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PLAY: Romeo and Juliet ACT/SCENE: 3.1 SPEAKER: Mercutio CONTEXT: I am hurt.
A plague o’ both your houses! I am sped.
Is he gone and hath nothing? DUTCH: De pest haal’ beide uw huizen!
MORE: Sped=done for, finished
Compleat:
Those things are sped=Deeze dingen geschieden, worden uitgevaardigd
REFERENCED IN E&W LAW: Horn & Anor v Phillips & Anor [2003] EWCA Civ 1877 (18 December 2003)
“LORD JUSTICE BROOKE: You are suggesting we should simply say a plague on both your houses: bear your own costs of the hearing below.
MR INFIELD: If I can borrow from Shakespeare, yes, my Lord.” Topics: still in use, insult

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
ROMEO
Oh, thou wilt speak again of banishment.
FRIAR LAWRENCE
I’ll give thee armor to keep off that word—
Adversity’s sweet milk, philosophy—
To comfort thee though thou art banishèd.
ROMEO
Yet “banishèd”? Hang up philosophy!
Unless philosophy can make a Juliet,
Displant a town, reverse a prince’s doom,
It helps not, it prevails not. Talk no more.

DUTCH:
k Geef u een harnas, waar dat woord op afstuit,
De zoetste melk in ‘t leed: philosophie,
Die u, al zijt gij balling, troosten zal.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Displant=transplant, transpose

Topics: punishment

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
O blessèd, blessèd night! I am afeard,
Being in night, all this is but a dream,
Too flattering sweet to be substantial.

DUTCH:
Stikdonk’re nacht, nu ik uw licht ontbeer!
Liefde ijlt tot liefde, als knapen van het leeren,
Maar draalt bij ‘t gaan, zooals zij schoolwaarts keeren.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “substantial”: Shaughnessy, Register of Wills v Linguistic Society of America, 198 Md. 446, 84 A.2d 68 (1951)

Topics: cited in law

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
FRIAR LAWRENCE
Hence from Verona art thou banishèd.
Be patient, for the world is broad and wide.
ROMEO
There is no world without Verona walls
But purgatory, torture, hell itself.
Hence “banishèd” is banished from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Then “banishèd,”
Is death mistermed. Calling death “banishment,”
Thou cutt’st my head off with a golden ax
And smilest upon the stroke that murders me.

DUTCH:
Wees geduldig want de wereld is groot en wijd /
Wees kalm, de wereld toch is ruim en wijd.

MORE:

Topics: patience, proverbs and idioms, punishment

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
Bondage is hoarse, and may not speak aloud,
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine,
With repetition of “My Romeo!”

DUTCH:
Afhankelijkheid is hees en mag niet hardop spreken. /
Afhanklijkheid is heesch en moet wel fluistren

MORE:
Schmidt:
Bondage= want of freedom, captivity(see also bondman: serf, slave)
Compleat:
Bondage=Slaaverny, dienstbaarheyd

Topics: free will, independence

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
I fear too early, for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night’s revels, and expire the term
Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
But he that hath the steerage of my course,
Direct my sail. On, lusty gentlemen.

DUTCH:
Maar Hij, die op mijn vaart de roerpen houdt,
Richt’ mij mijn zeil!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Mind misgives=To have a presentiment of evil
Vile=Having a bad effect or influence, evil
Forfeit=The loss or penalty incurred by a trespass or breach of condition. Loss of life, death: “expire the term of (…)”
Compleat:
A vile mercenary soul=Een laage haatzuchtige ziel
A vile commodity=Een slegte waar
Forfeit (or default)=Defout.
Forfeit (fine or penalty)=Boete
To forfeit=Verbeuren

Topics: plans/intentions, fate/destiny, life, adversity

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!

DUTCH:
Maar zacht, welk licht breekt door het raam daarginds? /
Maar stil! wat licht breekt door het venster ginds?

MORE:
But soft=Quiet, silence

Topics: misc.

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
Care keeps his watch in every old man’s eye,
And where care lodges, sleep will never lie.
But where unbruisèd youth with unstuffed brain
Doth couch his limbs, there golden sleep doth reign.

DUTCH:
In ‘s grijsaards oog houdt steeds de zorg de wacht,
Dan wijkt de slaap, die nooit bij zorg vernacht

MORE:
Care=worry
Watch=Vigilance, attention, close observation

Topics: age/experience, caution, concern

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Capulet
CONTEXT:
For you and I are past our dancing days.
How long is ’t now since last yourself and I
Were in a mask?

DUTCH:
Voor u en mij is ‘t dansen wel voorbij; —
Hoe lang zou ‘t zijn, dat gij en ik voor ‘t laatst
Een masker droegen?

MORE:

Topics: age/experience, life, still in use

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.

DUTCH:
Wie nooit een wonde voelde, lacht om pijn

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
U.S. v. Pastor, 557 F.2d 930, 942 (2d Cir. 1977)(Van Graafeiland, J.)( dissenting).

Topics: cited in law, courage, value, respect

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.
Show me a mistress that is passing fair;
What doth her beauty serve but as a note
Where I may read who passed that passing fair?
Farewell. Thou canst not teach me to forget.

DUTCH:
De blindgeword’ne kan den dierb’ren schat
Van ‘t licht, dat hij moet derven, nooit vergeten.

MORE:
Onions:
Passing=Exceedingly
Compleat:
A passing (or excellent) beauty=Een voortreffelyke schoonheid

Topics: memory, value, appearance, nature

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
BENVOLIO
Why, what is Tybalt?
MERCUTIO
More than Prince of Cats. Oh, he’s the courageous captain of compliments. He fights as you sing prick-song, keeps time, distance, and proportion. He rests his minim rests—one, two, and the third in your bosom. The very butcher of a silk button, a duelist, a duelist, a gentleman of the very first house of the first and second cause. Ah, the immortal passado, the punto reverso, the hai!

DUTCH:
Meer dan de vorst van het kattengeslacht, dat kan ik u
verzekeren; hij is de moedige aanvoerder van alle fijne manieren.

MORE:
Prince of Cats = figure from Reynard the Fox, also called Tybalt
To compliment (or complement) = to observe formal ceremonies or courtesy. Hence captain of compliments = one who observes protocol.
Butcher of a silk button=precise, never misses the mark.

Topics: custom, civility, flattery, clarity/precision

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
How art thou out of breath when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
The excuse that thou dost make in this delay
Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.
Is thy news good, or bad? Answer to that.
Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.
Let me be satisfied. Is ’t good or bad?

DUTCH:
Gij buiten adem? en gij hebt toch adem,
Dat gij me uw buiten-adem-zijn vertelt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Stay=Wait for
Circumstance=Particulars, detail
Compleat:
Stay (to tarry or sejourn)=Verblyven
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omsandigheden verhaalen.

Topics: time, good and bad, reason, reply, truth

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Capulet
CONTEXT:

How, how, how, how? Chopped logic! What is this?
“Proud,” and “I thank you,” and “I thank you not,”
And yet “not proud”? Mistress minion you,
Thank me no thankings, nor proud me no prouds,

DUTCH:
Zie, wat spitsvondig nest! wat praat is dit?

MORE:
Contranym. Either (1) to argue skilfully with sophisticated reasoning or (2) to advance an illogical argument, usually overcomplicated.
Onions:
Chop-logic: contentious sophistical arguer. (Q1 “chop logicke,” but the rest “chopt logic,” which would naturally mean ‘sophistical or contentious argument’).

Topics: reason, justification, plans/intentions

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
BENVOLIO
Romeo, away, be gone!
The citizens are up, and Tybalt slain.
Stand not amazed. The Prince will doom thee death
If thou art taken. Hence, be gone, away!
ROMEO
Oh, I am fortune’s fool!

DUTCH:
k Ben speelbal der Fortuin!

MORE:
Prince=Prince of Cats = figure from Reynard the Fox, also called Tybalt

Topics: fate/destiny, punishment

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
I do remember an apothecary—
And hereabouts he dwells—which late I noted
In tattered weeds, with overwhelming brows,
Culling of simples. Meager were his looks,
Sharp misery had worn him to the bones,
And in his needy shop a tortoise hung,
An alligator stuffed, and other skins
Of ill-shaped fishes

DUTCH:
k Herinner mij: er woont hier in de buurt
Een apotheker; onlangs zag ik hem
In haveloos gewaad; met somb’ren blik
Verlas hij kruiden; de oogen stonden hol;
‘t Gebrek had hem doorknaagd tot op ‘t gebeent’

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “animal”: Jett v Municipal Court for the San Diego Judicial District of San Diego County, 177 Cal. App. 3d 664, 670, 223 Cal. Rptr. 111 (1986). (Court concludes that taught us is an “animal” for purpose of statute.)
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “apothecary”: Carroll Perfumers, Inc. v State, 212 Ind. 455, 7 N.E.2d 970, 972 (1937)

Topics: cited in law

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat
The vaulty heaven so high above our heads.
I have more care to stay than will to go.
Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.—
How is ’t, my soul? Let’s talk. It is not day.

DUTCH:
O zalig blijven! bitter is ‘t vaarwel;

MORE:

Topics: death, plans/intentions, free will

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
I pray you, sir, what saucy merchant was this that was so full of his ropery?
ROMEO
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

DUTCH:
Nu, ook vaarwel. — Heer, zeg mij toch, wat is dat
voor een raren snuiter, met al die vrijmoedighedens?

MORE:
Schmidt:
saucy=impudent, insolent
merchant=fellow
ropery=roguery (Schmidt) =trickery, knavery (Onions)
Stand to=side with, assist, support, maintain, guard, be firm in the cause of
Compleat:
Roguery=Schelmery, fieltery
To stand to one’s word=By zyn woord staan, zijn woord gestand doen

Topics: language, civility

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
BENVOLIO
We talk here in the public haunt of men.
Either withdraw unto some private place,
And reason coldly of your grievances,
Or else depart. Here all eyes gaze on us.
MERCUTIO
Men’s eyes were made to look and let them gaze.
I will not budge for no man’s pleasure, I.

DUTCH:
Ik wijk van hier om niemands wil een haar.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Haunt = a “place much frequented”
Coldly = coolly, rationally
Shakespeare is said to have popularised use of the verb ‘to budge’, usually in a negative context to mean intransigence, refusal to change position. (See also Sly in Taming of the Shrew “I’ll not budge an inch”.)
Double negatives were common in Old English and weren’t a problem for Shakespeare (or Chaucer and other writers of the time). In fact, they weren’t condemned until the 18th century when grammarians declared that double negatives cancel each other out or amounted to an affirmative.

Topics: dispute, reason, civility

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
By love, that first did prompt me to inquire.
He lent me counsel and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot. Yet, wert thou as far
As that vast shore washed with the farthest sea,
I would adventure for such merchandise.

DUTCH:
Ik ben geen zeeman, maar, waart ge ook zoo ver
Als de oever, door de verste zee bespoeld,
Ik waagde toch de vaart voor zulk gewin.

MORE:
Adventure=Hazard, chance, risk; hazardous and striking enterprise

Topics: love, courage, risk

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Prince
CONTEXT:
I have an interest in your hate’s proceeding.
My blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding.
But I’ll amerce you with so strong a fine
That you shall all repent the loss of mine.
I will be deaf to pleading and excuses.
Nor tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses,
Therefore use none.

DUTCH:
Maar zulk een boete valle u thans te beurt,
Dat ge allen dit verlies van mij betreurt.

MORE:
Amerce = To punish, penalise
Abuses= offences, transgressions
CITED IN US LAW: Browning-Ferries Industries of Vermont, Inc. v Kelco Disposal, Inc. 492 US 257, 290, 109 Supreme Court 2909, 2928, 106 L.Ed.2d 1073 (1978) (Brennan, J) (dissenting). Cited by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, who, first noting that Shakespeare was ‘an astute observer of English law and politics’, then pointed to his interchangeable use of ‘fine’ and ‘amercement’ to make the point that money and punishment are synonymous. (This elicited the response from Justice Blackmun in his own verse that “Though Shakespeare, of course, knew the law of his time, He was foremost a poet In search of a rhyme”.)

Topics: cited in law, money, punishment

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
Pray you, sir, a word. And as I told you, my young lady bid me inquire you out. What she bade me say, I will keep to myself. But first let me tell ye, if ye should lead her into a fool’s paradise, as they say, it were a very gross kind of behavior, as they say. For the gentlewoman is young, and therefore, if you should deal double with her, truly it were an ill thing to be offered to any gentlewoman, and very weak dealing.

DUTCH:
(A)ls gij haar om den tuin wilt leiden, om zoo te zeggen, dat
het een heel leelijke manier van doen zou wezen, om zoo te zeggen,

MORE:
To live in a fool’s paradise: Idiom=in a state of happiness based on a delusion. (Phrase already in use in 1400s before it became popular after inclusion in R&J)

Topics: invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use, deceit, manipulation

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
I have no joy of this contract tonight.
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden,
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say “It lightens.” Sweet, good night.

DUTCH:
k begroet u blij, maar niet
Dat wiss’len van geloften in deez’ nacht;
Dat is te snel, te plotsling, te onberaden

MORE:

Topics: relationship, caution, haste

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Prince
CONTEXT:
But I’ll amerce you with so strong a fine
That you shall all repent the loss of mine.
I will be deaf to pleading and excuses.
Nor tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses,
Therefore use none. Let Romeo hence in haste,
Else, when he’s found, that hour is his last.
Bear hence this body and attend our will.
Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill.

DUTCH:
Genâ voor moord’naars is zoo goed als moord.

MORE:
Amerce = To punish, penalised
Purchase out=redeem
Abuses= offences, transgressions
But = only. Showing mercy (by pardoning murderers) will only lead to more killing.
Compleat:
Redeem=Verlossen, vrykoopen, lossen
Redeemed=Verlost, vrygekogt, gelost

Topics: mercy, pity, punishment

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
Nay, if our wits run the wild-goose chase, I am done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of thy wits than, I am sure, I have in my whole five. Was I with you there for the goose?

DUTCH:
Neen, als wij onze geestigheden als wilde ganzen tegen
elkaar op laten snateren, dan ben ik verloren; want gij
hebt in uw pink meer van een wilde gans dan ik in mijn
geheele lichaam, dat is zeker

MORE:
Wild goose chase originally meant a horse race that was popular in Shakespeare’s time. It’s modern meaning was probably coined by Dr Samuel Johnson, who defined it as a pursuit of something as unlikely to be caught as a wild goose. Current definition is a hopeless search.
Five wits = Another reference to the five inward wits which were originally memory, estimation, fancy, imagination and common sense.

Topics: intellect, dispute, equality, still/talent

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
O deadly sin! O rude unthankfulness!
Thy fault our law calls death, but the kind Prince,
Taking thy part, hath rushed aside the law,
And turned that black word “death” to “banishment.”
This is dear mercy, and thou seest it not.

DUTCH:
O zware zonde, o, zwarte ondankbaarheid!

MORE:
Schmidt:
To rush=vb. to move with suddenness and eager impetuosity
Metaphorically: “the prince hath –ed aside the law,”
Compleat:
To rush in=Invallen, instuiven, met een vaart inloopen, inrennen

Topics: ingratitude, law/legaloffence, mercy, punishment

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
O fortune, fortune! All men call thee fickle.
If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him
That is renowned for faith? Be fickle, fortune,
For then, I hope, thou wilt not keep him long,
But send him back.

DUTCH:
Fortuin, fortuin! een ieder noemt u wuft!
En zijt gij wuft, wat doet ge dan met hem,
Die zich getrouw betoont? Wees wuft, Fortuin

MORE:
Compleat:
Fickle=Wispeltuurig, veranderlyk, wuft, ongestadig

Topics: fate/destiny, loyalty

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight.
Let’s see for means. O mischief, thou art swift
To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!

DUTCH:
Euveldaad! Hoe snel neemt gij de ziel van radelozen in!/
Euveldaad! hoe snel
Neemt gij de ziel van radeloozen in!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Mischief=evil done on purpose, harm, injury
Desperate=despaired of, irremediable, not to be saved
Compleat:
Mischief=onheil, dwaad, ongeluk, ramp, verderf, heilloosheid
Desperate (who is in despair)=Wanhopig
To be in a desperate condition=In een vertwyfelden staat zyn

Topics: good and bad, temptation

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father refuse thy name, thou art thyself thou not a montegue, what is montegue? tis nor hand nor foot nor any other part belonging to a man
What is in a name?
That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet,
So Romeo would were he not Romeo called retain such dear perfection to which he owes without that title,
Romeo, Doth thy name!
And for that name which is no part of thee, take all thyself.

DUTCH:
O Romeo, Romeo! Waarom zijt gij Romeo?

MORE:
Wherefore = why, not where as might be a modern interpretation
Compleat:
Wherefore (or why)=Waarom
Wherefore did you do it?=Waarom deed gy het?
Wherefore (or therefore)=Daarom

Topics: relationship, love

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical!
Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despisèd substance of divinest show,
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st.
A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!

DUTCH:
O slangenhart, bij bloemzoet aangezicht!

MORE:
Divine=excellent in the highest degree, heavenly. Superl. –st “divinest show”
Show=appearance, aspect
Compleat:
Divine=Godlyk, voortreffelyk
Show (Shew)=Een vertooning
To make a fine shew=Een fraai figuur maaken, ‘er wel uitzien.

Topics: deceit, appearance

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
O Swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable

DUTCH:
O zweer niet bij de maan; ze is ongestadig,
En eeuwig wisselt ze in haar schijf;

MORE:

Topics: promise, uncertainty

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
JULIET
(…) I would have thee gone.
And yet no further than a wanton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from his hand
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silken thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.
ROMEO
I would I were thy bird
JULIET
Sweet, so would I.
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

DUTCH:
Vaarwel, vaarwel! ‘t Verdriet van ‘t afscheid is zo zoet, dat ik ‘t vaarwel herhaal tot d’ochtend ons begroet

MORE:
A wanton=someone spoiled or pampered
Gyves=fetters
Parting is such sweet sorrow is still quoted and embedded in everyday language

Topics: still in use, poverty and wealth

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
Oh my, time goes by slowly when you’re sad. Was that my father who left here in such a hurry?

DUTCH:
Ach, tijd valt lang door zorgen.

MORE:
The idiom today would say the oppposite: ‘Time flies when you’re enjoying yourself”.

Topics: time, emotion and mood, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Capulet
CONTEXT:
Therefore be patient. Take no note of him.
It is my will, the which if thou respect,
Show a fair presence and put off these frowns,
An ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.

DUTCH:
Wees vriendlijk; neen! toon op ‘t gelaat geen wrevel,
Want dat is iets, wat op een feest niet past.

MORE:
Ill-beseeming=unseemly, unbecoming
Semblance=show, outward appearance
Compleat:
To beseem=betaamen, voegen
Unbecoming=onbetaamelyk, niet voegend
Unbecomingness=Onbetaamelykheid, wanvoegelykheid

Topics: appearance, emotion and mood, civility

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
MERCUTIO
I mean, sir, in delay.
We waste our lights in vain, like lights by day.
Take our good meaning, for our judgment sits
Five times in that ere once in our five wits.

DUTCH:
Kom mee, wij meenen ‘t goed, stel dit op prijs,
Veel meer dan onzen geest, dan doet gij wijs.

MORE:

Topics: intellect, judgment

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
I must indeed, and therefore came I hither.
Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man.
Fly hence and leave me. Think upon these gone.
Let them affright thee. I beseech thee, youth,
Put not another sin upon my head
By urging me to fury. O, be gone!

DUTCH:
Breng een wanhopig mens niet in verzoeking/
Tart, edel jong’ling, niet een raad’loos man

MORE:
Schmidt:
Affright=frighten, scare
Desperate=despaired of, irremediable, not to be saved
Compleat:
Affright=Veschrikken, vervaard maaken
Affrighted=Vervaard, verschrikt, bang

Topics: temptation

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Gregory
CONTEXT:
GREGORY
That shows thee a weak slave, for the weakest goes to the wall.
SAMPSON
‘Tis true, and therefore women, being the weaker vessels, are ever thrust to the wall. Therefore I will push Montague’s men from the wall, and thrust his maids to the wall.

DUTCH:
Dat doet je alweer als een zwakken bloed kennen; want de
zwakste houdt zich aan alles vast.

MORE:
Vessel = person
To go to the wall=be pushed aside, succumb in conflict or struggle
Current use=A business that fails, goes bankrupt.
Even in Shakespeare’s time, the phrases were often confused. In the first scene of Romeo and Juliet, two characters engage in wordplay over meanings of the phrase “goes to the wall.” Gregory’s explanation is that being close to the wall is a sign of weakness as they were allowed to walk ‘inside’ to avoid being splashed or jostled. Sampson later describes how women “being the weaker vessels”) are thrust to the wall. The phrase, which dates back to around 1500, may also have its origins from the installation of seating in churches in the Middle Ages.
To give the wall means to allow someone else to walk on the safer side (i.e. the walled side of the street)
Compleat:
The wall (a place of honour in walking the streets)=De muur, de zyde der huizen, zynde in Engeland de hooger hand, als men langs de straat gaat
To give one the wall=Iemand aan de hoogerhand zetten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, status, order/society

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
The pox of such antic, lisping, affecting fantasticoes, these new tuners of accents! “By Jesu, a very good blade! A very tall man! A very good whore!” Why, is not this a lamentable thing, grandsire, that we should be thus afflicted with these strange flies, these fashion-mongers, these “pardon me’s,” who stand so much on the new form, that they cannot sit at ease on the old bench? Oh, their bones, their bones!

DUTCH:
Och, naar de maan met al die bespottelijke, lispelende,
gemaakte windbuilen, die nieuwe bauwers van brabbelwoorden!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Affecting=Using affectations
Fantasticoes (sometimes fantasmines)=Fantastic, coxcomical persons (fopppish, conceited)
Blade=Fencer; used as an emblem of youth
Fashion-monger=one who affects gentility (fashion-monging)
Tune=tune of the time (see Hamlet 5.2)
A pardon-me=One who is always excusing himself
Compleat:
Blade=Een Jonker, wittebroods kind
A fine blade=Een fraai Jongeling
To blade it=Den Jonker speelen
Pardon me=Vergeef het my
To pardon=Vergeeven, quytschelden
A pardon-monger=Die Aflaaten verkoopt

Topics: civility, appearance, custom, language

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness,
And fear’st to die? Famine is in thy cheeks.
Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes.
Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back.
The world is not thy friend nor the world’s law.
The world affords no law to make thee rich.
Then be not poor, but break it, and take this.

DUTCH:
De wereld noch haar wetten zijn uw vriend;
De wereld heeft geen wet, die u verrijkt;
Wees dan niet arm, neem dit, en breek de wet.

MORE:
CITED IN EU LAW: Blanco Perez & Chao Gomez (Freedom of establishment) [2009] EUECJ C-570/07_O (30 September 2009) Opinion of A-G Poiares Madura delivered on 30 September 2009 (1) Joined Cases C-570/07 and C-571/07 José Manuel Blanco Pérez and María del Pilar Chao Gómez

Topics: law/legal, poverty and wealth, cited in law

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,
Doing more murder in this loathsome world,
Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
I sell thee poison. Thou hast sold me none.
Farewell. Buy food, and get thyself in flesh.—
Come, cordial and not poison, go with me
To Juliet’s grave, for there must I use thee

DUTCH:
Hier is uw goud, een erger zielsvergif
Een boozer moorddrank in deez’ booze wereld,
Dan ‘t brouwsel, dat gij niet verkoopen moogt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Compound=composition, mixture
Compleat:
No reference to compound as a noun.
To compound with one’s creditors=Met zyn Schuld-eischers overeenkomen, accordeeren

Topics: poverty and wealth, money, good and bad

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder
Which, as they kiss, consume.

DUTCH:
Een vreugd, zoo heftig, neemt een heftig eind;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Violent=vehement in a moral sense; fierce; passionate
Compleat:
Violent=Geweldig, heftig, vinnig, krachtig, gewelddaadig
You are a little too violent (too hasty or too passionate)=Gy zyt wat al te oploopend

Topics: caution, haste

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
Conceit, more rich in matter than in words,
Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
They are but beggars that can count their worth.
But my true love is grown to such excess
I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.

DUTCH:
t Gevoel is rijk in schatten, niet in woorden;
‘t Is trotsch op wat het is, maar mint geen praal;
Wie weet, hoeveel hij waard is, is een beed’laar;

MORE:
Conceit=imagination
Compleat:
To conceit=Zich verbeelden, achten
A pretty conceit=een aardige verbeelding

Topics: poverty and wealth, life, value, imagination, love

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
For even the day before, she broke her brow.
And then my husband—God be with his soul!
He was a merry man—took up the child.
“Yea,” quoth he, “Dost thou fall upon thy face?
Thou wilt fall backward when thou hast more wit,
Wilt thou not, Jule?” and, by my holy dame,
The pretty wretch left crying and said “ay.”
To see now, how a jest shall come about!

DUTCH:
Gij valt wel achterover, als gij wijs wordt

MORE:

Topics: insult, intellect, emotion and mood

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
Thou wilt quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes;–what eye but such an eye would spy out such a quarrel?

DUTCH:
Gij krijgt met iemand twist, als hij een kastanje schilt, alleen omdat gij kastanje-bruine oogen hebt.

MORE:
Shakespeare is said to have been the first to use hazel as a description of eye colour. It was considered then to be a reddish brown.

Topics: dispute, conflict, appearance

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Second Servingman
CONTEXT:
Marry, sir, ’tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers. Therefore he that cannot lick his fingers goes not with me.

DUTCH:
Het is een slechte kok, die zijn eigen vingers niet kan aflikken

MORE:

Topics: misc.

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

DUTCH:
Te snel komt even laat aan als te traag./
Te haastig en te traag komt even laat./
Te haastig komt even laat aan als te langzaam.

MORE:
Moderately = in moderation
‘All things in moderation’.
Compleat:
Wine is a good liquor but it must be used moderately=Wyn is een goede drank, maar by moet matigheid gebruikt worden.

Topics: still in use, time, proverbs and idioms, haste

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
For naught so vile that on the earth doth live
But to the earth some special good doth give.
Nor aught so good but, strained from that fair use
Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.
Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied,
And vice sometime by action dignified.

DUTCH:
Niets zoo gering van wat op aarde leeft,
Dat niet aan de aarde iets goeds, iets nuttigs geeft;
En niets zoo goed, dat, in verkeerde hand,
Zijn oorsprong niet, door ‘t misbruik, maakt te schand;
In ondeugd wordt door misbruik deugd verkeerd,
Door waardig handlen ondeugd soms geëerd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Vile=base, bad, abject
Onions:
True birth=nature. (Revolts from=Rebels against nature)

Topics: nature, good and bad, virtue, abuse

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? Oh, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace!

DUTCH:
Wie gaf een boek van zulk een snooden inhoud
Ooit zulk een schoonen band?

MORE:

Topics: deceit, appearance

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
What, lamb! What, ladybird! God forbid! Where’s this girl? What, Juliet!

DUTCH:
Zeg, mijn lam, mijn poetje;–
Bewaar!–Waar zit ze toch?–Hé, Julia!

MORE:
Shakespeare first used ladybird (Our Lady’s Bird = Dutch “(onze) lieveheersbeestje”, interestingly “Our Lord’s small animal/bug) as an endearment

Topics: misc.

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name which is no part of thee
Take all myself.

DUTCH:
Wat zegt een naam? Dat wat wij een roos noemen, zou met elke andere naam even heerlijk ruiken /
Wat is een naam? Het ding, dat roos nu heet,
Geurde, als ‘t een andren naam had

MORE:
Often misquoted as: “A rose by any other name smells just as sweet.”
CITED IN E&W LAW: Chiron Corporation v Evans Medical Ltd & Ors [1997] EWHC 359 (Patent) (03 November 1997)/[1997] EWHC 359 (Patent)
‘Shakespeare wrote, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet.” The same approach applies in patent law. The question must always be “what is in” the name or terminology used by the inventor. What does it convey? ‘
CITED IN US LAW:
According to William Domnarski (Shakespeare in the Law, 1993) the most frequently cited passage in US law (65 times at that time). Some examples:
Definition of ‘vessel’: Digiovanni v Traylor Brothers, Inc., 959 F.2d 1119 (1st Cir. 1992) (Torruella, J);
Trade name dispute: Perini Corporation v Perini Construction, Inc. 915 F.2d 121 (4th Cir. 1990) (Manahan, J);
Union National Bank of Texas, Laredo, Texas v Union National Bank of Texas, Austin, Texas, 909 F.2d 839 (5th Cir. 1990) (Goldberg, J);
Mislabelling a direct appeal: Bray v Director, Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs, 664 F.2d 1045, 1047 n.3 (5th Cir. 1981 ( Henderson, J);
Causes of action: Royal v. Leading Edge Products, Inc., 833 F.2d 1,5 (1st Cir. 1987) (Selya, J);
Use of the words “so-called business crimes”: United States v. Davis, 702 F.2d418, 420 (2d Cir. 1983);
and many other subjects including reputation; de jure merger; termination/suspension; dollar reduction/percentage reduction; business activities; concept of limited liability; elements of felony; court; name of University; trustee/receiver; meanings of words; levels of murder; customer/shareholder; etc.
REFERENCED by UKFTT (TAX): Corte Dilitto Ltd v Revenue & Customs (VAT – ZERO-RATING : Food, etc) [2020] UKFTT 75 (TC) (06 February 2020)
‘The products were originally called “truffles” and are now called “healthy balls”. With apologies to Shakespeare we observe that “a truffle by any other name would taste as sweet”, and the products do taste sweet, even if not very sweet.’

Topics: cited in law, value

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: First Servingman
CONTEXT:
FIRST SERVINGMAN
When good manners shall lie all in one or two men’s hands, and they unwashed too, ’tis a foul thing.
PETER
Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard, look to the plate. Good thou, save me a piece of marchpane, and, as thou loves me, let the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.—Antony and Potpan!

DUTCH:
Als het voor de netheid aankomt op een paar menschenhanden,
en die zijn bovendien ongewasschen, dan ziet het er treurig uit.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Court-cupboard (cubbert, cubbord)=movable display closet or buffet
Marchpane=marzipan. Do they
Compleat:
Joint-stool=Een zitbankje, schabelletje

Topics: civility, appearance, custom

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
A man, young lady! Lady, such a man
As all the world. Why, he’s a man of wax.

DUTCH:
Dat is een man, mejonkvrouw, dat ‘s een man ,
Er is ter wereld, — o, een man van was!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Man of wax: as pretty as if he had been modelled in wax

Topics: appearance, respect, integrity

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
ROMEO
Oh, let us hence. I stand on sudden haste.
FRIAR LAWRENCE
Wisely and slow. They stumble that run fast.

DUTCH:
Al zacht, mijn zoon! wie voortholt, struikelt licht.

MORE:
Still in use
Compleat:
Haste=Haast, spoed
He made too much hast=Hy maakte al te groot een haast
The more haste the worse speed=Hoe meerder haast hoe minder spoed

Topics: patience, caution, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, wisdom, haste, still in use

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
If e’er thou wast thyself and these woes thine,
Thou and these woes were all for Rosaline.
And art thou changed? Pronounce this sentence then:
Women may fall when there’s no strength in men.

DUTCH:
Een vrouw zij zwak, want krachtloos is de man.

MORE:
Woes = Calamity, grief
Strength = moral or intellectual force

Topics: respect, loyalty, strength

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