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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Macbeth ACT/SCENE: 2.2 SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth CONTEXT: I hear a knocking
At the south entry. Retire we to our chamber.
A little water clears us of this deed.
How easy is it, then! Your constancy
Hath left you unattended. DUTCH: Een weinig waters spoelt die daad ons af MORE: CITED IN US LAW:
State v. Shanahan, 404 A.2d 975 (Me. 1979)(Wemick, J.)
Schmidt:
Constancy=Firmness of mind (purpose, resolve)
Compleat:
Constancy=Standvastigheid, volharding, bestendigheid Topics: guilt, cited in law, conscience, offence, evidence, purpose

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Hecate
CONTEXT:
He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
His hopes ‘bove wisdom, grace, and fear.
And you all know, security
Is mortals’ chiefest enemy.

DUTCH:
Zorgeloosheid is de voornaamste vijand van stervelingen./
En ‘t is de waan van veiligheid, Die wis verderf den mensch bereidt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Security=carelessness, want of caution, confidence
Compleat:
Security=Zorgeloosheyd

Topics: hope/optimism, ambition, haste, , wisdom, security

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Second Witch
CONTEXT:
Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn
The power of man, for none of woman born
Shall harm Macbeth.

DUTCH:
Wees bloedig, moedig, stout; spot, onvervaard,
Met menschenmacht; geen, door een vrouw gebaard,
Deert ooit Macbeth.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Laugh to scorn=Deride, make a mockery of

Topics: courage, purpose, ambition

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck,
Till thou applaud the deed. Come, seeling night,
Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day
And with thy bloody and invisible hand
Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond
Which keeps me pale. Light thickens, and the crow
Makes wing to th’ rooky wood.

DUTCH:

MORE:
Schmidt:
Applaud= To praise, approve
to Seel=to blind (originally a term of falconry)
Bond= Bond of life
Compleat:
To seel a hawk=Eenen valk een kap voor de oogen doen

Topics: innocence, offence

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
It will have blood, they say. Blood will have blood.
Stones have been known to move, and trees to speak.
Augurs and understood relations have
By magot pies and choughs and rooks brought forth
The secret’st man of blood.—What is the night?

DUTCH:
t Wil bloed, is ‘t zeggen; bloed wil bloed.

MORE:
Blood will have blood is an allusion to the proverb of retribution, “Blood will have blood” (c. 1395)

Topics: death, revenge, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Macduff
CONTEXT:
Boundless intemperance
In nature is a tyranny. It hath been
The untimely emptying of the happy throne
And fall of many kings. But fear not yet
To take upon you what is yours. You may
Convey your pleasures in a spacious plenty
And yet seem cold; the time you may so hoodwink.

DUTCH:
Matelooze wellust
Is tyrannie, die meen’gen schoonen troon
Te vroeg ontruimen deed, en meen’gen koning
Ten val bracht.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Intemperance= Want of moderation, licentiousness
Time=Men, the world
Spacious= wide, large, extensive
Plenty=Abundance
Convey=To do or manage with secrecy (i.e. indulge secretly)
Compleat:
Intemperance=Onmaatigheyd, overdaad

Topics: excess, deceit, secrecy, temptation

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
We fail?
But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
And we’ll not fail. When Duncan is asleep—
Whereto the rather shall his day’s hard journey
Soundly invite him—his two chamberlains
Will I with wine and wassail so convince
That memory, the warder of the brain,
Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
Their drenchèd natures lie as in a death,
What cannot you and I perform upon
The unguarded Duncan? What not put upon
His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
Of our great quell?

DUTCH:
Mislukken!
Schroef slechts uw moed tot aan het hoogste punt,
En het mislukt ons niet.

MORE:
There are several definitions of ‘sticking place’: Samuel Johnson descibes it as the place of being stopped, unable to proceed. It is also described as the point at which a tuning peg is set in its hole and the mark to which a soldier screwed up the cord of a crossbow (OED).
Schmidt:
Sticking-place= the place in which the peg of a stringed instrument remains fast; the proper degree of tension
Convince=Overcome, defeat
Warder=A guard, a keeper, a sentinel “Memory, the warder of the brain”
A fume=A delusion, a phantasm, anything hindering, like a mist, the function of the brain
Limbeck=An alembic (alchemical still)
Onions:
Sticking-place=Point at which (it) remains firm
The rather=The more quickly
Compleat:
Limbeck=Een afzyphelm
Alembick=Een Destilleerhelm, in de Scheikonst

Topics: invented or popularised, still in use, plans/intentions, conspiracy, deceit, offence

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
What need I fear of thee?
But yet I’ll make assurance double sure,
And take a bond of fate. Thou shalt not live,
That I may tell pale-hearted fear it lies,
And sleep in spite of thunder.

DUTCH:
Toch, dubbel zeker zij mijn zekerheid!
Ik neem een pand van ‘t noodlot

MORE:
Schmidt:
Assurance= Confidence, certain knowledge
Bond=A deed or obligation to pay a sum perform a contract, which may come near the sense of porn or pledge (“to make assurance double sure and take a bond of fate”)
Pale-hearted=Wanting courage, cowardly
Compleat:
Bond=een Band, verband, verbinding, verbindschrift, obligatie
Bond for appearance=een Borgstelling om voor ‘t Recht te zullen verschynen

Topics: plans/intentions, guilt, conscience, security, courage

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Second Witch
CONTEXT:
By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes.
Open, locks,
Whoever knocks.

DUTCH:
t Jeuken van mijn duim zegt mij:
Iets, dat boos is, komt nabij!

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: emotion and mood, fate/destiny, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Come what come may,
Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

DUTCH:
Laat komen wat komen wil, ook de ergste dag gaat voorbij./
Kome al wat komen wil; De ruwste dag verloopt, geen uur staat stil.

MORE:
Nowadays: Come what may
Even the worst day comes to an end

Topics: fate/destiny, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macduff
CONTEXT:
Confusion now hath made his masterpiece.
Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
The Lord’s anointed temple, and stole thence
The life o’ th’ building!

DUTCH:
Verwoesting heeft haar meesterstuk volbracht !

MORE:
Schmidt:
Temple= Used of man and of the human body as the habitation of the soul

Topics: offence, sorrow

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Witches
CONTEXT:
Double double toil and trouble, Fire burn and cauldron bubble

DUTCH:
Poken! dubbel, dubbel stoken!
Vuur, gij vonk’len! ketel, smoken!

MORE:
Misquoted as “Bubble bubble, toil and trouble.”

Topics: misc., misquoted, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Witches
CONTEXT:
Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
Hover through the fog and filthy air.

DUTCH:
Eerlijk is vals en vals is eerlijk/
Eerlijk is vuil en vuil is eerlijk/
Eerlijk is fout en fout is eerlijk/

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb “Fair without but foul within” (c1200). (Macbeth also alludes to the same proverb in Act 1.3: “So foul and fair a day I have not seen.”

Topics: appearance, deceit, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I am settled, and bend up
Each corporal agent to this terrible feat.
Away, and mock the time with fairest show.
False face must hide what the false heart doth know.

DUTCH:
Een huichelachtig gezicht moet verbergen wat een vals hart weet./
Door ‘t valsch gelaat het valsche hart verheeld!

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb “Fair face foul heart” (1584). Also an earlier form “He that makes the fairest face shall soonest deceive” (c1495)
Still in use today
Schmidt:
Settled=Resolved
Corporal=Bodily
Compleat:
Corporal=Lichaamlyk
To take a corporal oath (which is done by touching with one’s hand some part of the holy Scripture)=Een lyffelyke Eed doen, die geschiedt met het aanraaken van den Bybel.

Topics: deceit, appearance, still in use, offence

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Doctor
CONTEXT:
Foul whisp’rings are abroad. Unnatural deeds
Do breed unnatural troubles. Infected minds
To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets.
More needs she the divine than the physician.

DUTCH:
Men fluistert gruw’len. Onnatuurlijk doen
Baart onnatuurlijk wee.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Foul=Disgraceful, derogatory, detractive
Whisperings = rumours
Unnatural = supernatural (sleepwalkers were considered to be cursed; sleepwalking a sign of demonic possession)

Topics: madness, guilt, conspiracy, language

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
What, man! Ne’er pull your hat upon your brows.
Give sorrow words. The grief that does not speak
Whispers the o’erfraught heart and bids it break.

DUTCH:
Geef verdriet woorden: Het verdriet dat niet spreekt fluistert in het overbelaste hart, en vraagt het te breken./
Geef jammer woorden; ingehouden smart, breekt door zijn fluisteren het overladen hart./
Geef Uw jammer woorden! Ingehouden smart Breekt door zijn fluist’ren ‘t overladen hart.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb: “Grief pent up will break the heart” (1589)
CITED IN US LAW:
Baxter v. State, 503 S.W.2d 226,228 (Tenn. 1973): The court observes that “Shakespeare was right, as students of emotion know, when he advised, ‘give sorrows words. The grief that does not speak whispers the o’erfraught heart and bids it break'”.

Topics: grief, cited in law, emotion and mood, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
Go, prick thy face and over-red thy fear,
Thou lily-livered boy. What soldiers, patch?
Death of thy soul! Those linen cheeks of thine
Are counselors to fear. What soldiers, whey-face?

DUTCH:
Ga, schram ‘t gelaat en verf uw angsten rood!

MORE:
Pinch your cheeks for some colour
White livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare

Topics: appearance, courage

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
He’s here in double trust:
First, as I am his kinsman and his subject,
Strong both against the deed; then, as his host,
Who should against his murderer shut the door,
Not bear the knife myself.

DUTCH:
Hier dekt hem dubb’le hoede

MORE:
Schmidt:
Trust=A state of being confided to another’s care and guard

Topics: trust

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
By the worst means, the worst. For mine own good,
All causes shall give way. I am in blood
Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more,
Returning were as tedious as go o’er.
Strange things I have in head, that will to hand,
Which must be acted ere they may be scanned.

DUTCH:
k Heb in bloed
Zoo ver gewaad, dat, als ik nu bleef staan,
Mij de omkeer zwaarder viel, dan ‘t voorwaarts gaan.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb: “Go forward and fall, go backward and mar all” (1580)

Topics: purpose, uncertainty, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I conjure you by that which you profess—
Howe’er you come to know it—answer me.
Though you untie the winds and let them fight
Against the churches; though the yeasty waves
Confound and swallow navigation up;
Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down;
Though castles topple on their warders’ heads;
Though palaces and pyramids do slope
Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
Of nature’s germens tumble all together,
Even till destruction sicken; answer me
To what I ask you.

DUTCH:
k Bezweer u bij de macht van uwe kunst,
Hoe ‘t u ook kenn’lijk worde, geeft mij antwoord.

MORE:
Onions:
Profess=To claim to have knowledge of all skill in
Compleat:
to Profess=Belyden, belydenis doen, betuygen
A professed eleëmosinary=een Bedelaar die ‘er zyn ambacht van maakt

Topics: authority, justification, reply

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I have almost forgot the taste of fears.
The time has been my senses would have cooled
To hear a night-shriek, and my fell of hair
Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
As life were in ’t. I have supped full with horrors.
Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
Cannot once start me.

DUTCH:
k Heb schier vergeten, hoe het vreezen smaakt.

MORE:
Onions:
Fell=Skin, covering
Schmidt:
Treatise=Discourse, talk, tale
Dismal=Striking the mind with sorrow or dismay
Compleat:
Treatise=Een verhandeling, traktaat
Dismal=Schrikkelyk, gruuwelyk, yslyk, overdroevig, naar
Fell (skin)=Vel, huid

Topics: time, memory, age/experience, life

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
We will proceed no further in this business.
He hath honored me of late, and I have bought
Golden opinions from all sorts of people,
Which would be worn now in their newest gloss,
Not cast aside so soon.

DUTCH:
Laat ons niet verder gaan in deze zaak;
Pas heeft hij mij in eer verhoogd; ik kocht
Me een gouden naam bij ied’ren rang en stand

MORE:
Schmidt:
To buy= To acquire, procure, gain

Topics: plans/intentions, guilt, uncertainty, reputation

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
As far, my lord, as will fill up the time
‘Twixt this and supper. Go not my horse the better,
I must become a borrower of the night
For a dark hour or twain.

DUTCH:
Zoo ver, heer, dat ik tot het avondmaal
Mijn tijd behoef; als niet mijn ros zich rept,
Dan zal de nacht een donker uur of twee
Mij moeten borgen.

MORE:

Topics: misc.

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
This supernatural soliciting
Cannot be ill, cannot be good. If ill,
Why hath it given me earnest of success,
Commencing in a truth? I am thane of Cawdor.
If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
Against the use of nature? Present fears
Are less than horrible imaginings.

DUTCH:
En is zij goed, wat blaast zij mij iets in,
Zoo gruwlijk, dat mijn haar te berge rijst

MORE:
Unfix my hair = make my hair stand on end (hair standing on end is also attributed to Shakespeare (Hamlet))
CITED IN US LAW:
In Re Public Service Company of New Hampshire, 884 F.2d 11, 13 (1st Cir.1989);
In Re Martin, 817 F.2d 175, 183 (1st Cir.1987);
Scuncio Motors, Inc. v. Subaru of New England, Inc., 5.55 F.Supp. 1121, 1136 (D.R.I. 1982).

Topics: cited in law, temptation, manipulation, good and bad

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
If it were done when ’tis done, then ’twere well
It were done quickly. If th’ assassination
Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
With his surcease, success: that but this blow
Might be the be-all and the end-all

DUTCH:
Ware ‘t gedaan, als ‘t is gedaan, dan waar’
Het goed, zoo ‘t ras gedaan werd

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb “The thing done has an end” (c1380). Also Chaucer, “But that is don, is not to be done” (c1380).
Be-all and end-all (OED hyphenates)=the whole thing, perfection, ultimate goal.
Dyce:
Trammel up= To tie up or net up (a trammel is both a kind of draw net and a contrivance for teaching horses to pace or amble).
Compleat:
Tramel=Zekere slach van een vischnet
Trammel=Een beugel

Topics: offence, death, consequence, achievement, risk

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
To me you speak not.
If you can look into the seeds of time
And say which grain will grow and which will not,
Speak, then, to me, who neither beg nor fear
Your favors nor your hate.

DUTCH:
Als je in de zaden van de tijd kunt kijken, en zeg welk graan zal groeien en welke niet. /
Kunt gij der tijden zaad doorschouwen, spellen,
Wat korrel kiemen zal, wat korrel niet

MORE:
Seeds of time is thought to have been coined by Shakespeare; still in use, it has been adopted by many as a title including John Wyndham.

Topics: fate/destiny, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee:
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.

DUTCH:
Is dit een dolk die ik voor me zie, Het handvat naar mijn hand?/
Is dat een dolk, wat ik daar voor mij zie,
Het hecht mij toegekeerd?

MORE:

Topics: still in use, conscience, guilt

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

DUTCH:
Het is een sprookjen,
Verteld, vol galm en drift, door een onnooz’le,
Gansch zonder zin.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America v. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 636 F.2d 464, 469 (D.C.Cir. 1980);
McNeil v. Butz, Secretary of Agriculture, 480 F.2d 314, 323 (4th Cir. 1973)(|Winter, J): In a due process case the court writes that “without the right of confrontation, the process provided by the government here is mere sound and fury signifying nothing.”;
Action for Children’s Television v. Federal Communications Commission, 821 F.2d 741, 747 (D.C.Cir. 1987);
Jenkins v. Tatem, 795 F.2d 112, 113 (D.C.Cir. 1986);
Schering Corporation v. Vitarine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 124 F.R.D. 580, 587 (D.N.J. 1989);
Bell v. Busse, 633 F.Supp. 628, 632 (S.D.Ohio 1986);
Cebula v. General Electric Company, 614 F.Supp. 260, 265 (N.D.Ill. 1985)(Aspen, J.): In disparaging the plaintiff’ s statistical evidence, the court writes, “the so-called statistical evidence … is filled with sound and fury…”;
Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. v. Campbell, 512 So.2d 72.5, 729 Ala. 1987);
Arnold v. Parry, 173 Ind. App. 300, 363 N.E.2d 1055, 1061 (1977);
Claybrooks v. State, 36 Md. A,pp. 295,374 A.2d 365 (1977);
State v. Schweikert, 39 Ohio St.3d 603,604,529 N.E.2d 1271 (1988).

Topics: life, death, sorrow, cited in law, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
Knock, knock! Who’s there, in th’ other devil’s name? Faith, here’s an equivocator that could swear in both the scales against either scale, who committed treason enough for God’s sake, yet could not equivocate to heaven. O, come in, equivocator.

DUTCH:
Klop, klop, klop! wie is
daar, in naam van Beëlzebub?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Equivocator=One who uses ambiguous language
Compleat:
Equivocate=Dubbelzinnig spreeken

Topics: still in use, language, clarity/precision, truth

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.8
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I will not yield,
To kiss the ground before young Malcolm’s feet,
And to be baited with the rabble’s curse.
Though Birnam Wood be come to Dunsinane,
And thou opposed, being of no woman born,
Yet I will try the last. Before my body
I throw my warlike shield. Lay on, Macduff,
And damned be him that first cries, “Hold, enough!”

DUTCH:
Ik waag het uiterst; val dus uit, Macduff;
‘k Werp voor mij ‘t schild, dat meen’gen houw verdroeg;
Verdoemd wie ‘t eerste roept: „Houd op, genoeg!”

MORE:
Frequently misquoted as “Lead on, Macduff!”
Schmidt:
Bait=To harass in a manner like that of dogs
Rabble=the mean people, populace
Compleat:
Bait=Aas leggen, lokken lokaazen
Rabble=Het graauw, jan hagel, jan-rap en zyn maat, het gespuis
CITED IN EU LAW:
ECLI:EU:C:2011:254 Case C-53/10 Land Hessen v Franz Mūksch OHG
Opinion of A-G Sharpston
“It is common ground that Merck’s establishment was originally situated at a greater distance from the city, parts of which have crept towards it – reminding the agent for the German Government, as he stated at the hearing, of Birnam Wood coming to Dunsinane (Macbeth, Act 5).”

Topics: misquoted, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
Be this the whetstone of your sword. Let grief convert to anger; blunt not the heart, avenge it

DUTCH:
Dit zij de wetsteen van uw zwaard! Uw leed
Verkeere in toorn! Verstomp uw hart niet, neen,
Ontvlam het!

MORE:
Compleat:
To whet a knife=een Mes wetten (of slypen)
Whet-stone=een Wetsteen, Slypsteen
Whetted=Gewet, gesleepen, scherp gemaakt.

Topics: revenge, emotion and mood

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
Be comforted.
Let’s make us med’cines of our great revenge,
To cure this deadly grief.

DUTCH:
Zoek troost; dat onze felle wraak u heeling
Van deze doodwond breng’!

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb: “A desperate disease must have a desperate cure” (1539, Tilley)

Topics: revenge, grief, remedy

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
What will you do? Let’s not consort with them.
To show an unfelt sorrow is an office
Which the false man does easy. I’ll to England.

DUTCH:
Wat wilt gij doen? Laat ons niet met hen gaan

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “consort”: Jastrabek v Klein, 116 NJL 23, 69 A. 29 (1908)

Topics: cited in law, deceit, relationship

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
LADY MACBETH
Was the hope drunk
Wherein you dressed yourself? Hath it slept since?
And wakes it now, to look so green and pale
At what it did so freely? From this time
Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard
To be the same in thine own act and valor
As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that
Which thou esteem’st the ornament of life,
And live a coward in thine own esteem,
Letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would, ”
Like the poor cat i’ th’ adage?
MACBETH
Prithee, peace:
I dare do all that may become a man;
Who dares do more is none.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij dat bezitten,
Wat gij des levens sieraad schat, en wilt gij
In eigen schatting als een lafaard leven,
Die „’k Durf niet” volgen laat op: „O, ik wilde!”
Als de arme kat in ‘t spreekwoord?
Ik durf en waag al wat een man betaamt; Wie meer durft, is geen man.

MORE:
The cat in the adage: “The Cat would eat fish but she will not wet her feet” (1225).
P.G. Wodhouse quoted this in Right Ho, Jeeves:
“I remember. Yes, I recall the Sipperley case. He couldn’t bring himself to the scratch. A marked coldness of the feet, was there not? I recollect you saying he was letting–what was it?–letting something do something. Cats entered into it, if I am not mistaken.”
“Letting ‘I dare not’ wait upon ‘I would’, sir.”
“That’s right. But how about the cats?”
“Like the poor cat i’ the adage, sir.”
“Exactly. It beats me how you think up these things. And Gussie, you say, is in the same posish?”

Topics: courage, ambition, purpose

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
To beguile the time,
Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
But be the serpent under’t. He that’s coming
Must be provided for; and you shall put
This night’s great business into my dispatch,
Which shall to all our nights and days to come
Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.

DUTCH:
[S]chijn schuldloos als de bloem,
Maar wees de slang er onder

MORE:
Beguile the time=to deceive them; appear as expected, blend in
Schmidt:
Time=Men, the world
Dispatch=The finishing or winding up of a business
Compleat:
To dispatch=Afvaerdigen, afdoen, verrichten, beschikken, aflaaden, afmaaken, aan een kant helpen, ‘t leeven beneemen
The matter is dispatcht=De zaak is beschikt

Topics: deceit, appearance, good and bad

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Third apparition
CONTEXT:
Be lion-mettled, proud, and take no care
Who chafes, who frets, or where conspirers are.
Macbeth shall never vanquished be until
Great Birnam Wood to high Dunsinane Hill
Shall come against him.

DUTCH:
Macbeth wordt niet bedwongen, eer het woud
Van Birnam op te rukken zich verstout
Naar ‘t hooge Dunsinan.

MORE:
Schmidt:
lion-mettled=having the bravery of a lion
chafe=fret, fume, rage
Compleat:
Mettled=Vol vuurs, moedig
REFERENCED IN UK HOUSE OF LORDS: George Stewart, Younger of Grandtully, Esq., and Henry Hepburn, Slater in Perth, Appellents v. John Bell, Slater in Muirend, and James Bell, Slater in Scone [1790] UKHL 3_Paton_158 (12 April 1790)

Topics: courage, ambition, security

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
Nothing in his life
Became him like the leaving it. He died
As one that had been studied in his death
To throw away the dearest thing he owed
As ’twere a careless trifle.

DUTCH:
Niets in heel zijn leven
Deed hij zoo schoon als ‘t gaan ter dood; hij stierf
Als een, die zijnen dood had bestudeerd

MORE:
Schmidt:
Careless (passive sense)=Not cared for, indifferent (worthless)

Topics: life, value, dignity

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Angus
CONTEXT:
Now does he feel
His secret murders sticking on his hands.
Now minutely revolts upbraid his faith-breach.
Those he commands move only in command,
Nothing in love. Now does he feel his title
Hang loose about him, like a giant’s robe
Upon a dwarfish thief.

DUTCH:
Thans voelt hij recht, hoe los zijn waardigheid
Om ‘t lijf hem hangt

MORE:
Schmidt:
Faith-breach= Breach of fidelity, disloyalty
Minutely=Continual, happening every minute
Revolt= Desertion, going to the enemy
Upbraid=Reproach; with an accusation of the thing

Topics: loyalty, disappointment, failure, truth, discovery

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Sweet remembrancer!
Now, good digestion wait on appetite,
And health on both!

DUTCH:
Goede spijsvertering komt voort uit eetlust, en gezondheid uit beide./
Gij lieve maanster! — Nu, smake en wel bekome u allen ‘t maal!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Remembrancer=One who reminds
Compleat:
Remembrancer=Een Indachtig-maaker, waarschouwer
The Remembrancer of the first fruits=De Klerk der Eerstelingen, die alle bedingen en verdrag wegens Eerstelingen en Tienden aanschryft,

Topics: wellbeing, emotion and mood

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macduff
CONTEXT:
O horror, horror, horror!
Tongue nor heart cannot conceive nor name thee

DUTCH:
O, gruwel, gruwel, gruwel! Tong noch hart
Bevat, noch noemt u ooit.

MORE:

Topics: misc.

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
MACBETH
Oh, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!
Thou know’st that Banquo, and his Fleance, lives.
LADY MACBETH
But in them nature’s copy’s not eterne.
MACBETH
There’s comfort yet; they are assailable.
Then be thou jocund. Ere the bat hath flown
His cloistered flight, ere to black Hecate’s summons
The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
hath rung night’s yawning peal, there shall be done
A deed of dreadful note.

DUTCH:
O vrouw, vol schorpioenen is mijn hart

MORE:
“Mis”quoted as “A guilty mind is full of scorpions”
Schmidt:
Assailable=Liable to an attack
Jocund=Gay, lively, brisk
Of note= Any distinction or eminence. With an adjective denoting the particular kind of distinction: i.e. a deed of dreadful note

Topics: guilt, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
Were such things here as we do speak about?
Or have we eaten on the insane root
That takes the reason prisoner?

DUTCH:
Wat? of aten
Wij dolkruid, dat de rede in boeien slaat?

MORE:
Dyce:
The insane root: perhaps hemlock or more probably henbane (Douce: “Henbane . . . is called Insana, mad, for the use thereof is perillous; for if it be eate or dronke, it breedeth madnesse, or slow lykenesse of sleepe. Therefore this hearb is called commonly Mirilidium, for it taketh away wit and reason.” Batman Uppon Bartholome de propriet. rerum, lib. xvii. ch. 87.)
CITED IN US LAW:
Cruzan v. Harmon, 760 S.W.2d 408,413 (Mo. 1988)(Robertson, J.). (One majority writer writes, “the
dissenters work backwards, choosing a result then creating reasons to ‘support’ it. lt is our duty in a case of first impression in this state not only to consider precedents from other states, but also to determine their strength. We have found them wanting and refuse to eat ‘on the insane root which takes the reason prisoner.'”

Topics: madness, reason, justification, cited in law, law/legal

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
There is nor flying hence nor tarrying here.
I ‘gin to be aweary of the sun,
And wish th’ estate o’ th’ world were now undone.—
Ring the alarum-bell!—Blow, wind! Come, wrack!
At least we’ll die with harness on our back.

DUTCH:
Luidt, luidt alarm! — Blaas, wind! verschijn, verderf!
Dit rest mij toch, dat ik in ‘t harnas sterf!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Estate= State, peculiar form of existence
Wrack=Destruction, ruin; loss, decay
(nowadays: to fall into / go to (w)rack and ruin, e.g. a building or a business falling into decay or disrepair due to lack of upkeep)
Compleat:
Estate (or condition)=Staat, omstandigheid
Wrack (or shipwrack)=Schipbreuk
To go to wrack=Verlooren gaan, te gronde gaan
Wrack ( the part of the ship that is perished and cast a shoar, belonging to the King)=Wrak van een verongelukt Schip
Wracked=Aan stukken gestooten, te gronde gegaan

Topics: ruin, failure

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more.
By Sinel’s death I know I am thane of Glamis.
But how of Cawdor? The thane of Cawdor lives,
A prosperous gentleman, and to be king
Stands not within the prospect of belief,
No more than to be Cawdor. Say from whence
You owe this strange intelligence, or why
Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
With such prophetic greeting. Speak, I charge you.

DUTCH:
Spreekt, hoe gewerd u
Die wond’re wetenschap? En waarom treedt gij
Op deze barre heide ons in den weg
Met zulk een zienersgroet? Spreekt, ik bezweer u!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Intelligence=Notice, information, news
Compleat:
Intelligence=Kundschap, verstandhouding
To give intelligence=Kundschap geeven, overbrieven

Topics: fate/destiny, evidence, justification, suspicion

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Witches
CONTEXT:
Show his eyes and grieve his heart.
Come like shadows; so depart!

DUTCH:
Wenscht zijn hart zich leed, verschijnt!
Komt als schimmen, en verdwijnt!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Grieve his heart=make him sorry

Topics: fate/destiny, disappointment, truth, regret

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: First Witch
CONTEXT:
Sleep shall neither night nor day
Hang upon his penthouse lid.
He shall live a man forbid.
Weary sev’nnights nine times nine
Shall he dwindle, peak and pine.

DUTCH:
De slaap zal nacht noch dag aan het deksel van zijn penthouse hangen/
En geen slaap zijn oogen sluit; Dag noch nacht, te geener uur

MORE:
Schmidt:
Penthouse lid=Eyelid
A man forbid=A man cursed
Sevennight (or sennight)=Week
Dwindle, peak and pine=Shrink, grow lean and wear away, languish
Compleat:
Penthouse=Luyfel
Sevennight (Sennyt)=Week
Dwindle away=Verdwynen, te niet loopen
Peaking=Ziekelyk, quynende
To pine=Quynen, hartzeer ztten, een teering zetten
Pine away=Uytteeren, de teering zetten

Topics: guilt, conscience, regret

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Methought I heard a voice cry, ‘Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep: the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care,
The death of each day’s life, sore labor’s bath,
Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course,
Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

DUTCH:
Den slaap, die ‘t warnet van de zorg ontrafelt

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: To help to define “murder”. Wright et al v United States, 108 F. 805 (5th Cir. 1901). The same court also turned to Shakespeare to help to define “Conspire”.

Topics: cited in law, offence, innocence, conscience

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I pray you, speak not. He grows worse and worse.
Question enrages him. At once, good night.
Stand not upon the order of your going,
But go at once

DUTCH:
En staat bij ‘t gaan niet op uw rang, maar gaat.

MORE:
Schmidt:
To stand on=To insist on
The order of= Regular disposition, proper state, settled mode of being or proceeding
Compleat:
To stand (or insist) upon one’s privilege=Op zyne voorrechten staan, dezelven vorderen
To stand upon his reputation=Op zyne eere staan

Topics: order/society, civility, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
The prince of Cumberland! That is a step
On which I must fall down, or else o’erleap,
For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires;
Let not light see my black and deep desires.
The eye wink at the hand, yet let that be
Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.

DUTCH:
Taant, sterren! dat uw gloed
Den zwarten wensch niet zie van mijn gemoed!

MORE:

Topics: deceit, conspiracy, plans/intentions, guilt, betrayal, foul play

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.8
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Accursèd be that tongue that tells me so,
For it hath cowed my better part of man!
And be these juggling fiends no more believed,
That palter with us in a double sense,
That keep the word of promise to our ear,
And break it to our hope. I’ll not fight with thee.

DUTCH:
En nooit
Leene iemand aan die guichelduivels ‘t oor,
Die ons door dubbelzinnigheid bedriegen,
‘t Beloofde houden aan ons oor, maar ‘t breken
Aan onze hoop.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Palter=To shift, to dodge, to shuffle, to equivocate
Compleat:
To palter=Weyfelen, leuteren, haperen, achteruyt kruypen, aerzelen, bedektelyk handelen
CITED IN US LAW:
Prather v. Dayton Power & Light Company, 918 F.2d 1255, 1262 (6th Cir. 1990)(dissent);
Hydro-Dyne, Inc. v. Ecodyne Corporation, 812 F.2d 1407 (6th Cir. 1987)(dissent);
Shango v. Jurich, 521 F.Supp. 1196, 1202 (N.D.Ill. 1981);
Stringer v. Thompson, 537 F.Supp. 133, 136 (N.D.Ill. 1982);
State v. Neely, 112 N.M. 702, 819 P.2d 249 (1991);
U.S. v. Pollard, 959 F.2d 1011, 1039 (D.C.Cir. 1992)(Williams, J.)(dissenting). “Though I do not wish to be too critical of the government, and though the analogy is inexact on some points, the case does remind me of Macbeth’s curse against the witches whose promises-and their sophistical interpretation of them – led him to doom:”.

Topics: cited in law, promise, language, hope

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold:
What hath quenched them hath given me fire.

DUTCH:
Wat hen bedwelmde, heeft mij stout gemaakt;
Wat hen verdoofde, gaf mij vuur

MORE:

Topics: courage, ambition, purpose

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
And ’tis not done. Th’ attempt and not the deed
Confounds us. Hark! I laid their daggers ready;
He could not miss ’em. Had he not resembled
My father as he slept, I had done ’t.

DUTCH:
Het pogen, niet de daad, ware ons verderf

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
Schmidt:
Confound=To destroy, ruin, make away with

Topics: law/legal, plans/intentions, failure

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
But ’tis strange.
And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
Win us with honest trifles, to betray ’s
In deepest consequence.

DUTCH:
t Is vreemd; doch vaak
Verkonden, om ons in ‘t verderf te lokken,
De werktuigen der duisternis ons waarheid,
En winnen ons door eerlijkheid in ‘t kleine,
Om in het grootste ons te verraden!

MORE:
Schmidt:
To win=To gain in a moral sense; to move and prevail with by persuasion or any kind of influence

Topics: deceit, reason, betrayal, truth

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
MACDUFF
I know this is a joyful trouble to you,
But yet ’tis one.
MACBETH
The labor we delight in physics pain.
This is the door.
MACDUFF
I’ll make so bold to call,
For ’tis my limited service.

DUTCH:
Het is u, ‘k weet het, vreugdevolle moeite,
Doch moeite blijft het.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Physics=Is a remedy for
Compleat:
Physick=Artseny, medicyn, geneesmiddel
To physick=Geneesmiddelen gebruiken, medicineeren

Topics: work, remedy, satisfaction

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Duncan
CONTEXT:
There’s no art
To find the mind’s construction in the face.
He was a gentleman on whom I built
An absolute trust.

DUTCH:
Er is geen kunst,
Die ‘s menschen ziel leert lezen op ‘t gelaat

MORE:

Schmidt:
Art=The power of doing something not taught by nature, skill, dexterity
Construction=Interpretation
Compleat:
Art (Cunning or Industry)=Behendigheid, gebranderheid, narstigheid
Construction=Saamenstelling, saamenvoeging, gebouw, uitlegging
We ought to make the best construction of other men’s words=Men behoort de woorden van anderen ten besten te duiden
Construction=Woordenschikking
Proverbs: “The face is the index of the heart” (1575) or the older proverb “Deem not after the face” (1395)
CITED IN IRISH LAW:
Doherty (A. P. U. M.) -v- Quigley [2011] IEHC 361 (05 July 2011)/[2011] IEHC 361
CITED IN US LAW:
U.S. v. Vines, 214 F.Supp. 642, 645 (N.D.N.Y. 1963)(Foley, J.);
CITED IN EU LAW:
W. -v- W. [2009] IEHC 542 (18 December 2009) (cited in turn in High Court of Ireland, McDonald -v- Conroy & Ors [2017] IEHC 559 (09 October 2017))
‘In Shakespeare’s play Macbeth, Duncan says about the deceitful main character: “There’s no art to find the mind’s construction in the face: he was a gentlemen on whom I built an absolute trust”.’

Topics: appearance, deceit, trust, honesty, cited in law, still in use, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Doctor
CONTEXT:
MACBETH
Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
DOCTOR
Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
MACBETH
Throw physic to the dogs; I’ll none of it.

DUTCH:
Hier moet de kranke Zichzelf tot arts zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Minister to=Administer (medicines), to prescribe, to order
CITED IN LAW: In a direct quotation or “borrowed eloquence” in White v Chief Constable of the South Yorkshire Police [1999] 1 All ER 1, considering the concepts of foreseeability and psychiatric injury, Lord Hoffmann noted, as the Doctor of Physic tells Macbeth: “therein the patient must minister to himself” (Macbeth Act 5, Scene 3).

Topics: madness, memory, guilt, conscience, remedy

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Ross
CONTEXT:
I pray you school yourself. But for your husband,
He is noble, wise, judicious, and best knows
The fits o’ th’ season. I dare not speak much further;But cruel are the times when we are traitors
And do not know ourselves; when we hold rumor
From what we fear, yet know not what we fear,
But float upon a wild and violent sea
Each way and none. I take my leave of you.
Shall not be long but I’ll be here again.
Things at the worst will cease, or else climb upward
To what they were before.

DUTCH:
Wat in den afgrond zonk, is weg, of stijgt,
En drijft, als ‘t vroeger deed.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb, “When things are at the worst they will mend” (1582).
Onions:
Fits of the season=paroxysms, formerly regarded as a periodic disease; applied to critical times – “The violent fits o’ the time” (Cor, 3.2); “The fits o’ the season” (Macbeth, 4.2)
Schmidt:
School=To set to rights, to reprimand
Fits of the season= Any irregular and violent affection of the mind
Compleat:
To school=Bedillen, berispen
A Fit=Een vlaag, bui, overval, stoot
A Mad fits, a fit of madness=Een vlaag van dolheid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, fate/destiny,

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
How now, my lord! Why do you keep alone,
Of sorriest fancies your companions making,
Using those thoughts which should indeed have died
With them they think on? Things without all remedy
Should be without regard. What’s done is done.

DUTCH:
Aan wien zij denken? Naar het onherstelb’re
Niet omgezien! ‘t Gedane blijft gedaan

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb “Things done cannot be undone” (c1460). Earlier version, “What is done may not be undone” (1300). perhaps also the proverb “Past cure, past care” (1567)

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, fate/destiny,

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
MACBETH
(looking at his hands) This is a sorry sight.
LADY MACBETH
A foolish thought, to say a sorry sight.

DUTCH:
Een trieste aanblik/
Het is een jammerschouwspel!

MORE:
The phrase ‘sorry sight’ originated in Macbeth to mean woeful or wretched appearance.
Schmidt:
Sorry= Sorrowful, sad
Compleat:
Sorry (bad or paltry)=Slegt, voddig
Sorry days=Droevige dagen

Topics: invented or popularised, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
MACBETH
Thou art the best o’ th’ cutthroats:
Yet he’s good that did the like for Fleance.
If thou didst it, thou art the nonpareil.
FIRST MURDERER
Most royal sir, Fleance is ’scaped.
MACBETH
Then comes my fit again. I had else been perfect,

DUTCH:
Gij zijt een meester; maar ook hij is knap,
Die ‘t zelfde deed aan Fleance; deedt gij dat ook,
Dan zijt gij weêrgâloos

MORE:
Schmidt:
Nonpareil=One who has no equal, a paragon
Compleat:
Non-pareil=Weergadeloos, zonder weergaa, onvergelykelyk
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, skill/talent

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing

DUTCH:
Het leven is slechts een wandelende schaduw, een arme speler, die zijn uur op het podium steekt en piekert, en dan niet meer gehoord wordt; het is een verhaal verteld door een idioot, vol geluid en woede, wat niets betekent.

MORE:
5.From Macbeth’s famous soliloquy
This can be broken up into phrases still in use today:
1. To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow
2. Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
3. To the last syllable of recorded time
4. All our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death.
5. Out, out, brief candle!
6. Life’s but a walking shadow
7. A poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more.
8. It is a tale Told by an idiot
9. Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing

Topics: death, invented or popularised, sorrow, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Out, damned spot! Out, I say!—One, two. Why, then, ’tis time to do ’t. Hell is murky!—Fie, my lord, fie! A soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account?—Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him.

DUTCH:
Wat behoeven wij te duchten, dat iemand het te weten
komt, als niemand onze macht ter verantwoording kan
roepen

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, guilt, suspicion, consequence, punishment

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Macduff
CONTEXT:
All my pretty ones?
Did you say all? O hell-kite! All?
What, all my pretty chickens and their dam
At one fell swoop?

DUTCH:
Wat! al mijn lieve kiekens, met de kloek,
In éénen fellen greep?

MORE:
Fell=strong; cruel, vicious, intense, savage.
Compleat:
Fell=(cruel) Wreed, fel; (skin) Vel, huid

Topics: still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
ROSS
And, for an earnest of a greater honor,
He bade me, from him, call thee thane of Cawdor:
In which addition, hail, most worthy thane,
For it is thine.
BANQUO
What, can the devil speak true?
MACBETH
The thane of Cawdor lives. Why do you dress me
In borrowed robes?

DUTCH:
Wat! spreekt de duivel waarheid?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Earnest=Subst., handsel, part paid beforehand as a pledge
Compleat:
Handsel, Hansel=Handgift
To give/take hansel=Handgift geeven/ontvangen
To hansel something=een ding voor ‘t eerst gebruiken
I took hansel before my shop was quite open=Ik ontving handgeld voor dat myn winkel nog ter deeg open was.

Topics: truth, good and bad, honesty, money, business

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
What, will the line stretch out to th’ crack of doom?

DUTCH:
Wat! strekt die reeks zich uit tot de’ oordeelsdag?

MORE:
Shakespeare created ‘crack of doom’ to mean Day of Judgement. Doom was a term for the Last Judgment, ‘doomsday’ meaning ‘day of last judgment’. The Domesday Book, the “Great Survey” of land and assets in 1086, was also called because its decisions were unalterable.
Doom (or ‘dome’) was a statute or law (doombooks were codes of laws); related to the English suffix -dom, originally meaning jurisdiction.
Shakespeare is credited for first using doom to mean death and destruction in Sonnet 14.
Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
A heavy doom=een zwaar vonnis
Dooms-man=een Rechter, Scheidsman
Dooms-day=De dag des oordeels
Dooms-day Book=Zeker boek waar in de Landeryën van Engeland en derzelver waarde aangetekend staan
Dooms-day in the Afternoon=St Jutmis, nooit
To doom=Veroordelen, verwyzen, doemen
Doomed=Veroordeeld, verweezen.

Topics: invented or popularised

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macduff
CONTEXT:
LADY MACDUFF
He had none.
His flight was madness. When our actions do not,
Our fears do make us traitors.
ROSS
You know not
Whether it was his wisdom or his fear.

DUTCH:
Zijn vlucht was waanzin. Als geen daden ‘t doen,
Maakt onze vrees ons tot verraders.

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Topics: madness, appearance, wisdom

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: First Witch
CONTEXT:
FIRST WITCH
When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
SECOND WITCH
When the hurly-burly’s done,
When the battle’s lost and won.
THIRD WITCH
That will be ere the set of sun.

DUTCH:
Wanneer zullen wij drieën elkaar weer ontmoeten? In de donder, de bliksem of in de regen

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When the battle’s lost and won. Reflecting proverb of the time “No man wins but another loses” (1526)

Topics: still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Donalbain
CONTEXT:
Our separated fortune
Shall keep us both the safer. Where we are,
There’s daggers in men’s smiles. The near in blood,
The nearer bloody.

DUTCH:
Naar Ierland ik; het veiligst voor ons beiden
Is, dat we uiteengaan; in een glimlach schuilt
Hier licht een dolk. Hoe nader in den bloede,
Des te eerder bloedig.

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An allusion to a ‘received truth’/proverb, “The nearer in kin the less in kindness” (1565).

Topics: conspiracy, deceit, appearance, betrayal, relationship, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Who can be wise, amazed, temp’rate, and furious,
Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man.
Th’ expedition of my violent love
Outrun the pauser, reason.

DUTCH:
Wie is ontzet en wijs, bedaard en woedend,
Vol liefde en koud, in ‘t eigen oogenblik?

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Schmidt:
Amaze= To put in confusion, to put in a state where one does not know what to do or to say or to think
Temperate= Moderate, calm
Pauser= One who deliberates much
Compleat:
Temperate=Maatig, gemaatigd

Topics: reason, caution, haste, loyalty, uncertainty

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Yet do I fear thy nature;
It is too full o’ th’ milk of human kindness
To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great,
Art not without ambition, but without
The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly,
That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
And yet wouldst wrongly win.

DUTCH:
doch ik ducht uw hart;
Dat is te vol van melk der menschlijkheid,
Om ‘t naaste pad te nemen.

MORE:
Milk of human kindness was invented by Shakespeare as a metaphor for a gentle human nature. (Shakespeare also refers to “milky gentleness” in King Lear.)
Schmidt:
Illness= Iniquity, wickedness
Holily=Piously, virtuously, agreeably to the law of God
Compleat:
Ill nature=Kwaadaardigheid

Topics: nature, ambition, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use, good and bad

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Out, damned spot! Out, I say!—One, two. Why, then, ’tis time to do ’t. Hell is murky!—Fie, my lord, fie! A soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account?—Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him.

DUTCH:
Maar wie zou gedacht hebben, dat de oude
man zooveel bloed bij zich had?

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Three oft-quoted phrases from this monologue:
1. Out, damned spot; out, I say.
2. Hell is murky
3. Who would have thought the old man to have so much blood in him.

Topics: still in use

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