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PLAY: Julius Caesar ACT/SCENE: 4.1 SPEAKER: Antony CONTEXT: OCTAVIUS
You may do your will,
But he’s a tried and valiant soldier.
ANTONY
So is my horse, Octavius, and for that
I do appoint him store of provender.
It is a creature that I teach to fight,
To wind, to stop, to run directly on,
His corporal motion governed by my spirit,
And, in some taste, is Lepidus but so.
He must be taught and trained and bid go forth,
A barren-spirited fellow, one that feeds
On objects, arts, and imitations,
Which, out of use and staled by other men,
Begin his fashion. Do not talk of him
But as a property. And now, Octavius,
Listen great things. Brutus and Cassius
Are levying powers. We must straight make head.
Therefore let our alliance be combined,
Our best friends made, our means stretched.
And let us presently go sit in council
How covert matters may be best disclosed,
And open perils surest answered. DUTCH: Ja, wel beschouwd, is Lepidus niets meer,
Doet niets dan afgericht, bestuurd, gezweept,
En blijft een wezen zonder geest, zich voedend
Met waardeloozen afval, kunsten nadoend,
Die, oud en reeds door and’ren afgedankt,
Bij hem eerst mode worden.
MORE: Tried=Tested, experienced
Provender=Fodder
Wind=Turn
Corporal=Bodily
Spirit=Mind
Taste=Measure
Staled=Overused, outdated
Property=Tool, means to an end
Levying=Raising armed forces
Imitations=Counterfeits
Make head=Raise an army
Compleat:
Tried=Beproefd, te recht gesteld, verhoord
Provender=Voeder; paerden-voer
To wind=Draaijen
Corporal=Lichaamlyk
Spirit (wit, liveliness)=Verstand, vernuft
Taste=Proefje
To stale=Oud worden
To levy=(soldiers) Soldaaten ligten, krygsvolk werven
In imitation=Uyt naabootsing Topics: fashion/trends, independencelearning/education

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
I denied you not.
BRUTUS
You did.
CASSIUS
I did not. He was but a fool that brought
My answer back. Brutus hath rived my heart.
A friend should bear his friend’s infirmities,
But Brutus makes mine greater than they are.
BRUTUS
I do not, till you practice them on me.

DUTCH:
k Deed het niet; het was een dwaas,
Die u bescheid bracht. Brutus klooft mij ‘t hart;
Een vriend verdraagt de zwakken van zijn vriend;
Brutus vergroot de mijne bovenmate.

MORE:
Rived=Split
Bear=Endure, tolerate
Infirmities=Character flaws
Compleat:
Riven=Gescheurd, gebarsten
To bear=Draagen, verdraagen, voeren

Topics: friendship, flaw/fault

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
I do not like your faults.
CASSIUS
A friendly eye could never see such faults.
BRUTUS
A flatterer’s would not, though they do appear
As huge as high Olympus.
CASSIUS
Come, Antony, and young Octavius, come,
Revenge yourselves alone on Cassius,
For Cassius is aweary of the world—
Hated by one he loves; braved by his brother;
Checked like a bondman, all his faults observed,
Set in a notebook, learned, and conned by rote
To cast into my teeth. Oh, I could weep
My spirit from mine eyes.

DUTCH:
Een vriendenoog zou nooit die feilen zien.

MORE:
Proverb: To cast (hit) in the teeth

Checked=Rebuked
Braved=Defied
Bondsman=Slave
Cast into my teeth=Thrown in my face
Compleat:
Check=Berispen, beteugelen, intoomen, verwyten
Brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren
To lay in the teeth=Verwyten, braaveren

Topics: flaw/fault, friendship, proverbs and idioms, flattery

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
If this were true, then should I know this secret.
I grant I am a woman, but withal
A woman that Lord Brutus took to wife.
I grant I am a woman, but withal
A woman well-reputed, Cato’s daughter.
Think you I am no stronger than my sex,
Being so fathered and so husbanded?
Tell me your counsels. I will not disclose ’em.
I have made strong proof of my constancy,
Giving myself a voluntary wound
Here in the thigh. Can I bear that with patience,
And not my husband’s secrets?
BRUTUS
O ye gods,
Render me worthy of this noble wife!
Hark, hark! One knocks. Portia, go in awhile.
And by and by thy bosom shall partake
The secrets of my heart.
All my engagements I will construe to thee,
All the charactery of my sad brows.
Leave me with haste.

DUTCH:
Portia, ga een wijle binnen.
Zoo aanstonds zal uw boezem met mijn hart
Zijn zorgen deelen .
‘k Ontvouw u al waartoe ik mij verbond,
Heel ‘t raadselschrift van mijn bekommerd voorhoofd.
Verlaat mij nu met spoed.

MORE:
Withal=Nonetheless
Counsels=Secrets
Engagements=Commitments, pledges
Charactery=Handwriting (lines)
Compleat:
Engagement=Verbindtenis, verpligting
Charactery=Karakter-schrift, cyferschrift

Topics: secrecy, truth, trust, loyalty, honesty

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,
That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
That ever livèd in the tide of times.
Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood!
Over thy wounds now do I prophesy—
Which, like dumb mouths, do ope their ruby lips
To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue—
A curse shall light upon the limbs of men.
Domestic fury and fierce civil strife
Shall cumber all the parts of Italy.
Blood and destruction shall be so in use,
And dreadful objects so familiar,
That mothers shall but smile when they behold
Their infants quartered with the hands of war,
All pity choked with custom of fell deeds,
And Caesar’s spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice
Cry “Havoc!” and let slip the dogs of war,
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.

DUTCH:
Dat moeders, met een glimlach zelfs, haar spruiten
Door ‘s oorlogs hand gevierendeeld aanschouwen;
En deernis stikt door ‘t altijd zien van gruw’len.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Block 175 Corporation v. Fairmont Hotel Management Company, 648 F.Supp. 450, 451 (D.Colo. 1986); Carlisle v. State, 295 Ala. 396, 326 So.2d 776, 777 (1976)(”The whole subject of bail needs a thorough examination by the legislature, the courts, and the people of this state. When I say ‘people,’ I mean the whole body politic. The people should not stand idly by, ‘cry havoc, and let slip the dogs of
war.’ );
Fiscal Court of Jefferson County v. City of Windy Hills, Kentucky, 559 S.W.2d
478, 481 (Ky. 1977).

Cry havoc. Old French ‘crier havot’, originally a signal to plunder, assumes in English. In Shakespeare it is a general call to battle and slaughter (Julius Caesar) and may have the same meaning in Hamlet.

Piece of earth=Corpse
Times=History
Costly=Precious, expensive
Light=Fall, alight
Cumber=Oppress
Custom of=Familiarity with
Fell=Fierce
Ranging=Pacing, searching
Atë=The ancient Greek goddess of discord, destruction and folly
Confines=Regions
Havoc=Military order to slaughter and privilege
Compleat:
Costly=Kostelyk, staatelyk
To cumber=Beslommeren, bekommeren
Custom=Gewoonte, gebruik
Fell=Fel, wreed
To range up and down=Heen en weer loopen
Confines=Grenzen
Havock=Roof, plundering, deurbrenging

Burgersdijk notes:
Verzeld van Ate. Ate is de Furie van de Tweedracht, ook vermeld in “Veel Leven om niets” en in “Koning Jan”; hier wordt zij voorgesteld als ter jacht, en op het punt van de honden van den krijg, tot nog toe aan de lijn gehouden, los te laten. Wat Sh. onder deze honden verstaat, blijkt uit Koning Hendrik V: “Voor zjjn voeten kropen, Als honden aangekoppeld, vuur en zwaard En honger rond om
werk.”

Topics: cited in law, reputation, legacy, death, betrayal

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Into what dangers would you lead me, Cassius,
That you would have me seek into myself
For that which is not in me?
CASSIUS
Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear.
And since you know you cannot see yourself
So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.
And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus.
Were I a common laughter, or did use
To stale with ordinary oaths my love
To every new protester, if you know
That I do fawn on men and hug them hard
And, after, scandal them, or if you know
That I profess myself in banqueting
To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.

DUTCH:
En wijl gij weet, dat gij uzelf niet beter
Dan door weerkaatsing zien kunt, zoo wil ik,
Uw spiegel, welbezonnen dat van u
Aan u onthullen, wat gijzelf niet weet.

MORE:
Glass=Mirror
Jealous=Suspicion
Gentle=Mild, kind; noble
To stale=Debase, sully
Laughter=Object of ridicule
Ordinary=Common
Protester=Promiser of loyalty
Fawn on=Flatter
Scandal=Defame
Compleat:
Glass=Spiegel
Jealous=Belgziek, yverzuchtig, minnenydig; naayverig, argwaanig, achterdochtig, achterkousig, jaloers
Gentle=Aardig, edelmoedig
Ordinary=Gewoonlyk, gemeen
Protester=Een aankondiger, betuiger
To fawn upon=Vleijen, streelen
To scandal=Lasteren, enteeren

Topics: honesty, truth, envy, friendship, suspicion

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Octavius
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
So is my horse, Octavius, and for that
I do appoint him store of provender.
It is a creature that I teach to fight,
To wind, to stop, to run directly on,
His corporal motion governed by my spirit,
And, in some taste, is Lepidus but so.
He must be taught and trained and bid go forth,
A barren-spirited fellow, one that feeds
On objects, arts, and imitations,
Which, out of use and staled by other men,
Begin his fashion. Do not talk of him
But as a property. And now, Octavius,
Listen great things. Brutus and Cassius
Are levying powers. We must straight make head.
Therefore let our alliance be combined,
Our best friends made, our means stretched.
And let us presently go sit in council
How covert matters may be best disclosed,
And open perils surest answered.
OCTAVIUS
Let us do so. For we are at the stake
And bayed about with many enemies.
And some that smile have in their hearts, I fear,
Millions of mischiefs.

DUTCH:
Goed, want wij zijn als beren aan een paal,
Rondom door weerpartijders aangebast;
En menigeen, die glimlacht, voedt, zoo vrees ik,
In ‘t harte booshecn zonder tal.

MORE:
Provender=Fodder
Wind=Turn
Corporal=Bodily
Spirit=Mind
Taste=Measure
Staled=Overused, outdated
Property=Tool, means to an end
Levying=Raising armed forces
Imitations=Counterfeits
Make head=Raise an army
At the stake=Ref. to bear-baitig, entertainment where bears were chained to stakes and made to fight other animals
Compleat:
Provender=Voeder; paerden-voer
To wind=Draaijen
Corporal=Lichaamlyk
Spirit (wit, liveliness)=Verstand, vernuft
Taste=Proefje
To stale=Oud worden
To levy=(soldiers) Soldaaten ligten, krygsvolk werven
In imitation=Uyt naabootsing

Topics: fashion/trends, independencelearning/education, conflict, rivals

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
It must be by his death, and for my part
I know no personal cause to spurn at him
But for the general. He would be crowned.
How that might change his nature, there’s the question.
It is the bright day that brings forth the adder
And that craves wary walking. Crown him that,
And then I grant we put a sting in him
That at his will he may do danger with.
Th’ abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power. And, to speak truth of Caesar,
I have not known when his affections swayed
More than his reason. But ’tis a common proof
That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,
Whereto the climber upward turns his face.
But when he once attains the upmost round,
He then unto the ladder turns his back,
Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees
By which he did ascend. So Caesar may.
Then, lest he may, prevent. And since the quarrel
Will bear no colour for the thing he is,
Fashion it thus: that what he is, augmented,
Would run to these and these extremities.
And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg—
Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous—
And kill him in the shell.

DUTCH:
En daarom, acht hem als een slangenei,
Dat, uitgekomen, boos wordt naar zijn aard ;
En doodt hem in den dop!

MORE:
Proverb: To turn one’s back on the ladder (ut down the stairs) by which one rose

Craves=Requires
Wary=Carefully
Sting=Stinger
Remorse=Compassion
Affection=Passion
Swayed=Ruled
Proof=Experience
Lowliness=Affected humility, obsequiousness
Mischievous=Harmful
Fashion=Shape
Compleat:
Craving=Smeeking, bidding; happig, greetig
Wary=Voorzigtig, omzigtig, behoedzaam
Sting=Angel, steekel
Remorse=Knaaging, wroeging, berouw
Affection=Hartstogt, geneegenheyd
To sway=(govern) Regeeren
Proof=Proeven
Lowliness=Nederigheyd; ootmoedigheyd
Mischievous=Boos, boosardig, schaadelyk, quaadstokend, verderflyk, schelms
To fashion=Een gestalte geeven, vormen, fatzoeneeren

Topics: achievement, status, loyalty, ambition, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
No, Cassius, no. Think not, thou noble Roman,
That ever Brutus will go bound to Rome.
He bears too great a mind. But this same day
Must end that work the ides of March begun.
And whether we shall meet again I know not.
Therefore our everlasting farewell take.
Forever and forever farewell, Cassius.
If we do meet again, why, we shall smile.
If not, why then this parting was well made.
CASSIUS
Forever and forever farewell, Brutus.
If we do meet again, we’ll smile indeed.
If not, ’tis true this parting was well made.

DUTCH:
En of we elkander weerzien, weet ik niet.
Daarom, voor altoos afscheid nu genomen!
Vaar, Cassius, vaar voor eeuwig, eeuwig wel!
Zie ik u weer, met blijden lath zal ‘t zijn;
Zoo niet, dan was dit afscheid welgedaan.

MORE:
Bound=Tied
End=Outcome
Compleat:
Bound=Gebonden, verbonden, verpligt, dienstbaar

Topics: leadership, friendship

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Casca
CONTEXT:
CASCA
Are not you moved when all the sway of earth
Shakes like a thing unfirm? O Cicero,
I have seen tempests when the scolding winds
Have rived the knotty oaks, and I have seen
Th’ ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam
To be exalted with the threatening clouds,
But never till tonight, never till now,
Did I go through a tempest dropping fire.
Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
Or else the world, too saucy with the gods,
Incenses them to send destruction.

DUTCH:
Treft u dit niet, dat heel ‘t gevaart der aarde
Trilt als een tenger riet?

MORE:
Sway=Realm
Riven=Split, cleave
Exalted=Lifted as high as
Saucy=Insolent
Incense=Anger
Compleat:
Sway=Heerschappij
Riven=Gescheurd, gebarsten
Exalted=Verhoogd, verheven
Saucy=Stout, onbeschaamd, baldaadig
To incense=Ophitsen, vertoornen, tergen

Topics: nature, anger

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and
lovers! Hear me for my cause, and be silent that you may
hear. Believe me for mine honour, and have respect to
mine honour that you may believe. Censure me in your
wisdom, and awake your senses that you may the better
judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend
of Caesar’s, to him I say that Brutus’ love to Caesar
was no less than his. If then that friend demand why
Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: not that
I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you
rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that
Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved
me, I weep for him. As he was fortunate, I rejoice at
it. As he was valiant, I honour him. But, as he was
ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love, joy
for his fortune, honour for his valour, and death for his
ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman?
If any, speak—for him have I offended. Who is here so
rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak—for him
have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love
his country? If any, speak—for him have I offended. I
pause for a reply.

DUTCH:
Wijl Caesar mij liefhad, ween ik om hem ; wijl hij gelukkig was, verheug ik mij daarin ; wijl hij dapper was, vereer ik hem; maar wijl hij heerschzuchtig was, versloeg ik hem.

MORE:
The last=The end (until I have finished)
Censure=Judge
Sense=Understanding, mind
Bondman=Slave
Offended=Wronged
Rude=Ignorant
Compleat:
Censure=Bestraffing, berisping, oordeel, toets
Sense=Het gevoel; gevoeligheid; besef; reden
Bond-man, Bond-slave=Een Slaaf
Offend=Misdoen, ergeren, aanstoot geeven, verstoordmaaken, beledigen
Rude=Ruuw; Groffelyk; Onbeschaafd

Topics: offence, civility

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Brutus, I do observe you now of late
I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have.
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
Over your friend that loves you.
BRUTUS
Cassius,
Be not deceived. If I have veiled my look,
I turn the trouble of my countenance
Merely upon myself. Vexèd I am
Of late with passions of some difference,
Conceptions only proper to myself,
Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviours.
But let not therefore, my good friends, be grieved—
Among which number, Cassius, be you one—
Nor construe any further my neglect
Than that poor Brutus, with himself at war,
Forgets the shows of love to other men.

DUTCH:
Bedrieg u niet; heb ik mijn blik omsluierd,
De wrevel van mijn oog en houding keert zich
Slechts tegen mij alleen.

MORE:
Now of late=Recently
Show=Manifestation (not pretended)
Wont=Accustomed, usual
Strange=Unfriendly
Veiled=Concealed
Of some difference=Conflicting
Proper=Appropriate
Soil=Disgrace, contrast
Construe any further=See anything more in
Compleat:
Show=Vertooning
Wont=Gewoonte
Strange=Vreemd, misselyk, zeldzaam
Veil (vail)=Bedekken, besluyeren
To difference=Verschil maaken, onderscheyden
Proper=Bequaam
Soiled=Bezoedeld, vuy gemaakt, bevlekt
Construe (conster)=Woordenschikken; t’Zamenschikken, t’zamenstellen

Topics: appearance, friendship, negligence

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Soothsayer
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry “Caesar!”—Speak. Caesar is turned to hear.
SOOTHSAYER
Beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
What man is that?
BRUTUS
A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
Set him before me. Let me see his face.
CASSIUS
Fellow, come from the throng. Look upon Caesar.

DUTCH:
Hoed u voor de’ Idusdag van Maart!

MORE:
Ides of March (15th) were originally the time for settling debts.
English playwright Nicholas Udall probably coined the expression ‘Ides of March’ in 1533 in his translations of descriptions of Caesar’s murder by Terence (Publius Terentius Afer, Roman poet), including: For Spurinna beinge a southsayer hadde warned Cesar before to beware of the Ides of Marche, for he shulde be slayne as that daye, and soo he was.

Press=Crowd
Soothsayer=Foreteller of events
Compleat:
Press=Gedrang
Soothsayer=Waarzegger

Topics: order/society, suspicion

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Ligarius
CONTEXT:
LIGARIUS
I am not sick if Brutus have in hand
Any exploit worthy the name of honour.
BRUTUS
Such an exploit have I in hand, Ligarius,
Had you a healthful ear to hear of it.
LIGARIUS
By all the gods that Romans bow before,
I here discard my sickness! Soul of Rome,
Brave son derived from honourable loins,
Thou, like an exorcist, hast conjured up
My mortifièd spirit. Now bid me run,
And I will strive with things impossible,
Yea, get the better of them. What’s to do?
BRUTUS
A piece of work that will make sick men whole.
LIGARIUS
But aren’t there some healthy men whom we’ll have to
make sick?

DUTCH:
Zet thans mij aan ;
‘k Aanvaard met wat onmoog’lijk is den strijd,
En win den kamp . Spreek, wat is ‘t, dat te doen staat?

MORE:
Exorcist=One who exorcises spirits
Mortifièd=Deadened, numbed, insensible
Bid me=Give the order/word
Compleat:
Exorcist=Een bezweerder, duyveljaager
To mortify=Dooden, tuchtigen, onderbrengen, quellen, den voet dwars zetten
To bid=Gebieden, beveelen, belasten, heeten, noodigen, bieden

Topics: wellbeing, remedy, plans/intentions

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
I could be well moved if I were as you.
If I could pray to move, prayers would move me.
But I am constant as the Northern Star,
Of whose true-fixed and resting quality
There is no fellow in the firmament.
The skies are painted with unnumbered sparks.
They are all fire and every one doth shine,
But there’s but one in all doth hold his place.
So in the world. ‘Tis furnished well with men,
And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive,
Yet in the number I do know but one
That unassailable holds on his rank,
Unshaked of motion. And that I am he
Let me a little show it even in this:
That I was constant Cimber should be banished,
And constant do remain to keep him so.

DUTCH:
Ware ik aan u gelijk, ik liet mij roeren ;
Mij roerde smeeking, smeekte ikzelf tot roering ;
Doch wank’len is mij vreemd, als aan de noordster,
Wier eeuwig vaste, rustige natuur
Aan ‘t firmament geen wedergade heeft.

MORE:
Proverb: My own flesh and blood

Be well=Easily be
Pray to move=Try to persuade others to change
Resting=Constant, unchanging
Fellow=Equal
Holds on=Maintains
Unshaked of motion=Immovable
Constant=Firm, resolute
Compleat:
Pray=Verzoeken
To move=Verroeren, gaande maaken; voorstellen
Resting=Verblyving; rustende
Fellow=Gezel, medegezel, maat, vennoot, makker, weergade
To hold on=Aanhouden, volharden
Unshaken=Ongeschud, onbeweegd, onbewoogen
Constant=Standvastig, bestending, gestadig

Topics: proverbs and idioms, persuasion, resolution

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Cicero
CONTEXT:
CASCA
A common slave—you know him well by sight—
Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
Like twenty torches joined, and yet his hand,
Not sensible of fire, remained unscorched.
Besides—I ha’ not since put up my sword—
Against the Capitol I met a lion,
Who glaz’d upon me and went surly by,
Without annoying me. And there were drawn
Upon a heap a hundred ghastly women,
Transformèd with their fear, who swore they saw
Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.
And yesterday the bird of night did sit
Even at noon-day upon the marketplace,
Hooting and shrieking. When these prodigies
Do so conjointly meet, let not men say,
“These are their reasons; they are natural.”
For I believe they are portentous things
Unto the climate that they point upon.
CICERO
Indeed, it is a strange-disposèd time.
But men may construe things after their fashion,
Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.
Comes Caesar to the Capitol tomorrow?

DUTCH:
Gewis, de tijd is wondervreemd geluimd;
Maar menigeen legt op zijn eigen wijs
De dingen uit en vaak geheel verkeerd.

MORE:
Proverb: The croaking raven bodes misfortune (death)

Sensible of=Feeling
Put up=Put away
Against=Opposite
Glazed=Stared
Heap=Crowd
Ghastly=White, ghostly
Bird of night=Owl (a bad omen)
Conjointly meet=Coincide
Climate=Region
Construe=Interpret
After their fashion=In their own way
Compleat:
Sensible=Gevoelig, voelbaar
To put up a sword=Een zwaard in de scheede steeken
Against=Tegen, tegens
Heap=Menigte; hoop, stapel
Conjointly=t’Zaamengevoegt, vereenigt
Climate=Streek, luchtstreek, gewest
Construe (conster)=Woordenschikken; t’Zamenschikken, t’zamenstellen
After the French fashion=Naar de Fransche zwier

Topics: language, understanding, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Now, most noble Brutus,
The gods today stand friendly that we may,
Lovers in peace, lead on our days to age.
But since the affairs of men rest still incertain,
Let’s reason with the worst that may befall.
If we do lose this battle, then is this
The very last time we shall speak together.
What are you then determinèd to do?
BRUTUS
Even by the rule of that philosophy
By which I did blame Cato for the death
Which he did give himself — I know not how,
But I do find it cowardly and vile,
For fear of what might fall, so to prevent
The time of life — arming myself with patience
To stay the providence of some high powers
That govern us below.

DUTCH:
Doch wijl der menschen lot onzeker blijft,
Zij ‘t ergste, wat gebeuren kan, voorzien!
Verliezen wij den slag, dan is het thans
De laatste maal, dat we ooit elkander spreken.
Wat hebt gij voorgenomen, dan te doen?

MORE:
Proverb: It is good to fear the worst

Rests still=Remains
Reason with=Anticipate the possibility of
Determined=Resolved
Fall=Befall, happen
Prevent=Anticipate
Time=Natural liit
Stay=Await
Providence=Fate decreed
Compleat:
Determined=Bepaald, gesloten
Befall=Gebeuren, overkomen
To prevent=Voorkomen, eerstkomen; afkeeren; verhoeden
To stay=Wagten
Providence=(wariness or foresight) Voorzigtigheid, wysheid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, preparation, hope/optimism, fate/destiny

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Casca
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Did Cicero say anything?
CASCA
Ay, he spoke Greek.
CASSIUS
To what effect?
CASCA
Nay, an I tell you that, I’ll ne’er look you i’ th’ face again. But those that understood him smiled at one another and shook their heads. But, for mine own part, it was Greek to me. I could tell you more news too. Murellus and Flavius, for pulling scarfs off Caesar’s images, are put to silence. Fare you well. There was more foolery yet, if I could remember it.
CASSIUS
Will you sup with me tonight, Casca?
CASCA
No, I am promised forth.
CASSIUS
Will you dine with me tomorrow?
CASCA
Ay, if I be alive and your mind hold and your dinner worth the eating.

DUTCH:
Maar die hem verstonden, glimlachten
tegen elkaar en schudden het hoofd; maar wat mij aangaat,
voor mij was het Grieksch.

MORE:
Proverb: It is Greek to me

Forth=Elsewhere
Hold=Stays the same
Compleat:
Forth=Uyt, na buyten
Hold on=Aanhouden, volharden

Burgersdijk notes:
Ja, lets in bet Grieksch. Er werd onder de voorname Romeinen zeer veel Grieksch gesproken; hier zou men kunnen vermoeden , dat Cicero het deed, opdat het volk hem niet zou verstaan, doch men behoeft er dit niet achter te zoeken. Casca had het zeker ook kunnen verstaan, als hij er dicht genoeg bij was geweest; wat hij laat volgen: „voor mij was het Grieksch”, is als een spreekwoordelijk gezegde op te vatten voor iets onverstaanbaars.

Topics: langage, understanding, still in use, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
I blame you not for praising Caesar so.
But what compact mean you to have with us?
Will you be pricked in number of our friends?
Or shall we on, and not depend on you?
ANTONY
Therefore I took your hands, but was indeed
Swayed from the point by looking down on Caesar.
Friends am I with you all and love you all
Upon this hope: that you shall give me reasons
Why and wherein Caesar was dangerous.
BRUTUS
Or else were this a savage spectacle!
Our reasons are so full of good regard
That were you, Antony, the son of Caesar,
You should be satisfied.

DUTCH:
Ik laak u niet, omdat gij Caesar prijst;
Doch op wat voet denkt gij met ons te staan?
Wilt gij bij de onzen zijn geteld, of moeten
Wij voortgaan en op uwe hulp niet reek’nen ?

MORE:
Compact=Agreement
Pricked in number=On a list, counted amongst
On=Proceed
Swayed=Distracted
Good regard=Proper consideration
Compleat:
Compact=Verdrag, verding, verbond

Topics: persuasion, reason, friendship

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Decius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
But it is doubtful yet
Whether Caesar will come forth today or no.
For he is superstitious grown of late,
Quite from the main opinion he held once
Of fantasy, of dreams and ceremonies.
It may be, these apparent prodigies,
The unaccustomed terror of this night,
And the persuasion of his augurers
May hold him from the Capitol today.
DECIUS
Never fear that. If he be so resolved,
I can o’ersway him. For he loves to hear
That unicorns may be betrayed with trees,
And bears with glasses, elephants with holes,
Lions with toils, and men with flatterers.
But when I tell him he hates flatterers,
He says he does, being then most flatterèd.
Let me work.
For I can give his humour the true bent,
And I will bring him to the Capitol.

DUTCH:
Maar als ik zeg, dat hij de vleiers haat,
Dan stemt hij toe, en is zoo ‘t meest gevleid .

MORE:
CITED IN IRISH LAW: Meridian Communications Ltd. v. Eircell Ltd. [2001] IEHC 195 (5 April 2001)

Doubtful yet=Still uncertain
Ceremonies=Rites
Prodigy=Omen, portent
Augurers=Soothsayers
Bent=Inclination
Compleat:
Doubtfull=Twyfelachtig
Ceremony=Plegtigheyd
Prodigy (omen, portent)=Voorbeduidsel
An augur=Een vogel-waarzegger
To augurate=Voorzeggen, voorspellen
Bent=Buiging, neiging

Burgersdijk notes:
Dat de eenhoorn zich met boomen laat verschalken. De fabelachtige Eenhoorn, uit het Engelsch wapen welbekend, wordt als een zeer grimmig dier goschilderd. Om het te overmeesteren, zorgde de jager, door plotseling achter een boom te treden, dat de eenhoorn, in voile vaart aanrennend, met zijn hoorn in den boom beklemd raakte.
De beer met spiegels. Blijkbaar moest een spiegel den beer zijn beeld vertoonen en hem ophouden, opdat de jager naderen kon of beter kans had om het dier te treffen.

Topics: cited in law, fate/destiny, flattery

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
What can be avoided
Whose end is purposed by the mighty gods?
Yet Caesar shall go forth, for these predictions
Are to the world in general as to Caesar.
CALPHURNIA
When beggars die there are no comets seen.
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
CAESAR
Cowards die many times before their deaths.
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.

DUTCH:
De lafaard sterft veel malen eer hij sterft;
Nooit smaakt de dapp’re meer dan eens den dood .

MORE:
CITED IN IRISH LAW: Rule against Perpetuities and Cognate Rules, Report on the (LRC 62-2000) [2000] IELRC 62 (1st December, 2000)/[2000] IELRC 62, [2000] IELRC 3. Footnote 34.

Proverb: A coward dies many deaths, a brave man but one

Purposed=Intended
Blaze forth=Proclaim
Never but=Only
Compleat:
To purpose=Voorneemen, voorhebben
To blaze=Opflakkeren
To blaze abroad=Ruchtbaar maaken, uyttrom

Topics: courage, proverbs and idioms, death, order/society, cited in law, poverty and wealth, equality

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,
That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
That ever livèd in the tide of times.
Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood!
Over thy wounds now do I prophesy—
Which, like dumb mouths, do ope their ruby lips
To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue—
A curse shall light upon the limbs of men.
Domestic fury and fierce civil strife
Shall cumber all the parts of Italy.
Blood and destruction shall be so in use,
And dreadful objects so familiar,
That mothers shall but smile when they behold
Their infants quartered with the hands of war,
All pity choked with custom of fell deeds,
And Caesar’s spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice
Cry “Havoc!” and let slip the dogs of war,
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.

DUTCH:
En Caesar’s geest, naar wrake snuivend, zal,
Verzeld van Ate, heet der hel ontstegen,
Met heerschersstem hier: ,,Slachting! slachting!” roepen,
En ‘s krijgs bloedhonden hitsen door heel ‘t land,
Dat doze schanddaad stinke tot den hemel,
Door ‘t menschenaas, dat om begraving kreunt.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Block 175 Corporation v. Fairmont Hotel Management Company, 648 F.Supp. 450, 451 (D.Colo. 1986); Carlisle v. State, 295 Ala. 396, 326 So.2d 776, 777 (1976)(”The whole subject of bail needs a thorough examination by the legislature, the courts, and the people of this state. When I say ‘people,’ I mean the whole body politic. The people should not stand idly by, ‘cry havoc, and let slip the dogs of
war.’ );
Fiscal Court of Jefferson County v. City of Windy Hills, Kentucky, 559 S.W.2d
478, 481 (Ky. 1977).

Cry havoc. Old French ‘crier havot’, originally a signal to plunder, assumes in English. In Shakespeare it is a general call to battle and slaughter (Julius Caesar) and may have the same meaning in Hamlet.

Piece of earth=Corpse
Times=History
Costly=Precious, expensive
Light=Fall, alight
Cumber=Oppress
Custom of=Familiarity with
Fell=Fierce
Ranging=Pacing, searching
Atë=The ancient Greek goddess of discord, destruction and folly
Confines=Regions
Havoc=Military order to slaughter and privilege
Compleat:
Costly=Kostelyk, staatelyk
To cumber=Beslommeren, bekommeren
Custom=Gewoonte, gebruik
Fell=Fel, wreed
To range up and down=Heen en weer loopen
Confines=Grenzen
Havock=Roof, plundering, deurbrenging

Burgersdijk notes:
Verzeld van Ate. Ate is de Furie van de Tweedracht, ook vermeld in “Veel Leven om niets” en in “Koning Jan”; hier wordt zij voorgesteld als ter jacht, en op het punt van de honden van den krijg, tot nog toe aan de lijn gehouden, los te laten. Wat Sh. onder deze honden verstaat, blijkt uit Koning Hendrik V: “Voor zjjn voeten kropen, Als honden aangekoppeld, vuur en zwaard En honger rond om
werk.”

Topics: cited in law, reputation, legacy, death, betrayal

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Do not presume too much upon my love.
I may do that I shall be sorry for.
BRUTUS
You have done that you should be sorry for.
There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats,
For I am armed so strong in honesty
That they pass by me as the idle wind,
Which I respect not. I did send to you
For certain sums of gold, which you denied me,
For I can raise no money by vile means.
By heaven, I had rather coin my heart
And drop my blood for drachmas than to wring
From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash
By any indirection. I did send
To you for gold to pay my legions,
Which you denied me. Was that done like Cassius?
Should I have answered Caius Cassius so?
When Marcus Brutus grows so covetous
To lock such rascal counters from his friends,
Be ready, gods, with all your thunderbolts.
Dash him to pieces!

DUTCH:
Verlaat u niet te zeer op mijne liefde;
Ik mocht iets doen, wat mij berouwen zou.

MORE:
That=That which, something
Terror in=Are not frightening
Idle=Insignificant
Respect=Heed
Indirection=Devious means
Coin=Convert into money
Covetous=Mean
Rascal=Inferior, sorry
Compleat:
Terror (terrour)=Schrik
Idle=Onnutte, wisje-wasje
Respect=Aanzien, opzigt, inzigt, ontzag, eerbiedigheyd
To coin=Geld slaan, geld munten
Covetous=Begeerlyk, begeerig, gierig, inhaalig
Rascal=Een schelm, guit, schobbejak, schurk, vlegel, schavuit

Topics: regret, respect, money

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
Et tu, Bruté?—Then fall, Caesar.
CINNA
Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead!
Run hence, proclaim, cry it about the streets.
CASSIUS
Some to the common pulpits, and cry out,
“Liberty, freedom, and enfranchisement!”
BRUTUS
People and senators, be not affrighted.
Fly not. Stand still. Ambition’s debt is paid.

DUTCH:
Brutus, ook gij? – Dan, Caesar, val!

MORE:
Dan, handen, spreekt voor mij.
Hierop volgen bij Sh. alleen de woorden : Zij doorsteken Ccsar, en
op Caesar’s laatste woorden : sterft. Deze aanwijzing is geheel voldoende
; latere uitgevers hebben haar naar aanleiding van Plutarchus
verhaal eenigszins uitgebreid. – De laatste woorden van Caesar
luiden bij Shakespeare : Et tu, Brute! Then fall, Caesar! Deze
zijn niet aan Plutarchus ontleend, die vermeldt, dat Caesar b(j den
eersten stoot, Casca’s hand grijpend, in bet Latijn uitriep : “Verrader
Casca, wat doet gij?” maar ziende, dat hij door zwaarden
omgeven was, zijn hoofd omhulde, zijn toga laag nedertrok om
op welvoegelijke wijs to vallen en aan bet voetstuk van Pompejus’
beeld nederstortte . In Suetonius’ leven van C . Julius Caesar,
C. 82, vindt men, dat volgens sommigen Caesar, toen hij Brutus
zag naderen, in bet Grieksch zeide : „Zijt ook gij van dezen, ook
gij, mijn zoon?” Waarschijnlijk werden de woorden Et tit, Brutel
als historisch aangemerkt, of waren aan bet publiek als zoodanig
bekend ; men vindt ten minste in de quarto-uitgave van 3 Koning
Hendrik VI, – niet in de folio, – in bet tooneel (V .1) waar Clarence
als bondgenoot van zijns broeders vijanden met zijn kri)* gsmacht
optreedt, dat Edward hem toespreekt : Et to Brute, wilt thou
stab Ccsar too ? waarop een mondgesprek van Clarence en Edward
volgt en Clarence overloopt met de woorden (reg . 81) : Weet gij,
wat dit beteekent, vader Warwick?” enz . Misschien waren de
woorden : Et tu, Brute? aan een Latijnschen Julius Caesar”, van
Richard Eedes, ontleend, welke in 1581 to Oxford gespeeld werd .

Topics: betrayal, conspiracy, offence, ambition

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Well, Brutus, thou art noble. Yet I see
Thy honourable mettle may be wrought
From that it is disposed. Therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes,
For who so firm that cannot be seduced?
Caesar doth bear me hard, but he loves Brutus.
If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
He should not humour me. I will this night,
In several hands, in at his windows throw,
As if they came from several citizens,
Writings all tending to the great opinion
That Rome holds of his name, wherein obscurely
Caesar’s ambition shall be glancèd at.
And after this let Caesar seat him sure,
For we will shake him, or worse days endure.

DUTCH:
Dies sluite steeds
Een hooge geest zich zijnsgelijken aan ;
Wie is zoo vast, dat niets hem ooit verleidt?

MORE:
Mettle=Spirit (Punning on metal and wrought)
Wrought=Altered
Disposed=Natural qualities
Bear me hard=Dislike me
Humour=Influence
Keep ever with=Stay with
Likes=Equals
Tending=Leaning towards
Glanced=Hinted at
Seat him sure=Comfortable, safe
Compleat:
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
Wrought=Gewerkt, gewrocht
Dispose=Beschikken, schikken
Like=Gelyk
To tend=Strekken
To glance upon a thing=Eventjes raaken; Ter loop iets aanroeren

Burgersdijk notes:
Nimmer leende ik aan hem het oor. In ‘t Engelsch : He should not humour me ; “hij zou mij niet winnen, niet bewerken, zijn luim niet doen dienen.” Mij dunkt, er staat duidelijk : Als ik Brutus was, en hij Cassius, dan zou hij mij niet bepraten, niet ompraten.” Er is geen reden om dit He op Caesar te laten slaan, en het zeggen op te vatten : „Dan zou Caesar, of Caesar’s liefde, mij niet bewegen, zjjn luim te dienen .” Deze verklaring komt mij gedwongen voor en past niet goed in het verband, dat naar de hier gegeven vertaling duidelijk genoeg is. “Als Cassius een hooger, edeler geest was, zooals Brutus, alzoo aan Caesar’s geest nader stond, en bovendien zich in Caesar’s liefde mocht verheugen, zou hij zich niet laten ompraten, maar zich aan Caesar houden.”

Topics: integrity, honour, reputation

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
OCTAVIUS’ SERVANT
He and Lepidus are at Caesar’s house.
ANTONY
And thither will I straight to visit him.
He comes upon a wish. Fortune is merry,
And in this mood will give us anything.
OCTAVIUS’ SERVANT
I heard him say, Brutus and Cassius
Are rid like madmen through the gates of Rome.
ANTONY
Belike they had some notice of the people
How I had moved them. Bring me to Octavius.

DUTCH:
Ik ga terstond er heen om hem te spreken .
Hij komt gewenscht. Het Lot is goed gestemd,
En zal in deze luim ons alles schenken.

MORE:
Straight=Go direct
Merry=In a good mood
Are rid=Have ridden their horses
Belike=Probably
Compleat:
Straightway=Eenswegs, terstond, opstaandevoet
Merry=Vrolyk

Topics: fate/destiny, hope/optimism

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
LUCILLIUS
Safe, Antony. Brutus is safe enough.
I dare assure thee that no enemy
Shall ever take alive the noble Brutus.
The gods defend him from so great a shame!
When you do find him, or alive or dead,
He will be found like Brutus, like himself.
ANTONY
This is not Brutus, friend, but, I assure you,
A prize no less in worth. Keep this man safe.
Give him all kindness. I had rather have
Such men my friends than enemies. Go on,
And see whether Brutus be alive or dead.
And bring us word unto Octavius’ tent
How everything is chanced.

DUTCH:
Toch geen gering’re vangst. Bewaak hem wel;
Bewijs hem enkel goedheid; want ik wensch
Een man als hij tot vriend veeleer dan vijand.

MORE:

Topics: security, friendship, value

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Your reason?
CASSIUS
This it is:
‘Tis better that the enemy seek us.
So shall he waste his means, weary his soldiers,
Doing himself offence, whilst we, lying still,
Are full of rest, defence, and nimbleness.
BRUTUS
Good reasons must of force give place to better.
The people ’twixt Philippi and this ground
Do stand but in a forced affection,
For they have grudged us contribution.
The enemy, marching along by them,
By them shall make a fuller number up,
Come on refreshed, new-added, and encouraged,
From which advantage shall we cut him off
If at Philippi we do face him there,
These people at our back.

DUTCH:
t Is beter, dat de vijand ons komt zoeken;
Zoo wordt zijn macht verzwakt, zijn volk vermoeid ;
Hij schaadt zichzelf, en wij, die rustig blijven,
Zijn frisch en vaardig en vol weerbaarheid.

MORE:
Means=Provisions
Doing himself offence=Weakening his own side
Of force=Of necessity
Contribution=Levies to support recruitment
New-added=Reinforced
Compleat:
Means=Middelen
To force=Dwingen, geweld aandoen
Contribution=Opbrenging, schattinggeld

Topics: conflict, wisdom, patience, advantage/benefit

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Words before blows. Is it so, countrymen?
OCTAVIUS
Not that we love words better, as you do.
BRUTUS
Good words are better than bad strokes, Octavius.
ANTONY
In your bad strokes, Brutus, you give good words.
Witness the hole you made in Caesar’s heart,
Crying “Long live, hail, Caesar!”
CASSIUS
Antony,
The posture of your blows are yet unknown.
But for your words, they rob the Hybla bees
And leave them honeyless.

DUTCH:
Goed woord gaat boven boozen slag, Octavius .

MORE:
Proverb: As sweet as honey
Proverb: Words before blows

Posture=Quality
Hybla=Hyblean. Reputed for excellent honey
Compleat:
Posture=Stand, gestalte

Burgersdijk notes:
Hybla’s bijen . De bijen van Hybla, een berg in Sicilils, waren bij de ouden om haar honig beroemd .

Topics: proverbs and idioms, language, conflict

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
Would he were fatter! But I fear him not.
Yet if my name were liable to fear,
I do not know the man I should avoid
So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much.
He is a great observer, and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men. He loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony. He hears no music.
Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mocked himself and scorned his spirit
That could be moved to smile at anything.
Such men as he be never at heart’s ease
Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,
And therefore are they very dangerous.
I rather tell thee what is to be feared
Than what I fear, for always I am Caesar.
Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf,
And tell me truly what thou think’st of him.

DUTCH:
Veel neemt hij waar en goed, en hij doorschouwt
Volkomen ‘s menschen doen ;

MORE:
Proverb: An envious man grows lean
Proverb: To turn (give) a deaf ear

Quite=Entirely
Looks through=Sees through
Sort=Manner
Heart’s ease=Heart’s content
This ear is deaf=Proverbially, this ear doesn’t want to hear/accept this message
Compleat:
Quite=t’Eenemaal, geheelendal, geheel, ganschelyk
Sort=Slach, wyze

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, risk, loyalty, skill/talent

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Flavius
CONTEXT:
FLAVIUS
Hence! Home, you idle creatures get you home!
Is this a holiday? What, know you not,
Being mechanical, you ought not walk
Upon a labouring day without the sign
Of your profession?—Speak, what trade art thou?
CARPENTER
Why, sir, a carpenter.
MURELLUS
Where is thy leather apron and thy rule?
What dost thou with thy best apparel on?
—You, sir, what trade are you?
COBBLER
Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am but, as
you would say, a cobbler.
MURELLUS
But what trade art thou? Answer me directly.
COBBLER
A trade, sir, that I hope I may use with a safe
conscience, which is, indeed, sir, a mender of bad
soles.
MURELLUS
What trade, thou knave? Thou naughty knave, what trade?

DUTCH:
Van hier, naar huis! gij, luie vlegels, voort!
Is dit een vrije dag?

MORE:
Mechanical=Labourer, working class
Thou=Use of thou signified familiarity or, as here, contempt
Rule=Punning on (1) ruler and (2) conduct
Cobbler=Punning on (1) shoemender and (2) bungler
Soles=Punning on (1) shoe soles and (2) souls
Compleat:
To cobble=Flikken, lappen, brodden; schoenlappen
Cobbler=(Cobler) Een schoenlapper, schoenflikker, broddelaar
Rule=Regel, lijn; bestieren, regeren

Burgersdijk notes:
Dat gij, als handwerkslieden, enz. Zulke bepalingen bestonden inderdaad, zoowel in Engeland als in
Duitschland .

Topics: status, order/society, work

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASCA
Indeed he is not fit.
DECIUS
Shall no man else be touched but only Caesar?
CASSIUS
Decius, well urged. I think it is not meet
Mark Antony, so well beloved of Caesar,
Should outlive Caesar. We shall find of him
A shrewd contriver. And, you know, his means,
If he improve them, may well stretch so far
As to annoy us all; which to prevent,
Let Antony and Caesar fall together.

DUTCH:
Mijns inziens mag
Marcus Antonius, Caesar’s liefste vriend,
Caesar niet overleven; want hij blijkt
Ons wis een sluw belager; en gij weet,
Maakt hij zijn midd’len zich ten nut, dan reiken
Zij ver tot ons verderf; dit zij voorkomen,
En dies zij Caesar’s val Antonius’ dood.

MORE:
Urged=Proposed, good suggestion
Meet=Appropriate
Shrewd=Malicious
Contriver=Plotter
Improve=Put to good use
Annoy=Harm
Compleat:
Urged=Gedrongen, geprest, aangedrongen
Meet=Dienstig
Shrewd=Loos, doortrapt, sneedig, vinnig, fel
To contrive=Bedenken, verzinnen
Improve=Wel besteeden, waarneemen, vorderen, toeneemen, bebouwen, aanqueeken, aanleggen, zich van bedienen, gebruyken
To annoy=Beschaadigen, quetsen, beleedigne, afbreuk doen
To annoy the enemy=Den Vyand abreuk doen

Topics: plans/intentions, conspiracy

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
How many ages hence
Shall this our lofty scene be acted over,
In states unborn and accents yet unknown!
BRUTUS
How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport,
That now on Pompey’s basis lies along
No worthier than the dust!
CASSIUS
So oft as that shall be,
So often shall the knot of us be called
“The men that gave their country liberty.”

DUTCH:
In welke verre tijden
Wordt dit verheven schouwtooneel herhaald,
In ongeboren Staten, nieuwe tongen!

MORE:
Accents=Languages
In sport=Entertainment
Basis=Base of P’s statue
Along=Stretched out
Knot=Small group
Compleat:
Accent=Klankteken, bygalm, schrapken, toon, woorklank
To make sport=Lachen, speelen
Knot=Een rist of trop

Topics: langage, understanding, legacy, reputation

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
I am not gamesome. I do lack some part
Of that quick spirit that is in Antony.
Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires.
I’ll leave you.
CASSIUS
Brutus, I do observe you now of late
I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have.
You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand
Over your friend that loves you.

DUTCH:
Een spel lokt mij niet aan; ik mis te veel
Van de opgewektheid, die Antonius heeft.

MORE:
Gamesome=Fond of sport; Frivolous, playful
Quick=Lively
Now of late=Recently
Show=Manifestation (not pretended)
Wont=Accustomed, usual
Strange=Unfriendly
Compleat:
Gamesom=Speelziek, weeldrig, dartel
Quick=Scherp
Show=Vertooning
Wont=Gewoonte
Strange=Vreemd, misselyk, zeldzaam

Topics: friendship, skill/talent

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Cobbler
CONTEXT:
COBBLER
A trade, sir, that I hope I may use with a safe
conscience, which is indeed, sir, a mender of bad
soles.
MURELLUS
What trade, thou knave? Thou naughty knave, what trade?
COBBLER
Nay, I beseech you, sir, be not out with me. Yet, if you be out, sir, I can mend you.
MURELLUS
What mean’st thou by that? “Mend” me, thou saucy fellow?

DUTCH:
Neen, ik bid u, leg er geen knoop op; want wezenlijk,
als er een steek aan u los is, kan ik u opknappen.

MORE:
Cobbler=Punning on (1) shoemender and (2) bungler
Soles=Punning on (1) shoe soles and (2) souls
“Out” double meaning: first out to mean angry, second out at heel (now down at heel); see also double meaning in a “mender of bad soles”.
Compleat:
To cobble=Flikken, lappen, brodden; schoenlappen
Cobbler=(Cobler) Een schoenlapper, schoenflikker, broddelaar
To be out=Missen, uythebben

Burgersdijk notes:
Het verbeteren van den slechten wandel der menschen. Het Engelsch heeft: a mender of bad soles. De woordspeling met soles en souls is in het Engelsch veel natuurlijker, en wat hier gegeven wordt, is veel te deftig, maar het is moeilijk lets beters te vinden; misschien zou kunnen dienen: Zonder mij ging de wereld op sloffen,” of wel: op sokken”.

Topics: status, order/society, work

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
FIRST PLEBEIAN
Methinks there is much reason in his sayings.
SECOND PLEBEIAN
If thou consider rightly of the matter,
Caesar has had great wrong.
THIRD PLEBEIAN
Has he, masters?
I fear there will a worse come in his place.
FOURTH PLEBEIAN
Marked ye his words? He would not take the crown.
Therefore ’tis certain he was not ambitious.
FIRST PLEBEIAN
If it be found so, some will dear abide it.

DUTCH:
Ik vrees, er komt een erger in zijn plaats.

MORE:
Has had=Has suffered
Rightly=Correctly
Dear abide=Pay dearly for
Compleat:
Wronged=Verongelykt, verkort
Rightly=Billyk
Abide=Blyven, harden, duuren, uytstaan
Dear=Waard, lief, dierbaar, dier

Topics: reason, language, ambition, punishment, error

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?
Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf
But that he sees the Romans are but sheep.
He were no lion were not Romans hinds.
Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
Begin it with weak straws. What trash is Rome,
What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
For the base matter to illuminate
So vile a thing as Caesar! But, O grief,
Where hast thou led me? I perhaps speak this
Before a willing bondman. Then I know
My answer must be made. But I am armed,
And dangers are to me indifferent.

DUTCH:
En waarom zou dan Caesar dwingland zijn?
Een nietig mensch! Ik weet, hij waar’ geen wolf,
Zoo hij niet in Romeinen schapen zag.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. The definition of “rubbish”: Gorman v City of Cleveland, 26 Ohio App. 109, 159 NE 136 (1927)

Why should=How can
Hinds=Female deer; servants
Base=Underlying; low
Trash=Twigs, straw
Vile=Worthless
Answer must be made=I am accountable
Offal=Garbage
Armed=Prepared
Indifferent=Insignifcant
Compleat:
Hind=Hinde; Boere knecht
Base=Ondergeschikt; Onderbehangsel
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed
Vile=Slecht, gering, verachtelyk, eerloos
Armed=Gewapend, toegerust
Indifferent=Onvercheelig, middelmaatig, koelzinnig, onzydig, passelyk, taamelyk, tussenbeyde

Topics: haste, preparation, reply, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
Good friends, sweet friends! Let me not stir you up
To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
They that have done this deed are honourable.
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,
That made them do it. They are wise and honourable,
And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts.
I am no orator, as Brutus is,
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man
That love my friend. And that they know full well
That gave me public leave to speak of him.
For I have neither wit nor words nor worth,
Action nor utterance nor the power of speech,
To stir men’s blood. I only speak right on.
I tell you that which you yourselves do know,
Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
And bid them speak for me. But were I Brutus,
And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue
In every wound of Caesar that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

DUTCH:
lk kom niet, vrienden, om uw hart te stelen;
lk ben geen reed’naar, zooals Brutus is;
Slechts, daarvoor kent gij mij , een boersch, rond man,
Mijn vriend getrouw ; dit wisten zij zeer goed,
Die mij vergunden hier van hem to spreken.
Ik heb geen woorden, wijsheid, geen gewicht,
Noch kunst, noch voordracht, noch de macht der taal,
Om ‘s menschen bloed te prikk’len, spreek eenvoudig,
Zeg enkel wat gijzelf wel weet.

MORE:
The “Nervii,” or Nervians, were a Belgian tribe whom Caesar defeated in battle in 57 BC

Stir up=Incite
Flood=Surge
Griefs=Grievances
Plain=Plain-speaking
Public leave to speak=Permission to speak privately
Words=Vocabulary
Worth=Authority
Right on=What I think
Utterance=Delivery
Ruffle up=Enrage
Compleat:
To stir up=Gaande maaken, verwekken, opwekken, aanprikkelen
To stir up to anger=Tot toorn verwekken
Grievance=Bezwaarenis
Plain=Vlak, effen, klaar, duydelyk, slecht, eenvoudig, oprecht
Vocabulary=Een klein woordenboek
Utterance=Uytspraak; aftrek, vertier

Topics: language, persuasion, leadership

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Soothsayer
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
Thou hast some suit to Caesar, hast thou not?
SOOTHSAYER
That I have, lady. If it will please Caesar
To be so good to Caesar as to hear me,
I shall beseech him to befriend himself.
PORTIA
Why, know’st thou any harm’s intended towards him?
SOOTHSAYER
None that I know will be; much that I fear may chance.
Good morrow to you. Here the street is narrow.
The throng that follows Caesar at the heels,
Of senators, of praetors, common suitors,
Will crowd a feeble man almost to death.
I’ll get me to a place more void, and there
Speak to great Caesar as he comes along.

DUTCH:
Dat heb ik, eed’le vrouw; behaagt het Caesar,
Uit goedheid jegens Caesar mij te hooren,
Dan bid ik hem zijn eigen vriend te zijn .

MORE:
Suit=Plea
Chance=Happen
Praetor=Senior judge
More void=Emptier, not as crowded
Compleat:
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding
To chance=Voorvallen, gebeuren
Void=Leedig, ontleedigd

Burgersdijk notes:
‘k Weet niets, dat moet, vrees veel, dat kan gebeuren. Ten onrechte vervangen verscheidene uitgevers dezen waarzegger, die niets bepaalds weet, maar beduchtheid koestert, door Artemidorus, die van de samenzwering veel nauwkeuriger kennis draagt .

Topics: defence, communication, fate/destiny

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Bear with me, good boy, I am much forgetful.
Canst thou hold up thy heavy eyes awhile,
And touch thy instrument a strain or two?
LUCIUS
Ay, my lord, an ’t please you.
BRUTUS
It does, my boy.
I trouble thee too much, but thou art willing.
LUCIUS
It is my duty, sir.
BRUTUS
I should not urge thy duty past thy might.
I know young bloods look for a time of rest.
LUCIUS
I have slept, my lord, already.
BRUTUS
It was well done, and thou shalt sleep again.
I will not hold thee long. If I do live,
I will be good to thee.

DUTCH:
lk moest niet meer verlangen dan gij kunt;
1k weet, het jonge bloed wil rust op tijd.

MORE:
Hold up heavy eyes=Stay awake
A strain=Strain of music
An=If
Past=Beyond
Might=Capabilities
Compleat:
A strain of musick=Een trant van muzyk
Past=Verleegen, geleden, voorby, over, gepasseerd
Might=Magt, vermoogen, kracht

Topics: memory, duty, loyalty

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Hear me, for I will speak.
Must I give way and room to your rash choler?
Shall I be frighted when a madman stares?
CASSIUS
O ye gods, ye gods, must I endure all this?
BRUTUS
“All this”? Ay, more. Fret till your proud heart break.
Go show your slaves how choleric you are
And make your bondmen tremble. Must I budge?
Must I observe you? Must I stand and crouch
Under your testy humour? By the gods,
You shall digest the venom of your spleen,
Though it do split you. For from this day forth,
I’ll use you for my mirth, yea, for my laughter,
When you are waspish.

DUTCH:
Bij de goden, zwelgen,
Verteren zult gijzelf uws wrevels gif;
Al moest gij er aan barsten; van nu aan
Zult gij mij voorwerp zijn voor spot en lach,
Als gij zoo giftig zijt.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
People v. Gardner, 56 Cal. App.3d 91, 97 n.2, 128 Cal. Rptr. 101, 106 n.2 (1976) Paras, J.).

Rash=Sudden
Choler=Anger, temper
Budge=Move, flinch
Choleric=Furious
Observe=Defer to
Crouch=Cower
Digest=Swallow
Spleen=Temper
Waspish=Sharp
Compleat:
Rash=Voorbaarig, haastig, onbedacht, roekeloos
To budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
To observe=Waarneemen, gadeslaan, onderhouden, aanmerken, opmerken
To crouch=Neerbuigen, neerbogen liggen
To digest=Verteeren, verdouwen, verkroppen; in orde schikken
Spleen (Spite, hatred or grudge)=Spyt, haat, wrak
Waspish=Kribbig, knyzig, snaauwachtig

Topics: anger, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Into what dangers would you lead me, Cassius,
That you would have me seek into myself
For that which is not in me?
CASSIUS
Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear.
And since you know you cannot see yourself
So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.
And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus.
Were I a common laughter, or did use
To stale with ordinary oaths my love
To every new protester, if you know
That I do fawn on men and hug them hard
And, after, scandal them, or if you know
That I profess myself in banqueting
To all the rout, then hold me dangerous.

DUTCH:
In wat gevaren, Cassius, lokt gij mij ?
Dat gij mij dringt mijn binnenst te doorvorschen
Naar wat niet in mij is?

MORE:
Glass=Mirror
Jealous=Suspicion
Gentle=Mild, kind; noble
To stale=Debase, sully
Laughter=Object of ridicule
Ordinary=Common
Protester=Promiser of loyalty
Fawn on=Flatter
Scandal=Defame
Compleat:
Glass=Spiegel
Jealous=Belgziek, yverzuchtig, minnenydig; naayverig, argwaanig, achterdochtig, achterkousig, jaloers
Gentle=Aardig, edelmoedig
Ordinary=Gewoonlyk, gemeen
Protester=Een aankondiger, betuiger
To fawn upon=Vleijen, streelen
To scandal=Lasteren, enteeren

Topics: honesty, truth, envy, friendship, suspicion

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Nay, I am sure it is, Volumnius.
Thou seest the world, Volumnius, how it goes.
Our enemies have beat us to the pit.
It is more worthy to leap in ourselves
Than tarry till they push us. Good Volumnius,
Thou know’st that we two went to school together.
Even for that our love of old, I prithee,
Hold thou my sword hilts, whilst I run on it.

DUTCH:
Het is zoo ; ‘k ben er zeker van, Volumnius .
Gij ziet, Volumnius, hoe de wereld loopt;
De vijand stiet ons tot aan ‘s afgronds rand;
Het past ons beter, zelf er in te springen,
Dan op zijn stoot to wachten.

MORE:
Beat=Driven
Pit=Animal trap

Topics: conflict, integrity, friendship

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
It must be by his death, and for my part
I know no personal cause to spurn at him
But for the general. He would be crowned.
How that might change his nature, there’s the question.
It is the bright day that brings forth the adder
And that craves wary walking. Crown him that,
And then I grant we put a sting in him
That at his will he may do danger with.
Th’ abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power. And, to speak truth of Caesar,
I have not known when his affections swayed
More than his reason. But ’tis a common proof
That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,
Whereto the climber upward turns his face.
But when he once attains the upmost round,
He then unto the ladder turns his back,
Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees
By which he did ascend. So Caesar may.
Then, lest he may, prevent. And since the quarrel
Will bear no colour for the thing he is,
Fashion it thus: that what he is, augmented,
Would run to these and these extremities.
And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg—
Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous—
And kill him in the shell.

DUTCH:
De warme dag lokt de adders uit haar hol;
Dan zie de wand’laar scherp!

MORE:
Proverb: To turn one’s back on the ladder (ut down the stairs) by which one rose

Craves=Requires
Wary=Carefully
Sting=Stinger
Remorse=Compassion
Affection=Passion
Swayed=Ruled
Proof=Experience
Lowliness=Affected humility, obsequiousness
Mischievous=Harmful
Fashion=Shape
Compleat:
Craving=Smeeking, bidding; happig, greetig
Wary=Voorzigtig, omzigtig, behoedzaam
Sting=Angel, steekel
Remorse=Knaaging, wroeging, berouw
Affection=Hartstogt, geneegenheyd
To sway=(govern) Regeeren
Proof=Proeven
Lowliness=Nederigheyd; ootmoedigheyd
Mischievous=Boos, boosardig, schaadelyk, quaadstokend, verderflyk, schelms
To fashion=Een gestalte geeven, vormen, fatzoeneeren

Topics: achievement, status, loyalty, ambition, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
The morning comes upon ’s. We’ll leave you, Brutus.
—And, friends, disperse yourselves. But all remember
What you have said, and show yourselves true Romans.
BRUTUS
Good gentlemen, look fresh and merrily.
Let not our looks put on our purposes,
But bear it as our Roman actors do,
With untired spirits and formal constancy.
And so good morrow to you every one.
BRUTUS
Boy! Lucius!—Fast asleep? It is no matter.
Enjoy the honey-heavy dew of slumber.
Thou hast no figures nor no fantasies,
Which busy care draws in the brains of men.
Therefore thou sleep’st so sound.

DUTCH:
En, wakk’re mannen, vroolijk rondgeblikt;
Draagt op uw voorhoofd niet uw plan ten toon;
Neen, zet het door, als helden op ‘t tooneel,
Met onbezweken geest en kalm gemoed.

MORE:
Put on=Show
Bear it=Carry ourselves
Formal=Dignified
Constancy=Firm mind
Figures=Illusions
Compleat:
To put on=Aandoen
+G84
Formal=Gestaltig, vormelyk, naauwgezet, gemaakt
Constancy=Standvastigheid, volharding, bestendigheid
Figure=Voorbeeldsel, afbeeldsel

Topics: purpose, appearance, conspiracy, conscience

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Our course will seem too bloody, Caius Cassius,
To cut the head off and then hack the limbs,
Like wrath in death and envy afterwards,
For Antony is but a limb of Caesar.
Let us be sacrificers but not butchers, Caius.
We all stand up against the spirit of Caesar,
And in the spirit of men there is no blood.
Oh, that we then could come by Caesar’s spirit
And not dismember Caesar! But, alas,
Caesar must bleed for it. And, gentle friends,
Let’s kill him boldly but not wrathfully.
Let’s carve him as a dish fit for the gods,
Not hew him as a carcass fit for hounds.
And let our hearts, as subtle masters do,
Stir up their servants to an act of rage
And after seem to chide ’em. This shall make
Our purpose necessary and not envious,
Which so appearing to the common eyes,
We shall be called purgers, not murderers.
And for Mark Antony, think not of him,
For he can do no more than Caesar’s arm
When Caesar’s head is off.

DUTCH:
Laat ons hem moedig dooden, niet in toorn ;
Laat ons hem off’ren, als een spijs voor goden,

MORE:
Idiom: A dish for the gods
Proverb: A king (prince) loves the treason but hates the traitor

Course=Action (also punning on ‘corse’, meaning corpse)
Head and limbs=Fig., body politic
Envy=Hatred
Subtle=Insidious
Envious=Malicious
Purgers=Healers
Compleat:
To take a course=Een gang gaan
To take bad courses=Quaade gangen gaan
Envy=Nyd, afgunst
Subtle=Listig, loos, sneedig, spitsvindig
Envious=Nydig, afgunstig, wangunstig
Purger=Een zuyveraar, reyniger

Burgersdijk notes:
En later schijnbaar gispen. And after seem to chide ’em . Het woord sluwe meesters, subtle masters, heeft Sh. het woord dienaars in plaats van “handen” doen gebruiken en ook deze woorden doen bezigen. Zoo zal het hart later de daad, die noodzakelijk geacht wordt, betreuren. Dat de gedachte aan huichelarij hier verre moet bljjven, spreekt wel van zelve.

Topics: still in use, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Men at some time are masters of their fates.
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Brutus and Caesar—what should be in that “Caesar”?
Why should that name be sounded more than yours?
Write them together, yours is as fair a name;
Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;
Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with ’em,
“Brutus” will start a spirit as soon as “Caesar.”
Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed
That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods!
When went there by an age, since the great flood,
But it was famed with more than with one man?
When could they say, till now, that talked of Rome,
That her wide walks encompassed but one man?
Now is it Rome indeed, and room enough
When there is in it but one only man.
O, you and I have heard our fathers say
There was a Brutus once that would have brooked
Th’ eternal devil to keep his state in Rome
As easily as a king.

DUTCH:
Soms is de mensch zelf meester van zijn lot;
Niet door de schuld van ons gesternte, Brutus,
Neen, door onszelve zijn wij klein en nietig.

MORE:
Misquoted as: “It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.”

CITED IN US LAW:
Myers v. Penzoil Company, 889 F.2d 1457, 1462 (5th Cir. 1989);
Brandywine-Main Line Radio, Ine. v. Federal Communications Commission, 473 F.2d 16, (D.C. Cir. 1972);
Continental X-Ray Corporation v. Popovich, 1992 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 1510, at 8 (N.D. Ill.); Cole v. Erie Lackawanna Railway, 396 F.Supp. 65, 68 (N.D. Ohio 1975)(“The fact that an employee may be required to join the union only points up more clearly the urgent need for permitting him to press his own claim and to secure his own future. ‘Men at some time .. .’ “);
Clark v. State, 308 Ark. 84, 824 S.W.2d 345 (1992).

At sometime=Once
Stars=Astrology
Sounded=Trumpeted, proclaimed
Meat=Food
Age=This era
Noble bloods=Noble lineage
Famed with=Renowned for
Compleat:
Somewhile=Een wyl tyd, te eeniger tyd
To sound=Blaazen
Age=Eeuw
Of noble extraction=Van adel, van edelen afkomst
To get a fame=Vermaard worden, in naam komen

Burgersdijk notes:
Na den grooten vloed. Cassius kan natuurlijk alleen aan den grooten vloed denken, waar Deucalion en Pyrrha uit overbleven. Dat de tooneeldichter, met het oog op zjjn gehoor, hier niet op Noach’s zondvloed gezinspeeld heeft, is echter moeilijk te beweren. Een oogenblik later wordt van den “opperduivel” gesproken, in ‘t Engelsch van the eternal devil, den alouden, eeuwigen duivel”. De woordspeling met Rome en ruim klinkt, of klonk, in het Engelsch beter dan in het Nederlandsch: de overeenkomst in de uitspraak van beide woorden is grooter.

Topics: fate/destiny, misquoted, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
FIRST PLEBEIAN
Methinks there is much reason in his sayings.
SECOND PLEBEIAN
If thou consider rightly of the matter,
Caesar has had great wrong.
THIRD PLEBEIAN
Has he, masters?
I fear there will a worse come in his place.
FOURTH PLEBEIAN
Marked ye his words? He would not take the crown.
Therefore ’tis certain he was not ambitious.
FIRST PLEBEIAN
If it be found so, some will dear abide it.

DUTCH:
Mij dunkt, er is veel waars in wat hij zegt.

MORE:
Has had=Has suffered
Rightly=Correctly
Dear abide=Pay dearly for
Compleat:
Wronged=Verongelykt, verkort
Rightly=Billyk
Abide=Blyven, harden, duuren, uytstaan
Dear=Waard, lief, dierbaar, dier

Topics: reason, ambition, betrayal

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
Moreover, he hath left you all his walks,
His private arbours and new-planted orchards,
On this side Tiber. He hath left them you
And to your heirs forever—common pleasures,
To walk abroad and recreate yourselves.
Here was a Caesar! When comes such another?
FIRST PLEBEIAN
Never, never.—Come, away, away!
We’ll burn his body in the holy place,
And with the brands fire the traitors’ houses.
Take up the body.
SECOND PLEBEIAN
Go fetch fire.
THIRD PLEBEIAN
Pluck down benches.
FOURTH PLEBEIAN
Pluck down forms, windows, anything.
ANTONY
Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot.
Take thou what course thou wilt!

DUTCH:
Nu werk’ het voort! Verderf, gij zijt op weg;
Neem welken loop gij wilt !

MORE:
Idiom: There’s mischief afoot

Arbour=Garden
Common pleasures=Public recreation
Windows=Shutters
Compleat:
Arbour=Prieeltje
Common=Gemeen

Topics: fate/destiny, consequence, still in use, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Hear me, for I will speak.
Must I give way and room to your rash choler?
Shall I be frighted when a madman stares?
CASSIUS
O ye gods, ye gods, must I endure all this?
BRUTUS
“All this”? Ay, more. Fret till your proud heart break.
Go show your slaves how choleric you are
And make your bondmen tremble. Must I budge?
Must I observe you? Must I stand and crouch
Under your testy humour? By the gods,
You shall digest the venom of your spleen,
Though it do split you. For from this day forth,
I’ll use you for my mirth, yea, for my laughter,
When you are waspish.

DUTCH:
Moet ik wijken?
U staag naar de oogen zien, en, blikt gij kregel,
Mij krommen, kruipen?

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
People v. Gardner, 56 Cal. App.3d 91, 97 n.2, 128 Cal. Rptr. 101, 106 n.2 (1976) Paras, J.).

Rash=Sudden
Choler=Anger, temper
Budge=Move, flinch
Choleric=Furious
Observe=Defer to
Crouch=Cower
Digest=Swallow
Spleen=Temper
Waspish=Sharp
Compleat:
Rash=Voorbaarig, haastig, onbedacht, roekeloos
To budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
To observe=Waarneemen, gadeslaan, onderhouden, aanmerken, opmerken
To crouch=Neerbuigen, neerbogen liggen
To digest=Verteeren, verdouwen, verkroppen; in orde schikken
Spleen (Spite, hatred or grudge)=Spyt, haat, wrak
Waspish=Kribbig, knyzig, snaauwachtig

Topics: anger, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion,
By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried
Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations.
Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?
BRUTUS
No, Cassius, for the eye sees not itself
But by reflection, by some other things.
CASSIUS
‘Tis just.
And it is very much lamented, Brutus,
That you have no such mirrors as will turn
Your hidden worthiness into your eye
That you might see your shadow . I have heard
Where many of the best respect in Rome,
Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus
And groaning underneath this age’s yoke,
Have wished that noble Brutus had his eyes.

DUTCH:
Neen, Cassius; ‘t oog ontwaart zichzelve niet,
Niet dan teruggekaatst, door and’re dingen

MORE:
Proverb: The eye sees not itself but by reflection
Also registered in the Oxford Dictionary of English Proverbs: “How wel or ill I haue done in it, I am ignorant: (the eye that sees round about it selfe, sees not into it selfe).”
Cassius replies later:
“And since you know you cannot see yourself
So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
Will modestly discover to yourself
That of yourself which you yet know not of.”

Buried=Concealed
Worthy=Important
Cogitations=Thoughts
Just=True
Turn=Reflect
Shadow=Reflection, form
Respect=Reputation
Had his eyes=Could see clearly
Compleat:
Buried=Begraven, bedelven
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Cogitation=Een gedacht, overdenking
Just (righteous)=Een rechtvaardige
Just=Effen, juist, net
Shadow=Een schaduw, schim

Topics: understanding, error, wisdom, value

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Soothsayer
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
Thou hast some suit to Caesar, hast thou not?
SOOTHSAYER
That I have, lady. If it will please Caesar
To be so good to Caesar as to hear me,
I shall beseech him to befriend himself.
PORTIA
Why, know’st thou any harm’s intended towards him?
SOOTHSAYER
None that I know will be; much that I fear may chance.
Good morrow to you. Here the street is narrow.
The throng that follows Caesar at the heels,
Of senators, of praetors, common suitors,
Will crowd a feeble man almost to death.
I’ll get me to a place more void, and there
Speak to great Caesar as he comes along.

DUTCH:
k Weet niets, dat moet, vrees veel, dat kan gebeuren.
Doch goeden dag!

MORE:
Suit=Plea
Chance=Happen
Praetor=Senior judge
More void=Emptier, not as crowded
Compleat:
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding
To chance=Voorvallen, gebeuren
Void=Leedig, ontleedigd

Burgersdijk notes:
‘k Weet niets, dat moet, vrees veel, dat kan gebeuren. Ten onrechte vervangen verscheidene uitgevers dezen waarzegger, die niets bepaalds weet, maar beduchtheid koestert, door Artemidorus, die van de samenzwering veel nauwkeuriger kennis draagt .

Topics: defence, communication, fate/destiny

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
(…) Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept.
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause.
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me.
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

DUTCH:
Wie ziet hierin een blijk van Caesar’s heerschzucht?
Als de armoe leed en kreet, dan weende Caesar;
De heerschzucht pleegt van harder stof te zijn;
Maar Brutus zegt, dat hij vol heerschzucht was,
En Brutus is een achtenswaardig man.

MORE:
REFERENCED IN SCOTTISH LAW: 2019 GWD 34-541, [2019] CSIH 52, 2019 SLT 1269, 2020 SCLR 165, [2019] ScotCS CSIH_52
“CITED IN SCOTTISH LAW: THOMAS O’LEARY v. HER MAJESTY’S ADVOCATE [2014] ScotHC HCJAC_45 (23 May 2014)/[2014] HCJAC 45, 2014 SLT 711, 2014 SCCR 421
Ironic/sarcastic to the point where the meaning has been inverted by the end of the speech and turns public against Brutus and co-conspirators.
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “”honourable””: State v Martin, 651 S.W.2d 645, 656 (Mo. Ct. App. 1983)”

Topics: cited in law, honour, reputation, legacy, ambition

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Metellus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
But what of Cicero? Shall we sound him?
I think he will stand very strong with us.
CASCA
Let us not leave him out.
CINNA
No, by no means.
METELLUS
O, let us have him, for his silver hairs
Will purchase us a good opinion
And buy men’s voices to commend our deeds.
It shall be said his judgment ruled our hands.
Our youths and wildness shall no whit appear,
But all be buried in his gravity.
BRUTUS
O, name him not. Let us not break with him,
For he will never follow anything
That other men begin.
CASSIUS
Then leave him out.

DUTCH:
Hij moet er bij zijn, want zijn zilv’ren haar
Koopt ons een goede meening bij het volk,
En werft ons stemmen om ons doen te prijzen.

MORE:
Proverb: In young men to err is less shame

Sound=Sound out
Strong=Firmly
Opinion=Reputation
Silver hairs=Denoting age/experience
No whit=Not at all
Gravity=Stability, dignity
Break with=Disclose plans to
Compleat:
To sound=Peilen
Strong=Sterk, krachtig
Whit=Point, jot (used negatively)(not in the least, not at all)
Gravity=Deftigheyd, Stemmigheyd, Ernsthaftigheyd, staataigheyd
To break a business=Een zaak voordraagen of op ‘t tapyt brengen

Topics: age/experience, intellect, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Lucius, a bowl of wine!
CASSIUS
I did not think you could have been so angry.
BRUTUS
O Cassius, I am sick of many griefs.
CASSIUS
Of your philosophy you make no use
If you give place to accidental evils.

DUTCH:
Dan geeft ge uw wijsbegeerte geen gehoor,
Als gij toevallig kwaad zoo heerschen laat.

MORE:
Accidental evils=Occasional bad fortune
Give place=Yield to

Topics: anger, complaint

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Forever and forever farewell, Brutus.
If we do meet again, we’ll smile indeed.
If not, ’tis true this parting was well made.
BRUTUS
Why then, lead on. Oh, that a man might know
The end of this day’s business ere it come!
But it sufficeth that the day will end,
And then the end is known.—Come, ho! Away!

DUTCH:
O waar’ ‘t den mensch gegeven,
Voor ‘t einde van dit dagwerk ‘t eind te weten !
Doch ‘t is genoeg; het eind des dags zal komen;
Dan weten wij het eind.

MORE:
Proverb: Every day the night comes

Topics: proverbs and idioms, friendship

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Under your pardon. You must note beside,
That we have tried the utmost of our friends,
Our legions are brim-full, our cause is ripe.
The enemy increaseth every day.
We, at the height, are ready to decline.
There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves
Or lose our ventures.

DUTCH:
Bedien u van den vloed, gij hebt geluk ;
Verzuim dien en de gansche levensvaart
Wordt eng en hach’lijk, banken, nooden dreigen;
Wij vlotten thans op zulk een volle zee
En moeten varen, nu het tij ons dient,
Of schipbreuk volgt.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
A.F.A. Tanker Corp. v. Reinauer Transportation Company, 594 F.Supp. 598, 599, n. 1 (S.D.N.Y. 1984)(Tenney, J.);
Prevatt v. Penwalt Corporation, 192 Cal. App.3d 438, 237 Cal. Rptr. 488, 500, n. 26 (1987)(Perren, J.)(“…it became clear that the flood of settlements in which the case was now engulfed either led on to his fortune or if bypassed left him wallowing in the shallows and the miseries of trial.”).

Proverb: The tide must be taken when it comes
Proverb: And wealth with me was never yet afloate (1616)

Under your pardon=Begging your pardon, allow me (to continue)
Tried the utmost=Strained to the limit
Omitted=Missed
Bound=Confined
Ventures=Investment
Compleat:
Beg your pardon=Ik bid u om vergiffenis
Tried=Beproefd, te recht gesteld, verhoord
Omitted=Nagelaaten, overgeslagen, verzuymd
Venture=’t Gene men ter zee waagt

Topics: proverbs and idioms, fate/fortune, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
O Antony, beg not your death of us.
Though now we must appear bloody and cruel—
As by our hands and this our present act
You see we do—yet see you but our hands
And this the bleeding business they have done.
Our hearts you see not. They are pitiful.
And pity to the general wrong of Rome—
As fire drives out fire, so pity pity—
Hath done this deed on Caesar. For your part,
To you our swords have leaden points, Mark Antony.
Our arms in strength of malice and our hearts
Of brothers’ temper do receive you in
With all kind love, good thoughts, and reverence.
CASSIUS
Your voice shall be as strong as any man’s
In the disposing of new dignities.
BRUTUS
Only be patient till we have appeased
The multitude, beside themselves with fear,
And then we will deliver you the cause,
Why I, that did love Caesar when I struck him,
Have thus proceeded.

DUTCH:
Alleen geduld geoefend, totdat de onrust
Van ‘t yolk, van angst zichzelf niet, is gestild.

MORE:
Proverb: One fire (heat) drives out another

Pitiful=Full of pty
Fire drives out fire=Proverbial
Leaden=Blunt, heavy
Unstrung of malice=Limbs were thought to be controlled by internal strings, like a puppet
Temper=Disposition
Disposing=Conferring
Dignities=Government positions
Appeased=Calmed
Deliver=Explain, report
Compleat:
Pitifull=Vol medelyden
Leaden=Looden
Temper=Gesteltenis. To be in a good temper=In een goede gesteltenis zyn.
Dispose=Beschikken, schikken
Dignities=Waardigheyd, staat, een staatelyk ampt
Appease=Bevreedigen, stillen, verzoenen
To deliver a message=Een boodschap afleggen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, resolution

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Remember March, the ides of March remember.
Did not great Julius bleed for justice’ sake?
What villain touched his body, that did stab,
And not for justice? What, shall one of us
That struck the foremost man of all this world
But for supporting robbers, shall we now
Contaminate our fingers with base bribes,
And sell the mighty space of our large honours
For so much trash as may be graspèd thus?
I had rather be a dog and bay the moon
Than such a Roman.

DUTCH:
Denk gij aan Maart, aan de’ Idusdag van Maart ;
Stierf niet de groote Julius om het recht?
Zou een, die toestiet, schurk geweest zijn? treffend,
En niet om ‘t recht? Wat! spreek, zou een van ons,
Die de’ eersten man der wereld nederstieten,
Slechts wijl hij roovers steunde, zouden wij
Door lage giften onze hand bezoed’len,
Der eereposten groot gewicht verkoopen
Voor zooveel slijks als grijpbaar is? Veel liever
Ware ik een hond, die bast bij ‘t zien der maan,
Dan zoo Romein.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. definition of “contaminate”: Hi-G, Inc. v. St. Paul Fire & Marine Ins. Co., 283 F.Supp. 211 (D. Mass. 1967)

Proverb: The dog (wolf) barks in vain at the moon

What villain=Who was so villainous
Contaminate our fingers=Dirty our hads
Base=Bowly
Honours=Reputations
Trash=Money
Compleat:
Contaminate=Besmetten
Base=Ondergeschikt
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed

Topics: proverbs and idioms, cited in law, corruption

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
Would he were fatter! But I fear him not.
Yet if my name were liable to fear,
I do not know the man I should avoid
So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much.
He is a great observer, and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men. He loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony. He hears no music.
Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mocked himself and scorned his spirit
That could be moved to smile at anything.
Such men as he be never at heart’s ease
Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,
And therefore are they very dangerous.
I rather tell thee what is to be feared
Than what I fear, for always I am Caesar.
Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf,
And tell me truly what thou think’st of him.

DUTCH:
Nooit is bij zulke mannen ‘t hart voldaan,
Zoolang zij iemand grooter zien dan zij;
En dat is ‘t, wat hen zoo gevaarlijk maakt.

MORE:
Proverb: An envious man grows lean
Proverb: To turn (give) a deaf ear

Quite=Entirely
Looks through=Sees through
Sort=Manner
Heart’s ease=Heart’s content
This ear is deaf=Proverbially, this ear doesn’t want to hear/accept this message
Compleat:
Quite=t’Eenemaal, geheelendal, geheel, ganschelyk
Sort=Slach, wyze

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, risk, loyalty, skill/talent

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
DECIUS
Caesar, all hail! Good morrow, worthy Caesar.
I come to fetch you to the senate house.
CAESAR
And you are come in very happy time
To bear my greeting to the senators
And tell them that I will not come today.
“Cannot” is false, and that I dare not, falser.
I will not come today. Tell them so, Decius.
CALPHURNIA
Say he is sick.
CAESAR
Shall Caesar send a lie?
Have I in conquest stretched mine arm so far
To be afraid to tell greybeards the truth?
Decius, go tell them Caesar will not come.
DECIUS
Most mighty Caesar, let me know some cause,
Lest I be laughed at when I tell them so.
CAESAR
The cause is in my will. I will not come.
That is enough to satisfy the senate.
But for your private satisfaction,
Because I love you, I will let you know.
Calphurnia here, my wife, stays me at home.
She dreamt tonight she saw my statue,
Which, like a fountain with an hundred spouts,
Did run pure blood. And many lusty Romans
Came smiling and did bathe their hands in it.
And these does she apply for warnings and portents
And evils imminent, and on her knee
Hath begged that I will stay at home today.

DUTCH:
En juist te goeder uur zijt gij gekomen,
Om met mijn groeten den senaat de tijding
Te brengen, dat ik heden niet wil komen ;
„Niet kan” waar leugen, en „niet durf’ nog erger ;
lk wil vandaag niet komen ; meld dit, Decius.

MORE:
Happy time=Opportune moment
Greybeards=Old men
Cause=Reason
Compleat:
Happy=Gelukkig, gelukzalig
Cause=Oorzaak, reden, zaak

Topics: language, authority, civility, order/society

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
It must be by his death, and for my part
I know no personal cause to spurn at him
But for the general. He would be crowned.
How that might change his nature, there’s the question.
It is the bright day that brings forth the adder
And that craves wary walking. Crown him that,
And then I grant we put a sting in him
That at his will he may do danger with.
Th’ abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power. And, to speak truth of Caesar,
I have not known when his affections swayed
More than his reason. But ’tis a common proof
That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,
Whereto the climber upward turns his face.
But when he once attains the upmost round,
He then unto the ladder turns his back,
Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees
By which he did ascend. So Caesar may.
Then, lest he may, prevent. And since the quarrel
Will bear no colour for the thing he is,
Fashion it thus: that what he is, augmented,
Would run to these and these extremities.
And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg—
Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous—
And kill him in the shell.

DUTCH:
Aan misbruik schuldig wordt de grootheid, die
‘t Geweten scheidt van macht ; en ‘k weet van Caesar,
Naar waarheid, niet, dat ooit bij hem zijn hartstocht
Meer heerschte dan zijn rede.

MORE:
Proverb: To turn one’s back on the ladder (ut down the stairs) by which one rose

Craves=Requires
Wary=Carefully
Sting=Stinger
Remorse=Compassion
Affection=Passion
Swayed=Ruled
Proof=Experience
Lowliness=Affected humility, obsequiousness
Mischievous=Harmful
Fashion=Shape
Compleat:
Craving=Smeeking, bidding; happig, greetig
Wary=Voorzigtig, omzigtig, behoedzaam
Sting=Angel, steekel
Remorse=Knaaging, wroeging, berouw
Affection=Hartstogt, geneegenheyd
To sway=(govern) Regeeren
Proof=Proeven
Lowliness=Nederigheyd; ootmoedigheyd
Mischievous=Boos, boosardig, schaadelyk, quaadstokend, verderflyk, schelms
To fashion=Een gestalte geeven, vormen, fatzoeneeren

Topics: achievement, status, loyalty, ambition, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
O mighty Caesar! Dost thou lie so low?
Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils,
Shrunk to this little measure? Fare thee well.
—I know not, gentlemen, what you intend,
Who else must be let blood, who else is rank.
If I myself, there is no hour so fit
As Caesar’s death’s hour, nor no instrument
Of half that worth as those your swords, made rich
With the most noble blood of all this world.
I do beseech ye, if you bear me hard,
Now, whilst your purpled hands do reek and smoke,
Fulfil your pleasure. Live a thousand years,
I shall not find myself so apt to die.
No place will please me so, no mean of death,
As here by Caesar, and by you cut off,
The choice and master spirits of this age.

DUTCH:
Leefde ik duizend jaar,
Nooit ben ik zoo geheel ter dood bereid;
Geen plaats zal mij, geen sneven zoo behagen,
Als hier bij Caesar vallen, en door u,
De grootste heldengeesten onzer eeuw.

MORE:
Purpled=Bloodied
Reek and smoke=Steam
Apt=Ready
Mean=Means
Choice=Select
Master=Commanding
Compleat:
Reek=Rook, wassem
Apt=Gereed
Choice=Uytgeleezen, keurlyk
Choicest men of the city=De treffelykste van de stad
To master=Vermeesteren, bedwingen

Topics: authority, death, corruption, status

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interrèd with their bones.
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men—
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. (….)

DUTCH:
Het kwaad, dat menschen doen, leeft na hen voort;
Het goed wordt vaak met hun gebeent’ begraven ;
Zoo moge ‘t zijn met Caesar.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Kiser v. Huge, 517 F.2d 12.37, 1262, n. l (D.C.Cir. 1974);
Maritote v. Desilu Productions, Inc., 345 F.2d 418, 420 (7th Cir. 1965)(administratrix of Estate of Al Capone);
MacDonald v. Bolton, 51 Cal.3d 262, 281, 794 P.2d 911, 924 (1990);
Turner v. Consumers Power Company, 376 Mich. 188, 192, 136 N.W.2d l, 3 (1965);
Taylor v. Auditor Genera), 360 Mich. 146, 103 N.W.2d 769, 774 (1960).
US District Court in Bostom Marathon Bomber case

Topics: cited in law, honour, reputation, legacy, ambition

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
He greets me well.—Your master, Pindarus,
In his own change or by ill officers
Hath given me some worthy cause to wish
Things done, undone. But if he be at hand
I shall be satisfied.
PINDARUS
I do not doubt
But that my noble master will appear
Such as he is, full of regard and honour.
BRUTUS
He is not doubted.—A word, Lucillius.
How he received you, let me be resolved.
LUCILLIUS
With courtesy and with respect enough.
But not with such familiar instances
Nor with such free and friendly conference
As he hath used of old.
BRUTUS
Thou hast described
A hot friend cooling. Ever note, Lucillius,
When love begins to sicken and decay,
It useth an enforcèd ceremony.
There are no tricks in plain and simple faith.
But hollow men, like horses hot at hand,
Make gallant show and promise of their mettle.

DUTCH:
Gij teekent daar
Een warmen vriend, die koel wordt. Geef steeds acht,
Als vriendschap kwijnen en verwelken gaat,
Dan bezigt zij gedwongen hoflijkheid .
De slechte rechte trouw weet niets van kunsten.

MORE:
Proverb: Full of courtesy full of craft
Proverb: Things done cannot be undone

Greets me well=Sends greetings through a worthy emissary
Change=Changed mind
Ill=Bad, untrustworthy
Worthy=Justifiable, respectable
Satisfied=Receive a satisfactory explanation
Regard=Respect
Resolved=Informed
Familiar instances=Signs of affection
Conference=Conversation
Enforcèd=Strained
Hot friend=Previously close friend
Trick=Artifice
Compleat:
Change=Verschiet, verscheydenheyd, verandering, verwisseling
Ill=Quaad, ondeugend, onpasselijk
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Satisfaction, content=Voldoening
Regard=Opzigt, inzigt, omzigtigheyd, zorg, acht, achting
Resolve (untie, decide, determine a hard question, difficulty etc.)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopten
Resolve (deliberation, decision)=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel
Familiar=Gemeenzaam
Conference=Onderhandeling, t’zamenspraak, mondgemeenschap
Enforcèd=Gedwongen, opgedrongen
Trick=Een looze trek, greep, gril

Topics: respect, civility, proverbs and idioms, reply, judgment, resolution

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Under your pardon. You must note beside,
That we have tried the utmost of our friends,
Our legions are brim-full, our cause is ripe.
The enemy increaseth every day.
We, at the height, are ready to decline.
There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves
Or lose our ventures.

DUTCH:
In menschenzaken is er eb en vloed;
Bedien u van den vloed, gij hebt geluk.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
A.F.A. Tanker Corp. v. Reinauer Transportation Company, 594 F.Supp. 598, 599, n. 1 (S.D.N.Y. 1984)(Tenney, J.);
Prevatt v. Penwalt Corporation, 192 Cal. App.3d 438, 237 Cal. Rptr. 488, 500, n. 26 (1987)(Perren, J.)(“…it became clear that the flood of settlements in which the case was now engulfed either led on to his fortune or if bypassed left him wallowing in the shallows and the miseries of trial.”).

Proverb: The tide must be taken when it comes
Proverb: And wealth with me was never yet afloate (1616)

Under your pardon=Begging your pardon, allow me (to continue)
Tried the utmost=Strained to the limit
Omitted=Missed
Bound=Confined
Ventures=Investment
Compleat:
Beg your pardon=Ik bid u om vergiffenis
Tried=Beproefd, te recht gesteld, verhoord
Omitted=Nagelaaten, overgeslagen, verzuymd
Venture=’t Gene men ter zee waagt

Topics: proverbs and idioms, fate/fortune, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Artemidorus
CONTEXT:
ARTEMIDORUS
“Caesar, beware of Brutus. Take heed of Cassius. Come not near Casca. Have an eye to Cinna. Trust not Trebonius. Mark well Metellus Cimber. Decius Brutus loves thee not. Thou hast wronged Caius Ligarius. There is but one mind in all these men, and it is bent against Caesar. If thou beest not immortal, look about you. Security gives way to conspiracy. The mighty gods defend thee!
     Thy lover,
     Artemidorus”
Here will I stand till Caesar pass along,
And as a suitor will I give him this.
My heart laments that virtue cannot live
Out of the teeth of emulation.
If thou read this, O Caesar, thou mayst live.
If not, the Fates with traitors do contrive.

DUTCH:
Slechts een geest leeft in al deze mannen,
en die is tegen Caesar gekeerd.

MORE:
Look about you=Keep your eyes open, take care
Security=Over-confidence
Suitor=Petitioner
Out of the teeth=Beyond the reach
Emulation=Rivalry, envy
Contrive=Conspire
Compleat:
To look about=Rondom zien, omkyken
Secure (fearless or careless)=Onbevreest, zorgeloos
Suiter in chancery=een Pleiter in de Kanselarij
Emulation=Haayver, volgzucht, afgunst
To contrive=Bedenken, verzinnen, toestellen

Burgersdijk notes:
Caesar, neem u in acht enz. Plutarchus bericht, dat zekere Artemidorus, een rhetor uit Cnidos, die van de samenzwering kennis had gekregen, aan Caesar bij zijn gang naar de Senaatszitting een klein geschrift overreikte, waarin hij hem de noodigste inlichtingen gaf en zeer aandrong, dat Caesar, dit onmiddellijk lezen zou. Deze beproefde het verscheidene keeren, maar werd er in verhinderd door de menigte volks, dat hem begroette.

Topics: conspiracy, defence, envy, unity/collaboration

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Do not presume too much upon my love.
I may do that I shall be sorry for.
BRUTUS
You have done that you should be sorry for.
There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats,
For I am armed so strong in honesty
That they pass by me as the idle wind,
Which I respect not. I did send to you
For certain sums of gold, which you denied me,
For I can raise no money by vile means.
By heaven, I had rather coin my heart
And drop my blood for drachmas than to wring
From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash
By any indirection. I did send
To you for gold to pay my legions,
Which you denied me. Was that done like Cassius?
Should I have answered Caius Cassius so?
When Marcus Brutus grows so covetous
To lock such rascal counters from his friends,
Be ready, gods, with all your thunderbolts.
Dash him to pieces!

DUTCH:
Gij hebt gedaan, wat u berouwen moet.
In al uw dreigen, Cassius, woont geen schrik;
Mijn manneneer is mij zoo stork een rusting,
Dat ik zoo min het tel, als de’ ijd’len wind,
Die langs mij heensuist.

MORE:
That=That which, something
Terror in=Are not frightening
Idle=Insignificant
Respect=Heed
Indirection=Devious means
Coin=Convert into money
Covetous=Mean
Rascal=Inferior, sorry
Compleat:
Terror (terrour)=Schrik
Idle=Onnutte, wisje-wasje
Respect=Aanzien, opzigt, inzigt, ontzag, eerbiedigheyd
To coin=Geld slaan, geld munten
Covetous=Begeerlyk, begeerig, gierig, inhaalig
Rascal=Een schelm, guit, schobbejak, schurk, vlegel, schavuit

Topics: regret, respect, money

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
Are we all ready? What is now amiss
That Caesar and his senate must redress?
METELLUS
(kneeling)
Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar,
Metellus Cimber throws before thy seat
An humble heart—
CAESAR
I must prevent thee, Cimber.
These couchings and these lowly courtesies
Might fire the blood of ordinary men
And turn preordinance and first decree
Into the law of children. Be not fond,
To think that Caesar bears such rebel blood
That will be thawed from the true quality
With that which melteth fools—I mean, sweet words,
Low-crookèd curtsies, and base spaniel fawning.
Thy brother by decree is banishèd.
If thou dost bend and pray and fawn for him,
I spurn thee like a cur out of my way.
Know, Caesar doth not wrong, nor without cause
Will he be satisfied.

DUTCH:
Dat kruipen en dat onderdanig buigen
Ontvlamm’ gewonen menschen ‘t bloed, verkeere
Hun eerst besluit en vastgestelde wet
In kinderrechtspraak, — waan niet in uw dwaasheid,

MORE:
Puissant=Powerful
Prevent=Forestall
Couchings=Cringing, bowing, protestation
Courtesies=Deference
Blood=Passion
Preordinance and first decree=Decreed from the outset
Fond=Foolish
True quality=Quality of fidelity
Curtsies=Deference
Repealing=Recalling
Compleat:
Puissant=Machtig, groot van vermogen
+G95
Courtesy=Beleefdheid, hoflykheid, eerbiedigheid; genyg, nyging; vriendelykheid
Blood (bloud)=Bloed
His blood is up=Zyn bloed is aan ‘t zieden geraakt
To preordain=Voorschikken, voorbestemmen, voorverordenen
To decree=Verordenen, besluyten
Curtsy=Nyging, genyg
Repeal=Herroepen, afschaffen, weer intrekken

Topics: authority, flattery, judgment

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Flavius
CONTEXT:
FLAVIUS
Go, go, good countrymen, and for this fault,
Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears
Into the channel till the lowest stream
Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
See whether their basest metal be not moved.
They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
Go you down that way towards the Capitol.
This way will I. Disrobe the images
If you do find them decked with ceremonies.
MURELLUS
May we do so?
You know it is the feast of Lupercal.
FLAVIUS
It is no matter. Let no images
Be hung with Caesar’s trophies. I’ll about
And drive away the vulgar from the streets.
So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
These growing feathers plucked from Caesar’s wing
Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,
Who else would soar above the view of men
And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

DUTCH:
Ruk Caesar’s vleugels deze veeren uit ;
Dit houdt zijn vlucht wat lager bij den grond.

MORE:
Sort=Rank
Kiss=Touch
Most exalted=Highest river level
Metal=Punning on mettle: spirit, disposition
Disrobe=Undress
Ceremonies=Caesar’s supporters would put diadems on statues
Trophies=Symbols of the ruler
Lupercal=A fertility festival
Vulgar=Common people
Pitch=Height, highest point of flight. Plucking feathers would prevent Caesar from rising above ordinary Roman citizens.
Compleat:
Sort=Soort
Exalted=Verhoogd, verheven
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
To disrobe=Den tabberd uitschudden; zich ontkleeden
Ceremony=Plegtigheyd
Trophy=Een zeegeteken, trofee
Vulgar=(common) Gemeen
Pitch=Pik

Burgersdijk notes:
Laat met Caesar’s zegeteek’nen enz. Plutarchus vermeldt, dat er beelden van Caesar werden opgericht met diademen op het hoofd, en dat de volkstribunen, Flavius en Marullus, die omverhaalden.
Ruk Caesar’s vleugels deze veed’ren uit. Namelijk de gunst van het gepeupel – the vulgar – een paar regels vroeger genoemd. In ‘t Engelsch wordt gesproken van ‘These growing feathers’, „dit wassend gevederte”; in de vertaling is het woord “wassend” weggevallen.

Topics: guilt, ingratitude, order/society, status, leadership

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Decius
CONTEXT:
DECIUS
This dream is all amiss interpreted.
It was a vision fair and fortunate.
Your statue spouting blood in many pipes,
In which so many smiling Romans bathed,
Signifies that from you great Rome shall suck
Reviving blood, and that great men shall press
For tinctures, stains, relics, and cognizance.
This by Calphurnia’s dream is signified.
CAESAR
And this way have you well expounded it.
DECIUS
I have, when you have heard what I can say.
And know it now: the senate have concluded
To give this day a crown to mighty Caesar.

DUTCH:
Voorwaar, die droom is averechts geduid ;
Het was een schoon vizioen, dat heil verkondt.

MORE:
Amiss interpreted=Misinterpreted
Pipes=Veins
Tinctures=Colours
Stains=Bloodstains, heraldic colours
Relics=Remains of a saint or martyr
Cognizance=Distinguishing mark/heraldic device
Expounded=Interpreted
Compleat:
Amiss=Onrecht, verkeerd, quaalyk
To be taken amiss=Quaalyk genomen worden
Tincture=Een verwsel, uyttreksel, treksel, smet
Tinctured=Geverwd, doortrokken, doordrongen, besmet
To stain=Bevlekken, besmetten, bezwalken
Reliques=H. Overblyffelen
Cognizance=Kennisse, wapenmerk, kenteken
To expound=Uytleggen, verklaaren

Topics: language, understanding

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!
He was quick mettle when he went to school.
CASSIUS
So is he now in execution
Of any bold or noble enterprise,
However he puts on this tardy form.
This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
Which gives men stomach to digest his words
With better appetite.
BRUTUS
And so it is. For this time I will leave you.
Tomorrow, if you please to speak with me,
I will come home to you; or, if you will,
Come home to me, and I will wait for you.
CASSIUS
I will do so. Till then, think of the world.

DUTCH:
Die ruwheid is een toekruid bij zijn geest;
‘t Versterkt de maag der hoorders, om zijn taal
Met beter eetlust te verteren.

MORE:
Blunt=Dull in understanding
Quick mettle=Quick-witted; keen
However=Although
Tardy form=Sluggish appearance
Wit=Intelligence
Rudeness=Roughness, coarseness
Compleat:
To blunt=Stomp maaken, verstompen
A blunt fellow=Een ongeschikte vent, een plompe boer
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
Tardy=Slof, traag, langzaam
Wit (understanding)=Vinding, schranderheid, verstand
Rudeness=Ruuwheyd, onbehouwenheyd, plompheyd

Burgersdijk notes:
Denk midd’lerwijl aan ‘s werelds eischen. Er staat eigenlijk: “Denk middelerwijl aan de wereld”,
aan de wereld en hoe het er toegaat; overweeg den toestand .

Topics: intellect, language, understanding, communication

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
Good friends, sweet friends! Let me not stir you up
To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
They that have done this deed are honourable.
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,
That made them do it. They are wise and honourable,
And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts.
I am no orator, as Brutus is,
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man
That love my friend. And that they know full well
That gave me public leave to speak of him.
For I have neither wit nor words nor worth,
Action nor utterance nor the power of speech,
To stir men’s blood. I only speak right on.
I tell you that which you yourselves do know,
Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
And bid them speak for me. But were I Brutus,
And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue
In every wound of Caesar that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

DUTCH:
Goden, oordeelt, hoe hem Caesar liefhad!
Dit was de stoot, van alle ‘t onnatuurlijkst

MORE:
The “Nervii,” or Nervians, were a Belgian tribe whom Caesar defeated in battle in 57 BC

Stir up=Incite
Flood=Surge
Griefs=Grievances
Plain=Plain-speaking
Public leave to speak=Permission to speak privately
Words=Vocabulary
Worth=Authority
Right on=What I think
Utterance=Delivery
Ruffle up=Enrage
Compleat:
To stir up=Gaande maaken, verwekken, opwekken, aanprikkelen
To stir up to anger=Tot toorn verwekken
Grievance=Bezwaarenis
Plain=Vlak, effen, klaar, duydelyk, slecht, eenvoudig, oprecht
Vocabulary=Een klein woordenboek
Utterance=Uytspraak; aftrek, vertier

Topics: language, persuasion, leadership

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
This was the noblest Roman of them all.
All the conspirators save only he
Did that they did in envy of great Caesar.
He only in a general honest thought
And common good to all, made one of them.
His life was gentle, and the elements
So mixed in him that Nature might stand up
And say to all the world, “This was a man.”
OCTAVIUS
According to his virtue let us use him,
With all respect and rites of burial.
Within my tent his bones tonight shall lie
Most like a soldier, ordered honourably.
So call the field to rest, and let’s away
To part the glories of this happy day.

DUTCH:
Hij was van alien de edelste Romein ;
Want elk der saamgezwoor’nen, hj slechts niet,
Deed, wat hij deed, uit afgunst tegen Caesar ;
Slechts hij werd, voor het vaderland bezield,
Alleen tot heil van alien, een van hen .
Zacht was zijn leven, de elementen zoo
In hem gemengeld, dat natuur mocht opstaan,
En roemen voor ‘t heelal : „Dit was een man!”

MORE:
Burgersdijk notes:
Hij was van allen de edelste Romein. Volgens Plutarchus zou, naar verhaald werd, Antonius meermalen openlijk verklaard hebben, dat onder allen, die Cesar gedood hadden, alleen Brutus er toe bewogen werd door de overtuiging van de loffelijkheid der daad , maar de anderen door wrok of afgunst gedreven werden . Aan de volgende woorden ligt de meening ten grondslag, dat de mensch uit de vier elementen is samengesteld en dat van hunne meer of minder gelukkige mengeling de meer of mindere volkomenheid, lichamelijke zoowel als geestelijke, van den mensch afhangt.

Topics: legacy, reputation, betrayal, envy

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?
Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf
But that he sees the Romans are but sheep.
He were no lion were not Romans hinds.
Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
Begin it with weak straws. What trash is Rome,
What rubbish and what offal, when it serves
For the base matter to illuminate
So vile a thing as Caesar! But, O grief,
Where hast thou led me? I perhaps speak this
Before a willing bondman. Then I know
My answer must be made. But I am armed,
And dangers are to me indifferent.

DUTCH:
Wat schaafsel en wat afval, zoo ‘t als brandstof
Moet dienen om iets nietigs, iets als Caesar,
In ‘t licht te stellen?

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. The definition of “rubbish”: Gorman v City of Cleveland, 26 Ohio App. 109, 159 NE 136 (1927)

Why should=How can
Hinds=Female deer; servants
Base=Underlying; low
Trash=Twigs, straw
Vile=Worthless
Answer must be made=I am accountable
Offal=Garbage
Armed=Prepared
Indifferent=Insignifcant
Compleat:
Hind=Hinde; Boere knecht
Base=Ondergeschikt; Onderbehangsel
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed
Vile=Slecht, gering, verachtelyk, eerloos
Armed=Gewapend, toegerust
Indifferent=Onvercheelig, middelmaatig, koelzinnig, onzydig, passelyk, taamelyk, tussenbeyde

Topics: haste, preparation, reply, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
The morning comes upon ’s. We’ll leave you, Brutus.
—And, friends, disperse yourselves. But all remember
What you have said, and show yourselves true Romans.
BRUTUS
Good gentlemen, look fresh and merrily.
Let not our looks put on our purposes,
But bear it as our Roman actors do,
With untired spirits and formal constancy.
And so good morrow to you every one.
BRUTUS
Boy! Lucius!—Fast asleep? It is no matter.
Enjoy the honey-heavy dew of slumber.
Thou hast no figures nor no fantasies,
Which busy care draws in the brains of men.
Therefore thou sleep’st so sound.

DUTCH:
Knaap! Lucius! – Vast in slaap? Nu, ‘t is om ‘t even ;
Geniet den honig-zwaren dauw der sluim’ring;
Uw waan ziet geen gedaanten, geene spooksels,
Die drukke zorg in ‘t brein van mannen wekt;
Dies slaapt gij zoo gezond.

MORE:
Put on=Show
Bear it=Carry ourselves
Formal=Dignified
Constancy=Firm mind
Figures=Illusions
Compleat:
To put on=Aandoen
To bear=Draagen, verdraagen, voeren
Formal=Gestaltig, vormelyk, naauwgezet, gemaakt
Constancy=Standvastigheid, volharding, bestendigheid
Figure=Voorbeeldsel, afbeeldsel

Topics: purpose, appearance, conspiracy, conscience

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Casca
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
That done, repair to Pompey’s theatre.
Come, Casca, you and I will yet ere day
See Brutus at his house. Three parts of him
Is ours already, and the man entire
Upon the next encounter yields him ours.
CASCA
Oh, he sits high in all the people’s hearts,
And that which would appear offence in us,
His countenance, like richest alchemy,
Will change to virtue and to worthiness.
CASSIUS
Him and his worth and our great need of him
You have right well conceited. Let us go,
For it is after midnight, and ere day
We will awake him and be sure of him.

DUTCH:
Reeds drie vierden
Van hem zijn ons, en bij den volgende’ aanval
Geeft wis de gansche man aan ons zich over.

MORE:
Repair=Resort to
Ours=On our side
Worthiness=Nobility
Conceited=Understood
Compleat:
To repair=Zich na een plaats begeeven
Worthiness=Waardigheyd
To conceit=Zich verbeelden, achten

Topics: persuasion, reason

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Cobbler
CONTEXT:
COBBLER
Why, sir, cobble you.
FLAVIUS
Thou art a cobbler, art thou?
COBBLER
Truly, sir, all that I live by is with the awl. I
meddle with no tradesman’s matters nor women’s matters,
but withal I am indeed, sir, a surgeon to old shoes.
When they are in great danger, I recover them. As proper
men as ever trod upon neat’s leather have gone upon my
handiwork.

DUTCH:
Om de waarheid te zeggen, ja, mijn els is mijn alles .
Ik meng mij niet met koopmanszaken, noch met koopvrouwen, maar mijn els lapt mij alles.

MORE:
Proverb: As good a man as ever trod on shoe (beat’s) leather. (See also The Tempest 2.2: ‘he’s a present for any emperor that ever trod on neat’s leather’).
Proverb: Without awl (all) the cobbler’s nobody
Proverb: As good a man as ever trod on shoe leather, stressing the quality and reliability of the cobbler’s craft as well as character. Other relevant proverbs from the time are “Meddle not with another man’s matter” (1584) and “Let not the cobbler go beyond his last” (1539), “Cobbler, stick to thy last” (still in use today).
The origins of the proverb actually existed in Latin when Pliny the Elder composed ‘Naturalis Historia’. Pliny’s original text (ne supra crepidam sutor iudicaret) meant ‘the cobbler should not judge beyond his shoe’. (Erasmus omitted the verb ‘judicaret in ‘Adagia’).
The word ‘ultracrepidarian’ also originated from this proverb!

Cobbler=Punning on (1) shoemender and (2) bungler
Neat’s leather=Cowhide.
Awl=Punning on (1) punch for holes in leather and (2) all
Compleat:
To cobble=Flikken, lappen, brodden; schoenlappen
Cobbler=(Cobler) Een schoenlapper, schoenflikker, broddelaar
Last=Leest. Last-maker=een Leestemaaker
Awl=Een els
Neat=Een rund, varre (os of koe)

Burgersdijk notes:
Mijn els lapt mij alles. Het Engelsch heeft een woordspeling met awl en all.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, status, order/society, work

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
No, not an oath. If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuse—
If these be motives weak, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed.
So let high-sighted tyranny range on
Till each man drop by lottery. But if these—
As I am sure they do—bear fire enough
To kindle cowards and to steel with valour
The melting spirits of women, then, countrymen,
W hat need we any spur but our own cause
To prick us to redress? What other bond
Than secret Romans that have spoke the word
And will not palter? And what other oath
Than honesty to honesty engaged,
That this shall be, or we will fall for it?
Swear priests and cowards and men cautelous,
Old feeble carrions and such suffering souls
That welcome wrongs. Unto bad causes swear
Such creatures as men doubt. But do not stain
The even virtue of our enterprise,
Nor th’ insuppressive mettle of our spirits,
To think that or our cause or our performance
Did need an oath, when every drop of blood
That every Roman bears—and nobly bears—
Is guilty of a several bastardy
If he do break the smallest particle
Of any promise that hath passed from him.

DUTCH:
Beeedigt priesters, lafaards, sluwe reek’naars,
Stokoude stumperds, of het slaafsch geboefte,
Dat bij verguizing dankt; vergt onbetrouwb’ren
Een eed voor slechte zaken af.

MORE:
Faces=Expressions
Sufferance=Suffering
Time’s abuse=Corruption of the time
Betimes=Immediately
High-sighted=Arrogant, looking down
Lottery=Chance
Palter=Equivocate
Engaged=Pledged
Cautelous=Crafty, false; cautious
Even=Honest, unstained
Insuppressive=Undefeatable
Guilty of bastardy=Adulterated
Compleat:
Face=’t Aangezigt, gelaat, gedaante
Sufferance=Verdraagzaamheid, toegeevendheid
Betimes=Bytyds, vroeg
High-minded=Hoogmoedig, verwaand
Lottery=Lotery
To palter=Weyfelen, leuteren, haperen, achteruyt kruypen, aerzelen, bedektelyk handelen
To engage=Verbinden, verplichten, verpanden
Cautelous=Omzigtig, zorgvuldig
To even=Effenen, vereffenen, effenmaaken, gelykmaaken
To suppress=(to stifle, stop) Beletten, verhinderen, sluiten
Bastardy=Onechtheid

Burgersdijk notes:

Indien niet onze trekken. Het Engelsch heeft: If not the face of men, ,zoo niet der menschen gelaat”. Het gelaat is natuurlijk, wat op het gelaat te lezen staat, de droef heid om Rome’s vernedering; wat door het woord trekken genoegzaam is uitgedrukt. Dat er bij deze zamenzwering geen eed werd afgelegd, vond Sh. in Plutarchus; evenzoo dat zjj aan Cicero de zaak niet mededeelden, en wel omdat
zij vreesden, dat hij door de bedachtzaamheid van den ouderdom het vuur, voor de uitvoering noodig, zou trachten te temperen’ alsmede, dat Marcus Antonius op Brutus’ aandrang gespaard bleef.

Topics: promise, courage, honesty

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASCA
Indeed he is not fit.
DECIUS
Shall no man else be touched but only Caesar?
CASSIUS
Decius, well urged. I think it is not meet
Mark Antony, so well beloved of Caesar,
Should outlive Caesar. We shall find of him
A shrewd contriver. And, you know, his means,
If he improve them, may well stretch so far
As to annoy us all; which to prevent,
Let Antony and Caesar fall together.

DUTCH:
Mijns inziens mag
Marcus Antonius, Caesar’s liefste vriend,
Caesar niet overleven; want hij blijkt
Ons wis een sluw belager; en gij weet,
Maakt hij zijn midd’len zich ten nut, dan reiken
Zij ver tot ons verderf; dit zij voorkomen,
En dies zij Caesar’s val Antonius’ dood.

MORE:
Urged=Proposed, good suggestion
Meet=Appropriate
Shrewd=Malicious
Contriver=Plotter
Improve=Put to good use
Annoy=Harm
Compleat:
Urged=Gedrongen, geprest, aangedrongen
Meet=Dienstig
Shrewd=Loos, doortrapt, sneedig, vinnig, fel
To contrive=Bedenken, verzinnen
Improve=Wel besteeden, waarneemen, vorderen, toeneemen, bebouwen, aanqueeken, aanleggen, zich van bedienen, gebruyken
To annoy=Beschaadigen, quetsen, beleedigne, afbreuk doen
To annoy the enemy=Den Vyand abreuk doen

Topics: plans/intentions, conspiracy

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Flavius
CONTEXT:
FLAVIUS
Go, go, good countrymen, and for this fault,
Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears
Into the channel till the lowest stream
Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
See whether their basest metal be not moved.
They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
Go you down that way towards the Capitol.
This way will I. Disrobe the images
If you do find them decked with ceremonies.
MURELLUS
May we do so?
You know it is the feast of Lupercal.
FLAVIUS
It is no matter. Let no images
Be hung with Caesar’s trophies. I’ll about
And drive away the vulgar from the streets.
So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
These growing feathers plucked from Caesar’s wing
Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,
Who else would soar above the view of men
And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

DUTCH:
Voert ze aan des Tibers oevers, en vergiet
Uw tranen in zijn bedding, tot de stroom
Van ‘t laagste deel de hoogste boorden kust.

MORE:
Sort=Rank
Kiss=Touch
Most exalted=Highest river level
Metal=Punning on mettle: spirit, disposition
Disrobe=Undress
Ceremonies=Caesar’s supporters would decorate statues in his honour
Trophies=Symbols of the ruler
Lupercal=A fertility festival
Vulgar=Common people
Pitch=Height, highest point of flight. Plucking feathers would prevent Caesar from rising above ordinary Roman citizens.
Compleat:
Exalted=Verhoogd, verheven
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
To disrobe=Den tabberd uitschudden; zich ontkleeden
Ceremony=Plegtigheyd
Trophy=Een zeegeteken, trofee
Vulgar=(common) Gemeen
Pitch=Pik

Burgersdijk notes:
Laat met Caesar’s zegeteek’nen enz. Plutarchus vermeldt, dat er beelden van Caesar werden opgericht met diademen op het hoofd, en dat de volkstribunen, Flavius en Marullus, die omverhaalden.
Ruk Caesar’s vleugels deze veed’ren uit. Namelijk de gunst van het gepeupel – the vulgar – een paar regels vroeger genoemd. In ‘t Engelsch wordt gesproken van ‘These growing feathers’, „dit wassend gevederte”; in de vertaling is het woord “wassend” weggevallen.

Topics: guilt, ingratitude, order/society, status, leadership

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
As well as I do know your outward favour.
Well, honour is the subject of my story.
I cannot tell what you and other men
Think of this life, but, for my single self,
I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
I was born free as Caesar. So were you.
We both have fed as well, and we can both
Endure the winter’s cold as well as he.
For once upon a raw and gusty day,
The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores,
Caesar said to me, “Darest thou, Cassius, now
Leap in with me into this angry flood
And swim to yonder point?” Upon the word,
Accoutred as I was, I plungèd in
And bade him follow. So indeed he did.
The torrent roared, and we did buffet it
With lusty sinews, throwing it aside
And stemming it with hearts of controversy.
But ere we could arrive the point proposed,
Caesar cried, “Help me, Cassius, or I sink!”
I, as Aeneas, our great ancestor,
Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder
The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber
Did I the tired Caesar. And this man
Is now become a god, and Cassius is
A wretched creature and must bend his body
If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
He had a fever when he was in Spain,
And when the fit was on him, I did mark
How he did shake. ‘Tis true, this god did shake!
His coward lips did from their colour fly,
And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world
Did lose his luster. I did hear him groan,
Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans
Mark him and write his speeches in their books—
“Alas,” it cried, “give me some drink, Titinius,”
As a sick girl. Ye gods, it doth amaze me
A man of such a feeble temper should
So get the start of the majestic world
And bear the palm alone.

DUTCH:
Nu, eer is onderwerp van wat ik spreek

MORE:
Favour=Appearance
As lief not=Rather not
Chafing with=Raging against
Accoutred=Equipped
Bend his body=Bow
From their colour fly=Turn pale; desert their flag
Bend=Glance
Temper=Constitution
Get the start of=Take a lead over
Compleat:
Well-favoured=Aangenaam, bevallig
I had as lief=Ik wilde al zo lief
Chafing=Verhitting, oploopendheid, wryving, schaaving
To accoutre=Toerusten, opschikken
Colour=Een vaandel
A man of an instable temper=Een man van een ongestadig humeur, van eenen wispelteurigen aart

Topics: virtue, honour, appearance, wellbeing

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!
He was quick mettle when he went to school.
CASSIUS
So is he now in execution
Of any bold or noble enterprise,
However he puts on this tardy form.
This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit,
Which gives men stomach to digest his words
With better appetite.
BRUTUS
And so it is. For this time I will leave you.
Tomorrow, if you please to speak with me,
I will come home to you; or, if you will,
Come home to me, and I will wait for you.
CASSIUS
I will do so. Till then, think of the world.

DUTCH:
Wat is uit hem een plompe borst gegroeid!
Toen hij ter school ging, was hij geest en vuur.

MORE:
Blunt=Dull in understanding
Quick mettle=Quick-witted; keen
However=Although
Tardy form=Sluggish appearance
Wit=Intelligence
Rudeness=Roughness, coarseness
Compleat:
To blunt=Stomp maaken, verstompen
A blunt fellow=Een ongeschikte vent, een plompe boer
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
Tardy=Slof, traag, langzaam
Wit (understanding)=Vinding, schranderheid, verstand
Rudeness=Ruuwheyd, onbehouwenheyd, plompheyd

Burgersdijk notes:
Denk midd’lerwijl aan ‘s werelds eischen. Er staat eigenlijk: “Denk middelerwijl aan de wereld”,
aan de wereld en hoe het er toegaat; overweeg den toestand .

Topics: understanding, intellect, wisdom

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Brutus, a word with you .
You know not what you do. Do not consent
That Antony speak in his funeral.
Know you how much the people may be moved
By that which he will utter?
BRUTUS
By your pardon.
I will myself into the pulpit first,
And show the reason of our Caesar’s death.
What Antony shall speak, I will protest,
He speaks by leave and by permission,
And that we are contented Caesar shall
Have all true rites and lawful ceremonies.
It shall advantage more than do us wrong.
CASSIUS
I know not what may fall. I like it not.

DUTCH:
En wat Antonius spreekt, zal ik verklaren,
Dat hij met ons verlof en wil hot spreekt

MORE:
By your pardon=With your leave
Protest=State solemnly, declare
True=Proper, genuine
Advantage=Benefit
Compleat:
I beg your pardon=Ik bid u om vergiffenis
To protest=Beetuygen, aantuygen, aankondigen
True=Trouw, oprecht
To advantage=Vorderen, baaten

Topics: advantage/benefit, persuasion

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
No, not an oath. If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuse—
If these be motives weak, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed.
So let high-sighted tyranny range on
Till each man drop by lottery. But if these—
As I am sure they do—bear fire enough
To kindle cowards and to steel with valour
The melting spirits of women, then, countrymen,
W hat need we any spur but our own cause
To prick us to redress? What other bond
Than secret Romans that have spoke the word
And will not palter? And what other oath
Than honesty to honesty engaged,
That this shall be, or we will fall for it?
Swear priests and cowards and men cautelous,
Old feeble carrions and such suffering souls
That welcome wrongs. Unto bad causes swear
Such creatures as men doubt. But do not stain
The even virtue of our enterprise,
Nor th’ insuppressive mettle of our spirits,
To think that or our cause or our performance
Did need an oath, when every drop of blood
That every Roman bears—and nobly bears—
Is guilty of a several bastardy
If he do break the smallest particle
Of any promise that hath passed from him.

DUTCH:
Doch dragen zij,
Gelijk ik vast vertrouw, het vuur in zich
Om lafaards te doorgloeien, weeke vrouwen
Door moed te stalen, waartoe, medeburgers,
Dan nog een and’re spoor dan onze zaak
Als prikkel, dat wij redden?

MORE:
Faces=Expressions
Sufferance=Suffering
Time’s abuse=Corruption of the time
Betimes=Immediately
High-sighted=Arrogant, looking down
Lottery=Chance
Palter=Equivocate
Engaged=Pledged
Cautelous=Crafty, false; cautious
Even=Honest, unstained
Insuppressive=Undefeatable
Guilty of bastardy=Adulterated
Compleat:
Face=’t Aangezigt, gelaat, gedaante
Sufferance=Verdraagzaamheid, toegeevendheid
Betimes=Bytyds, vroeg
High-minded=Hoogmoedig, verwaand
Lottery=Lotery
To palter=Weyfelen, leuteren, haperen, achteruyt kruypen, aerzelen, bedektelyk handelen
To engage=Verbinden, verplichten, verpanden
Cautelous=Omzigtig, zorgvuldig
To even=Effenen, vereffenen, effenmaaken, gelykmaaken
To suppress=(to stifle, stop) Beletten, verhinderen, sluiten
Bastardy=Onechtheid

Burgersdijk notes:

Indien niet onze trekken. Het Engelsch heeft: If not the face of men, ,zoo niet der menschen gelaat”. Het gelaat is natuurlijk, wat op het gelaat te lezen staat, de droef heid om Rome’s vernedering; wat door het woord trekken genoegzaam is uitgedrukt. Dat er bij deze zamenzwering geen eed werd afgelegd, vond Sh. in Plutarchus; evenzoo dat zjj aan Cicero de zaak niet mededeelden, en wel omdat
zij vreesden, dat hij door de bedachtzaamheid van den ouderdom het vuur, voor de uitvoering noodig, zou trachten te temperen’ alsmede, dat Marcus Antonius op Brutus’ aandrang gespaard bleef.

Topics: promise, courage, honesty

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
That you do love me, I am nothing jealous.
What you would work me to, I have some aim.
How I have thought of this and of these times
I shall recount hereafter. For this present,
I would not, so with love I might entreat you,
Be any further moved. What you have said
I will consider, what you have to say
I will with patience hear, and find a time
Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
Till then, my noble friend, chew upon this:
Brutus had rather be a villager
Than to repute himself a son of Rome
Under these hard conditions as this time
Is like to lay upon us.
CASSIUS
I am glad that my weak words
Have struck but thus much show of fire from Brutus.

DUTCH:
Dring mij niet verder. Overwegen wil ik,
Wat gij gezegd hebt, wat gij meer wilt zeggen
Met kalmte hooren, zorgen voor een tijd,
Geschikt om zulke zaken te bespreken.

MORE:
Nothing jealous=In no doubt
Work=Persuade
Aim=Idea, guess
Moved=Persuaded
Meet=Appropriate
Chew upon=Ruminate on
Compleat:
Jealous=Belgziek, yverzuchtig, minnenydig; naayverig, argwaanig, achterdochtig,
To aim=(Guess) Mikken
Moved=Bewoogen, verroerd, ontroerd
Meet=Dienstig
To chew=Kaauwen

Topics: persuasion, reason

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Calphurnia
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
What can be avoided
Whose end is purposed by the mighty gods?
Yet Caesar shall go forth, for these predictions
Are to the world in general as to Caesar.
CALPHURNIA
When beggars die there are no comets seen.
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
CAESAR
Cowards die many times before their deaths.
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.

DUTCH:
Kometen ziet men niet als beed’laars sterven,
Doch vorstendood vlamt van den hemel af .

MORE:
CITED IN IRISH LAW: Rule against Perpetuities and Cognate Rules, Report on the (LRC 62-2000) [2000] IELRC 62 (1st December, 2000)/[2000] IELRC 62, [2000] IELRC 3. Footnote 34.

Proverb: A coward dies many deaths, a brave man but one

Purposed=Intended
Blaze forth=Proclaim
Never but=Only
Compleat:
To purpose=Voorneemen, voorhebben
To blaze=Opflakkeren
To blaze abroad=Ruchtbaar maaken, uyttrom

Topics: courage, proverbs and idioms, death, order/society, cited in law, poverty and wealth, equality

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
He greets me well.—Your master, Pindarus,
In his own change or by ill officers
Hath given me some worthy cause to wish
Things done, undone. But if he be at hand
I shall be satisfied.
PINDARUS
I do not doubt
But that my noble master will appear
Such as he is, full of regard and honour.
BRUTUS
He is not doubted.—A word, Lucillius.
How he received you, let me be resolved.
LUCILLIUS
With courtesy and with respect enough.
But not with such familiar instances
Nor with such free and friendly conference
As he hath used of old.
BRUTUS
Thou hast described
A hot friend cooling. Ever note, Lucillius,
When love begins to sicken and decay,
It useth an enforcèd ceremony.
There are no tricks in plain and simple faith.
But hollow men, like horses hot at hand,
Make gallant show and promise of their mettle.

DUTCH:
Gij teekent daar
Een warmen vriend, die koel wordt. Geef steeds acht,
Als vriendschap kwijnen en verwelken gaat,
Dan bezigt zij gedwongen hoflijkheid .
De slechte rechte trouw weet niets van kunsten.

MORE:
Proverb: Full of courtesy full of craft
Proverb: Things done cannot be undone

Greets me well=Sends greetings through a worthy emissary
Change=Changed mind
Ill=Bad, untrustworthy
Worthy=Justifiable, respectable
Satisfied=Receive a satisfactory explanation
Regard=Respect
Resolved=Informed
Familiar instances=Signs of affection
Conference=Conversation
Enforcèd=Strained
Hot friend=Previously close friend
Trick=Artifice
Compleat:
Change=Verschiet, verscheydenheyd, verandering, verwisseling
Ill=Quaad, ondeugend, onpasselijk
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Satisfaction, content=Voldoening
Regard=Opzigt, inzigt, omzigtigheyd, zorg, acht, achting
Resolve (untie, decide, determine a hard question, difficulty etc.)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopten
Resolve (deliberation, decision)=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel
Familiar=Gemeenzaam
Conference=Onderhandeling, t’zamenspraak, mondgemeenschap
Enforcèd=Gedwongen, opgedrongen
Trick=Een looze trek, greep, gril

Topics: respect, civility, proverbs and idioms, reply, judgment, resolution

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Lucius
CONTEXT:
LUCIUS
No, sir. Their hats are plucked about their ears,
And half their faces buried in their cloaks,
That by no means I may discover them
By any mark of favour.
BRUTUS
Let ’em enter.
They are the faction. O conspiracy,
Shamest thou to show thy dangerous brow by night
When evils are most free? O, then by day
Where wilt thou find a cavern dark enough
To mask thy monstrous visage? Seek none, conspiracy.
Hide it in smiles and affability.
For if thou path, thy native semblance on,
Not Erebus itself were dim enough
To hide thee from prevention.

DUTCH:
O gij, samenzwering!
Schroomt gij uw dreigend voorhoofd ‘s nachts to toonen,
Wanneer het kwaad vrij omgaat? Waar dan vindt gij
Bij dag een grot, wier zwart uw monsteraanschijn
Genoeg vermomt? O zoek niet, samenzwering ;
Een glimlach zij uw mom en vriend’lijkheid

MORE:
Proverb: Fair face foul heart

Plucked about=Pulled down over
Discover=Identify
Mark of favour=Feature, identifying mark
Dangerous=Threatening
Native semblance=True appearance
Prevention=Being stopped (recognised)
Compleat:
Plucked=Gerukt
Discover=Ontdekken, bespeuren, aan ‘t licht brengen
Semblance=Gelykenis, schyn
Prevention=Voorkoming, verhoeding, verhinderen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, deceit, appearance, conspiracy

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Messala
CONTEXT:
TITINIUS
No, this was he, Messala,
But Cassius is no more. O setting sun,
As in thy red rays thou dost sink tonight,
So in his red blood Cassius’ day is set.
The sun of Rome is set. Our day is gone.
Clouds, dews, and dangers come! Our deeds are done.
Mistrust of my success hath done this deed.
MESSALA
Mistrust of good success hath done this deed.
O hateful error, melancholy’s child,
Why dost thou show to the apt thoughts of men
The things that are not? O error, soon conceived,
Thou never comest unto a happy birth
But kill’st the mother that engendered thee!

DUTCH:
Mistrust of good success hath done this deed.
O hateful error, melancholy’s child,
Why dost thou show to the apt thoughts of men
The things that are not? O error, soon conceived,
Thou never comest unto a happy birth
But kill’st the mother that engendered thee!

MORE:
Mistrust=Uncertainty
Success=Outcome
Melancholy’s child=Melancholy thoughts

Topics: ucertainty, perception, error

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Lucillius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
He greets me well.—Your master, Pindarus,
In his own change or by ill officers
Hath given me some worthy cause to wish
Things done, undone. But if he be at hand
I shall be satisfied.
PINDARUS
I do not doubt
But that my noble master will appear
Such as he is, full of regard and honour.
BRUTUS
He is not doubted.—A word, Lucillius.
How he received you, let me be resolved.
LUCILLIUS
With courtesy and with respect enough.
But not with such familiar instances
Nor with such free and friendly conference
As he hath used of old.
BRUTUS
Thou hast described
A hot friend cooling. Ever note, Lucillius,
When love begins to sicken and decay,
It useth an enforcèd ceremony.
There are no tricks in plain and simple faith.
But hollow men, like horses hot at hand,
Make gallant show and promise of their mettle.

DUTCH:
Beleefd genoeg, met ieder blijk van achting;
Maar niet met blijken van vertrouwlijkheid,
Diet op een wijs, zoo hart’lijk en vriendschapp’lijk,
Als hij ‘t wel plach to doen.

MORE:
Proverb: Full of courtesy full of craft
Proverb: Things done cannot be undone

Greets me well=Sends greetings through a worthy emissary
Change=Changed mind
Ill=Bad, untrustworthy
Worthy=Justifiable, respectable
Satisfied=Receive a satisfactory explanation
Regard=Respect
Resolved=Informed
Familiar instances=Signs of affection
Conference=Conversation
Enforcèd=Strained
Hot friend=Previously close friend
Trick=Artifice
Compleat:
Change=Verschiet, verscheydenheyd, verandering, verwisseling
Ill=Quaad, ondeugend, onpasselijk
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Satisfaction, content=Voldoening
Regard=Opzigt, inzigt, omzigtigheyd, zorg, acht, achting
Resolve (untie, decide, determine a hard question, difficulty etc.)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopten
Resolve (deliberation, decision)=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel
Familiar=Gemeenzaam
Conference=Onderhandeling, t’zamenspraak, mondgemeenschap
Enforcèd=Gedwongen, opgedrongen
Trick=Een looze trek, greep, gril

Topics: respect, civility, proverbs and idioms, reply, judgment, resolution

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
METELLUS
Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar,
Metellus Cimber throws before thy seat
An humble heart—
CAESAR
I must prevent thee, Cimber.
These couchings and these lowly courtesies
Might fire the blood of ordinary men
And turn preordinance and first decree
Into the law of children. Be not fond,
To think that Caesar bears such rebel blood
That will be thawed from the true quality
With that which melteth fools—I mean, sweet words,
Low-crookèd curtsies, and base spaniel fawning.
Thy brother by decree is banishèd.
If thou dost bend and pray and fawn for him,
I spurn thee like a cur out of my way.
Know, Caesar doth not wrong, nor without cause
Will he be satisfied.
METELLUS
Is there no voice more worthy than my own
To sound more sweetly in great Caesar’s ear
For the repealing of my banished brother?

DUTCH:
Waan niet in my dwaasheid,
Dat Caesar’s bloed zoo licht in opstand komt,
En wordt ontdooid, zijn rechten aard verzakend,
Door dat wat narren smelt, door zoete woorden,
Door krom gebuk, door kruipend hondsch gekwispel.

MORE:
Puissant=Powerful
Prevent=Forestall
Couchings=Cringing, bowing, protestation
Courtesies=Deference
Blood=Passion
Preordinance and first decree=Decreed from the outset
Fond=Foolish
True quality=Quality of fidelity
Curtsies=Deference
Repealing=Recalling
Compleat:
Puissant=Machtig, groot van vermogen
To prevent=Voorkomen, eerstkomen; afkeeren; verhoeden
Courtesy=Beleefdheid, hoflykheid, eerbiedigheid; genyg, nyging; vriendelykheid
Blood (bloud)=Bloed
His blood is up=Zyn bloed is aan ‘t zieden geraakt
To preordain=Voorschikken, voorbestemmen, voorverordenen
To decree=Verordenen, besluyten
Curtsy=Nyging, genyg
Repeal=Herroepen, afschaffen, weer intrekken

Topics: authority, flattery, judgment

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
I know that we shall have him well to friend.
CASSIUS
I wish we may. But yet have I a mind
That fears him much, and my misgiving still
Falls shrewdly to the purpose.
BRUTUS
But here comes Antony.—Welcome, Mark Antony.
ANTONY
O mighty Caesar! Dost thou lie so low?
Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils,
Shrunk to this little measure? Fare thee well.
—I know not, gentlemen, what you intend,
Who else must be let blood, who else is rank.

DUTCH:
Ik hoop het ; maar toch heb ik een gevoel,
Dat zeer hem vreest ; en als ik onheil ducht,
Komt mijn beduchtheid altijd uit.

MORE:
Well to friend=On our side
Shrewdly=Astutely; grievously
To the purpose=Accurate
Shrunk=Distilled
Rank=Infected, corrupt
Compleat:
Shrewdly=Doortrapetelyk, vinniglyk; sterk
Shrunk=Gekrompen
To the purpose=Ter zaake
Rank=Vunsig, garstig, oolyk

Topics: corruption, caution, trust, merit

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Caesar
CONTEXT:
CAESAR
Let me have men about me that are fat,
Sleek-headed men and such as sleep a-nights.
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look.
He thinks too much. Such men are dangerous.
ANTONY
Fear him not, Caesar. He’s not dangerous.
He is a noble Roman and well given.

DUTCH:
Die Cassius ziet er schraal en hong’rig uit;
Hij denkt te veel; die mannen zijn gevaarlijk.

MORE:
Proverb: An envious man grows lean

Yond=Pronoun, used in pointing to a person or thing at a distance, not always within view; yonder. (Yon is generally within view)
Sleek-headed=Smooth haired
Well given=Well-disposed
Compleat:
Yon=Gins
Yonder=Ginder
Sleek=Glad, gelekt. To sleen linnen=Linnen lekken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, risk, loyalty, skill/talent

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Murellus
CONTEXT:
MURELLUS
Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings he home?
What tributaries follow him to Rome
To grace in captive bonds his chariot wheels?
You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things,
O you hard hearts, you cruèl men of Rome,
Knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oft
Have you climbed up to walls and battlements,
To towers and windows, yea, to chimney tops,
Your infants in your arms, and there have sat
The livelong day with patient expectation
To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome.
And when you saw his chariot but appear,
Have you not made an universal shout
That Tiber trembled underneath her banks
To hear the replication of your sounds
Made in her concave shores?
And do you now put on your best attire?
And do you now cull out a holiday?
And do you now strew flowers in his way
That comes in triumph over Pompey’s blood?
Be gone!
Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,
Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
That needs must light on this ingratitude.

DUTCH:
Gij klompen, steenen, erger dan gevoelloos,
Gij harde harten, Rome’s wreede mannen,
Hebt gij Pompeius niet gekend?

MORE:
Conquest=Victory
Tributaries=Vassals who pay tributes
Grace=Dignify
Senseless=Unfeeling
Livelong=Whole, throughout the day
Replication=Echo
Concave=Hollow
Cull out=Select
Intermit=Interrupt
Light=Land, descend
Compleat:
Conquest=Overwinning, verovering
Tributary=Cynsbaar; schatting onderworpen
To grace=Vercieren, bevallig maaken
Senseless=Gevoeleloos, ongevoelig, zinneloos
Replication=Ontvouwing; een weder antwoord [van den klaager op het eerste antwoord des aangeklaagden]Concave=Hol
To cull=Uitpikken, uitkiezen
To intermit=Aflaaten, verpoozen, ophouden; staaken
Light=Neerzetten

Burgersdijk notes:

Ja, schoorsteentoppen zelfs. Begrijpelijk zeker voor het schouwburgpubliek, al schudden oudheidkenners het hoofd bij die Romeinsche schoorsteenen.

Topics: status, order/society, ingratitude, leadership

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Brutus, bait not me.
I’ll not endure it. You forget yourself
To hedge me in. I am a soldier, I,
Older in practice, abler than yourself
To make conditions.
BRUTUS
Go to. You are not, Cassius.
CASSIUS
I am.
BRUTUS
I say you are not.
CASSIUS
Urge me no more, I shall forget myself.
Have mind upon your health, tempt me no further.
BRUTUS
Away, slight man!
CASSIUS
Is ’t possible?

DUTCH:
Gij vergeet uzelf,
Brengt gij me in ‘t nauw. Ik ben een krijger ik,
Van ouder oef’ning, en veel meer geschikt
Om u den weg te wijzen.

MORE:
Bait=Provoke
Endure=Stand for, accept
Older in practice=More experienced
Make conditions=Manage things
Urge=Provoke
Tempt=Provoke
Slight=Little, insignificant
Compleat:
Bait=Aas leggen, lokken lokaazen
To endure=Verdraagen, harden, duuren
To urge=Dringen, pressen, aandringen, aanstaan
To tempt=Aanvechten, verzoeken, bekooren, bestryden
Slight=Van weinig belang, een beuzeling

Topics: dispute, age/experience, patience, skill/talent, error

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Hear me, for I will speak.
Must I give way and room to your rash choler?
Shall I be frighted when a madman stares?
CASSIUS
O ye gods, ye gods, must I endure all this?
BRUTUS
“All this”? Ay, more. Fret till your proud heart break.
Go show your slaves how choleric you are
And make your bondmen tremble. Must I budge?
Must I observe you? Must I stand and crouch
Under your testy humour? By the gods,
You shall digest the venom of your spleen,
Though it do split you. For from this day forth,
I’ll use you for my mirth, yea, for my laughter,
When you are waspish.

DUTCH:
Bij de goden, zwelgen,
Verteren zult gijzelf uws wrevels gif;
Al moest gij er aan barsten; van nu aan
Zult gij mij voorwerp zijn voor spot en lach,
Als gij zoo giftig zijt.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
People v. Gardner, 56 Cal. App.3d 91, 97 n.2, 128 Cal. Rptr. 101, 106 n.2 (1976) Paras, J.).

Rash=Sudden
Choler=Anger, temper
Budge=Move, flinch
Choleric=Furious
Observe=Defer to
Crouch=Cower
Digest=Swallow
Spleen=Temper
Waspish=Sharp
Compleat:
Rash=Voorbaarig, haastig, onbedacht, roekeloos
To budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
To observe=Waarneemen, gadeslaan, onderhouden, aanmerken, opmerken
To crouch=Neerbuigen, neerbogen liggen
To digest=Verteeren, verdouwen, verkroppen; in orde schikken
Spleen (Spite, hatred or grudge)=Spyt, haat, wrak
Waspish=Kribbig, knyzig, snaauwachtig

Topics: anger, cited in law

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
That you have wronged me doth appear in this:
You have condemned and noted Lucius Pella
For taking bribes here of the Sardians,
Wherein my letters, praying on his side
Because I knew the man, were slighted off.
BRUTUS
You wronged yourself to write in such a case.
CASSIUS
In such a time as this it is not meet
That every nice offence should bear his comment.
BRUTUS
Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourself
Are much condemned to have an itching palm,
To sell and mart your offices for gold
To undeservers.
CASSIUS
I “an itching palm”!
You know that you are Brutus that speak this,
Or, by the gods, this speech were else your last.
BRUTUS
The name of Cassius honours this corruption,
And chastisement doth therefore hide his head.

DUTCH:
Door zulk een brief deedt gij uzelven onrecht.

MORE:
Meet=Appropriate
Nice=Trivial
Bear his comment=Be criticised
Itching palms=According to superstition, an itching palm means that money (here, a bribe) was on its way (the superstition is said to be based on the use of silver to cure diseases, which developed into the superstition that the itch meant silver was coming).
Compleat:
Meet=Dienstig
Nice=Keurig, vies
Itching palms =Jeukende handpalmen

Topics: corruption, money

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Brutus
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
That you have wronged me doth appear in this:
You have condemned and noted Lucius Pella
For taking bribes here of the Sardians,
Wherein my letters, praying on his side
Because I knew the man, were slighted off.
BRUTUS
You wronged yourself to write in such a case.
CASSIUS
In such a time as this it is not meet
That every nice offence should bear his comment.
BRUTUS
Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourself
Are much condemned to have an itching palm,
To sell and mart your offices for gold
To undeservers.
CASSIUS
I “an itching palm”!
You know that you are Brutus that speak this,
Or, by the gods, this speech were else your last.
BRUTUS
The name of Cassius honours this corruption,
And chastisement doth therefore hide his head.

DUTCH:
Laat ik u zeggen, Cassius, dat gijzelf
Gelaakt wordt, wijl de holle hand u jeukt,
En wijl ge onwaardigen voor goud uw ambten
Te koop biedt.

MORE:
Meet=Appropriate
Nice=Trivial
Bear his comment=Be criticised
Itching palms=According to superstition, an itching palm means that money (here, a bribe) was on its way (the superstition is said to be based on the use of silver to cure diseases, which developed into the superstition that the itch meant silver was coming).
Compleat:
Meet=Dienstig
Nice=Keurig, vies
Itching palms =Jeukende handpalmen

Topics: corruption, money

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Calpurnia
CONTEXT:
CALPHURNIA
Alas, my lord,
Your wisdom is consumed in confidence.
Do not go forth today. Call it my fear
That keeps you in the house, and not your own.
We’ll send Mark Antony to the senate house,
And he shall say you are not well today.
Let me, upon my knee, prevail in this.
CAESAR
Mark Antony shall say I am not well,
And for thy humour I will stay at home.

DUTCH:
Uw wijsheid wordt verteerd door zelfvertrouwen.

MORE:
Consumed=Overtaken by
Confidence=Over-confidence
Humour=Whim
Compleat:
Confidence=Betrouwen, vertrouwen, vrymoedigheyd, verzekerdheyd
Over-confident=Al te stout
Humour (or disposition of the mind)=Humeur, gemoeds gesteldheid

Topics: risk, caution, wisdom

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