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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Othello ACT/SCENE: 1.2 SPEAKER: Iago CONTEXT: Nay, but he prated
And spoke such scurvy and provoking terms
Against your honour
That, with the little godliness I have,
I did full hard forbear him. But I pray you, sir,
Are you fast married? Be assured of this:
That the Magnifico is much beloved
And hath in his effect a voice potential
As double as the Duke’s. He will divorce you,
Or put upon you what restraint and grievance
The law (with all his might to enforce it on)
Will give him cable. DUTCH: Neen, maar hij relde,
En sprak op zulk een tergend lage wijs
Uw eer te na,
Dat, met het luttel vroomheid dat ik heb,
Ik nauw mij inhield
MORE:
Cable=Will give him scope (nautical)
Full hard forbear=Made great effort at restraint
Scurvy=Insulting
Grievance=Injury, punishment
Cable=Scope (nautical)

Compleat:
Forbear=Zich van onthouden
Scurvy=Kwaad, slecht Topics: insult, dispute, punishment, law/legal

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
A knave very voluble, no further conscionable than in putting on the mere form of civil and humane seeming, for the better compassing of his salt and most hidden loose affection. Why, none, why, none! A slipper and subtle knave, a finder of occasions that has an eye, can stamp and counterfeit advantages, though true advantage never present itself. A devilish knave. Besides, the knave is handsome, young, and hath all those requisites in him that folly and green minds look after. A pestilent complete knave, and the woman hath found him already.

DUTCH:
Een geslepen, gladde schelm; een gelegenheidsnajager, met een oog om voordeeltjens te stempelen en na te bootsen, al bood geen echt voordeel zich ooit aan; een verduivelde schelm!

MORE:

Slipper=Deceitful, slippery
Voluble=Plausible, glib
Conscionable=Conscientious
Humane=Polite, civil
Seeming=Appearance
Salt=Lecherous
Occasions=Opportunities

Compleat:
A slippery (or dangerous) business=Een gevaarlyke bezigheid
Conscionable=Gemoedelyk, billyk
Humane=Menschelyk, beleefd, heusch

Topics: deceit, appearance, relationship, reputation, manipulation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
O, behold,
The riches of the ship is come on shore!
You men of Cyprus, let her have your knees.
Hail to thee, lady! And the grace of heaven,
Before, behind thee, and on every hand,
Enwheel thee round.

DUTCH:
Heil, vrouwe, en laat hemelse genade
u voor en achter en van alle kanten
omringen!

MORE:

Schmidt:
Enwheel=To encircle, surround, encompass

Topics: civility

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Nay, this was but his dream.
OTHELLO
But this denoted a foregone conclusion.
IAGO
‘Tis a shrewd doubt, though it be but a dream.
And this may help to thicken other proofs
That do demonstrate thinly.
OTHELLO
I’ll tear her all to pieces!
IAGO
Nay, yet be wise, yet we see nothing done,
She may be honest yet. Tell me but this,
Have you not sometimes seen a handkerchief
Spotted with strawberries in your wife’s hand?

DUTCH:
En ’t kan ook andere bewijzen schragen,
die niet zo overtuigend zijn.

MORE:

Still in use: A foregone conclusion=a decision made before (‘afore’) evidence is known; or a certainty, an inevitable result.

Schmidt:
Foregone=Gone before, previous
Shrewd=Bad, evil, mischievous

Compleat:
Fore-conceived=Vooraf bevat
A fore-conceived=Voor-opgevatte waan, vooroordeel
Fore-deem=Raamen, gissen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, suspicion, reason, evidence

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
DUKE
The Turk with a most mighty preparation makes for Cyprus. Othello, the fortitude of the place is best known to you, and though we have there a substitute of most allowed sufficiency, yet opinion, a sovereign mistress of effects, throws a more safer voice on you. You must therefore be content to slubber the gloss of your new fortunes with this more stubborn and boist’rous expedition.
OTHELLO
The tyrant custom, most grave senators,
Hath made the flinty and steel couch of war
My thrice-driven bed of down. I do agnise
A natural and prompt alacrity
I find in hardness, and do undertake
These present wars against the Ottomites.
Most humbly therefore bending to your state,
I crave fit disposition for my wife.
Due reference of place and exhibition,
With such accommodation and besort
As levels with her breeding.

DUTCH:
Gij moet dieshalve er genoegen mee nemen, den frisschen glans van uw nieuw geluk te laten verdooven door deze ruwe en stormachtige onderneming.

MORE:

Allowed=Acknowledged
Slubber=Sully
Sufficiency=Capability
Safer voice=More reliable, offering more security
Sovereign mistresss of effect=Opinion has greatest effect
Stubborn=Rough, harsh
Boisterous=Wild, intractable, rudely violent, noisy and tumultuous
Alacrity=Eagerness
At levels with=Commensurate with
Hardness=Hardship
Besort=Suitable companionship
Agnise=Acknowledge
Bending to=Bowing to (figuratively)
Disposition=Arrangement, settlement

Compleat:
To know how to be on a level with=Op een gelyken voet weten te stellen
Agnition=Herkenning, wederkenning
Level=Paslood
Hardiness (difficult)=Zwaarigheid
He bends himself wholly to this=Hy is ganschelyk daarop gevallen
Allow=Bekennen
Slubber=Beslobberen
Stubborn=Hardnekkig, wederspannig
Boisterous=Onstuimig, stormachtig, windig
Sufficiency (or capacity)=Bekwaamheid. Sufficiency (ability)=Genoegzaamheid

Topics: preparation, adversity, order/society

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither. I’ll smell thee on the tree.
Oh, balmy breath, that dost almost persuade
Justice to break her sword! One more, one more.
Be thus when thou art dead and I will kill thee
And love thee after.

DUTCH:
Als jij zo dood zult zijn, zal ik je doden,
en liefhebben erna. Nog eens, voor ’t laatst…
nooit zag men dodelijker schoonheid.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Barkauskas v. Lane, 78 F.2d 1031, 1032 (7th Cir. 1989)(Posner, J.); See also Hornstein v. Hornstein, 195 Md. 627, 75 A.2d 103 (Md. Ct. App. 1950)(husband reading from Othello and threatening to treat her as Othello treated Desdemona).

Schmidt:
Balmy=Fragrant
Sword=Emblem of power and authority

Compleat:

Topics: life, strength, regret, death, cited in law

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls:
Who steals my purse steals trash; ’tis something, nothing;
’twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to thousands;
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him,
And makes me poor indeed.

DUTCH:
Een voortreffelijke reputatie, waarde heer, is zowel bij mannen als vrouwen het duidelijkst zichtbare sieraad van hun innerlijk.

MORE:

CITED IN EU LAW: LINDON, OTCHAKOVSKY-LAURENS AND JULY v. FRANCE – 21279/02 [2007] ECHR 836 (22 October 2007)/46 EHRR 35, (2008) 46 EHRR 35, [2007] ECHR 836.
CITED IN US LAW:
According to William Domnarski (Shakespeare in the Law, 1993) the second most frequently cited passage in US law (27 times at that time). Some examples:
Milkovich v Lorain Journal Co., 497 US 1, 110 Supreme Court 2695, 2702, 111 L.Ed.2d 1 (1990) (Rehnquist, C.J.).

Cited by Abraham Lincoln when he was a defence lawyer.

Schmidt:
Immediate=Direct, without the intervention of another; needs no other considerations to enforce its importance
Filch=To steal, to pilfer
Trash=Worthless matter, dross, lumber (Also a scornful term to describe money; See J.Caesar 4.3)

Compleat:
Filch=Ontfutzelen, afhandig maaken, ontloeren, onsteelen
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed

Topics: reputation, respect, emotion and mood, secrecy, cited in law

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
But seeming so, for my peculiar end.
For when my outward action doth demonstrate
The native act and figure of my heart
In compliment extern, ’tis not long after
But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
For daws to peck at. I am not what I am.

DUTCH:
God weet dat ik dat niet uit liefde of plicht
maar voor de schijn, ten eigen bate, doe.
Als mijn gedrag verraadt wat ik beoog
en zien laat wat mij innerlijk beweegt, zal het[5] niet lang meer duren, of ik stel mijn hart aan elke kraai bloot die daarin zijn snavel steekt: ik ben niet wat ik ben.

MORE:

Proverb: To wear one’s heart upon one’s sleeve (1604)

Daws: Jackdaws
Peculiar=Private, particular
End=Purpose
Compliment extern=External show, form
Not what I am=Not what I seem to be

Compleat:
Jack daw=Een exter of kaauw
Extern=Uitwendig, uiterlyk
End=Voorneemen, oogmerk

Topics: deceit, appearance, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use, purpose

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
And Cassio high in oath, which till tonight
I ne’er might say before. When I came back—
For this was brief— I found them close together
At blow and thrust, even as again they were
When you yourself did part them.
More of this matter cannot I report.
But men are men, the best sometimes forget.
Though Cassio did some little wrong to him,
As men in rage strike those that wish them best,
Yet surely Cassio, I believe, received
From him that fled some strange indignity
Which patience could not pass.
OTHELLO
I know, Iago,
Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter,
Making it light to Cassio. Cassio, I love thee,
But never more be officer of mine.

DUTCH:
Ach,
een mens is maar een mens en ook de beste
vergeet zichzelf weleens.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Lindros v. Governing Board of the Torrance Unified School District, 9 Cal.3d 524, 540, 510 P.2d 361, 371, 108 Cal. Rptr. 185, 195 (1973)(Torriner, J.)(en banc).

Proverb: To mince the matter (Tell sparingly or by halves)

Schmidt:
Forget=Forget themselves
Indignity=Contemptuous injury, insult
Patience=Self-control
Pass=Overlook

Compleat:
Indignity=Smaad
Pass, pass by=Passeren, voorbygaan, overslaan
Mince=Kleyn kappen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, cited in law

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
I am not valiant neither,
But ever puny whipster gets my sword.
But why should honour outlive honesty?
Let it go all.

DUTCH:
Ik ben geen krijgsheld meer,
en elke snotaap is mij nu de baas.
Maar waarom overleeft eer eerlijkheid?
Laat alles gaan.

MORE:

Onions:
Whipster=Contemptible fellow (Arden: Whippersnapper)
Puny=Little, petty (meaning invented by Shakespeare)

Compleat:
Puny (a younger brother)=Een jonger broeder
A puny judge=Een jongste rechter (See Puisny. Puisne (or puisny)=a law term for younger; a name given in the house of lords to the youngest baron, and in Westminster hall to the youngest judge. De jongste Lord in ‘t hogerhuis, of de jongste Rechter in de pleitzaal van Westmunster.)
Valiant=Dapper, kloekmoedig

Topics: honesty, strength, honour, reputation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
So let the Turk of Cyprus us beguile,
We lose it not so long as we can smile;
He bears the sentence well that nothing bears
But the free comfort which from thence he hears;
But he bears both the sentence and the sorrow
That to pay grief must of poor patience borrow.
These sentences, to sugar or to gall,
Being strong on both sides, are equivocal.
But words are words; I never yet did hear
That the bruised heart was pierced through the ear.
Beseech you now, to the affairs of the state.

DUTCH:
Doch woord blijft woord, en dat het spreuken horen, een krank hart heelde, kwam mij nooit ter oren./
Die uitspraken, geschikt voor zuur en zoet,
doen het aan beide zijden even goed:
het zijn maar woorden; ik heb nooit gehoord
van ’t wonde hart dat baat vond bij een woord.

MORE:

Sentence that nothing bears=Indifferent platitude
Gall=Bitterness, to embitter
Pierced=lanced (and cured)(See LLL, 5.2: Honest plain words best pierce the ear of grief)

Compleat:
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten; to gall (or vex)=Tergen, verbitteren
To pierce=Doordringen, doorbooren

Topics: language, deceit, appearance, emotion and mood, wisdom, understanding

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:

IAGO
Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls.
Who steals my purse steals trash. ’Tis something,
nothing;
’Twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to
thousands.
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him
And makes me poor indeed
OTHELLO
By heaven, I’ll know thy thoughts.
IAGO
You cannot, if my heart were in your hand,
Nor shall not, whilst ’tis in my custody.

DUTCH:
Mijn hemel, ik wil weten wat jij denkt!

MORE:

Immediate=Direct, without the intervention of another; needs no other considerations to enforce its importance
Trash=Worthless matter, dross, lumber (Also a scornful term to describe money; See J.Caesar 4.3)
Filch=To steal, pilfer

Compleat:
To filch=Ontfutzelen, afhandig maaken, ontloeren, ontsteelen
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed

Topics: reputation, respect, emotion and mood, confidentiality, secrecy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
I do believe it, and I ask your pardon.
Will you, I pray, demand that demi-devil
body?
IAGO
Demand me nothing. What you know, you know.
From this time forth I never will speak word.
LODOVICO
What, not to pray?
GRATIANO
Torments will ope your lips.
OTHELLO
Well, thou dost best.
LODOVICO
Sir, you shall understand what hath befall’n,
Which, as I think, you know not. Here is a letter
Found in the pocket of the slain Roderigo,
And here another. The one of them imports
The death of Cassio to be undertook
By Roderigo.

DUTCH:
Vraag niets aan mij. U weet zelf wat u weet.
Vanaf dit uur zal ik geen woord meer zeggen.

MORE:
Proverb: I know what I know (I wot what I wot, though I few words make (1546))

Demand me=Ask me

Topics: secrecy, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
I have rubbed this young quat almost to the sense,
And he grows angry. Now, whether he kill Cassio
Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other,
Every way makes my gain. Live Roderigo,
He calls me to a restitution large
Of gold and jewels that I bobbed from him
As gifts to Desdemona.
It must not be. If Cassio do remain
He hath a daily beauty in his life
That makes me ugly. And besides, the Moor
May unfold me to him—there stand I in much peril.
No, he must die. But so, I hear him coming.

DUTCH:
Ik kneep tot berstens toe dien jongen windbuil;
Hij wordt nu boos. Nu, ‘t zij hij Cassio doode,
Of Cassio hem, of dat ze elkander vellen,
Hoe ‘t loop’, ik win er bij.

MORE:

Quat=Contemptible youth; boil or pimple
To the sense=To the quick, raw
Makes my gain=Is to my advantage
Bobbed=Swindled
Unfold=Expose

Compleat:
Unfold=Ontvouwen, open leggen
To bob=Begekken, bedriegen, loeren, foppen

Burgersdijk notes:
Dien jongen windbuil. In ‘t Engelsch staat quat, welk woord tegelijk een blaar of vin, en een ellendig, verachtelijk wezen beteekent.

Topics: age/experience, learning and education, dispute, appearance, perception

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Thus do I ever make my fool my purse.
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well.
The better shall my purpose work on him.
Cassio’s a proper man. Let me see now,

DUTCH:
Zoo moet mijn nar mij steeds als buidel dienen.
Want voor mijn groote ervaring ware ‘t schande,
Als ik met zulk een eend mijn tijd verspilde,
Zoo niet tot scherts en voordeel

MORE:

Snipe=Bird, also ‘worthless’ fellow, simpleton
Gained knowledge=Practical experience
In that kind=In that regard
‘Twixt=Betwixt (between)
Surety=Certainty
Holds me well=Respects, has a good opinion of
Purpose=Plan

Compleat:
Snipe=Snip, snep
Betwixt=Tusschen, tusschenbeide
Betwixt the devil and the red sea=Tusschen hangen en worgen
Purpose (design, resolution, project)=Voorneemen, besluit, ontwerp

Topics: money, skill/talent, age/experience, respect, suspicion

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
LODOVICO
O, thou Othello, that wert once so good,
Fallen in the practice of a damned slave,
What shall be said to thee?
OTHELLO
Why, anything.
An honourable murderer, if you will,
For naught I did in hate, but all in honour.

DUTCH:
Zeg maar wat,
een goede moordenaar, zo u dat wilt,
want wat mij aandreef was niet haat, maar eer.

MORE:

In the practice=Through the machinations

Schmidt:
Practice=Artifice, stratagem, insidious device
Slave=Abject person, wretch

Compleat:
Practice (underhand dealing, intrigue, way of proceeding)=Praktyk, bedekten handel, list
Machination=Kwaadstooking, kwaadbrouwing, berokkening

Topics: honour, offence

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Villain, be sure thou prove my love a whore,
Be sure of it. Give me the ocular proof
Or by the worth of mine eternal soul
Thou hadst been better have been born a dog
Than answer my waked wrath!

DUTCH:
Bewijs mij dat mijn lief een hoer is, schurk!
Laat mij het met mijn eigen ogen zien

MORE:

Schmidt:
Ocular=Depending on the eye, offered by sight: “give me the o. proof”
Waked=Awakened

Compleat:
Ocular=’t Geen tot het oog behoort
An ocular withness=Een ooggetuige
An ocular inspection=Een onderzoek of beschouwing met zyn eige oogen

Topics: invented or popularised, evidence, still in use, anger

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them.
Good signior, you shall more command with years
Than with your weapons.
BRABANTIO
O thou foul thief, where hast thou stowed my daughter?
Damned as thou art, thou hast enchanted her!
For I’ll refer me to all things of sense,
If she in chains of magic were not bound,
Whether a maid so tender, fair, and happy,
So opposite to marriage that she shunned
The wealthy curlèd darlings of our nation,
Would ever have, t’ incur a general mock,
Run from her guardage to the sooty bosom
Of such a thing as thou—to fear, not to delight.

DUTCH:
Steekt op uw blanke klingen, want de nachtdauw
Zal die doen roesten. — Edel Heer, uw leeftijd
Dwingt eér ontzag af, dan uw zwaard het doet.

MORE:

Keep up=Put away
Stowed=Hidden away
Command with years=Respect for age and status
General mock=Public ridicule

Topics: status, respect, age/experience, dispute, resolution, relationship, marriage

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
It hath pleased the devil drunkenness to give place to the devil wrath; one unperfectness shows me another, to make me frankly despise myself.
IAGO
Come, you are too severe a moraler. As the time, the place, and the condition of this country stands, I could heartily wish this had not befallen; but since it is as it is, mend it for your own good.
CASSIO
I will ask him for my place again; he shall tell me I am a drunkard. Had I as many mouths as Hydra, such an answer would stop them all. To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is unblessed, and the ingredience is a devil.
IAGO
Come, come, good wine is a good familiar creature, if it be well used ; exclaim no more against it.

DUTCH:
Verzoek ik hem mijn plaats terug, dan zal hij zeggen:
„gij zijt een dronkaard.” En al had ik zooveel monden
als de Hydra, met dit antwoord waren zij allen gestopt.
Een verstandig mensch zijn, kort daarna een dwaas, en
plotseling een beest! 0 onbegrijpelijk! — Ieder beker te
veel is vervloekt en zijn inhoud een duivel!

MORE:

Proverb: As many heads as Hydra

Hydra=Serpent in Greek mythology. When one head was cut off, two would grow in its place
Moraler=Moraliser
Ingredience=Content

Schmidt:
Familiar=Pertaining to the house and family, attached and serviceable to men
Inordinate=Improper, immoderate

Topics: excess, reply, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
What sense had I in her stol’n hours of lust?
I saw ’t not, thought it not, it harmed not me.
I slept the next night well, fed well, was free and merry.
I found not Cassio’s kisses on her lips.
He that is robbed, not wanting what is stol’n,
Let him not know’t, and he’s not robbed at al

DUTCH:
Wie wordt beroofd en daarna niet iets mist –
vertel hem niets en hij is niet beroofd.

MORE:

Alluding to the proverb ‘He that is not sensible of his loss has lost nothing’ (c1526).

Wanting=Missing

Schmidt:
Sense=Mental power, faculty of thinking and feeling, spirit, mind

Compleat:
Sense=Het gevoel; gevoeligheid; besef; reden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, betrayal, emotion and mood, satisfaction

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Come, swear it, damn thyself.
Lest, being like one of heaven, the devils themselves
Should fear to seize thee. Therefore be double damned,
Swear thou art honest!
DESDEMONA
Heaven doth truly know it.
OTHELLO
Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell.

DUTCH:
God weet dat jij ontrouw bent als de hel.

MORE:
Proverb: As false as hell
Compleat:
False (not true)=Valsch, onwaar
False (counterfeit)=Nagemaakt
False (treacherous)=Verraderlyk

Topics: honesty, truth, deceit, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
How poor are they that have not patience!
What wound did ever heal but by degrees?
Thou know’st we work by wit and not by witchcraft,
And wit depends on dilatory time.

DUTCH:
Wie geen geduld heeft, is zeer arm/
Wat dom is hij die zijn geduld verliest!

MORE:

Proverb: He that has no patience has nothing

Depends on dilatory time = Time moves slowly

Compleat:
Dilatory=Uitstel-zoekende

Topics: intellect, patience, proverbs and idioms, purpose

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Desdemona
CONTEXT:
DESDEMONA
I am not merry, but I do beguile
The thing I am by seeming otherwise.
Come, how wouldst thou praise me?
IAGO
I am about it, but indeed my invention
Comes from my pate as birdlime does from frieze,
It plucks out brains and all. But my Muse labours
And thus she is delivered:
If she be fair and wise, fairness and wit,
The one’s for use, the other useth it.

DUTCH:
Ik ben niet vrolijk, maar door dat te schijnen
doe ik mij anders voor dan als ik ben…
Toe, hoe zou u mij prijzen?

MORE:

Beguile=Divert attention from
Birdlime=Sticky substance put on trees to catch small birds
Frieze=Coarse woollen cloth
Compleat:
Beguile=Bedriegen, om den tuin leiden

Topics: appearance, perception

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Desdemona
CONTEXT:
My noble father,
I do perceive here a divided duty.
To you I am bound for life and education.
My life and education both do learn me
How to respect you. You are the lord of duty.
I am hitherto your daughter. But here’s my husband.
And so much duty as my mother showed
To you, preferring you before her father,
So much I challenge that I may profess
Due to the Moor my lord.

DUTCH:
k Zie, eed’le vader, hier mijn plicht gedeeld;
En ‘t leven dank ik u èn leer voor ‘t leven;
En beide, leer en leven, leeren wij
U te eeren, als wien al mijn eerbied toekomt;
Ja, ‘k ben uw kind

MORE:

Education=Upbringing
Learn=Teach
Challenge=Claim

Topics: duty, debt/obligation, relationship, marriage, learning/education, respect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
BRABANTIO
The worser welcome;
I have charged thee not to haunt about my doors;
In honest plainness thou hast heard me say
My daughter is not for thee. And now in madness,
Being full of supper and distempering draughts,
Upon malicious bravery dost thou come
To start my quiet.
RODERIGO
Sir, sir, sir-
BRABANTIO
But thou must needs be sure
My spirit and my place have in them power
To make this bitter to thee.

DUTCH:
Dan nog minder welkom;
‘k Gelastte u, niet om mijne deur te waren

MORE:

Worser=Less
Malicious display=Defiance (Bravery=Ostentatious display.)
Distempering=Deranging, disturbing
Start my quiet=Disturb my peace
Honest plainness=Clearly, frankly
Spirit and place=Character and position

Compleat:
Distemper (or troubles) of the State=Wanorder in den Staat
To distemper (or trouble)=Wanorder veroorzaaken
The plainness (or simplicity) of a discourse=De klaarheid eener redenvoering

Topics: order/society, insult

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:

RODERIGO
Every day thou daff’st me with some device, Iago, and rather, as it seems to me now, keep’st from me all conveniency than suppliest me with the least advantage of hope.
I will indeed no longer endure it, nor am I yet persuaded to put up in peace what already I have foolishly suffered.
IAGO
Will you hear me, Roderigo?
RODERIGO
I have heard too much, and your words and performances are no kin together.
IAGO
You charge me most unjustly.
RODERIGO
With naught but truth. I have wasted myself out of my means. The jewels you have had from me to deliver Desdemona would half have corrupted a votaress. You have told me she hath received them and returned me expectations and comforts of sudden respect and acquaintance, but I find none.
IAGO
Well, go to. Very well.
RODERIGO
“Very well,” “go to”! I cannot go to, man, nor ’tis not very well. Nay, I think it is scurvy, and begin to find myself fopped in it.

DUTCH:
Waarachtig, ik heb te veel naar u geluisterd, want
uw woorden en uw daden zijn elkaar niet verwant.

MORE:

Proverb: ‘Great promise small performance’ (your words and performances are no kin together.)

Conveniency=Opportunity
Advantage=Increase
Device=Scheme
Daff’st=Fob off (Daff=to put off (clothes)) Variation of doff, do off
Put up in peace=Endure silently
Votaress/Votarist=Nun
Comfort=Encouragement
Fopped=To make a fool of, to dupe

Compleat:
Votary=Een die zich door een (religieuse) belofte verbonden heeft; die zich ergens toe heeft overgegeeven

Topics: proverbs and idioms, perception, languge

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
And for I know thou ‘rt full of love and honesty
And weigh’st thy words before thou giv’st them breath,
Therefore these stops of thine fright me the more.
For such things in a false disloyal knave
Are tricks of custom, but in a man that’s just
They are close dilations, working from the heart,
That passion cannot rule

DUTCH:
Ja, en daar ik weet dat jij
de vriendschap hooghoudt en goudeerlijk bent,
en nadenkt vóór je spreekt, schrik ik temeer,
als jij ineens niets zegt.

MORE:

The two most favoured interpretations of close dilations are: (1) involuntary delays; and (2) half-hidden expressions

Schmidt:
Stops=Sudden pauses
Tricks of custom=Customary artifice, stratagem, device
Just=Honest, upright, to be relied on

Compleat:
Just (righteous)=Een rechtvaardige

Topics: honesty, loyalty, language, caution

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Roderigo
CONTEXT:
RODERIGO
Tush! Never tell me. I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.
IAGO
‘Sblood, but you’ll not hear me! If ever I did dream of such a matter, abhor me.
RODERIGO
Thou told’st me
Thou didst hold him in thy hate.
IAGO
Despise me
If I do not. Three great ones of the city
(In personal suit to make me his lieutenant)
Off-capped to him, and by the faith of man
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place.

DUTCH:
Ik neem je kwalijk, Jago,
dat jij die zo goed weg wist in mijn beurs
alsof dat ding van jou was, hiervan wist.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Unkindly=In a harsh and ungentle manner
Abhor=To detest to extremity, to loathe; with an accusation
Personal=Done or experienced in one’s own person, not by a representative or other indirect means
Suit=Petition, address of entreaty

Compleat:
Unkindly: To take a thing unkindly=Iets onvriendelyk opvatten
Abhor=Verfooijen, een afschrik hebben
Personal=In eigen hoofde
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding

Burgersdijk notes:
Geen praatjens, Jago. In ‘t Engelsch: Never tell me. Wij vallen hier midden in een gesprek; deze woorden
slaan op iets, dat Jago gezegd heeft; men mag aannemen, dat hij verklaard heeft, niets van de betrekking tasschen Othello en Desdemona geweten te hebben. — Daarop slaat ook Rodrigo’s gezegde in reg. 6: Gij haat hem innig; gij zult hem dus wel gade geslagen en er dus wel van geweten hebben; waarop Jago hem van zijn onderwerp af wil brengen door de redenen van zijn haat uiteen te zetten.

Topics: money, friendship, loyalty, respect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Desdemona
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
(to EMILIA) Some of your function, mistress,
Leave procreants alone and shut the door.
Cough or cry “hem” if any body come.
Your mystery, your mystery! Nay, dispatch!
DESDEMONA
Upon my knee, what doth your speech import?
I understand a fury in your words,
But not the words.

DUTCH:
Ach, op mijn knieën, wat beduidt die taal?
De razernij versta ik van uw woorden,
De woorden niet.

MORE:
Some of your function=Do you work
Mystery=Trade (brothel)

Topics: anger, language

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Desdemona
CONTEXT:
For let our finger ache, and it endues
Our other healthful members even to a sense
Of pain. Nay, we must think men are not gods,
Nor of them look for such observancy
As fits the bridal. Beshrew me much, Emilia,
I was – unhandsome warrior as I am –
Arraigning his unkindness with my soul;
But now I find I had suborned the witness

DUTCH:
Wee mij, wee, Emilia;
‘k Liet, tegen alle krijgstucht in, daar toe,
Dat wegens stuurschheid hem mijn ziel verklaagde;
Thasn ken ik die getuige als omgekocht
En hem als valsch beticht.

MORE:

Proverb: We are but men, not gods

Unhandsome=Unskilled, unfair, illiberal
Suborned=Influenced to bear false witness
Observancy=Homage
Arraigning=Accusing
Member=Limb

Compleat:
Member=Lid, Lidmaat. Member of the body=Een lid des lichaams
Arraign=Voor ‘t recht ontbieden; voor ‘t recht daagen
To suborn a witness=Eenen getuige opmaaken of omkoopen
Unhandsomly=Op een fatsoenlyke wyze
Abuser=Misbruiker, belediger, smyter en vegter

Topics: proverbs and idioms, nature, life, manipulation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Roderigo
CONTEXT:
RODERIGO
Every day thou daff’st me with some device, Iago, and rather, as it seems to me now, keep’st from me all conveniency than suppliest me with the least advantage of hope.
I will indeed no longer endure it, nor am I yet persuaded to put up in peace what already I have foolishly suffered.
IAGO
Will you hear me, Roderigo?
RODERIGO
I have heard too much, and your words and performances are no kin together.

DUTCH:
Ik wil dit bepaald niet langer verdragen, en ben volstrekt
niet gezind, verder kalm mij te laten welgevallen, wat
ik tot nog toe dwaas genoeg verduurd heb.

MORE:

Proverb: ‘Great promise small performance’ (your words and performances are no kin together.)

Conveniency=Opportunity
Advantage=Increase
Device=Scheme
Daff’st=Fob off (Daff=to put off (clothes)) Variation of doff, do off
Put up in peace=Endure silently
Votaress/Votarist=Nun
Comfort=Encouragement
Fopped=To make a fool of, to dupe

Compleat:
Votary=Een die zich door een (religieuse) belofte verbonden heeft; die zich ergens toe heeft overgegeeven

Topics: proverbs and idioms, perception, languge

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
Judge me the world, if ’tis not gross in sense
That thou hast practised on her with foul charms,
Abused her delicate youth with drugs or minerals
That weakens motion. I’ll have’t disputed on;
‘Tis probable and palpable to thinking.
I therefore apprehend and do attach thee
For an abuser of the world, a practiser
Of arts inhibited and out of warrant.

DUTCH:
De wereld oordeele, of ‘t niet zonneklaar is,
Dat gij door euv’le kunsten haar verlokt,
Haar teed’re jeugd door kruid of steen verdoofd,
Verbijsterd hebt.

MORE:

Arden:
Gross in sense=Palpable, obvious
Weakens motion=Dulls the normal perceptive faculties
Disputed on=Contested, debated
Abuser of the world=Corrupter of society
Attach=Arrest
Palpable to thinking=Obvious, manifest

Compleat:
To dispute, to agitate, or maintain a question=Een veschil verdedigen, handhaven
To dispute=Twistredenen, betwisten, zintwisten, disputeeren
Disputer=Een twistredenaar, zintwister, woordentwister, disputant
Attach=Beslaan, de hand opleggen, in verzekering neemen

Topics: dispute, law/legal, corruption

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Where virtue is, these are more virtuous.
Nor from mine own weak merits will I draw
The smallest fear or doubt of her revolt,
For she had eyes and chose me. No, Iago,
I’ll see before I doubt, when I doubt, prove,
And on the proof there is no more but this:
Away at once with love or jealousy!

DUTCH:
Nee, vóór ik twijfel,
wil ik eerst zien, ná twijfel eerst bewijs.
Als dat bewijs er is, is het meteen
met liefde uit en uit met jaloezie.

MORE:

Doubt=Suspicion
Revolt=Gross departure from duty; unfaithfulness

Compleat:
Revolt=Afvallen, oproerig worden, aan ‘t muiten slaan

Topics: suspicion, evidence, virtue, merit, flaw/fault, betrayal

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Emelia
CONTEXT:
If he say so, may his pernicious soul
Rot half a grain a day! He lies to th’ heart.
She was too fond of her most filthy bargain.

DUTCH:
Als hij dat zegt, mag zijn perverse ziel
wegrotten met een grein per dag. Hij liegt:
daarvoor had zij haar slechtste koop te lief.

MORE:
Proverb: He lies to th’heart (Cf. Macbeth 2.3: “That it did, sir, i’ th’ very throat on me; but I requited him for his lie’)

Topics: insult, truth, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I’ll have our Michael Cassio on the hip,
Abuse him to the Moor in the right garb
(For I fear Cassio with my night-cape too)
Make the Moor thank me, love me, and reward me
For making him egregiously an ass
And practicing upon his peace and quiet
Even to madness. ‘Tis here, but yet confused.
Knavery’s plain face is never seen till used.

DUTCH:
De Moor is iemand die geen argwaan kent
en houdt voor eerlijk wie dat schíjnt te zijn;
je neemt hem net zo maklijk bij de neus
als stomme ezels.
Ik heb het, ’t is verwekt! Door hel en nacht
moet deze monstertelg aan ’t licht gebracht.

MORE:

Proverb: To have one on the hip
On the hip=Have the advantage over; have at one’s mercy (See MoV, 1.3 “If I can catch him once upon the hip”)
Schmidt:
Abuse=Slander
Egregiously=In an enormous, shameful manner
Plain=Open, clear, easily understood, evident

Compleat:
Egregiously=Befaamd, berucht, aankerkelyk (in an ill sense)
An egregious knave=Een beruchte boef

Topics: deceit, appearance, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Emila
CONTEXT:
Twill out, ’twill out.—I peace?
No, I will speak as liberal as the north.
Let heaven and men and devils, let them all,
All, all cry shame against me, yet I’ll speak

DUTCH:
Het moet eruit, eruit! Ik zwijgen? Nee,
ik spreek mij uit, vrij als de noordenwind.
Laat God en mens en duivel, laat hen allen,
laat allen, allen, mij te schande maken,
toch zeg ik het.

MORE:

‘The truth will out’ (Cf. Murder will Out)

Topics: truth, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Let’s teach ourselves that honourable stop
Not to outsport discretion.
CASSIO
Iago hath direction what to do,
But notwithstanding with my personal eye
Will I look to ’t.

DUTCH:
Laat ons door waardige beheerstheid zorgen
niet meer te brassen dan verstandig is.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Stop=Restraint
Direction=Prescription, instruction, order
Outsport=Go beyond lmits in revelling (Celebrate to excess)

Compleat:
Direction=Het bestier, aanwijzing

Topics: caution, patience, wisdom

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
And Cassio high in oath, which till tonight
I ne’er might say before. When I came back—
For this was brief— I found them close together
At blow and thrust, even as again they were
When you yourself did part them.
More of this matter cannot I report.
But men are men, the best sometimes forget.
Though Cassio did some little wrong to him,
As men in rage strike those that wish them best,
Yet surely Cassio, I believe, received
From him that fled some strange indignity
Which patience could not pass.
OTHELLO
I know, Iago,
Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter,
Making it light to Cassio. Cassio, I love thee,
But never more be officer of mine.

DUTCH:
Al heeft hem Cassio
dan wel wat kwaad gedaan, zoals een man
in drift hem goedgezinde lieden slaat,
denk ik dat hij door de gevluchte vent
zo werd getergd dat zijn geduld dat niet
op zijn beloop kon laten.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Lindros v. Governing Board of the Torrance Unified School District, 9 Cal.3d 524, 540, 510 P.2d 361, 371, 108 Cal. Rptr. 185, 195 (1973)(Torriner, J.)(en banc).

Proverb: To mince the matter (Tell sparingly or by halves)

Still in common use e.g Don’t mince matters, don’t mince your words= Speak frankly,say what you mean

Schmidt:
Forget=Forget themselves
Indignity=Contemptuous injury, insult
Patience=Self-control
Pass=Overlook

Compleat:
Indignity=Smaad
Pass, pass by=Passeren, voorbygaan, overslaan
Mince=Kleyn kappen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, cited in law, language, honour

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Men should be what they seem;
Or those that be not, would they might seem none!
OTHELLO
Certain, men should be what they seem.
IAGO
Why then, I think Cassio’s an honest man.
OTHELLO
Nay, yet there’s more in this.
I prithee speak to me as to thy thinkings,
As thou dost ruminate, and give thy worst of thoughts
The worst of words.
IAGO
Good my lord, pardon me;
Though I am bound to every act of duty,
I am not bound to that all slaves are free to.
Utter my thoughts! Why, say they are vile and false?
As where’s that palace, whereinto foul things
Sometimes intrude not? Who has a breast so pure,
But some uncleanly apprehensions
Keep leets and law-days, and in session sit
With meditations lawful?

DUTCH:
Men móét zijn wat men schijnt.
Wie niet oprecht is, moet dat juist niet schijnen.

MORE:

Proverb: Be what thou would seem to be
Proverb: Thought is free

Schmidt:
Ruminate=To muse, to meditate, to ponder
Leet=A manor court, court-leet, private jurisdiction; a day on which such court is held
Apprehensions=Ideas

Compleat:
To ruminate upon (to consider of) a thing=Eene zaak overweegen
Leet, Court leet=Een gerechtshof
Leet-days=Recht-dagen
Apprehension=Bevatting, begryping; jaloezy, achterdogt

Topics: proverbs and idioms, language, duty, betrayal

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Do you perceive the gastness of her eye?—Stay you, good gentlemen.—Look you pale, mistress?—
Nay, if you stare, we shall hear more anon.—
Behold her well. I pray you, look upon her.
Do you see, gentlemen? Nay, guiltiness
Will speak, though tongues were out of use.

DUTCH:
De wereld is voor zo’n klein zondetje
een veel te grote maat.

MORE:
Gastness=Ghastness, ghastliness, haggard look (fear, terror)
Though tongues out of use=Even without the power of speech

Compleat:
Guiltiness=Schuldigheid; misdaadigheid

Topics: guilt, language, appearance

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
So did I yours. Good your grace, pardon me.
Neither my place nor aught I heard of business
Hath raised me from my bed, nor doth the general care
Take hold on me, for my particular grief
Is of so flood-gate and o’erbearing nature
That it engluts and swallows other sorrows
And it is still itself.

DUTCH:
Zoo ik uw hulp. Genadig heer, vergeef mij,
Geen ambtszaak, geen gerucht van wat hier omging,
Riep van mijn bed mij op; geen staatszorg is ‘t,
Die mij vervult, want mijn, mijn eigen leed
Breekt dam en sluis en stroomt zoo machtig, dat
Het iedere andre smart verzwelgt, verslindt,
En toch zichzelf steeds blijft.

MORE:

Flood-gate=Strong stream, torrent; Adjectively=torrential
Englut=To swallow, engulf

Compleat:
Englut=Verkroppen.
A glut of rain=Een stortregen
Floud-gate=Een sluis, doortogt

Topics: emotion and mood, work, satisfaction, sorrow

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Well, happiness to their sheets! Come, lieutenant, I have a stoup of wine, and here without are a brace of Cyprus gallants, that would fain have a measure to the health of the black Othello.
CASSIO
Not tonight, good Iago. I have very poor and unhappy brains for drinking. I could well wish courtesy would invent some other custom of entertainment.

DUTCH:
Vanavond niet, beste Jago, ik heb een heel slechte en ongelukkige dronk. Ik zou heel graag willen dat de etiquette een andere vorm van gezelligheid zou verzinnen.

MORE:

Stoup=Two quarts
Have a measure=Drink a toast
Schmidt:
Fain=Gladly, willingly; always joined with would; followed by a clause
Unhappy=Evil, mischievous, fatal, pernicious (but often in a somewhat milder sense)
Courtesy=Politeness

Compleat:
Courtesy=Beleefdheid, hoflykheid

Topics: excess, welbeing

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:

Oh, beware, my lord, of jealousy!
It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock
The meat it feeds on. That cuckold lives in bliss
Who, certain of his fate, loves not his wronger,
But, oh, what damnèd minutes tells he o’er
Who dotes, yet doubts— suspects, yet soundly loves!

DUTCH:
Hoed u voor jaloezie: ’t groenogig monster
—dat met het vlees speelt dat het eet.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
State v. Potter, 60 N.O. 183,233 N.W. 650 (1930)(Burke, J.); Van Meter v. State, 30 Md. App. 406, 353 A.2d 850 (1976)(“appellant’s conviction of murder rested heavily upon the testimony of his paramour Debra Turner, who used appellant’s jealousies to bring about his own misfortune, in much the same way as did Othello … “).

Schmidt:
Mock the meat=To deride, to ridicule, to laugh to scorn (its victim)
Wronger=One who wrongs or injures
Tells=Counts, numbers

Compleat:
To mock=Bespotten, beschimpen, begekken
To tell (count or compute)=Rekenen, begrooten
Dutch: “monster met groene ogen” (“het groene monster”)

Topics: cited in law, offence, envy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
DESDEMONA
What wouldst thou write of me, if thou shouldst praise me?
IAGO
O gentle lady, do not put me to ’t,
For I am nothing, if not critical.
DESDEMONA
Come on, assay. There’s one gone to the harbour?
IAGO
Ay, madam

DUTCH:
Als ik iets ben, dan wel kritisch.

MORE:

Put (me) to it=Compel, oblige, force, push
Assay=Try, make an attempt
Compleat:
Assaying=Trachtende

Topics: temptation, honestytruth, value

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
I remember a mass of things, but nothing distinctly. A quarrel, but nothing wherefore. Oh, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains! That we should, with joy, pleasance, revel and applause, transform ourselves into beasts!

DUTCH:
O god, dat mensen een vijand in hun
mond nemen om hun hersens te stelen!

MORE:

CITED IN EU LAW:
Ahokainen and Leppik (Free movement of goods) [2006] EUECJ C-434/04 (28 September 2006) Opinion of A-G Poiares Maduro delivered on 13 July 2006

Nothing wherefore=Not the reason

Schmidt:
Pleasance=Gaiety, merriment

Compleat:
Befallen=Gebeurd, overgekomen

Topics: cited in law, dispute, reason

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners. So that if we will plant nettles or sow lettuce, set hyssop and weed up thyme, supply it with one gender of herbs or distract it with many—either to have it sterile with idleness, or manured with industry—why, the power and corrigible authority of this lies in our wills.

DUTCH:
Ons lichaam is onze tuin, waarvan onze wil de tuiman is.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Corrigible=Corrective
Sterile=Barren, not fertile
Gender of herbs=Race, kind, sort
Compleat:
Corrigible=Verbeterlyk

Topics: free will, independence, authority, emotion and mood, reason, intellect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
You or any man living may be drunk at a time, man. I tell you what you shall do. Our general’s wife is now the general. I may say so in this respect, for that he hath devoted and given up himself to the contemplation, mark, and denotement of her parts and graces. Confess yourself freely to her, importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter, and, my fortunes against any lay worth naming, this crack of your love shall grow stronger than it was before.

DUTCH:
De vrouw van onzen Generaal is nu de Generaal; — ik
mag dit wel in zoo verre zeggen, als hij zich geheel
heeft toegewijd en overgegeven aan de beschouwing,
waarneming en opsomming van hare gaven en bevalligheden

MORE:

Proverb: A broken bone is the stronger when it is well set

Denotement=Contemplation; mark, indication: “in a man that’s just they are close –s, working from the heart”.
Importune (in the sense of ‘ask urgently and persistently’ usu. with a person as obj.)
Parts=Accomplishments, qualities

Compleat:
To importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen

Topics: excess, marriage, authority, marriage, love, skill/talent, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Poor and content is rich, and rich enough,
But riches fineless is as poor as winter
To him that ever fears he shall be poor.
Good heaven, the souls of all my
OTHELLO
Why, why is this?
Think’st thou I’d make a life of jealousy,
To follow still the changes of the moon
With fresh suspicions? No, to be once in doubt
Is once to be resolved. Exchange me for a goat
When I shall turn the business of my soul
To such exsufflicate and blown surmises
Matching thy inference. ‘Tis not to make me jealous
To say my wife is fair, feeds well, loves company,
Is free of speech, sings, plays, and dances well :
Where virtue is, these are more virtuous. tribe defend
From jealousy!

DUTCH:
Arm en tevreden is rijk, en rijk genoeg

MORE:

Proverb: The greatest wealth is contentment with a little

Fineless=Infinite, boundless
Resolved=Convinced, Fixed in a determination
Once=Once and for all

Schmidt:
Exsufflicate (Exufflicate)=From exsufflare, probably synonymous to blown=`puffed jup, inflated; empty, unsubstantial, frivolous.

Compleat:
Resolve (untie, decide, determine a hard question, difficulty etc.)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopten
Resolve (deliberation, decision)=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel

Topics: poverty and wealth, satisfaction, proverbs and idioms, virtue, envy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:

IAGO
Despise me
If I do not. Three great ones of the city
(In personal suit to make me his lieutenant)
Off-capped to him, and by the faith of man
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place.
But he (as loving his own pride and purposes)
Evades them with a bombast circumstance
Horribly stuffed with epithets of war,
And in conclusion
Nonsuits my mediators. For “Certes,” says he,
“I have already chose my officer.”
And what was he?
Forsooth, a great arithmetician,
One Michael Cassio, a Florentine
(A fellow almost damned in a fair wife)
That never set a squadron in the field,
Nor the division of a battle knows
More than a spinster—unless the bookish theoric,
Wherein the toged consuls can propose
As masterly as he. Mere prattle without practice
Is all his soldiership. But he, sir, had th’ election
And I, of whom his eyes had seen the proof
At Rhodes, at Cyprus, and on other grounds
Christian and heathen, must be belee’d and calmed
By debitor and creditor. This counter-caster
He (in good time) must his lieutenant be
And I, bless the mark, his Moorship’s ancient.
RODERIGO
By heaven, I rather would have been his hangman.
IAGO
Why, there’s no remedy. ‘Tis the curse of service.
Preferment goes by letter and affection,
And not by old gradation, where each second
Stood heir to th’ first. Now sir, be judge yourself,
Whether I in any just term am affined
To love the Moor.

DUTCH:
Niets aan te doen. Het is de vloek van ’t leger: promotie maakt men óf op aanbeveling, óf door een vriendendienst, niet als vanouds, toen men van rang tot rang, van tweede man tot eerste werd bevorderd. Oordeel zelf of ik één reden heb om met de Moor bevriend te zijn.

MORE:

Off-capped=Doffed caps
Suit=Petition
Bombast circumstance=Inflated rhetoric, circumlocution
Bombast=Cotton used to stuff out garments (hence ‘stuffed with epithets’)
Non-suit=Rejection of petition, causing withdrawal of petition

Schmidt:
Preferment=Advancement, promotion
Gradation=Regular advance from step to step
Affined=Bound by any tie
Just=Conforming to the laws and principles of justice, equitable
Term=Expression, word
Belee’d=To place on the lee, in a positoin unfavourable to the wind
Ancient=The next in command under the lieutenant

CurseCompleat:
Gradation=Een trafspreuk, opklimming in eene reede
To come to preferment=Bevorderd worden
Preferment=Verhooging, voortrekking, bevordering tot Staat
Bombast=Bombazyne of kattoene voering; fustian
Bombast=Hoogdraavende wartaal, ydel gezwets
To bumbast=Met bombazyn voeren
Bumbast: Bombazyn als ook Brommende woorden

Burgersdijk notes:
Een groote cijfermeester, Een Michel Cassio, een Florentijner. Florence was niet, zooals Venetië, telkens in oorlogen gewikkeld; hoe zou Cassio daar de krijgskunst geleerd hebben? Ontvangsten en uitgaven, winsten en verliezen te berekenen, ja. dit kon men zich daar eigen maken. – Het volgende „verslingerd op een schoone vrouw,” heet in het Engelsch : almost damned in a fair wife „bijna verdoemd”. Het gerucht liep, dat Cassio van plan was de schoone Bianca, met wie hij verkeer had, te trouwen Door zulk een huwelijk zou hij zich, naar Jago’s opvatting , in de verdoemenis storten.

Topics: corruption, loyalty, relationship, skill/talent, age/experience

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Put out the light, and then put out the light.
If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
I can again thy former light restore
Should I repent me. But once put out thy light,
Thou cunning’st pattern of excelling nature,
I know not where is that Promethean heat
That can thy light relume. When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither.

DUTCH:
Doe uit het licht en doe dan uit het licht:
als ik u doof, gedienstige flambouw,
en mij dat spijt, kan ik uw vroeger licht;
opnieuw ontsteken.

MORE:

Put out the light, and then put out the light = Extinguish the candle and kill Desdemona
Relume = re-illuminate, rekindle
Flaming=Carrying a light (Cf. Psalms 104.4; ‘Which maketh he spirits his messengers, and a flaming fire his ministers’.)
Cunning=Dexterously wrought or devised

Onions:
Fire stolen by the demigod Prometheus from Olympus and conveyed to men, to whom he taught its use; allusively applied to that which inspires or infuses life

Compleat:
Cunning=Behendig, Schrander, Naarstig
A cunning fellow=Een doortrapte vent, een looze gast
To cast a cunning look=Iemand snaaks aanzien

Topics: life, strength, regret, death

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my
reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what
remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation!
IAGO
As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some bodily wound. There is more sense in that than in reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false imposition, oft got without merit and lost without deserving. You have lost no reputation at all unless you repute yourself such a loser.

DUTCH:
Een goede naam is een nutteloze en zeer ambivalente last,
iets dat wij onverdiend ontvangen en onterecht weer kwijt-raken.

MORE:

Proverb: A man is weal or woe as he thinks himself so

Schmidt:
Imposition=Cheat, imposture
Repute (yourself)=To think, to account, to hold

Compleat:
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting, bedrog
Repute=Achten

Topics: reputation, merit, honesty, value, integrity, wellbeing

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my
reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation!
IAGO
As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some bodily wound. There is more sense in that than in reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false imposition, oft got without merit and lost without deserving. You have lost no reputation at all unless you repute yourself such a loser.

DUTCH:
Mijn goede naam, mijn goede naam, mijn goede naam!
Ik heb mijn goede naam verloren, ik heb het onsterfelijke
deel van mijzelf verloren, en wat overblijft is niet meer
dan een beest.

MORE:

Proverb: A man is weal or woe as he thinks himself so

Schmidt:
Imposition=Cheat, imposture
Repute (yourself)=To think, to account, to hold

Compleat:
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting, bedrog
Repute=Achten

Topics: reputation, merit, honesty, value, integrity, wellbeing

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Rude am I in my speech,
And little blessed with the soft phrase of peace,
For since these arms of mine had seven years’ pith
Till now some nine moons wasted, they have used
Their dearest action in the tented field,
And little of this great world can I speak,
More than pertains to feats of broils and battle,
And therefore little shall I grace my cause
In speaking for myself. Yet, by your gracious patience,
I will a round unvarnished tale deliver
Of my whole course of love. What drugs, what charms,
What conjuration and what mighty magic—
For such proceeding I am charged withal—
I won his daughter.

DUTCH:
Ruw ben ik in mijn mond,en spreek geen lieve vredestaal,
want van mijn zevende tot nog geen jaar terug
heb ik mijn armspieren gestaald en die
op ’t slagveld voor zwaar krijgswerk aangewend
en weet van deze grote wereld niets
dan wat tot krijgsgewoel en wapens hoort.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Rude=Raw, unrefined, uncivilized
Pith=Strength, force
Moon=month
Grace=To give, in any manner, a good appearance to, to set off, to adorn, to dignify, to exalt
Proceeding=Doing, action, course taken
Round=Plain
Conjuration=Incantation
Withal=With

Compleat:
Rude=Ruuw, onbeschouwen, plomp
Grace=Genade, gunst, bevalligheyd, fraaigheyd, aardige zwier
Proceeding=Voortvaaring, handeling
Conjuration=Zamenzweering, eedgespan, vloekverwantschap, bezweering

Topics: learning/education, language, defence

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Divinity of hell !
When devils will the blackest sins put on,
They do suggest at first with heavenly shows
As I do now. For whiles this honest fool
Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes,
And she for him pleads strongly to the Moor,
I’ll pour this pestilence into his ear:
That she repeals him for her body’s lust.
And by how much she strives to do him good
She shall undo her credit with the Moor.
So will I turn her virtue into pitch
And out of her own goodness make the net
That shall enmesh them all.

DUTCH:
En door haar pogen
hem goed te doen, verspeelt ze bij de Moor
al haar krediet – zo maak ik haar pikzwart
en weef uit haar goedhartigheid een net
dat allen zal verstrikken.

MORE:

Proverb: The devil can transform himself into an angel of light.

Put on=Incite
Schmidt:
Repeal=Recall from exile
Credit=A good opinion entertained of a p. and influence derived from it: Reputation
Pitch=1) Something odious; 2) blackness; 3) with power to ensnare

Compleat:
Pitch=Pik
Credit=Aanzien, goede naam
Repeal=Herroepen, afschaffen, weer intrekken

Topics: deceit, appearance, manipulation, , reputation, virtue, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Speak of me as I am. Nothing extenuate,
Nor set down aught in malice. Then must you speak
Of one that loved not wisely, but too well.
Of one not easily jealous, but being wrought,
Perplexed in the extreme. Of one whose hand,
Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away
Richer than all his tribe. Of one whose subdued eyes,
Albeit unused to the melting mood,
Drops tears as fast as the Arabian trees
Their medicinable gum.

DUTCH:
als u die droeve daden releveert,
van mij te spreken als ik ben. Vergoelijk niets,
maar schrijf ook niets vileins. Spreek van een man
wiens liefde groter dan zijn wijsheid was;

MORE:

‘In the extreme’ coined by Shakespeare.
Wrought=Worked on, agitated
Extenuate, 1) to palliate (opposed to aggravate); 2) to mitigate; 3) to undervalue, to detract from
Perplex=To confound, to bewilder
Melting=Yielding or softening to emotion, tender
Tears=Reference to myrrh tree
Medicinable=Medicinal, having the power of healing

Compleat:
Melting=Smelting, smeltende
Perplex=Raadeloos maaken, kwellen, ontstellen, bedrommelen, beteuteren, verwarren, verbysteren
Extenuate=Verkleinen
Wrought=Gewerkt, gewrocht

Topics: still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
O wretched fool
That lov’st to make thine honesty a vice!
O monstrous world! Take note, take note, O world,
To be direct and honest is not safe.
I thank you for this profit, and from hence
I’ll love no friend, sith love breeds such offence

DUTCH:
Schrijf het op! Schrijf het op, o wereld! Spontaan en eerlijk zijn is niet genoeg.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Profit=Proficiency, improvement:
Sith=Since, as, seeing that

Compleat:
Sith=Naardien, nademaal
Sith that=Sedert dat
Profit=Voordeel, gewin, nut, profyt, winst, baat

Topics: honesty, truth, learning/education

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Thus do I ever make my fool my purse.
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well.
The better shall my purpose work on him.
Cassio’s a proper man. Let me see now,To get his place and to plume up my will
In double knavery. How? How? Let’s see.
After some time, to abuse Othello’s ear
That he is too familiar with his wife.
He hath a person and a smooth dispose
To be suspected, framed to make women false.
The Moor is of a free and open nature
That thinks men honest that but seem to be so,
And will as tenderly be led by th’ nose
As asses are.
I have ’t. It is engendered! Hell and night
Must bring this monstrous birth to the world’s light.

DUTCH:
De Moor is gul en open van natuur,
Waant ieder eerlijk, die slechts eerlijk schijnt,
En laat zoo zachtkens bij den neus zich leiden,
Als ezels ‘t laten doen.

MORE:

Snipe=Bird, also ‘worthless’ fellow, simpleton
Gained knowledge=Practical experience
In that kind=In that regard
‘Twixt=Betwixt (between)
Surety=Certainty
Holds me well=Respects, has a good opinion of
Purpose=Plan

Compleat:
Snipe=Snip, snep
Betwixt=Tusschen, tusschenbeide
Betwixt the devil and the red sea=Tusschen hangen en worgen
Purpose (design, resolution, project)=Voorneemen, besluit, ontwerp

Topics: honesty, gullibility, trust, suspicion, respect, learning/education, age/experience, conspiracy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
Let me speak like yourself and lay a sentence
Which as a grise or step may help these lovers
Into your favour.
When remedies are past the griefs are ended
By seeing the worst which late on hopes depended.
To mourn a mischief that is past and gone
Is the next way to draw new mischief on.
What cannot be preserved when fortune takes,
Patience her injury a mock’ry makes.
The robbed that smiles steals something from the thief,
He robs himself that spends a bootless grief.

DUTCH:
Wie lacht om diefstal, steelt iets van de dief;
wie huilt om niets, verzint zijn eigen grief.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Dykes v. State, 264 So.2d 65, 66 n. 1 (Fla. Ct. App. 1972)(Howell, J.).

Proverb: Never grieve for that you cannot help

Onions:
Grise (grize) (also grice, greese)=Step, degree
Lay a sentence=Apply a maxim
Patience=Endurance
Mockery=Subject of laughter and derision
Bootless=Futile, unavailing

Compleat:
Mockery=Bespotting, spotterny
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos

Topics: adversity, regret, cited in law, proverbs and idioms, remedy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I am glad of this, for now I shall have reason
To show the love and duty that I bear you
With franker spirit. Therefore, as I am bound,
Receive it from me. I speak not yet of proof.
Look to your wife, observe her well with Cassio.
Wear your eyes thus, not jealous nor secure.
I would not have your free and noble nature
Out of self-bounty be abused. Look to ’t.
I know our country disposition well.
In Venice they do let God see the pranks
They dare not show their husbands. Their best conscience
Is not to leave ’t undone, but keep’t unknown.

DUTCH:
Ik ben met onzen landaard wel vertrouwd;
Men laat bij ons den hemel treken zien,
Die de gemaal niet zien mag; ‘t reinst geweten
Zegt daar niet:laat het na”, maar: houdt verborgen.”

MORE:

Proverb: Live charily if not chastely

Secure=Free from suspicion
Self-bounty-Innate generosity
Revolt=Unfaithfulness
Best conscicence=Highest morality

Topics: love, honesty, trust, betrayal, suspicion, evidence, marriage, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Emilia
CONTEXT:
Yes, a dozen, and as many to th’ vantage as
would store the world they played for.
But I do think it is their husbands’ faults
If wives do fall. Say that they slack their duties
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
And pour our treasures into foreign laps,
Or else break out in peevish jealousies,
Throwing restraint upon us. Or say they strike us,
Or scant our former having in despite.
Why, we have galls, and though we have some grace,
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
Their wives have sense like them. They see and smell
And have their palates both for sweet and sour,
As husbands have. What is it that they do
When they change us for others? Is it sport?
I think it is. And doth affection breed it?
I think it doth. Is ’t frailty that thus errs?
It is so too. And have not we affections,
Desires for sport, and frailty, as men have?
Then let them use us well, else let them know,
The ills we do, their ills instruct us so.

DUTCH:
Dus, dat ze ons goed behand’len of bedenken,
Dat, zoo ze ons krenken, zij ons leeren krenken.

MORE:

In despite=Out of spite
Peevish=Silly, spiteful
Galls=Tempers or spirits to cause resentment
Affection=Passion

Compleat:
Peevish=Kribbig, gemelyk

Topics: marriage, trust, betrayal, revenge, age/experience, equality, respect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Thou art sure of me. Go, make money. I have told thee often, and I re-tell thee again and again, I hate the Moor. My cause is hearted. Thine hath no less reason. Let us be conjunctive in our revenge against him. If thou canst cuckold him, thou dost thyself a pleasure, me a sport. There are many events in the womb of time which will be delivered. Traverse, go, provide thy money. We will have more of this tomorrow. Adieu.

DUTCH:
De tijd gaat groot van allerlei voorvallen, die in de geboorte zijn. Opgerukt, ga, zorg voor geld.

MORE:

Be conjunctive=Join forces
Hearted=Seated in the heart
Cuckold=To make a cuckold

Topics: time, money, reason, dispute, trust, unity/collaboration, revenge, conspiracy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
This fellow’s of exceeding honesty
And knows all quantities, with a learnèd spirit,
Of human dealings. If I do prove her haggard,
Though that her jesses were my dear heartstrings,
I’d whistle her off and let her down the wind
To prey at fortune.

DUTCH:
Ik heb nog nooit zo’n eerlijk man ontmoet.
Zijn scherpe geest dringt door tot alle hoeken
van ons gedrag.

MORE:

Jesses=Straps of leather or silk, with which hawks were tied by the legs
Haggard=Intractable, wild (as an untrained hawk)
Whistle off=Call of falconers (Johnson: the falconers always let fly the hawk against the wind; if she flies with the wind behind her, she seldom returns. If therefore a hawk was for any reason to be dismissed, she was let down the wind, and from that time shifted for herself and preyed at fortune)

Compleat:
Learnèd=Geleerd

Blijkt zij me een woeste valk. Shakespeare noemt het woord valk niet. maar bezigt het woord haggard,
dat juist voor een valk , die niet gehoorzaam wil worden, maar wild blijft, gebezigd wordt, en spreekt van de jesses, de veters of riemen, waarmee men den valk op de hand vasthoudt, van het gefluit, waarmeê men hem loslaat, en van het laten vliegen met den wind mee of voor den wind, waarna een valk zelden terugkeert, maar voor eigen rekening gaat jagen. In Sh.’s tijd was de valkerij met hare uitdrukkingen algemeen bekend en werd iedere toespeling er op onmiddellijk begrepen.

Burgersdijk notes:

Topics: honesty, learning and education

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Kind gentlemen, let’s go see poor Cassio dressed.—
Come, mistress, you must tell ’s another tale.—
Emilia, run you to the citadel
And tell my lord and lady what hath happed.—
Will you go on afore? Aside. This is the night
That either makes me or fordoes me quite.

DUTCH:
Dra blijkt, of deze nacht
Mij hoog verhief of diepen val mij bracht.

MORE:

Proverb: To make one tell another tale

Dressed=wounds dressed
Fordoes=Ruins

Topics: fate/destiny, risk, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Emila
CONTEXT:
Peace, you were best.
Thou hast not half that power to do me harm
As I have to be hurt. O gull! O dolt!
As ignorant as dirt! Thou hast done a deed—
I care not for thy sword, I’ll make thee known
Though I lost twenty lives.

DUTCH:
Je kunt
mij nog niet half het kwaad aandoen dat ik
verdragen kan. Jij dom en gedupeerd,
onwetend hoopje vuil, hebt iets gedaan…

MORE:

Schmidt:
Gull=A person easily deceived, a dupe, a fool

Compleat:
Gull=Bedrieger
To gull=Bedriegen, verschalken. You look as if you had a mind to gull me=Hete schynt of gy voorneemens waart om my te foppen

Topics: insult, gullibility, intellect, revenge

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
How poor are they that have not patience!
What wound did ever heal but by degrees?
Thou know’st we work by wit and not by witchcraft,
And wit depends on dilatory time.

DUTCH:
Wie geen geduld heeft, is zeer arm/
Wat dom is hij die zijn geduld verliest!

MORE:

Proverb: He that has no patience has nothing

Depends on dilatory time = Time moves slowly

Compleat:
Dilatory=Uitstel-zoekende

Topics: intellect, patience, proverbs and idioms, purpose

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Though other things grow fair against the sun,
Yet fruits that blossom first will first be ripe.
Content thyself awhile. By th’mass, ’tis morning :
Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.
Retire thee, go where thou art billeted.
Away, I say, thou shalt know more hereafter –
Nay, get thee gone.
Two things are to be done.
My wife must move for Cassio to her mistress –
I’ll set her on.
Myself the while to draw the Moor apart,
And bring him jump when he may Cassio find
Soliciting his wife. Ay, that’s the way :
Dull not device by coldness and delay.

DUTCH:
Genoegen en bedrijvigheid maken de uren kort./
Plezier en daden lijken de uren kort te maken.

MORE:

Other things grow fair=Long-term plans blossom slowly
Fruits that blossom first=Preliminary plans (have already borne fruit)
Move for=Plead for
Jump=At that precise time
Device=Plot
To dull=To incapacitate, make inert
Coldness=Lack of enthusiasm or energy

Compleat:
To move (to stir up, to egg on, to solicit or persuade)=Aanstooken, oprokkenen
To move to compassion=Tot medelyden beweegen

Topics: time, plans/intentions, conspiracy, patience, purpose

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
And Cassio high in oath, which till tonight
I ne’er might say before. When I came back—
For this was brief— I found them close together
At blow and thrust, even as again they were
When you yourself did part them.
More of this matter cannot I report.
But men are men, the best sometimes forget.
Though Cassio did some little wrong to him,
As men in rage strike those that wish them best,
Yet surely Cassio, I believe, received
From him that fled some strange indignity
Which patience could not pass.
OTHELLO
I know, Iago,
Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter,
Making it light to Cassio. Cassio, I love thee,
But never more be officer of mine.

DUTCH:
Jago, ik weet
dat je als zijn vriend dit bagatelliseert
en Cassio’s misstap wilt vergoelijken.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Lindros v. Governing Board of the Torrance Unified School District, 9 Cal.3d 524, 540, 510 P.2d 361, 371, 108 Cal. Rptr. 185, 195 (1973)(Torriner, J.)(en banc).

Proverb: To mince the matter (Tell sparingly or by halves)

Still in common use e.g Don’t mince matters, don’t mince your words= Speak frankly,say what you mean

Schmidt:
Forget=Forget themselves
Indignity=Contemptuous injury, insult
Patience=Self-control
Pass=Overlook
Compleat:
Indignity=Smaad
Pass, pass by=Passeren, voorbygaan, overslaan
Mince=Kleyn kappen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, cited in law, language, honour

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
DESDEMONA
Can you inquire him out and be edified by report?
CLOWN
I will catechise the world for him, that is, make questions, and by them answer.
DESDEMONA
Seek him, bid him come hither. Tell him I have moved my lord on his behalf, and hope all will be well.
CLOWN
To do this is within the compass of man’s wit: and therefore I will attempt the doing of it.

DUTCH:
Dit valt binnen het bereik van het menselijke denkvermogen.
Daarom zal ik proberen het ten uitvoer te brengen.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Catechise=To try by questions (allusion to instructional method)
Compass=Reach, range (Nowadays: Is it beyond the wit of man?)

Compleat:
Compass=Omtrek, omkreits, begrip, bestek, bereik
It is not within the compass of humane skill=’t Gaat het bereik van ‘s menschen verstand te boven
Catechise=In ‘t geloof onderwyzen, katechizeren; een vermaaning geven
Edify (to set examples of piety)=Stichten door een goed voorbeeld

Topics: skill/talent, intellect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
BRABANTIO
(…) It is a judgment maimed and most imperfect
That will confess perfection so could err.
Against all rules of nature, and must be driven
To find out practices of cunning hell
Why this should be. I therefore vouch again
That with some mixtures powerful o’er the blood
Or with some dram, conjured to this effect,
He wrought upon her.
DUKE
To vouch this is no proof,
Without more wider and more overt test
Than these thin habits and poor likelihoods
Of modern seeming do prefer against him.
FIRST SENATOR
But, Othello, speak.
Did you by indirect and forcèd courses
Subdue and poison this young maid’s affections?
Or came it by request and such fair question
As soul to soul affordeth?

DUTCH:
Betuigd is niet bewezen,
Tenzij gij beter gronden hebt, meer klemmend,
Dan ‘t los vermoeden, dat, met krachtloos uitzicht,
En dun gekleed, nu optreedt tegen hem.

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Proverb: Accusation is no proof

Vouch again=Reaffirm expressly
Wider=Fuller
Test=Testimony, evidence
Thin habits=Scant, insubstantial exterior
Poor=Tenuous
Likelihood=Circumstantial evidence, somethng from which inferences may be drawn, indication, sign
Indirect=Underhand
Forced=Constrained, unnatural, false (against the will of)
Modern seeming=Common assumption
Compleat:
Testable=Die volgens de rechten getuigen mag
Indirect=Niet rechts weegs, zydelings. Indirect means=Slinksche middelen
Directly or indirectly=Middelyk of onmiddelyk, voor de vuist of heimelyk

Topics: proverbs and idioms, nature, error, evidence

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I will in Cassio’s lodging lose this napkin
And let him find it. Trifles light as air
Are to the jealous confirmations strong
As proofs of holy writ. This may do something.
The Moor already changes with my poison :
Dangerous conceits are in their natures poisons,
Which at the first are scarce found to distaste
But, with a little act upon the blood,
Burn like the mines of sulphur. I did say so.

DUTCH:
Nietigheden, ijl als lucht, zijn voor de jaloersen bevestiging, zo sterk als bewijzen uit de Heilige Schrift./
Voor wie jaloers is, Zijn dingen, ijl als lucht, sterker bewijzen, Dan spreuken uit de Schrift.

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Proverb: As light as air

Schmidt:
Napkin=Handkerchief
Conceits=Conceptions, ideas
To distaste=To be distasteful, unsavoury

Compleat:
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening
Distaste=Weersmaak, weerzin, misnoegen
To give distaste=Misnoegen veroorzaaken
To distaste=Geen smaak in iets vinden; (to take distaste)=Een walg krygen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, envy, perception, imagination

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
O sir, content you.
I follow him to serve my turn upon him.
We cannot all be masters, nor all masters
Cannot be truly followed. You shall mark
Many a duteous and knee-crooking knave
That (doting on his own obsequious bondage)
Wears out his time much like his master’s ass
For naught but provender, and when he’s old, cashiered.

DUTCH:
Wel, maak je maar geen zorg!
Ik dien hem slechts om ’t hem betaald te zetten.
Niet elk kan meester zijn, noch alle meesters
getrouw gediend. Je zult er wel een kennen,
zo’n plichtsgetrouwe, kruiperige knecht
die, opgaand in zijn lage slavernij,
als de ezel van zijn baas voor slechts wat voer
zijn tijd uitdient en, oud, wordt afgedankt.

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Proverb: Every man cannot be a master (lord)

Whipping was a cruel punishment. In the days of Henry VIII an Act decreed that vagrants were to be carried to some market town, or other place, and there tied to the end of a cart, naked, and beaten with whips throughout such market-town, or other place, till the body should be bloody by reason of such whipping. The punishment was mitigated in Elizabeth’s reign, to the extent that vagrants need only to be “stripped naked from the middle upwards and whipped till the body should be bloody”.

Schmidt:
Content you=Be quiet, calm
Doting=to be fond, to love to excess
Knee-crooking=Flattering
Obsequious=Zealous, officious, devoted
Wear out=To spend all of, to come to the end of
Provender=Dry food for beasts
Cashiered=Discarded from service

Compleat:
Dote upon=Op iets verzot zyn; zyne zinnen zeer op iets gezet hebben
Obsequious=Gehoorzaam, gedienstig
To cashiere=Den zak geeven, afdanken, ontslaan

Topics: loyalty, deceit, proverbs and idioms, leadership, duty

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
My life upon her faith!—Honest Iago,
My Desdemona must I leave to thee.
I prithee, let thy wife attend on her,
And bring them after in the best advantage.
Come, Desdemona, I have but an hour
Of love, of worldly matter and direction,
To spend with thee. We must obey the time.

DUTCH:
Kom, Desdemona; slechts een enkel uur
Is mij voor liefde en reeg’ling van ons huis
Met u vergund; de tijd beheerscht ons doen.

MORE:
In the best advantage=Most favourable opportunity (Arden)
Obey the time=Time is pressing

Topics: time, plans/intentions, life, deceit, truth

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Hold your hands,
Both you of my inclining and the rest.
Were it my cue to fight, I should have known it
Without a prompter. Whither will you that I go
To answer this your charge?
BRABANTIO
To prison, till fit time
Of law and course of direct session
Call thee to answer.
OTHELLO
What if I do obey?
How may the Duke be therewith satisfied,
Whose messengers are here about my side
Upon some present business of the state
To bring me to him?

DUTCH:
Steekt op die zwaarden ,
Niet gij slechts aan mijn zij, gij and’ren ook!
Waar’ strijd mijn wachtwoord, ‘k wist het zelf, al blies
Het niemand in. Waar wilt gij, dat ik ga,
Opdat ik mij verantwoord?

MORE:

Hold your hands=Don’t strike
Of my inclining=On my side
Course of direct session=Specially convened court hearing

Compleat:
To hold back=Te rugge houden, onthouden
Session=Een zitting

Topics: dispute, law/legal, punishment, reply

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
IAGO
(…) You are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice, even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion. Sue to him again, and he’s yours.
CASSIO
I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so good a commander with so slight, so drunken, and so indiscreet an officer. Drunk? And speak parrot? And squabble? Swagger? Swear? And discourse fustian with one’s own shadow? O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil!

DUTCH:
Dronken zijn! Wezenloos oreren!
Herrie schoppen! Twisten! Vloeken! Onzin staan uit te
kramen tegen je schaduw! O jij onzichtbare wijngeest, als
jij geen naam hebt waaronder je bekend staat, laten wij je
dan duivel noemen!

MORE:

Cast=Dismissed
Mood=Anger
In policy=Public demonstration
Speak parrot=Nonsense
Fustian=Bombastic, high-sounding nonsense
Sue=Petition, entreat

Compleat:
To cast off=Afwerpen, verwerpen, achterlaaten
To cast his adversary at the bar=Zyn party in rechte verwinnen
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben
Fustian (or bombast)-Gezwets, snorkery
Fustian language=Grootspreeking, opsnyery

Topics: punishment, judgment, excess, anger

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