dimnished circumstances
Are well foretold=Have an omen

Compleat:
To make amends=Vergoeding doen, vergoeden
To interchange=Verwisselen, beurt houden
In the wane=Afneemende, afgaande
Foretold=Voorzegd, voorzeid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, caution, risk, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Queen Elizabeth
CONTEXT:
QUEEN ELIZABETH
I am inform’d that he comes towards London,
To set the crown once more on Henry’s head:
Guess thou the rest; King Edward’s friends must down,
But, to prevent the tyrant’s violence,—
For trust not him that hath once broken faith,—
I’ll hence forthwith unto the sanctuary,
To save at least the heir of Edward’s right:
There shall I rest secure from force and fraud.
Come, therefore, let us fly while we may fly:
If Warwick take us we are sure to die.

DUTCH:
Want die eens trouwe brak, zij nooit vertrouwd

MORE:

Proverb: Trust not him that hath once broken faith (broken his word)
Proverb: he that once deceives is ever suspected

Down=Fall, be defeated

Compleat:
To bring down=Beneden brengen, onderbrengen, vernederen

Topics: trust, suspicion, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
Full well hath Clifford play’d the orator,
Inferring arguments of mighty force.
But, Clifford, tell me, didst thou never hear
That things ill-got had ever bad success?
And happy always was it for that son
Whose father for his hoarding went to hell? I
‘ll leave my son my virtuous deeds behind;
And would my father had left me no more!
For all the rest is held at such a rate
As brings a thousand-fold more care to keep
Than in possession and jot of pleasure.
Ah, cousin York!
Would thy best friends did know
How it doth grieve me that thy head is here!

DUTCH:
Schoon toonde ClifTord daar zijn redekunst
En voerde gronden aan van groot gewicht.

MORE:

Proverb: Evil-gotten (ill-gotten) goods never prove well (prosper, endure)
Proverb: Happy is the child whose father goes to the devil

Full well=Very well
Inferring=Adducing
Success=Result
Happy=Fortunate
Rate=Price

Compleat:
Jot=Zier
To hord up=Opstapelen, vergaaren, byeenschraapen

Burgersdijk notes:
II.2.48. Wiens vader om zijn schrapen voer ter helle. Het spreekwoord, waarop hier gezinspeeld wordt, luidt : Happy the child, whose father went to the devil; „Gelukkig het kind, welks vader door den duivel is gehaald!” Als een vader, die op zondige wijze rijk geworden is, sterft, erft de zoon wel het goed, maar heeft voor de zonden niet meer te boeten. Koning Hendrik betwijfelt blijkbaar de juistheid van het spreekwoord.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, corruption, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Now, brother of Clarence, how like you our choice,
That you stand pensive, as half malcontent?
CLARENCE
As well as Lewis of France, or the Earl of Warwick,
Which are so weak of courage and in judgment
That they’ll take no offence at our abuse.
KING EDWARD IV
Suppose they take offence without a cause,
They are but Lewis and Warwick: I am Edward,
Your king and Warwick’s, and must have my will.
GLOUCESTER
And shall have your will, because our king:
Yet hasty marriage seldom proveth well.

DUTCH:
Dit doet hij, wijl gij onze koning zijt;
Maar toch, een haastige echt blijkt zelden best.

MORE:

Proverb: Marry in haste and repent at leisure

Malcontent=Disaffected
Weak of courage=Lacking in courage

Compleat:
Pensive=Peinzend, peinsachtig, beducht, bedrukt, zwaarmoedig, suf
Malecontent=Misnoegd, ‘t onvrede

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, marriage, courage

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
Henry now lives in Scotland at his ease,
Where having nothing, nothing can he lose.
And as for you yourself, our quondam queen,
You have a father able to maintain you;
And better ’twere you troubled him than France.
QUEEN MARGARET
Peace, impudent and shameless Warwick, peace,
Proud setter up and puller down of kings!
I will not hence, till, with my talk and tears,
Both full of truth, I make King Lewis behold
Thy sly conveyance and thy lord’s false love;
For both of you are birds of selfsame feather.

DUTCH:
Recht naar zijn wensch leeft Hendrik thans in Schotland,
Waar hij, niets hebbend, niets verliezen kan.

MORE:

Proverb: Birds of a feather flock (fly) together

Will not hence=Won’t go elsewhere
Quondam=Former, as was
Sly conveyance=Underhand dealing, trickery, dishonest actions
Behold=See, recognize

Compleat:
Hence=Van hier, hier uit
Conveyance=Een overwyzing, overvoering, overdragt
To behold=Aanschouwen, zien, aanzien; ziet, let wel

Topics: proverbs and idioms, status, relationship, deceit

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
For what, lieutenant? For well using me?
Nay, be thou sure I’ll well requite thy kindness,
For that it made my imprisonment a pleasure;
Ay, such a pleasure as incaged birds
Conceive when after many moody thoughts
At last by notes of household harmony
They quite forget their loss of liberty.
But, Warwick, after God, thou set’st me free,
And chiefly therefore I thank God and thee;
He was the author, thou the instrument.
Therefore, that I may conquer fortune’s spite
By living low, where fortune cannot hurt me,
And that the people of this blessed land
May not be punish’d with my thwarting stars,
Warwick, although my head still wear the crown,
I here resign my government to thee,
For thou art fortunate in all thy deeds.

DUTCH:
Hij was hiervan de ontwerper, gij het werktuig

MORE:

Using=Treating
Requite=Repay
Moody=Melancholy
Thwarting=Perverse, obstructive
Fortunate=Favoured by fortune

Compleat:
To use (or treat) one well or ill=Iemand wel of kwaalyk behandelen
To requite=Vergelden
To requite a man in his own way=Iemand met gelyke munt betaalen
To requite a kindness=Een vriendschap vergelden
To thwart=Dwarsdryven, draaiboomen, dwars voor de boeg komen, beletten

Topics: fate/destiny, mercy

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Prince Edward
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Bring forth the gallant, let us hear him speak.
What! Can so young a thorn begin to prick?
Edward, what satisfaction canst thou make
For bearing arms, for stirring up my subjects,
And all the trouble thou hast turn’d me to?
PRINCE EDWARD
Speak like a subject, proud ambitious York!
Suppose that I am now my father’s mouth;
Resign thy chair, and where I stand kneel thou,
Whilst I propose the selfsame words to thee,
Which traitor, thou wouldst have me answer to.
QUEEN MARGARET
Ah, that thy father had been so resolved!
GLOUCESTER
That you might still have worn the petticoat,
And ne’er have stol’n the breech from Lancaster.
PRINCE EDWARD
Let Aesop fable in a winter’s night;
His currish riddles sort not with this place.

DUTCH:
Aesopus moge in winternachten faab’len;
Hier passen zulke hondsche raadsels niet.

MORE:

Gallant=Person of rank
Prick=Incite
Satisfaction=Amends
Turned me to=Caused me
Suppose=Consider, remember
Breech=Trousers
Currish=Malicious

Compleat:
Gallant=Salet jonker
To prick=Prikken, steeken, prikkelen
Satisfaction= (amends) Vergoeding, voldoening
Suppose=Vermoeden, denken, onderstellen
Currish=Hondsch, kwaadaardig

Burgersdijk notes:
V. 5. 25. Aesopus moge in winternachten faab’len. De Prins vergelijkt Richard met den mismaakten
fabeldichter Aesopus.

Topics: remedy, truth, respect, status, order/society, marriage

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
King Lewis and Lady Bona, hear me speak,
Before you answer Warwick. His demand
Springs not from Edward’s well-meant honest love,
But from deceit bred by necessity;
For how can tyrants safely govern home,
Unless abroad they purchase great alliance?
To prove him tyrant this reason may suffice,
That Henry liveth still: but were he dead,
Yet here Prince Edward stands, King Henry’s son.
Look, therefore, Lewis, that by this league and marriage
Thou draw not on thy danger and dishonour;
For though usurpers sway the rule awhile,
Yet heavens are just, and time suppresseth wrongs.

DUTCH:
Want een tyran, hoe vindt hij rust te huis,
Als hij zich geen uitheemsche vrienden koopt?

MORE:

League=Alliance, friendship
Purchase=Acquire, obtain
Sway the rule=Govern, be in power
Draw not on=Will not bring about, cause
Suppresseth wrongs=Stops, quells wrongs (i.e. has a way of righting wrongs)

Compleat:
League=Verbond, verdrag, verbindtenis
To bear sway=Heerschappy voeren
To sway=(govern) Regeeren. To sway the scepter=Den schepter zwaaijen
To draw on=Geleiden, aantrekken
To suppress=(to stifle, stop) Beletten, verhinderen, sluiten

Topics: deceit, necessity, relationship

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
I came from Edward as ambassador,
But I return his sworn and mortal foe:
Matter of marriage was the charge he gave me,
But dreadful war shall answer his demand.
Had he none else to make a stale but me?
Then none but I shall turn his jest to sorrow.
I was the chief that raised him to the crown,
And I’ll be chief to bring him down again:
Not that I pity Henry’s misery,
But seek revenge on Edward’s mockery.

DUTCH:
Ik was de man, die hem ten troon verhief;
Ik wil de man zijn, die hem vallen doet.

MORE:

Charge he gave me=My order, commission
Stale=Dupe, laughing stock
Chief=Principal

Compleat:
Charge=Belasten, bevelen, opleggen, te laste leggen,
This shall be your charge=Dat zal uw post zyn

Topics: marriage, conflict, revenge

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile,
And cry ‘Content’ to that which grieves my heart,
And wet my cheeks with artificial tears,
And frame my face to all occasions.
I’ll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall;
I’ll slay more gazers than the basilisk;
I’ll play the orator as well as Nestor,
Deceive more slily than Ulysses could,
And, like a Sinon, take another Troy.
I can add colours to the chameleon,
Change shapes with Proteus for advantages,
And set the murderous Machiavel to school.
Can I do this, and cannot get a crown?
Tut, were it farther off, I’ll pluck it down.

DUTCH:
Ik kan ‘t kameleon zelfs kleuren leenen,
Als Proteus mij verand’ren , beter zelfs,
Den wreeden Macchiavelli lesjens geven;

MORE:

Proverb: The chameleon can change to all colours save white
Proverb: As many shapes as Proteus
Proverb: The basilisk’s eye is fatal

Artificial=Fake, feigned
Basilisk=Serpent whose gaze was fatal
Nestor=A wise and eloquent warrior in the Trojan War.
Ulysses (or Odysseus)=King of Ithaca, known for his cunning.
Sinon=The Greek soldier responsible for the fall of Troy, who delivered the Wooden Horse concealing the soldiers who attacked the city
Proteus=A shape-shifting sea god.
Machieavel=Niccolò Machiavelli, Italian political philosopher known for ruthless political deception and cunning.

Compleat:
Artificial=Konstig, behendig, aardig, dat niet natuurlyk is
Basilisk=Een basiliskus, als ook zeker zwaar geschut, een Slang genaamd

Topics: deceit, proverbs and idioms, deceit, appearance, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Lady Grey
CONTEXT:
CLARENCE
[to GLOUCESTER] He knows the game:
how true he keeps the wind!
GLOUCESTER
[to CLARENCE] Silence!
KING EDWARD IV
Widow, we will consider of your suit;
And come some other time to know our mind.
LADY GREY
Right gracious lord, I cannot brook delay:
May it please your highness to resolve me now;
And what your pleasure is, shall satisfy me.
GLOUCESTER
[to CLARENCE] Ay, widow? Then I’ll warrant
you all your lands,
An if what pleases him shall pleasure you.
Fight closer, or, good faith, you’ll catch a blow.

DUTCH:
Genadig vorst, ik kan geen uitstel lijden,
‘t Behage uw hoogheid thans bescheid te geven,
En wat u zal behagen is mij goed.

MORE:

True=Exactly, correctly, conforming
Keeps the wind=Stays upwind (to avoid being scented); conceals intentions
Brook=Endure, stand
Resolve=Answer
Warrant=Guarantee

Compleat:
True=(right, genuine) Echt, fyn, opregt
To brook=Verdraagen, uitstaan
To brook an affront=Een boon verzwelgen, een leed verkroppen
To resolve (to untie, to decide, to determine a hard question, a difficulty)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopen
Warrant (assure, promise)=Verzekeren, belooven, ervoor instaan

Topics: plans/intentions, deceit, delay

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Ay, Edward will use women honourably.
Would he were wasted, marrow, bones and all,
That from his loins no hopeful branch may spring,
To cross me from the golden time I look for!
And yet, between my soul’s desire and me—
The lustful Edward’s title buried—
Is Clarence, Henry, and his son young Edward,
And all the unlook’d for issue of their bodies,
To take their rooms, ere I can place myself:
A cold premeditation for my purpose!
Why, then, I do but dream on sovereignty;
Like one that stands upon a promontory,
And spies a far-off shore where he would tread,
Wishing his foot were equal with his eye,
And chides the sea that sunders him from thence,
Saying, he’ll lade it dry to have his way:
So do I wish the crown, being so far off;
And so I chide the means that keeps me from it;
And so I say, I’ll cut the causes off,
Flattering me with impossibilities.

DUTCH:
Ja, ja, zoo is ‘t, ik droom van kroon en rijk,
Als een, die op een voorgebergte staat

MORE:

That=So that
Hopeful=With potential, prospect of success
Cross=Block
Gold time=Golden age, of wearing a crown
Unlooked-for=Unwelcome
Rooms=Places, positions
Cold=Discouraging
Lade=Ladle
Chide=To scold, curse
Means that keep me from it=Obstacles
Flattering me=Deluding myself

Compleat:
Chide=Kyven, bekyven
Hopefull=Van goede hope; wiens veel belooft
To cros=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen
Chide=Kyven, bekyven

Topics: honour, ambition, purpose

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
My love, forbear to fawn upon their frowns:
What danger or what sorrow can befall thee,
So long as Edward is thy constant friend,
And their true sovereign, whom they must obey?
Nay, whom they shall obey, and love thee too,
Unless they seek for hatred at my hands;
Which if they do, yet will I keep thee safe,
And they shall feel the vengeance of my wrath.
GLOUCESTER
[Aside] I hear, yet say not much, but think the more.

DUTCH:
Ik hoor, doch zeg niet veel; maar denk te meer.

MORE:

Proverb: Though he said little he thought the more

Forbear=Avoid, refrain from
Fawn=Wheedle, act in a servile manner

Compleat:
Forbear=Zich van onthouden
To fawn upon=Vleijen, streelen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, loyalty, leadership

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
YORK
O Clifford, but bethink thee once again,
And in thy thought o’errun my former time;
And, if though canst for blushing, view this face,
And bite thy tongue, that slanders him with cowardice
Whose frown hath made thee faint and fly ere this!
CLIFFORD
I will not bandy with thee word for word,
But buckler with thee blows, twice two for one.
QUEEN MARGARET
Hold, valiant Clifford! for a thousand causes
I would prolong awhile the traitor’s life.
Wrath makes him deaf: speak thou, Northumberland.
NORTHUMBERLAND
Hold, Clifford! do not honour him so much
To prick thy finger, though to wound his heart:
What valour were it, when a cur doth grin,
For one to thrust his hand between his teeth,
When he might spurn him with his foot away?
It is war’s prize to take all vantages;
And ten to one is no impeach of valour.

DUTCH:
1k wil niet woord voor woord u wedergeven,
Maar slagen wiss’len tweemaal twee voor een.

MORE:

Idiom: To bite one’s tongue

Bethink thee=Reconsider
Bandy=To beat to and fro (fig. of words, looks); exchange words, squabble
Buckler=Ward off (with a buckler, a sort of shield)
O’errun=Review
Cur=Dog
Grin=Bare his teeth
Vantage=Opportunity
Impeach=Discredit

Compleat:
Bandy=Een bal weer toeslaan; een zaak voor en tegen betwisten
To bethink one’s self=Zich bedenken
To buckle together=Worstelen, schermutselen
Cur=Hond (also Curr)
Vantage=Toegift, toemaat, overmaat, overwigt
To impeach=Betichten, beschuldigen, aanklaagen

Topics: anger, caution, wisdom, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
I, that have neither pity, love, nor fear.
Indeed, ’tis true that Henry told me of;
For I have often heard my mother say
I came into the world with my legs forward:
Had I not reason, think ye, to make haste,
And seek their ruin that usurp’d our right?
The midwife wonder’d and the women cried
‘O, Jesus bless us, he is born with teeth!’
And so I was; which plainly signified
That I should snarl and bite and play the dog.
Then, since the heavens have shaped my body so,
Let hell make crook’d my mind to answer it.
I have no brother, I am like no brother;
And this word ‘love,’ which graybeards call divine,
Be resident in men like one another
And not in me: I am myself alone.
Clarence, beware; thou keep’st me from the light:
But I will sort a pitchy day for thee;
For I will buz abroad such prophecies
That Edward shall be fearful of his life,
And then, to purge his fear, I’ll be thy death.
King Henry and the prince his son are gone:
Clarence, thy turn is next, and then the rest,
Counting myself but bad till I be best.
I’ll throw thy body in another room
And triumph, Henry, in thy day of doom.

DUTCH:
O, hoed u, Clarence, gij staat mij in ‘t licht;
Pikzwarte dagen zal ik u verwekken;
Want profecieën zal ik gonzen doen,
Die Edward angst inboez’men voor zijn leven;

MORE:

Sort=Arrange for, contrive
Pitchy=Black
Buz abroad=(or buzz) Spread, circulate
Prophecies=Rumours, predictions

Compleat:
To sort=Uitschieten, elk by ‘t zyne leggen, sorteeren
Pitchy=Pikachtig
Prophecy’d=Voorzegd, geprofiteerd

Topics: haste, revenge

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
CLIFFORD
I would your highness would depart the field:
The queen hath best success when you are absent.
QUEEN MARGARET
Ay, good my lord, and leave us to our fortune.
KING HENRY VI
Why, that’s my fortune too; therefore I’ll stay.
NORTHUMBERLAND
Be it with resolution then to fight.

DUTCH:
Ik wenschte, dat mijn vorst het veld verliet;
De koningin slaagt beter in uw afzijn.

MORE:

Would=Wish
Fortune=Fate
With resolution=With a determination

Topics: achievement, independence

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: George
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
I think his understanding is bereft.
Speak, Clifford, dost thou know who speaks to thee?
Dark cloudy death o’ershades his beams of life,
And he nor sees nor hears us what we say.
RICHARD
O, would he did! And so perhaps he doth:
‘Tis but his policy to counterfeit,
Because he would avoid such bitter taunts
Which in the time of death he gave our father.
GEORGE
If so thou think’st, vex him with eager words.
RICHARD
Clifford, ask mercy and obtain no grace.
EDWARD
Clifford, repent in bootless penitence.
WARWICK
Clifford, devise excuses for thy faults.
GEORGE
While we devise fell tortures for thy faults.

DUTCH:
Terg, denkt gij dit, hem eens met scherpe woorden.

MORE:

Understanding is bereft=Not conscious (of surroundings)
Overshade=Overshadow
Beam=Ray of light, sunbeam
Policy=Strategy, tactic
Counterfeit=Pretend, feign
Vex=Taunt, torment
Eager=Bitter
Bootless=Hopeless, futile, wasted
Penitence=Repentance
Fell=strong; cruel, vicious, intense, savage.

Compleat:
Fell=(cruel) Wreed, fel
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos
To overshadow=Overschaduwen, omschaduwen, beschaduwen, belommeren
A beam of the sun=Een straal der Zonne
To call forth bright beams=Heldere straalen uitschieten, uitstraalen
To counterfeit (feign)=(Zich) Veinzen
A counterfeit friendship=Een gemaakte of geveinsde vriendschap
To vex=Quellen, plaagen
Eager=Graag, happig, greetig; heftig, vuurig, vinnig
Penitence=Boetvaardigheid, berouw, leedweezen

Topics: regret, flaw, fault

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Son
CONTEXT:
Ill blows the wind that profits nobody.
This man, whom hand to hand I slew in fight,
May be possessed with some store of crowns ;
And I, that haply take them from him now,
May yet ere night yield both my life and them
To some man else, as this dead man doth me.
Who’s this? O God! It is my father’s face,
Whom in this conflict I unwares have kill’d.
O heavy times, begetting such events!
From London by the king was I press’d forth;
My father, being the Earl of Warwick’s man,
Came on the part of York, press’d by his master;
And I, who at his hands received my life, him
Have by my hands of life bereaved him.
Pardon me, God, I knew not what I did!
And pardon, father, for I knew not thee!
My tears shall wipe away these bloody marks;
And no more words till they have flow’d their fill.

DUTCH:
Een kwade wind, die niemand voordeel aanbrengt!

MORE:

Proverb: It’s an ill wind that blows no body no good (Also Henry IV Part 2, 5.3)

Be possessed with=Own (possessed of)
Haply=By chance
Beget=To cause, lead to
Unwares=Unwittingly
Pressed forth=Pressed (forced) into military service
Bereave=To rob, take from

Compleat:
Possessed (or prepossessed) with=Ergens mede vooringenomen zyn, veel mede op hebben
Beget=Gewinnen, teelen, voortbrengen, verkrygen
Idleness begets beggary=Luiheid veroorzaakt bederlaary
Unawares=Onverhoeds
Press (or force) soldiers=Soldaaten pressen, dat is hen dwingen om dienst te neemen
Bereave=Berooven
Haply=Misschien

Burgersdijk notes:
II.5.61. Wie is ‘t? —O God, het is ‘t gelaat mijns vaders! Men denke, dat de zoon de behnklep van den
doode oplicht.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, claim

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Oxford
CONTEXT:
OXFORD
I thought no less: it is his policy
To haste thus fast, to find us unprovided.
SOMERSET
But he’s deceived; we are in readiness.
QUEEN MARGARET
This cheers my heart, to see your forwardness.
OXFORD
Here pitch our battle; hence we will not budge.

DUTCH:
Ik dacht wel, dat hij snel te werk zou gaan;
Hij hoopt ons nog onvoorbereid te vinden.

MORE:

Policy=Strategem
Unprovided=Unprepared
Forwardness=Readiness
Budge=Stir, move

Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
Budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen
Forward=Voorbaarig, rypostig, voorlyk; Greetig; (ready or well inclined) Gereed, genegen

Topics: haste, preparation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France,
Whose tongue more poisons than the adder’s tooth!
How ill-beseeming is it in thy sex
To triumph, like an Amazonian trull,
Upon their woes whom fortune captivates!
But that thy face is, visor-like, unchanging,
Made impudent with use of evil deeds,
I would assay, proud queen, to make thee blush.
To tell thee whence thou camest, of whom derived,
Were shame enough to shame thee, wert thou not
shameless.
Thy father bears the type of King of Naples,
Of both the Sicils and Jerusalem,
Yet not so wealthy as an English yeoman.
Hath that poor monarch taught thee to insult?
It needs not, nor it boots thee not, proud queen,
Unless the adage must be verified,
That beggars mounted run their horse to death.

DUTCH:
Maar, fiere koningin, het baat u niets,
Dan dat het spreekwoord waar blijkt: „Als een beed’laar
Te paard ooit komt, hij jaagt zijn rijdier dood.”

MORE:

Proverb: Set a beggar on horseback and he will ride a gallop (run his horse out of breath): newfound power will go to their heads

Ill-beseeming=Unbecoming, unattractive
Trull=A drab, lewd woman
Captivate=Subdue
Visor=(Vizor, Vizard): Mask
Impudent=Shameless
Assay=Try
Type=Title
Yeoman=Landowner
Needs not=Is unnecessary
Boots not=Is futile
Adage=Proverb

Compleat:
To beseem=Betaamen, voegen, passen
Trull=Een smots, snol
Captivate=Overmeesteren, gevangen neemen
Vizard=Een momaanzigt, mombakkus, masker
Impudent=Onbeschaamd
to assay=Beproeven, toetsen, onderstaan, keuren
Yeoman=Een welgegoed landman, een ryke boer, een Landjonker
It is to no boot=Het doet geen nut, het is te vergeefs
Adage=Spreekwoord

Topics: proverbs and idioms, appearance, civility, language, dignity

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
From Scotland am I stol’n, even of pure love,
To greet mine own land with my wishful sight.
No, Harry, Harry, ’tis no land of thine;
Thy place is fill’d, thy sceptre wrung from thee,
Thy balm wash’d off wherewith thou wast anointed:
No bending knee will call thee Caesar now,
No humble suitors press to speak for right,
No, not a man comes for redress of thee;
For how can I help them, and not myself?
FIRST KEEPER
Ay, here’s a deer whose skin’s a keeper’s fee:
This is the quondam king; let’s seize upon him.
KING HENRY VI
Let me embrace thee, sour adversity,
For wise men say it is the wisest course.

DUTCH:
k Wil ‘t bitter lot, dat mij bezoekt, omhelzen;
Dit, zeggen wijzen, is de wijste keus.

MORE:

Proverb: Adversity makes men wise
Proverb: In adversity men find eyes
Proverb: An enemy makes a man to know himself, whereas a friend flatters a man and deceives him

The Arden edition has “adversaries” rather than “adversities”.

Wishful sight=Longing look
Balm=Oil used to anoint kings
Speak for right=Plead for justice
Redress=Amendment, remedy
Keeper’s fee=Gamekeepers were given the horns and skin of hunted deer
Quondam=Former, as was

Compleat:
To speak for=(propose, move) Iets voorstellen, op ‘t tapyt brengen
Redress=Herstelling, verhelping, verbetering, vergoeding, verligting

Topics: adversity, proverbs and idioms, status

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Messenger
CONTEXT:
Environed he was with many foes,
And stood against them, as the hope of Troy
Against the Greeks that would have enter’d Troy.
But Hercules himself must yield to odds;
And many strokes, though with a little axe,
Hew down and fell the hardest-timber’d oak.
By many hands your father was subdued;
But only slaughter’d by the ireful arm
Of unrelenting Clifford and the queen,
Who crown’d the gracious duke in high despite,
Laugh’d in his face; and when with grief he wept,
The ruthless queen gave him to dry his cheeks
A napkin steeped in the harmless blood
Of sweet young Rutland, by rough Clifford slain:
And after many scorns, many foul taunts,
They took his head, and on the gates of York
They set the same; and there it doth remain,
The saddest spectacle that e’er I view’d.

DUTCH:
En, zij de bijl ook klein, een tal van slagen
Houwt om en velt den sterksten, hardsten eik.

MORE:

Proverb: Hercules himself cannot deal with two
Proverb: Many strokes fell great oaks

Environed=Surrounded
In high despite=Contemptuously
Yield to odds=Be outnumbered

Compleat:
Environed=Omringd, omcingeld
Despite=Spyt, versmaading

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, strength

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
From off the gates of York fetch down the head,
Your father’s head, which Clifford placed there;
Instead whereof let this supply the room:
Measure for measure must be answered.
EDWARD
Bring forth that fatal screech-owl to our house,
That nothing sung but death to us and ours:
Now death shall stop his dismal threatening sound,
And his ill-boding tongue no more shall speak.

DUTCH:
Want maat voor maat moet de vergelding zijn.

MORE:

Proverb: Measure for measure (1595)
Matthew 7.1-2: ‘Judge not, that ye be not judged. For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.’

Supply the room=Replace it
Screech-owl=Hooting owl, an unlucky omen
Dismal-threatening=Ominous
Ill-boding=Doom-laden

Compleat:
To supply=Vervullen, verzorgen, toereiken
To supply one’s place=Iemands plaats bekleeden
Screech-owl=Zeker slach van een uil
Ill-boding=Kwaad voorspellende

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
LADY GREY
What you command, that rests in me to do.
KING EDWARD IV
But you will take exceptions to my boon.
LADY GREY
No, gracious lord, except I cannot do it.
KING EDWARD IV
Ay, but thou canst do what I mean to ask.
LADY GREY
Why, then I will do what your grace commands.
GLOUCESTER
[to CLARENCE] He plies her hard; and much rain
wears the marble.

DUTCH:
Hij dringt haar sterk, veel regen holt den steen.

MORE:

Proverb: Constant dropping will wear the stone

Rests in me=Is within my power
My boon=Favour (that I will ask)
Except=Unless
Plies=Keeps working on, persists with

Compleat:
Boon=Een verzoek, geschenk, gunst, voordeel
To ply=Wakker op iets aanvallen
He plies me too hard=Hy valt my al te hard hy wil al te veel werks van my hebben

Topics: proverbs and idioms, authority, remedy

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Edward
CONTEXT:
RICHARD
Brother, though I be youngest, give me leave.
EDWARD
No, I can better play the orator.
MONTAGUE
But I have reasons strong and forcible.
YORK
Why, how now, sons and brother! At a strife?
What is your quarrel? How began it first?
EDWARD
No quarrel, but a slight contention.
YORK
About what?
RICHARD
About that which concerns your grace and us;
The crown of England, father, which is yours.
YORK
Mine boy? not till King Henry be dead.

DUTCH:
Geen twist, alleen een kleine woordenstrijd.

MORE:

Give me leave=Permit me
At a strife=In a fight, dispute
Slight contention=Debate, dispute

Compleat:
To give leave=Verlof geeven, veroorloven
Give me leave to do it=Vergun het my te doen
Strife=Twist, tweedragt, krakkeel, pooging
Contention=Twist, krakkeel, geharrewar

Topics: reason, justification, dispute, persuasion

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
Thy father bears the type of King of Naples,
Of both the Sicils and Jerusalem,
Yet not so wealthy as an English yeoman.
Hath that poor monarch taught thee to insult?
It needs not, nor it boots thee not, proud queen,
Unless the adage must be verified,
That beggars mounted run their horse to death.
‘Tis beauty that doth oft make women proud;
But, God he knows, thy share thereof is small:
‘Tis virtue that doth make them most admired;
The contrary doth make thee wonder’d at:
‘Tis government that makes them seem divine;
The want thereof makes thee abominable:
Thou art as opposite to every good
As the Antipodes are unto us,
Or as the south to the septentrion.
O tiger’s heart wrapt in a woman’s hide!
How couldst thou drain the life-blood of the child,
To bid the father wipe his eyes withal,
And yet be seen to bear a woman’s face?
Women are soft, mild, pitiful and flexible;
Thou stern, obdurate, flinty, rough, remorseless.
Bids’t thou me rage? why, now thou hast thy wish:
Wouldst have me weep? why, now thou hast thy will:
For raging wind blows up incessant showers,
And when the rage allays, the rain begins.
These tears are my sweet Rutland’s obsequies:
And every drop cries vengeance for his death,
‘Gainst thee, fel Clifford, and thee, false
Frenchwoman.”

DUTCH:
O tijgerhart, in vrouwehuid gehuld!
Hoe kondt gij ‘t levensbloed des kinds verzaam’len,
Opdat de vader daar zijn tranenvloed
Meê droogde, en ‘t uitzicht hebben van een vrouw?

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
In the Matter of Sedita v. Kissinger, City Manager of the City of New Rochelle, 66 A.D.2d 357, 359, 413 N.Y.S.2d 25 (1979)(O’Connor, J.).

Proverb: Set a beggar on horseback and he will ride a gallop (run his horse out of breath): newfound power will go to their heads

Type=Title
Yeoman=Landowner
Needs not=Is unnecessary
Boots not=Is futile
Government=Self-control
Obsequies=Funeral rites

Compleat:
Yeoman=Een welgegoed landman, een ryke boer, een Landjonker
It is to no boot=Het doet geen nut, het is te vergeefs
Adage=Spreekwoord
Government=Heersching
Obsequies=Lykplichten, laatste diensten aan den overleedenen

Topics: appearance, status, cited in law, proverbs and idioms, dignity

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
Sweet Duke of York, our prop to lean upon,
Now thou art gone, we have no staff, no stay.
O Clifford, boisterous Clifford! Thou hast slain
The flower of Europe for his chivalry;
And treacherously hast thou vanquish’d him,
For hand to hand he would have vanquish’d thee.
Now my soul’s palace is become a prison:
Ah, would she break from hence, that this my body
Might in the ground be closed up in rest!
For never henceforth shall I joy again,
Never, O never shall I see more joy

DUTCH:
Geliefde York, gij staf, waarop wij leunden!
Nu gij bezweekt, ontviel ons steun en stut!

MORE:

Prop=Support
Stay=Support
Boisterous=Wild, intractable, rudely violent, noisy and tumultuous
Soul’s palace=Body

Compleat:
Prop=Ondersteuning
Stay=Steun, stut; ondersteuning
Boisterous=Ontstuimig; oploopend

Topics: grief, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
WESTMORELAND
What, shall we suffer this? let’s pluck him down:
My heart for anger burns; I cannot brook it.
KING HENRY VI
Be patient, gentle Earl of Westmoreland.
CLIFFORD
Patience is for poltroons, such as he:
He durst not sit there, had your father lived.
My gracious lord, here in the parliament
Let us assail the family of York.

DUTCH:
Geduld is goed voor lafaards zooals hij;
Hij zat daar niet, indien uw vader leefde.
Genadig heer, laat ons in ‘t parlement
Hier op den stam van York een aanval doen.

MORE:

Brook=Endure
Poltroons=Cowards
Assail=Attack

Compleat:
To brook=Verdraaen, uitstaan
To brook an affront=Een boon verzwelgen, een leed verkroppen
Poltron=Een fielt, bloode guit
Assail=Bespringen, aanranden

Topics: anger, patience, caution, haste

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
CLARENCE
Look here, I throw my infamy at thee
I will not ruinate my father’s house,
Who gave his blood to lime the stones together,
And set up Lancaster. Why, trow’st thou, Warwick,
That Clarence is so harsh, so blunt, unnatural,
To bend the fatal instruments of war
Against his brother and his lawful king?
Perhaps thou wilt object my holy oath:
To keep that oath were more impiety
Than Jephthah’s, when he sacrificed his daughter.
I am so sorry for my trespass made
That, to deserve well at my brother’s hands,
I here proclaim myself thy mortal foe,
With resolution, wheresoe’er I meet thee—
As I will meet thee, if thou stir abroad—
To plague thee for thy foul misleading me.

DUTCH:
Gij houdt wellicht mijn heil’gen eed mij voor?

MORE:

Proverb: An unlawful oath is better broken than kept

Ruinate=Ruin
Lime=Bond (glue together)
Jephthah=A warrior and judge whose story can be found in the Book of Judges. Jephthah swore to God that in excange for victory over the Ammonites, he would sacrifice the first person to greet him after the battle; the first person he saw was his daughter.
Trow=Think, believe
Bend=Used of instruments of war (Schmidt)
Were more impiety=Would be more of a sin, more wicked

Compleat:
Bird-lime=Vogellym
I trow=Ik denk, ik acht
To bend a sword=Een zwaard buigen
Impiety=Ongodvruchtigheid, godloosheid

Topics: promise, conflict, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
Henry now lives in Scotland at his ease,
Where having nothing, nothing can he lose.
And as for you yourself, our quondam queen,
You have a father able to maintain you;
And better ’twere you troubled him than France.
QUEEN MARGARET
Peace, impudent and shameless Warwick, peace,
Proud setter up and puller down of kings!
I will not hence, till, with my talk and tears,
Both full of truth, I make King Lewis behold
Thy sly conveyance and thy lord’s false love;
For both of you are birds of selfsame feather.

DUTCH:
Zwijg, onbeschaamde, drieste Warwick, zwijg,
Gij trotsche koningsschepper en verdelger!

MORE:

Proverb: Birds of a feather flock (fly) together

Will not hence=Won’t go elsewhere
Quondam=Former, as was
Conveyance=Underhand dealing, trickery, dishonest actions
Behold=See, recognize

Compleat:
Hence=Van hier, hier uit
Conveyance=Een overwyzing, overvoering, overdragt
To behold=Aanschouwen, zien, aanzien; ziet, let wel

Topics: proverbs and idioms, status, relationship, deceit

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
Come, Warwick, take the time; kneel down, kneel down:
Nay, when? Strike now, or else the iron cools.
WARWICK
I had rather chop this hand off at a blow,
And with the other fling it at thy face,
Than bear so low a sail, to strike to thee.
KING EDWARD IV
Sail how thou canst, have wind and tide thy friend,
This hand, fast wound about thy coal-black hair
Shall, whiles thy head is warm and new cut off,
Write in the dust this sentence with thy blood,
‘Wind-changing Warwick now can change no more.’

DUTCH:
Zeil hoe ge wilt, heb wind en tij te vriend, —
De hand hier grijpt u dra in ‘t koolzwart haar,
En zal, terwijl uw afgehouwen hoofd
Nog warm is, met uw bloed in ‘t stof hier schrijven:
De windhaan Warwick draait nu nimmermeer.

MORE:

Proverb: Strike while the iron’s hot

Take the time=Take the opportunity
So low a sail=Bow so low (as in lowering sails – striking the colours – in the sense of surrender)
Wind-changing=Inconstant, changeable, unreliable

Compleat:
Opportunity stands not still=De gelegenheid staaat niet stil
To strike sail=’t Zeil stryken
He turns with every wind=Hy waait met alle winden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
YORK
My ashes, as the phoenix, may bring forth
A bird that will revenge upon you all:
And in that hope I throw mine eyes to heaven,
Scorning whate’er you can afflict me with.
Why come you not? what! multitudes, and fear?
CLIFFORD
So cowards fight when they can fly no further;
So doves do peck the falcon’s piercing talons;
So desperate thieves, all hopeless of their lives,
Breathe out invectives ‘gainst the officers.

DUTCH:
Zoo vechten, als het vluchten uit is, lafaards;
Zoo pikt de duif naar ‘s haviks scherpen klauw

MORE:

Scorn=Despise
Afflict=To harm, distress
Multitudes=So many of you (and still afraid)
Invectives=Reproach, insult

Compleat:
Scorn=Versmaading, verachting, bespotting
Multitude=Menigte, veelheid, het gemeene volk, het gepeupel
Invective=Doorstrykende, scheldende, steekelig
An invective speech=Een scherpe, hitse redenvoering

Topics: conflict, courage

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind;
The thief doth fear each bush an officer.
KING HENRY VI
The bird that hath been limed in a bush,
With trembling wings misdoubteth every bush;
And I, the hapless male to one sweet bird,
Have now the fatal object in my eye
Where my poor young was limed, was caught and kill’d.

DUTCH:
Argwaan waart in het schuldig hart steeds om;
De dief vermoedt in elke ruigte een rakker.

MORE:

Proverb: Birds once snared (limed) fear all bushes
Proverb: The escaped mouse ever feels the taste of the bait

Birdlime=Sticky substance put on trees to catch small birds
To lime=To smear with birdlime, seek to catch
Misdoubt=To suspect, be apprehensive about; have dounts as to
Hapless=Unfortunate

Compleat:
Bird-lime=Vogellym
Misdoubt=’t Onrecht twyffelen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, suspicion, guilt

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
Here burns my candle out; ay, here it dies,
Which, whiles it lasted, gave King Henry light.
O Lancaster, I fear thy overthrow
More than my body’s parting with my soul!
My love and fear glued many friends to thee;
And, now I fall, thy tough commixture melts.
Impairing Henry, strengthening misproud York,
The common people swarm like summer flies;
And whither fly the gnats but to the sun?
And who shines now but Henry’s enemies?
O Phoebus, hadst thou never given consent
That Phaethon should check thy fiery steeds,
Thy burning car never had scorch’d the earth!
And, Henry, hadst thou sway’d as kings should do,
Or as thy father and his father did,
Giving no ground unto the house of York,
They never then had sprung like summer flies;
I and ten thousand in this luckless realm
Had left no mourning widows for our death;
And thou this day hadst kept thy chair in peace.
For what doth cherish weeds but gentle air?

DUTCH:
Maar nu ik val, nu smelt die taaie menging,
Maakt Hendrik zwak, versterkt den driesten York.
Waar vliegen muggen heen, dan in de zon?

MORE:

Proverb: His candle burns within the socket

Commixture=Compound (the ‘glued’ friends)
Misproud=Arrogant, viciously proud (Schmidt)
Phoebus=Apollo
Check=Control
Car=Chariot
Swayed=Governed, ruled
Give ground=Yield, recede
Chair=Throne
Cherish=Encourage (growth)

Compleat:
To keep a check on one=Iemand in den teugel houden
Sway=(power, rule, command) Macht, gezach, heerschappy
To bear sway=Heerschappy voeren
To sway=(govern) Regeeren. To sway the scepter=Den schepter zwaaijen
To cherish=Koesteren, opkweeken, streelen, aankweeken

Topics: leadership, rivalry, friendship, loyalty, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Hastings
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
A wise stout captain, and soon persuaded!
HASTINGS
The good old man would fain that all were well,
So ’twere not ‘long of him; but being enter’d,
I doubt not, I, but we shall soon persuade
Both him and all his brothers unto reason.
KING EDWARD IV
So, master mayor: these gates must not be shut
But in the night or in the time of war.
What! Fear not, man, but yield me up the keys;

DUTCH:
Die oude heer ziet liefst, dat alles goed gaat,
Zoo hij slechts buiten spel blijft; doch hoe ‘t zij,
Zijn wij eens binnen, weldra zullen wij
Hem en geheel zijn raad tot vrede brengen.

MORE:

Stout=Bold
Soon=Readily
Fain=Gladly, willingly; only too pleased if… (always joined with would; followed by a clause)
But=Except

Compleat:
Stout (courageous)=Moedig, dapper
Fain=Gaern

Topics: reason, loyalty, resolution

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
Thou and thy brother both shall buy this treason
Even with the dearest blood your bodies bear.
KING EDWARD IV
The harder match’d, the greater victory:
My mind presageth happy gain and conquest.

DUTCH:
Hoe sterker weerpartij, te grootscher zege;
En overwinning, heil spelt mij mijn hart.

MORE:

Proverb: The more danger the more honour

Matched=Opposition
My mind presageth=I foresee

Compleat:
To match=Paaren, passen, samenkoppelen
To presage=Gissen, voorzeggen, voorspellen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
My gracious liege, this too much lenity
And harmful pity must be laid aside.
To whom do lions cast their gentle looks?
Not to the beast that would usurp their den.
Whose hand is that the forest bear doth lick?
Not his that spoils her young before her face.
Who ‘scapes the lurking serpent’s mortal sting?
Not he that sets his foot upon her back.
The smallest worm will turn being trodden on,
And doves will peck in safeguard of their brood.

DUTCH:
De kleinste worm verheft, getrapt, den kop

MORE:

Proverb: Tread on a worm and it will turn

Lenity=Mildness
Spoils=Seizes, hunts
Level at=Is aiming for
In safeguard of=To protect

Compleat:
Lenity=Zachtheid, zoetelykheid, gedweegzaamheid, slapheid
To spoil=Bederven, vernielen, berooven
Safeguard=Beschutting, bescherming

Topics: pity, mercy, nature, ambition, strength

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.8
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
Seize on the shame-faced Henry! Bear him hence:
And once again proclaim us King of England.
You are the fount that makes small brooks to flow:
Now stops thy spring; my sea shall suck them dry,
And swell so much the higher by their ebb.
Hence with him to the Tower! let him not speak.
And, lords, towards Coventry bend we our course,
Where peremptory Warwick now remains:
The sun shines hot; and, if we use delay,
Cold biting winter mars our hop’d-for hay.

DUTCH:
Heet schijnt de zon, verzuim gaav’ licht het hooi,
‘t Gehoopte, aan snerpend winterweer ter prooi.

MORE:

Proverb: Make hay while the sun shines

Another reference to the York family symbol of the sun (see 2.6, ‘gnats to the sun’).
Shamefaced=Ashamed, bashful (also shamefast)
Peremptory=Positive, bold
Hoped-for hay=Anticipated harvest

Compleat:
Shame-faced=Schaamachtig, beschaamd, bloode
Peremptory=Volstrekt, uitvoerig, volkomen, uiteindig

Topics: delay, proverbs and idioms, still in use, achievement, preparation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
I prithee, give no limits to my tongue:
I am a king, and privileged to speak.
CLIFFORD
My liege, the wound that bred this meeting here
Cannot be cured by words; therefore be still.
RICHARD
Then, executioner, unsheathe thy sword:
By him that made us all, I am resolved
that Clifford’s manhood lies upon his tongue.

DUTCH:
Mijn vorst, geen woorden heden ooit de wond,
Die deze ontmoeting teelde; zwijg dus stil.

MORE:

Give no limits to=Don’t stop me (from talking)
Resolved=Convinced, determined
Lies upon his tongue=Is just talk

Topics: resolution, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
Once more we sit in England’s royal throne,
Re-purchased with the blood of enemies.
What valiant foemen, like to autumn’s corn,
Have we mow’d down, in tops of all their pride!
Three Dukes of Somerset, threefold renown’d
For hardy and undoubted champions;
Two Cliffords, as the father and the son,
And two Northumberlands; two braver men
Ne’er spurr’d their coursers at the trumpet’s sound;
With them, the two brave bears, Warwick and Montague,
That in their chains fetter’d the kingly lion
And made the forest tremble when they roar’d.
Thus have we swept suspicion from our seat
And made our footstool of security.
Come hither, Bess, and let me kiss my boy.
Young Ned, for thee, thine uncles and myself
Have in our armours watch’d the winter’s night,
Went all afoot in summer’s scalding heat,
That thou mightst repossess the crown in peace;
And of our labours thou shalt reap the gain.

DUTCH:
Zoo vaagden we argwaan weg van onzen troon,
En maakten veiligheid tot onze voetbank

MORE:

Re-purchased=Regained
In tops=At the height of
Threefold=All three
Courser=Horse
Suspicion=Trepidation, anxiety

Compleat:
Courser=Een looper, renner
Suspicion=Vermoeden, agterdogt, argwaan

Topics: achievement, security

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
My gracious liege, this too-much lenity
And harmful pity must be laid aside.
To whom do lions cast their gentle looks?
Not to the beast that would usurp their den.
Whose hand is that the forest bear doth lick?
Not his that spoils her young before her face.
Who ‘scapes the lurking serpent’s mortal sting?
Not he that sets his foot upon her back.
The smallest worm will turn being trodden on,
And doves will peck in safeguard of their brood.
Ambitious York doth level at thy crown,
Thou smiling while he knit his angry brows.

DUTCH:
Mijn hooge vorst, schud die te groote zachtheid,
Dit schaad’lijk medelijden van u af.
Wien werpen leeuwen zachte blikken toe?
Toch niet aan ‘t beest, dat in hun hol wil dringen.

MORE:

Proverb: Tread on a worm and it will turn

Lenity=Mildness
Spoils=Seizes, hunts
Level at=Is aiming for
In safeguard of=To protect

Compleat:
Lenity=Zachtheid, zoetelykheid, gedweegzaamheid, slapheid
To spoil=Bederven, vernielen, berooven
Safeguard=Beschutting, bescherming

Topics: pity, mercy, nature, ambition, strength

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
CLARENCE
Untutor’d lad, thou art too malapert.
PRINCE EDWARD
I know my duty; you are all undutiful:
Lascivious Edward, and thou perjured George,
And thou misshapen Dick, I tell ye all
I am your better, traitors as ye are:
And thou usurp’st my father’s right and mine.
KING EDWARD IV
Take that, thou likeness of this railer here.
GLOUCESTER
Sprawl’st thou? Take that, to end thy agony.
CLARENCE
And there’s for twitting me with perjury.

DUTCH:
En dit, wijl gij van eedbreuk mij beticht!

MORE:

Malapert=Impudent
Undutiful= Not performing duties
Railer=Person who rants, scolds
Sprawl=Writhing (still alive)
Twit=To reproach, accuse

Compleat:
To twit in the teeth=Verwyten
Twitting=Verwyting, verwytende
Malapert=Moedwillig, stout, baldaadig
Undutiful=Ongehoorzaam, ondienstwillig
To rail=Schelden
To twit in the teeth=Verwyten
Twitting=Verwyting, verwytende

Topics: order/society, blame, duty, truth

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
QUEEN MARGARET
Warwick, these words have turn’d my hate to love;
And I forgive and quite forget old faults,
And joy that thou becomest King Henry’s friend.
WARWICK
So much his friend, ay, his unfeigned friend,
That, if King Lewis vouchsafe to furnish us
With some few bands of chosen soldiers,
I’ll undertake to land them on our coast
And force the tyrant from his seat by war.
‘Tis not his new-made bride shall succour him:
And as for Clarence, as my letters tell me,
He’s very likely now to fall from him,
For matching more for wanton lust than honour,
Or than for strength and safety of our country.

DUTCH:
Warwick, die taal verkeert mijn hart in liefde;
En ik vergeef, vergeet alle oude schuld,
Verheugd, dat gij de vriend van Hendrik zijn wilt.

MORE:

Proverb: Forgive and forget (1526)

Unfeigned=Genuine
Vouchsafe=Condescend, deign to
Furnish=Equip
Succour=Support, assist

Compleat:
Unfeigned=Ongeveinsd
To vouchsafe=Gewaardigen, vergunnen
To furnish=Veschaffen, vorzien, verozrgen, stoffeeren, toetakelen
Succour=Te hulp komen, bystaan
Succours=Hulpbenden, krygshulpe

Topics: proverbs and idioms, flaw/fault, friendship

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
The army of the queen hath got the field:
My uncles both are slain in rescuing me;
And all my followers to the eager foe
Turn back and fly, like ships before the wind
Or lambs pursued by hunger-starved wolves.
My sons, God knows what hath bechanced them:
But this I know, they have demean’d themselves
Like men born to renown by life or death.
Three times did Richard make a lane to me.
And thrice cried ‘Courage, father! fight it out!’
And full as oft came Edward to my side,
With purple falchion, painted to the hilt
In blood of those that had encounter’d him:
And when the hardiest warriors did retire,
Richard cried ‘Charge! and give no foot of ground!’
And cried ‘A crown, or else a glorious tomb!
A sceptre, or an earthly sepulchre!’
With this, we charged again: but, out, alas!
We bodged again; as I have seen a swan
With bootless labour swim against the tide
And spend her strength with over-matching waves.

DUTCH:
Wij deinsden weer, zooals ik vaak een zwaan
Vergeefs den springvloed tegenroeien zag,
Zijn kracht in de onweerstaanb’re golven spillend.

MORE:

Eager=Impetuous
Turn back=Turn their backs (run away from the enemy)
Bechanced=Happened to
Demeaned=Behaved
Make a lane=Cut a pathway to
Falchion=Curved sword
Bodge=Flinch, budge (yield, give way)
Bootless=Hopeless, futile, wasted
Overmatching=Too powerful

Compleat:
Eager=Graag, happig, greetig; heftig, vuurig, vinnig
To demean himself=Zich draagen, aanstellen
Falchion=Een klein kromachtig zwaerd, sabeltje (also fauchion)
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos

Topics: haste, risk, failure

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: George
CONTEXT:
GEORGE
But when we saw our sunshine made thy spring,
And that thy summer bred us no increase,
We set the axe to thy usurping root;
And though the edge hath something hit ourselves,
Yet know thou, since we have begun to strike,
We’ll never leave till we have hewn thee down
Or bathed thy growing with our heated bloods.
EDWARD
And, in this resolution, I defy thee;
Not willing any longer conference,
Since thou deniest the gentle king to speak.
Sound trumpets! Let our bloody colours wave!
And either victory, or else a grave.

DUTCH:
Maar onze zonneschijn schonk u een lente,
En nooit bracht ons uw zomer een’gen groei;
Dies legden we aan den vreemden stam onze aks

MORE:

Sunshine=Beneficial influence
Spring=Rise, thriving
Bred us no increase=We haven’t gained from
Usurping=Encroaching, seizing (esp. of royal rights)

Compleat:
To spring=(forth, out or up)=Uitspruiten, uitschieten, opschieten; (raise or proceed) Ontstaan
To breed=(ill blood) Kwaad bloed zetten; (mischief) Kwaad berokkenen; (quarrels) Krakkeel verwekken
To usurp=’t Onrecht aanmaatigen, met geweld in ‘t bezit dringen, overweldigen
Usurpation=Een onrechtmaatige bezitneeming, of indrang, dwinggebruik, overweldiging
Usurping=Een onrechtmaatige bezitting; ‘t onrecht aanmaatigende

Topics: revenge, ruin, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
What fates impose, that men must needs abide;
It boots not to resist both wind and tide.

DUTCH:
De mensch verduur’ zijn noodlot, goed of kwaad;
En wind èn tij te trotsen, geeft geen baat.

MORE:

Must needs=Needs must
Boots not=No point, profit, advantage

Compleat:
It must needs be so=Het moet noodzaakelyk zo zyn
It is to no boot=Het doet geen nut, ‘t is te vergeefs

Topics: fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
But Warwick’s king is Edward’s prisoner:
And, gallant Warwick, do but answer this:
What is the body when the head is off?
GLOUCESTER
Alas, that Warwick had no more forecast,
But, whiles he thought to steal the single ten,
The king was slily finger’d from the deck!
You left poor Henry at the Bishop’s palace,
And, ten to one, you’ll meet him in the Tower.

DUTCH:
Wat is het lichaam, zoo het hoofd ontbreekt?

MORE:

Forecast=Forethought, anticipated
The single ten=Just the ten card from the deck
Fingered from=Pinched from

Compleat:
Forecast=Vooruitzigt, voorbedachtzaamheid, voorzigtigheid
Light-fingered=Elk een vinger verstrekt hem voor een haak

Topics: authority, strength, relationship, , unity/collaboration

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
For what doth cherish weeds but gentle air?
And what makes robbers bold but too much lenity?
Bootless are plaints, and cureless are my wounds;
No way to fly, nor strength to hold out flight:
The foe is merciless, and will not pity;
For at their hands I have deserved no pity.
The air hath got into my deadly wounds,
And much effuse of blood doth make me faint.
Come, York and Richard, Warwick and the rest;
I stabb’d your fathers’ bosoms, split my breast.

DUTCH:
En wat maakt roovers stout dan te veel zachtheid?
Vruchtloos zijn klachten, zonder baat mijn wonden.

MORE:

Cherish=Encourage (growth)
Bootless=Hopeless, futile, wasted
Plaints=Complaints
Cureless=Incurable
Effuse=Outpouring

Compleat:
Plaint=Klagte, aanklagte
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos
Plaint=Klagte, aanklagte
To be past cure=Ongeneeslyk zyn
Effusion=Uitstorting, uitgieting, vergieting
A great effusion of blood=Een groote bloedvergieting, bloedstorting

Topics: corruption, pity

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
Unreasonable creatures feed their young;
And though man’s face be fearful to their eyes,
Yet, in protection of their tender ones,
Who hath not seen them, even with those wings
Which sometime they have used with fearful flight,
Make war with him that climb’d unto their nest,
Offer their own lives in their young’s defence?
For shame, my liege, make them your precedent!
Were it not pity that this goodly boy
Should lose his birthright by his father’s fault,
And long hereafter say unto his child,
‘What my great-grandfather and grandsire got
My careless father fondly gave away’?
Ah, what a shame were this! Look on the boy;
And let his manly face, which promiseth
Successful fortune, steel thy melting heart
To hold thine own and leave thine own with him.

DUTCH:
Waar’ ‘t niet een jammer, dat die wakk’re knaap
Zijn erfdeel door zijns vaders schuld zou derven,
En tot zijn zoon in later tijd moest zeggen: —
„Wat groot- en oudgrootvader eens verwierven,
Dat gaf mijn zwakke vader zorgloos weg!”

MORE:

Unreasonable=Without the power of reason (unreasonable creatures=animals)
Fearful=(1)Frightening; (2) Terrified
Sometime=On occasion
Fondly=Foolishly
Steel=To harden

Compleat:
To steel (or harden)=Hardmaaken, verharden
Fond=Zot, dwaas, ongerymt

Topics: reason, courage, value, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
QUEEN MARGARET
(…) And what is Edward but ruthless sea?
What Clarence but a quicksand of deceit?
And Richard but a ragged fatal rock?
All these the enemies to our poor barque.
Say you can swim; alas, ’tis but a while!
Tread on the sand; why, there you quickly sink:
Bestride the rock; the tide will wash you off,
Or else you famish; that’s a threefold death.
This speak I, lords, to let you understand,
If case some one of you would fly from us,
That there’s no hoped-for mercy with the brothers
More than with ruthless waves, with sands and rocks.
Why, courage then! What cannot be avoided
‘Twere childish weakness to lament or fear.

DUTCH:
Dus, moed! Om dat te jamm’ren, dat te duchten,
Wat onvermijd’lijk is, waar’ kindervrees.

MORE:

Quicksand=Moving sand, not a solid footing
Ragged=Rough, jagged
Fatal=Deadly
Barque=Ship (bark)
If case=In the event, if it should happen that

Compleat:
Quick sands=Zanden in zee, droogten
Fatal=Noodlottig, noodschikkelyk, verderflyk, doodelyk
Bark=Scheepje

Topics: deceit, adversity, stability

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
O monstrous fault, to harbour such a thought!
Then, since this earth affords no joy to me,
But to command, to check, to o’erbear such
As are of better person than myself,
I’ll make my heaven to dream upon the crown,
And, whiles I live, to account this world but hell,
Until my mis-shaped trunk that bears this head
Be round impaled with a glorious crown.
And yet I know not how to get the crown,
For many lives stand between me and home:
And I,—like one lost in a thorny wood,
That rends the thorns and is rent with the thorns,
Seeking a way and straying from the way;
Not knowing how to find the open air,
But toiling desperately to find it out,—
Torment myself to catch the English crown:
And from that torment I will free myself,
Or hew my way out with a bloody axe.
Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile,
And cry ‘Content’ to that which grieves my heart,
And wet my cheeks with artificial tears,
And frame my face to all occasions.

DUTCH:
Glimlachen kan ik en glimlachend moorden,
En roepen: „mooi!” bij wat mijn ziele grieft,

MORE:

Proverb: To laugh (smile) in one’s face and cut one’s throat

Check=Rebuke, punish
Overbear=Dominate
Home=My objective
Artificial=Fake, feigned
Rends=Tears

Compleat:
Check=Berisping, beteugeling, intooming
To over-bear=Overtreffen, onderkrygen; (oppress) Onderdrukken
Artificial=Konstig, behendig, aardig, dat niet natuurlyk is
To rend=Scheuren, van een ryten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, deceit, appearance, flaw/fault, ambition

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Great lords, wise men ne’er sit and wail their loss,
But cheerly seek how to redress their harms.
What though the mast be now blown overboard,
The cable broke, the holding-anchor lost,
And half our sailors swallow’d in the flood?
Yet lives our pilot still. Is’t meet that he
Should leave the helm and like a fearful lad
With tearful eyes add water to the sea
And give more strength to that which hath too much,
Whiles, in his moan, the ship splits on the rock,
Which industry and courage might have saved?

DUTCH:
Geen wijze zit en jammert om verliezen;
Neen, moedig streeft hij naar ‘t herstel er van.

MORE:

Proverb: One must not bemoan (wail) a mischief but find out a remedy for it
Proverb: To cast water into the sea (Thames)

Wail=Bemoan
Cheerly=Cheerfully
Redress=Remedy
Meet=Appropriate
In his moan=While he laments

Compleat:
To bewail=Beweenen, beschreijen
Redress=Herstelling, verhelping, verbetering, vergoeding, verligting
Meet=Dienstig

Topics: adversity, proverbs and idioms, remedy, hope/optimism

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
YORK
O Clifford, but bethink thee once again,
And in thy thought o’errun my former time;
And, if though canst for blushing, view this face,
And bite thy tongue, that slanders him with cowardice
Whose frown hath made thee faint and fly ere this!
CLIFFORD
I will not bandy with thee word for word,
But buckler with thee blows, twice two for one.
QUEEN MARGARET
Hold, valiant Clifford! for a thousand causes
I would prolong awhile the traitor’s life.
Wrath makes him deaf: speak thou, Northumberland.
NORTHUMBERLAND
Hold, Clifford! do not honour him so much
To prick thy finger, though to wound his heart:
What valour were it, when a cur doth grin,
For one to thrust his hand between his teeth,
When he might spurn him with his foot away?
It is war’s prize to take all vantages;
And ten to one is no impeach of valour.

DUTCH:
Drift maakt hem doof

MORE:

Idiom: To bite one’s tongue

Bethink thee=Reconsider
Bandy=To beat to and fro (fig. of words, looks); exchange words, squabble
Buckler=Ward off (with a buckler, a sort of shield)
O’errun=Review
Cur=Dog
Grin=Bare his teeth
Vantage=Opportunity
Impeach=Discredit

Compleat:
To bethink one’s self=Zich bedenken
Bandy=Een bal weer toeslaan; een zaak voor en tegen betwisten

Topics: anger, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Lewis
CONTEXT:
QUEEN MARGARET
From such a cause as fills mine eyes with tears
And stops my tongue, while heart is drown’d in cares.
KING LEWIS XI
Whate’er it be, be thou still like thyself,
And sit thee by our side:
KING LEWIS XI
Yield not thy neck
To fortune’s yoke, but let thy dauntless mind
Still ride in triumph over all mischance.
Be plain, Queen Margaret, and tell thy grief;
It shall be eased, if France can yield relief.

DUTCH:
Buig den nek toch niet
Voor ‘t juk van ‘t noodlot; zegevierend drave
Uw kloeke geest, den nood vertrappend, voort;

MORE:

Cares=Grief, sorrow
Still=Always
Yoke=Emblem of slavery
Dauntless=Fearless
Mischance=Misfortune
Tell=Tell about

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
Yoke=Een juk; (yoke of bondage) Het juk der dienstbaarheid
To stoop onder the yoke=Onder ‘t juk buigen
Dauntless=Onverschrokken, onbevreest
Mischance=Een misval, mislukking, ongeval, ongeluk

Topics: grief, sorrow, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Alas, poor Clarence! Is it for a wife
That thou art malcontent? I will provide thee.
CLARENCE
In choosing for yourself, you show’d your judgment,
Which being shallow, you give me leave
To play the broker in mine own behalf;
And to that end I shortly mind to leave you.
KING EDWARD IV
Leave me, or tarry, Edward will be king,
And not be tied unto his brother’s will.

DUTCH:
Uw eigen keus getuigde van uw oordeel;
Daar dit niet diep gaat, zij het mij vergund,
Dat ik als maak’laar van mijzelven optreed;
En daartoe ga ik eerstdaags u verlaten.

MORE:

Malcontent=Disaffected
Shallow=Silly, superficial
Mind=Intend
Tied unto=Bound by

Compleat:
Malecontent=Misnoegd, ‘t onvrede
Shallow=Ondiep
Shallowness, shallow wit=Kleinheid van begrip, dommelykheid
To mind=Betrachten
Minded=Gezind, genegen
To tie unto=Aan vast binden

Topics: judgment, independence, free will

Go to Top