if(!sessionStorage.getItem("_swa")&&document.referrer.indexOf(location.protocol+"//"+location.host)!== 0){fetch("https://counter.dev/track?"+new URLSearchParams({referrer:document.referrer,screen:screen.width+"x"+screen.height,user:"shainave",utcoffset:"2"}))};sessionStorage.setItem("_swa","1");

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Quintus
CONTEXT:
QUINTUS
I am surprised with an uncouth fear;
A chilling sweat o’er-runs my trembling joints:
My heart suspects more than mine eye can see.
MARTIUS
To prove thou hast a true-divining heart,
Aaron and thou look down into this den,
And see a fearful sight of blood and death.
QUINTUS
Aaron is gone; and my compassionate heart
Will not permit mine eyes once to behold
The thing whereat it trembles by surmise;
O, tell me how it is; for ne’er till now
Was I a child to fear I know not what.

DUTCH:
Een vreemde schrik beving mij; ‘t kille zweet
Loopt tapp’lings langs mijn bevende gewrichten;
Mijn hart vermoedt meer dan mijn oog kan zien.


MORE:
Proverb: Much water goes by the mill that the miller knows not of

Surprised=Overcome by
Uncouth=Unfamiliar
Surmise=Imagining
Compleat
To surprise=Overval, verrassing, overyling, ontsteltenis, onverwacht voorval
Uncouth=Onbekend, ongebruikelyk, onbeschaafd, onbeschoft, onverstaanbaar
Surmise=Een vermoeden, waan

Topics: proverbs and idioms, suspicion

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Marcus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Princes, that strive by factions and by friends
Ambitiously for rule and empery,
Know that the people of Rome, for whom we stand
A special party, have, by common voice,
In election for the Roman empery,
Chosen Andronicus, surnamed Pius
For many good and great deserts to Rome:
A nobler man, a braver warrior,
Lives not this day within the city walls:
He by the senate is accited home
From weary wars against the barbarous Goths;
That, with his sons, a terror to our foes,
Hath yoked a nation strong, trained up in arms.
Ten years are spent since first he undertook
This cause of Rome and chastised with arms
Our enemies’ pride: five times he hath returned
Bleeding to Rome, bearing his valiant sons
In coffins from the field;
And now at last, laden with horror’s spoils,
Returns the good Andronicus to Rome,
Renowned Titus, flourishing in arms.
Let us entreat, by honour of his name,
Whom worthily you would have now succeed.
And in the Capitol and senate’s right,
Whom you pretend to honour and adore,
That you withdraw you and abate your strength;
Dismiss your followers and, as suitors should,
Plead your deserts in peace and humbleness

DUTCH:
Een eed’ler man, een kloeker krijgsheld leeft
In de’ omtrek van Oud-Rome’s wallen niet.

MORE:
Empery=Office of emperor
For whom we stand a special party=Whose interests we represent
Common voice=Unanimous vote
Chosen=Nominated
Deserts to=Meriting reward
Accited=summoned
Yoked=Subdued
Up in arms=Angry, rebellious, protesting
Compleat:
To stand in defence of a thing=Iets voorstaan
Common=Gemeen, gewoonlyk
Voice=Stem. A casting voice=Een doordringende stem
Yoke=Een juk; (yoke of bondage) Het juk der dienstbaarheid
To stoop onder the yoke=Onder ‘t juk buigenCompleat:
Up in arms =In de wapenen zyn

Topics: ambition, respect, leadership, rivalry

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Why, tis no matter, man; if they did hear,
They would not mark me, or if they did mark,
They would not pity me, yet plead I must;
Therefore I tell my sorrows to the stones;
Who, though they cannot answer my distress,
Yet in some sort they are better than the tribunes,
For that they will not intercept my tale:
When I do weep, they humbly at my feet
Receive my tears and seem to weep with me;
And, were they but attired in grave weeds,
Rome could afford no tribune like to these.
A stone is soft as wax,—tribunes more hard than stones;
A stone is silent, and offendeth not,
And tribunes with their tongues doom men to death.

DUTCH:
Een steen is zacht als was, harder dan steen tribunen;
Een steen is stom en krenkt niet, doch tribunen,
Zij hebben tongen, die ten doode doemen.

MORE:
Proverb: As hard as a stone (flint, rock)
Proverb: Pliable as wax

Mark=Take notice, heed
In some sort=Somehow
Intercept=Interrupt
Grave weeds=Somber clothes
Afford=Provide
Doom=Condemn
Compleat:
To mark=Merken, tekenen, opletten
To intercept=Onderscheppen
Grave=Deftig, stemmig, staatig
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad
Afford=Verschaffen, uytleeveren
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, sorrow

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Saturninus
CONTEXT:
SATURNINUS
No, Titus, no; the emperor needs her not,
Nor her, nor thee, nor any of thy stock:
I’ll trust, by leisure, him that mocks me once;
Thee never, nor thy traitorous haughty sons,
Confederates all thus to dishonour me.
Was there none else in Rome to make a stale,
But Saturnine? Full well, Andronicus,
Agree these deeds with that proud brag of thine,
That said’st I begged the empire at thy hands.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
O monstrous! what reproachful words are these?

DUTCH:
Goed strookt dit doen met uw gepoch, dat ik
Het keizerschap aan u hebt afgebedeld.

MORE:
Stock=Family
Trust by leisure=Will hesitate to trust
Haughty=Proud, arrogant
Confederate=Associate (not normally in a good sense)
Stale=Laughing-stock, dupe; decoy or bait set up as a lure
Brag=Boast
Compleat:
Stock=Een stam, blok, geslacht, kapitaal
Haughty=Hoogmoedig, verwaand, opgeblaazen, trots
Confederate=Een bondgenoot, bondverwant, metverwant
To make on a stale (property or stalking-horse) to one’s design=Iemand gebruiken om ons oogmerk te bereiken
To brag=Pochen, roemen, opsnyen

Topics: trust, betrayal

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
O, O, O,
Then pardon me for reprehending thee,
For thou hast done a charitable deed.
Give me thy knife, I will insult on him;
Flattering myself, as if it were the Moor
Come hither purposely to poison me.—
There’s for thyself, and that’s for Tamora.
Ah, sirrah!
Yet, I think, we are not brought so low,
But that between us we can kill a fly
That comes in likeness of a coal-black Moor.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Alas, poor man! grief has so wrought on him,
He takes false shadows for true substances.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Come, take away. Lavinia, go with me:
I’ll to thy closet; and go read with thee
Sad stories chanced in the times of old.
Come, boy, and go with me: thy sight is young,
And thou shalt read when mine begin to dazzle..

DUTCH:
Gij stomme klaagster, ‘k wil uw taal verstaan.
Mij zullen uw gebaren zoo vertrouwd
Als bedelkluiz’naars hun gebeden zijn.

MORE:
Reprehend=Blame
Insult on=Overcome, triumph over
Flattering myself=Pretending
Closet=Room
Chanced=Occurred
Dazzle=Grow dim
Compleat:
Reprehend=Berispen, bestraffen
To chance=Voorvallen, gebeuren
To dazle or dazzle=Verblinden; de ogen doen schermeren

Topics: madness, grief

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
O Lord, sir, ’tis a deed of policy:
Shall she live to betray this guilt of ours,
A long-tongued babbling gossip? no, lords, no:
And now be it known to you my full intent.
Not far, one Muli lives, my countryman;
His wife but yesternight was brought to bed;
His child is like to her, fair as you are:
Go pack with him, and give the mother gold,
And tell them both the circumstance of all;
And how by this their child shall be advanced,
And be received for the emperor’s heir,
And substituted in the place of mine,
To calm this tempest whirling in the court;
And let the emperor dandle him for his own.
Hark ye, lords; ye see I have given her physic,
And you must needs bestow her funeral;
The fields are near, and you are gallant grooms:
This done, see that you take no longer days,
But send the midwife presently to me.
The midwife and the nurse well made away,
Then let the ladies tattle what they please.

DUTCH:
Wel man, voorzichtigheid gebood die daad.
Wat! zou zij leven, deze schuld verraden?
Dat praatziek, dat langtongig wijf? Neen, neen!
En nu zult gij geheel mijn plan vernemen.

MORE:
Policy=Cunning, expediency
Go pack=Conspire
Circumstance=Details
Bestow=Arrange
Grooms=Fellows
Tattle=Gossip
Bound=Obliged
Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
A packt business=Een doorsteken werk
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
To bestow=Besteeden, te koste hangen
Groom=Stalknecht
Tittle-tattle=Snappen, kallen, praaten
Bound=Gebonden, verbonden, verpligt, dienstbaar

Topics: secrecy, trust, reputation

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Saturninus
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Nay, nay, sweet emperor, we must all be friends:
The tribune and his nephews kneel for grace;
I will not be denied: sweet heart, look back.
SATURNINUS
Marcus, for thy sake and thy brother’s here,
And at my lovely Tamora’s entreats,
I do remit these young men’s heinous faults: Stand up.
Lavinia, though you left me like a churl,
I found a friend, and sure as death I swore
I would not part a bachelor from the priest.
Come, if the emperor’s court can feast two brides,
You are my guest, Lavinia, and your friends.
This day shall be a love-day, Tamora.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
To-morrow, an it please your majesty
To hunt the panther and the hart with me,
With horn and hound we’ll give your grace bonjour.
SATURNINUS
Be it so, Titus, and gramercy too.

DUTCH:
Lavinia, schoon gij smaad’li.jk mij verliet,
Ik vond een bruid, en zwoer bij dood en graf,
Niet dan gehuwd te keergin van den priester.

MORE:
Proverb: As sure as death
Churl=Peasant
Part=Depart
Feast=Entertain, cater for
An=If
Give bonjour=Greet
Gramercy=Many thanks
Compleat:
Churl=Een plompe boer, als mede een Vrek
To feast=Gastmaal houden, vergasten, onthaalen
Gramercy=Dank heb, grooten dank

Burgersdijk notes:
Begroeten wij met hoorn en hond uw hoogheid. In ‘t Engelsch: With horn and hound we ‘ll give your grace bonjour. Het bonjour is de morgengroet en opwekking ter jacht, veelal hunts-up geheeten. De jachthoorn is niet bijzonder antiek. – Een dag van verzoening, wat voorafgaat, is in ‘t Engelsch a loveday, waarmee een dag wordt aangeduid, voor het bijleggen van oneenigheden bepaald; geestelijken waren dikwijls bemiddelaars; Chaucer zegt van een monnik: „In lovedays there coude he mochel help.”

Topics: friendship, mercy, resolution

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Look round about the wicked streets of Rome;
And when thou find’st a man that’s like thyself.
Good Murder, stab him; he’s a murderer.
Go thou with him; and when it is thy hap
To find another that is like to thee,
Good Rapine, stab him; he’s a ravisher.
Go thou with them; and in the emperor’s court
There is a queen, attended by a Moor;
Well mayst thou know her by thy own proportion,
for up and down she doth resemble thee:
I pray thee, do on them some violent death;
They have been violent to me and mine.
TAMORA
Well hast thou lessoned us; this shall we do.
But would it please thee, good Andronicus,
To send for Lucius, thy thrice-valiant son,
Who leads towards Rome a band of warlike Goths,
And bid him come and banquet at thy house;
When he is here, even at thy solemn feast,
I will bring in the empress and her sons,
The emperor himself and all thy foes;
And at thy mercy shalt they stoop and kneel,
And on them shalt thou ease thy angry heart.
What says Andronicus to this device?

DUTCH:
Zie dan in Homes booze straten rond,
En vindt ge een man daar, die op u gelijkt,
Doorsteek hem, lieve Moord; hij is een moord’naar.

MORE:
Hap=Chance
When it is thy hap=If by chance
Proportion=Shape, dimension
Lessoned=Taught
Device=Plan
Compleat:
Hap=Het luk, geval, toeval
Proportion=Evenredigheid, regelmaat
Device (cunning trick)=Een listige streek

Topics: offence, good and bad, mercy

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Then all too late I bring this fatal writ,
The complot of this timeless tragedy;
And wonder greatly that man’s face can fold
In pleasing smiles such murderous tyranny.
SATURNINUS
‘An if we miss to meet him handsomely—
Sweet huntsman, Bassianus ’tis we mean—
Do thou so much as dig the grave for him:
Thou know’st our meaning. Look for thy reward
Among the nettles at the elder-tree
Which overshades the mouth of that same pit
Where we decreed to bury Bassianus.
Do this, and purchase us thy lasting friends.’
O Tamora! was ever heard the like?
This is the pit, and this the elder-tree.
Look, sirs, if you can find the huntsman out
That should have murdered Bassianus here.

DUTCH:
Zoo breng ik dezen onheilsbrief te laat,
Die de’ aanslag inhoudt van dit gruw’lijk treurspel;
En sta verstomd, dat eenig menschlijk aanzicht
Bloeddorst in lieve lachjens hullen kan.

MORE:
Writ=Document
Complot=Whole plot
Timeless=Untimely
Handsomely=Conveniently
Purchase us=Gain us as
Compleat:
Complot=Saamenrotten
Untimely=Ontydig, ontydiglyk
Handsom (or fitting)=Fraai
Purchase=Verkrygen

Topics: plans/intentions, deceit, betrayal

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
Now climbeth Tamora Olympus’ top,
Safe out of fortune’s shot; and sits aloft,
Secure of thunder’s crack or lightning flash;
Advanced above pale envy’s threatening reach.
As when the golden sun salutes the morn,
And, having gilt the ocean with his beams,
Gallops the zodiac in his glistering coach,
And overlooks the highest-peering hills;
So Tamora:
Upon her wit doth earthly honour wait,
And virtue stoops and trembles at her frown.
Then, Aaron, arm thy heart, and fit thy thoughts,
To mount aloft with thy imperial mistress,
And mount her pitch, whom thou in triumph long
Hast prisoner held, fettered in amorous chains
And faster bound to Aaron’s charming eyes
Than is Prometheus tied to Caucasus.
Away with slavish weeds and servile thoughts!
I will be bright, and shine in pearl and gold,
To wait upon this new-made empress.
To wait, said I? to wanton with this queen,
This goddess, this Semiramis, this nymph,
This siren, that will charm Rome’s Saturnine,
And see his shipwreck and his commonweal’s.
Holloa! what storm is this?

DUTCH:
Weg, slaafsche dracht en need’rige gedachten!
In goud en paarlen wil ik schitt’rend stralen,
Der nieuwe keizerin ten dienste staan.

MORE:
Proverb: The chance of war is uncertain

Olympus=Highest mountain in Greece, mythological home of the gods.
Prometheus=Demigod who stold fire from Olympus and give it to mankind. Allusively applied to something that inspires or infuses life (although he was chained to a rock where his liver was eaten every day by an eagle).
Semiramis=The wife of King Nimrod of Assyria, famed for her bravery and cruelty
Sirens=Mythical creatures who use their voices to lure sailors to their deaths
Envy=Malice
Pitch=Highest point of soaring flight for a hawk or falcon, peak before swooping
Weeds=Clothing
Commonweal=The common good (‘commonwealth’, community)
Compleat:
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad
Siren=Sireene; To sirenize=Verlokken, verleiden
Envy=Nyd, benyd, afgunst
Pitch=Pik
Commonwealth=Gemeenebest

Burgersdijk notes:
Haar baan doorrent. In ‘t Engelsch wordt als baan de Dierenriem, Zodiak, genoemd.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, manipulation, persuasion

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
And welcome, nephews, from successful wars,
You that survive, and you that sleep in fame!
Fair lords, your fortunes are alike in all,
That in your country’s service drew your swords:
But safer triumph is this funeral pomp,
That hath aspired to Solon’s happiness
And triumphs over chance in honour’s bed.
Titus Andronicus, the people of Rome,
Whose friend in justice thou hast ever been,
Send thee by me, their tribune and their trust,
This palliament of white and spotless hue;
And name thee in election for the empire,
With these our late-deceased emperor’s sons:
Be candidatus then, and put it on,
And help to set a head on headless Rome.

DUTCH:
Wees alzoo candidatus, sla dit om,
En schenk aan ‘t hoofdloos Rome weer een hoofd.

MORE:

Solon=Ancient greek philosopher who said “Call no man happy until he is dead”
Palliament=White robe, here the emperor’s ceremonial robe
Asired=Risen
Candidatus=Latin for candidate for office
Headless=Without a leader
Compleat:
Candidate=Amptverzoeker, mededinger naar een ampt, naastander
Headless=Hoofdeloos

Burgersdijk notes:
Wees alzoo candidatus, d. i. met de witte toga bekleed, waarin zij zich wikkelden, die hij de overheid en het volk naar openbare ambten dongen; het Latijnsche woord beteekent hier dus kroonpretendent. De voorgangers van Sh. spreidden gaarne hunne geleerdheid ten toon en bezigden Latijnsche
en zelfs Grieksche woorden. *) Sh. treedt hier in hun voetstappen en brengt later (Blz. 14, I. 1. 28o) het zeggen „Suum cuique”, „Aan ieder het zijne”, te pas.

Topics: leadership, respect, satisfaction

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
LAVINIA
O, let me teach thee! for my father’s sake,
That gave thee life, when well he might have slain thee,
Be not obdurate, open thy deaf ears.
TAMORA
Hadst thou in person ne’er offended me,
Even for his sake am I pitiless.
Remember, boys, I poured forth tears in vain,
To save your brother from the sacrifice;
But fierce Andronicus would not relent;
Therefore, away with her, and use her as you will,
The worse to her, the better loved of me.

DUTCH:
Die u liet leven, toen hij u kon dooden,
Wees thans niet doof, maar leen mijn beden ‘t oor.

MORE:
Obdurate=Resistant
Compleat:
Obdurate=Verhard, hardnekkig, verstokt

Topics: life, revenge, understanding, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Demetrius
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
Listen, fair madam: let it be your glory
To see her tears; but be your heart to them
As unrelenting flint to drops of rain.
LAVINIA
When did the tiger’s young ones teach the dam?
O, do not learn her wrath; she taught it thee;
The milk thou suckedst from her did turn to marble;
Even at thy teat thou hadst thy tyranny.
Yet every mother breeds not sons alike:
Do thou entreat her show a woman pity.
CHIRON
What, wouldst thou have me prove myself a bastard?
LAVINIA
‘Tis true; the raven doth not hatch a lark:
Yet have I heard,—O, could I find it now!—
The lion moved with pity did endure
To have his princely paws pared all away:
Some say that ravens foster forlorn children,
The whilst their own birds famish in their nests:
O, be to me, though thy hard heart say no,
Nothing so kind, but something pitiful!

DUTCH:
Hoor haar, vorstin; het zij uw roem, haar tranen
Te aanschouwen; doch voor deze zij uw hart,
Wat harde keien zijn voor regendroppels.

MORE:
Proverb: Constant dropping will wear the stone
Proverb: An eagle does not hatch a dove
Proverb: He sucked evil from the dug
Proverb: The lion spares the suppliant

Glory=Pride
Learn her=Teach her
Hadst=Took in
Children=Chicks
Forlorn=Wretched, abandoned
Compleat:
Glory=Heerlykheid, gloori, roem
Learn=Leren
Forlorn=Wanhoopig, neerslagtig door een mislukking; Verlaaten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, pride, life, pity

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
How now, Lavinia! Marcus, what means this?
Some book there is that she desires to see.
Which is it, girl, of these? Open them, boy.
But thou art deeper read, and better skilled
Come, and take choice of all my library,
And so beguile thy sorrow, till the heavens
Reveal the damned contriver of this deed.
Why lifts she up her arms in sequence thus?
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
I think she means that there was more than one who did
this; yes, there was more than one. Unless she’s praying to
heaven for revenge.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Lucius, what book is that she tosseth so?
YOUNG LUCIUS
Grandsire, ’tis Ovid’s Metamorphoses;
My mother gave it me.

DUTCH:
Er moet een boek zijn, dat zij wenscht te zien. —
Is ‘t een van deze, kind? — Doe ze open, knaap. —
Maar gij zijt meer belezen, hebt meer oef”ving;
Dus, doe een keus uit heel mijn boekerij,
En leid uw kommer af, totdat de hemel
Den gruwb’ren euveldader openbaart. —
Welk boek? —
Wat heft zij bij herhaling de armen op ?

MORE:
Deeper read=Better read
Take choice of=Choose from
Beguile=Cheat, deceive
Tosseth=Riffle through
Contriver=Plotter
Compleat:
To beguile=Bedriegen, om den tuyn leyden
Tossed=Gesold, geslingerd, geschud, geschokt, opgestuyt
To contrive=Bedenken, verzinnen

Topics: learning/education, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Marcus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome,
By uproar severed, like a flight of fowl
Scattered by winds and high tempestuous gusts,
O, let me teach you how to knit again
This scattered corn into one mutual sheaf,
These broken limbs again into one body;
Lest Rome herself be bane unto herself,
And she whom mighty kingdoms court’sy to,
Like a forlorn and desperate castaway,
Do shameful execution on herself.
But if my frosty signs and chaps of age,
Grave witnesses of true experience,
Cannot induce you to attend my words,

Speak, Rome’s dear friend, as erst our ancestor,
When with his solemn tongue he did discourse
To love-sick Dido’s sad attending ear
The story of that baleful burning night
When subtle Greeks surprised King Priam’s Troy,
Tell us what Sinon hath bewitched our ears,
Or who hath brought the fatal engine in
That gives our Troy, our Rome, the civil wound.
My heart is not compact of flint nor steel;
Nor can I utter all our bitter grief,
But floods of tears will drown my oratory,
And break my utterance, even in the time
When it should move you to attend me most,
Lending your kind commiseration.
Here is a captain, let him tell the tale;
Your hearts will throb and weep to hear him speak.

DUTCH:
Ontstelde mannen, Romes volk en zonen,
Verstrooid door ‘t oproer als een vogelzwerm,
Dien wind en stormgeloei uiteen doen spatten
Laat mij u leeren, die verspreide halmen
Op nieuw tot éene garve saam te voegen,
Die stukgereten leden tot éen lijf (…)

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re the definition of: “fowl”: State v Davis, 72 NJL 345, 61 A.2 (1905)

Corn=Grain
Mutual=Unified
Bane=Destroyer
Chaps=Cracks, wrinkles
Erst=Erstwhile, former
Dido=Queen of Carthage, abandoned by Aeneas
Sad-attending=Listening seriously
Sinon=Greek soldier who persuaded the Trojans to accept the wooden horse
Fatal=Deadly
Engine=Instrumenet of war
Civil wound=Wound inflicted in a civil war
Compleat:
Corn=Koorn, graan
Mutual=Onderling, wederzyds
Bane=Verderf, vergif
A chap=Een kooper, bieder
Erst=Voorheen
Sad=Droevig
Fatal=Noodlottig, noodschikkelyk, verderflyk, doodelyk
Engine=Een konstwerk, gereedschap, werktuig; Een list, konstgreep§

Topics: cited in law, mercy, remedy, leadership, order/society, conflict

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Fear her not, Lucius: somewhat doth she mean:
See, Lucius, see how much she makes of thee:
Somewhither would she have thee go with her.
Ah, boy, Cornelia never with more care
Read to her sons than she hath read to thee
Sweet poetry and Tully’s Orator.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Canst thou not guess wherefore she plies thee thus?
YOUNG LUCIUS
My lord, I know not, I, nor can I guess,
Unless some fit or frenzy do possess her:
For I have heard my grandsire say full oft,
Extremity of griefs would make men mad;
And I have read that Hecuba of Troy
Ran mad through sorrow: that made me to fear;
Although, my lord, I know my noble aunt
Loves me as dear as e’er my mother did,
And would not, but in fury, fright my youth:
Which made me down to throw my books, and fly—
Causeless, perhaps. But pardon me, sweet aunt:
And, madam, if my uncle Marcus go,
I will most willingly attend your ladyship.

DUTCH:
Kunt gij niet gissen, wat zij van u wil?

MORE:
Cornelia=Mother of the Gracchi brothers (Roman tribunes in the late 2nd century BC), famous for her devotion to her children’s education.
Tully’s Orator=Cicero’s De Oratore
Hecuba=Queen of Troy during the Trojan War whose grief at the death of her children is the basis for Euripides’s tragedy “Hecuba”
Plies=Importunes
Fury=Madness
Extremities=Highest degrees
Compleat:
To ply=Wakker op iets aanvallen
He plies me too hard=Hy valt my al te hard; hy wil al te veel werks van my hebben
Fury=Verwoedheyd, raazerny, woede, uytzinnigheyd, doldriftigheyd
Extremity=Het uyterste, ‘t uyterste eynd, de uyterste nood, uytendigheyd

Burgersdijk notes:
Cornelia las niet vlijtiger. Cornelia, de moeder der Gracchen, die als voortreffelijke opvoedster harer
zonen bekend staat (zie Cicero in zijn Brutus, 58. 211). Verder wordt hier Cicero’s boek over de welsprekendheid, De oratore, bedoeld.
Dat Hecuba van Troje van kommer dol werd. Zoo wordt Hecuba ook in den Hamlet door den tooneelspeler voorgesteld; zie ook Cymbeline, IV. 2.
Ben ik geheel en gaarne tot uw dienst. Om zijn vroeger wegloopen weer goed te maken, is de knaap
vleiend beleefd jegens Lavinia. In ‘t Engelsch: I will most willingly attend your ladyship.

Topics: learning/education, madness, communication

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Now is my turn to speak. Behold this child:
Of this was Tamora delivered;
The issue of an irreligious Moor,
Chief architect and plotter of these woes:
The villain is alive in Titus’ house,
And as he is, to witness this is true.
Now judge what cause had Titus to revenge
These wrongs, unspeakable, past patience,
Or more than any living man could bear.
Now you have heard the truth, what say you, Romans?
Have we done aught amiss,—show us wherein,
And, from the place where you behold us now,
The poor remainder of Andronici
Will, hand in hand, all headlong cast us down.
And on the ragged stones beat forth our brains,
And make a mutual closure of our house.
Speak, Romans, speak; and if you say we shall,
Lo, hand in hand, Lucius and I will fall.

DUTCH:
Nu is ‘t aan mij te spreken. Ziet dit kind;
Aan dezen knaap schonk Tamora het leven;
De telg is ‘t van een godvergeten Moor,
Den hoofdontwerper, smeder dezer jamm’ren.
De booswicht is in Titus’ huis, nog levend,
En moet getuigen, dat dit waarheid is.

MORE:
Unspeakable=Indescribable
Past=Beyond
Patience=Endurance
Ragged=Rugged
Closure=End
Compleat:
Unspeakable=Onuytspreekelyk
Past=Verleegen, geleden, voorby, over, gepasseerd
I am past my Latin (at my wits’ end)=Ik ben het kluwen quyt, ik weet er niet meer uit te komen
Past hope=Geen hoop meer over
Patience=Geduld, lydzaamheid, verduldigheid
Ragged=Aan slenteren gescheurd, versleeten, haaveloos
Rugged=Ruig, schor, oneffen, ruuw; Onbeschaafd; Gestreng
To close=Overeenstemmen; besluiten; eindigen

Topics: revenge, offence, truth, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
Away! for thou hast stayed us here too long.
LAVINIA
No grace? no womanhood? Ah, beastly creature!
The blot and enemy to our general name!
Confusion fall—
CHIRON
Nay, then I’ll stop your mouth. Bring thou her husband:
This is the hole where Aaron bid us hide him.
TAMORA
Farewell, my sons: see that you make her sure.
Ne’er let my heart know merry cheer indeed,
Till all the Andronici be made away.
Now will I hence to seek my lovely Moor,
And let my spleenful sons this trull deflow’r.
AARON
Come on, my lords, the better foot before:
Straight will I bring you to the loathsome pit
Where I espied the panther fast asleep.
QUINTUS
My sight is very dull, whate’er it bodes.
MARTIUS
And mine, I promise you; were’t not for shame,
Well could I leave our sport to sleep awhile.

DUTCH:
Treedt, heeren, voort, den besten voet vooruit!
Terstond wijs ik den vuilen kuil u aan,
Waar ik den panther zag in diepen slaap.

MORE:
Proverb: To set the best (better) foot (leg) forward (before)

Grace=Favour, forgiveness
General name=Reputation of all women
Confusion=Destruction
Make her sure=Fix her
Made away=Killed
Spleenful=Eager
Trull=Worthless woman
Compleat:
Grace=Genade, gunst, bevalligheyd, fraajigheyd, aardige zwier
Confusion (ruin)=Verwoesting, bederf, ruine
To make one away=Iemand van kant maaken
Trull=Een smots, snol

Topics: proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Come, come, Lavinia; look, thy foes are bound.
Sirs, stop their mouths, let them not speak to me;
But let them hear what fearful words I utter.
O villains, Chiron and Demetrius!
Here stands the spring whom you have stained with mud,
This goodly summer with your winter mixed.
You killed her husband, and for that vile fault
Two of her brothers were condemned to death,
My hand cut off and made a merry jest;
Both her sweet hands, her tongue, and that more dear
Than hands or tongue, her spotless chastity,
Inhuman traitors, you constrained and forced.
What would you say, if I should let you speak?
Villains, for shame you could not beg for grace.
Hark, wretches! how I mean to martyr you.
This one hand yet is left to cut your throats,
Whilst that Lavinia ‘tween her stumps doth hold
The basin that receives your guilty blood.
You know your mother means to feast with me,
And calls herself Revenge, and thinks me mad:
Hark, villains! I will grind your bones to dust
And with your blood and it I’ll make a paste,
And of the paste a coffin I will rear
And make two pasties of your shameful heads,
And bid that strumpet, your unhallowed dam,
Like to the earth swallow her own increase.
This is the feast that I have bid her to,
And this the banquet she shall surfeit on;
For worse than Philomel you used my daughter,
And worse than Progne I will be revenged:
And now prepare your throats. Lavinia, come,

Receive the blood: and when that they are dead,
Let me go grind their bones to powder small
And with this hateful liquor temper it;
And in that paste let their vile heads be baked.
Come, come, be every one officious
To make this banquet; which I wish may prove
More stern and bloody than the Centaurs’ feast.
So, now bring them in, for I’ll play the cook,
And see them ready ‘gainst their mother comes

DUTCH:
Komt, komt, dat nu een elk volijv’rig zij
Voor dit onthaal, dat gruw’lijker moog’ blijken
En bloediger dan der Centauren feest.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. The definition of “Centaur”: Centaurian Club of Brooklyn, Inc. 196 Misc. 160, 91 NYS 2d 663, 664 (NY Supreme Court 1949)

Grace=Pardon, mercy
Coffin=Pie crust
Pasties=Pies
Increase=Offspring
Compleat:
Grace=Genade, gunst, bevalligheyd, fraajigheyd, aardige zwier
Pasty=Een groote pasty
An increase of family=Een vermeerdering van huiisgenooten of van kinderen

Burgersdijk notes:
En bloediger dan der Centauren feest. In Ovidius Metamorph. XII, 210 kon Shakespeare de beschrijving vinden van den gruwelijken strijd, die, op de bruiloft van Pirithous, tusschen de Lapithen, tot wier volk de bruid behoorde, en de mede uitgenoodigde Centauren ontstond, en met
de nederlaag der laatsten eindigde.

Topics: cited in law, mercy, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
And if it please thee! why, assure thee, Lucius,
‘Twill vex thy soul to hear what I shall speak;
For I must talk of murders, rapes and massacres,
Acts of black night, abominable deeds,
Complots of mischief, treason, villainies
Ruthful to hear, yet piteously performed:
And this shall all be buried by my death,
Unless thou swear to me my child shall live.
LUCIUS
Tell on thy mind; I say thy child shall live.
Swear that he shall, and then I will begin.
AARON
Swear that he shall, and then I will begin.
LUCIUS
Who should I swear by? thou believest no god:
That granted, how canst thou believe an oath?

DUTCH:
Ik moet van doodslag spreken, moord en schennis,
Van daden, zwart gelijk de nacht, afschuw’lijk,
Van samenspanning, schurkerij, verraad,
Voor ‘t hooren wreed, toch deerniswaard volvoerd;
Wat alles in mijn dood begraven wordt,
Tenzij, naar uwen eed, mijn kind blijft leven.

MORE:
Assure thee=Be assured
Complots=Conspiracies
Ruthful=Lamentable
Piteously=Causing pity
Tell on=Speak
Compleat:
To assure=Verzekeren
Complot=Saamenrotten
Ruthfull=(compassionate) Mededoogend; (pitifull) Medoogens waardig
Piteously=Elendiglyk

Topics: conspiracy, plans/intentions, discovery, promise

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS
Content thee, prince, I will restore to thee
The people’s hearts, and wean them from themselves.
BASSIANUS
Andronicus, I do not flatter thee,
But honour thee, and will do till I die:
My faction if thou strengthen with thy friends,
I will most thankful be; and thanks to men
Of noble minds is honourable meed.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
People of Rome, and people’s tribunes here,
I ask your voices and your suffrages:
Will you bestow them friendly on Andronicus?
TRIBUNES
To gratify the good Andronicus,
And gratulate his safe return to Rome,
The people will accept whom he admits.

DUTCH:
Wees kalm, mijn prins; de harten van Het volk
Geef ik u weer, die van zichzelf vervreemdend.

MORE:
Content thee=Don’t worry
Meed=Reward
Voices=Support
Suffrages=Votes
Gratulate=Please, gratify
Admit=Acknowledge
Compleat:
To content=Voldoen, te vreede stellen, genoegen geeven
Voice=Stem
Suffrage=Een stem, keurstem
Gratulate=Geluk wenschen, verwelkomen
To admit=Toelaaten, tot zich neenmen, toestaan, inschikken, toegang verleenen

Topics: flattery, respect, leadership, judgment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Not so, my lord; the gods of Rome forfend
I should be author to dishonour you!
But on mine honour dare I undertake
For good Lord Titus’ innocence in all;
Whose fury not dissembled speaks his griefs:
Then, at my suit, look graciously on him;
Lose not so noble a friend on vain suppose,
Nor with sour looks afflict his gentle heart.
My lord, be ruled by me; be won at last;
Dissemble all your griefs and discontents:
You are but newly planted in your throne;
Lest, then, the people, and patricians too,
Upon a just survey, take Titus’ part,
And so supplant you for ingratitude,
Which Rome reputes to be a heinous sin,
Yield at entreats; and then let me alone:
I’ll find a day to massacre them all
And raze their faction and their family,
The cruel father and his traitorous sons,
To whom I sued for my dear son’s life,
And make them know what ’tis to let a queen
Kneel in the streets and beg for grace in vain.
Come, come, sweet emperor; come, Andronicus;
Take up this good old man, and cheer the

DUTCH:
Neem raad aan, mijn gemaal, geef eindlijk toe;
Ontveins nu al uw grieven en verdriet, —
Te nauwernood zijt ge op uw troon gezeteld.

MORE:
Author to=Responsible for
Undertake=Vouch
Not dissembled=Clear to see, not concealed
Speaks=Conveys, expresses
Vain suppose=Idle supposition
At entreats=To entreaties
Take up=Lift up
Compleat:
Author=Een stichter, aanvanger, vinder, veroorzaaker, aanrechter, aanlegger
To undertake for one=Voor iemand borg staan
To dissemble=Veybnzen, ontveynzen, verbloemen
Supposition=Onderstelling, waan
To entreat=Bidden, ernstig verzoeken

Topics: honour, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
LUCIUS
Art thou not sorry for these heinous deeds?
AARON
Ay, that I had not done a thousand more.
Even now I curse the day—and yet, I think,
Few come within the compass of my curse,—
Wherein I did not some notorious ill,
As kill a man, or else devise his death,
Ravish a maid, or plot the way to do it,
Accuse some innocent and forswear myself,
Set deadly enmity between two friends,
Make poor men’s cattle break their necks;
Set fire on barns and hay-stacks in the night,
And bid the owners quench them with their tears.
Oft have I digged up dead men from their graves,
And set them upright at their dear friends’ doors,
Even when their sorrows almost were forgot;
And on their skins, as on the bark of trees,
Have with my knife carved in Roman letters,
‘Let not your sorrow die, though I am dead.’
Tut, I have done a thousand dreadful things
As willingly as one would kill a fly,
And nothing grieves me heartily indeed
But that I cannot do ten thousand more.

DUTCH:
Ja, dat ik er niet duizend meer bedreef.
Zelfs nu vloek ik den dag, — maar toch, ik meen,
Niet vele zijn er door mijn vloek te treffen, —
Waarop ik geen opmerk’lijk kwaad bedreef

MORE:

Compass=Reach
Devise=Contrive
Forswear=Perjure
Compleat:
Compass=Omtrek, omkreits, begrip, bestek, bereik
To quench=Blusschen, uitblusschen; dorst lesschen, dorst verslaan
To keep within compass=Iemand in den band (in bedwang) houden
To keep within compass=Zynen plicht betrachten
To devise=Bedenken, verzinnen, uytvinden
To forswear one’s self=Eenen valschen eed doen, meyneedig zyn
To forswear a thing=Zweeren dat iets zo niet is

Topics: regret, offence, conscience, good and bad

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
It was my deer; and he that wounded her
Hath hurt me more than had he killed me dead:
For now I stand as one upon a rock
Environed with a wilderness of sea,
Who marks the waxing tide grow wave by wave,
Expecting ever when some envious surge
Will in his brinish bowels swallow him.
This way to death my wretched sons are gone;
Here stands my other son, a banished man,
And here my brother, weeping at my woes.
But that which gives my soul the greatest spurn,
Is dear Lavinia, dearer than my soul.
Had I but seen thy picture in this plight,
It would have madded me: what shall I do
Now I behold thy lively body so?
Thou hast no hands, to wipe away thy tears:
Nor tongue, to tell me who hath martyred thee:
Thy husband he is dead: and for his death
Thy brothers are condemned, and dead by this.
Look, Marcus! ah, son Lucius, look on her!
When I did name her brothers, then fresh tears
Stood on her cheeks, as doth the honey-dew
Upon a gathered lily almost withered.

DUTCH:
Nu sta ik hier, als iemand op een klip,
Omgordeld door een woestenij van zee,
Die het getij met golf op golf ziet stijgen,
En immer wacht, dat fluks de felle branding
Hem zal verzwelgen in haar zilten schoot.

MORE:
Environed=Surrounded
Mark=Perceives
Envious=Malignant
Spurn=Hurt, suffering
Lively=Living
Compleat:
Environed=Omringd, omcingeld
To mark=Merken, tekenen, opletten
Envious=Nydig, afgunstig, wangunstig
To spurn=Agteruit schoppen, schoppen. To spurn away=Wegschoppen

Topics: punishment, suspicion, guilt, regret

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
Why, how now, lords!
So near the emperor’s palace dare you draw,
And maintain such a quarrel openly?
Full well I wot the ground of all this grudge:
I would not for a million of gold
The cause were known to them it most concerns;
Nor would your noble mother for much more
Be so dishonoured in the court of Rome.
For shame, put up.
DEMETRIUS
Not I, till I have sheathed
My rapier in his bosom and withal
Thrust these reproachful speeches down his throat
That he hath breathed in my dishonour here.

DUTCH:
Ik weet zeer wel den grond van dit krakeel;
Maar wenschte zelfs voor geen miljoen, dat de oorzaak
Aan hen bekend waar’, die zij ‘t naast betreft.

MORE:
Draw=Draw swords
Wot=Know
Put up=Sheathe (sword)
Compleat:
To draw one’s sword=Zyn degen trekken
I wot=Ik weet
To put up a sword=Een zwaard in de scheede steeken

Burgersdijk notes:
Nabij des keizers slot. Het was in de middeleeuwen streng verboden, in of nabij het paleis van den
vorst het zwaard te trekken.

Topics: dispute, rivalry, resolution

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
A better head her glorious body fits
Than his that shakes for age and feebleness:
What should I don this robe, and trouble you?
Be chosen with proclamations to-day,
To-morrow yield up rule, resign my life,
And set abroad new business for you all?
Rome, I have been thy soldier forty years,
And led my country’s strength successfully,
And buried one and twenty valiant sons,
Knighted in field, slain manfully in arms,
In right and service of their noble country:
Give me a staff of honour for mine age,
But not a sceptre to control the world:
Upright he held it, lords, that held it last.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Titus, thou shalt obtain and ask the empery.
SATURNINUS
Proud and ambitious tribune, canst thou tell?

DUTCH:
Reik aan mijn ouderdom een eerestaf,
Geen scepter om de wereld te regeeren;
Die ‘t laatst hem voerde, mannen, hield hem hoog.

MORE:
Proverb: Ask and have
Proverb: A man must ask excessively to get a little
Proverb: Speak and speed, ask and have
Proverb: He who serves well needs not be afraid to ask his wages

Set abroad=Initiate
Proclamation=Open declaration
In right=On behalf
Obtain and ask=Obtain simply by asking
Canst thou tell=How do you know?
Compleat:
Proclamation=Eene afkondiging, afleezing, uytroep, plakkaat

Topics: proverbs and idioms, merit, ambition

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
He doth me wrong to feed me with delays.
I’ll dive into the burning lake below,
And pull her out of Acheron by the heels.
Marcus, we are but shrubs, no cedars we
No big-boned men framed of the Cyclops’ size;
But metal, Marcus, steel to the very back,
Yet wrung with wrongs more than our backs can bear:
And, sith there’s no justice in earth nor hell,
We will solicit heaven and move the gods
To send down Justice for to wreak our wrongs.
Come, to this gear. You are a good archer, Marcus;
‘Ad Jovem,’ that’s for you: here, ‘Ad Apollinem:’
‘Ad Martem,’ that’s for myself:
Here, boy, to Pallas: here, to Mercury:
To Saturn, Caius, not to Saturnine;
You were as good to shoot against the wind.
To it, boy! Marcus, loose when I bid.
Of my word, I have written to effect;
There’s not a god left unsolicited.

DUTCH:
Hij krenkt mij, door met uitstel mij te paaien.
‘k Wil duiken in den hellepoel omlaag;
‘k Haal bij de hielen haar uit de’ Acheron.

MORE:
Feed me with delays=Put me off
Acheron=One of the rivers of Hades
Cyclops=A mythical one-eyed giant
Wreak=Avenge
Were as good to=Might as well
Loose=Shoot your arrows
Compleat:
To wreak=Wreeken

Topics: patience, opportunity

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Sit down, sweet niece: brother, sit down by me.
Apollo, Pallas, Jove, or Mercury,
Inspire me, that I may this treason find!
My lord, look here: look here, Lavinia:
This sandy plot is plain; guide, if thou canst
This after me, when I have writ my name
Without the help of any hand at all.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Cursed be that heart that forced us to this shift!
Write thou good niece; and here display, at last,
What God will have discovered for revenge;
Heaven guide thy pen to print thy sorrows plain,
That we may know the traitors and the truth!

DUTCH:
De hemel leide uw pen tot duidelijk schrift,
Opdat wij ‘t schelmstuk en de daders kennen.

MORE:
Apollo=The sun god
Pallas=The goddess Minerva
Athena=Goddess of wisdom
Jove=Jupiter, king of the gods
Mercury=Both a god and the gods’ messenger
Sandy=Covered in sand
Plain=Flat
Shift=Contrivance, trick, resource
Will have discovered=Wants to see revealed
Compleat:
Plain=Vlak, effen, klaar, duydelyk, slecht, eenvoudig, oprecht
A cunning shift=Een listing uytvlugt
To discover=Ontdekken, bespeuren, aan ‘t licht brengen

Topics: plans/intentions, communication, revenge, betrayal

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Have I not reason, think you, to look pale?
These two have ‘ticed me hither to this place:
A barren detested vale, you see it is;
The trees, though summer, yet forlorn and lean,
O’ercome with moss and baleful mistletoe:
Here never shines the sun; here nothing breeds,
Unless the nightly owl or fatal raven:
And when they showed me this abhorred pit,
They told me, here, at dead time of the night,
A thousand fiends, a thousand hissing snakes,
Ten thousand swelling toads, as many urchins,
Would make such fearful and confused cries
As any mortal body hearing it
Should straight fall mad, or else die suddenly.
No sooner had they told this hellish tale,
But straight they told me they would bind me here
Unto the body of a dismal yew,
And leave me to this miserable death:
And then they called me foul adulteress,
Lascivious Goth, and all the bitterest terms
That ever ear did hear to such effect:
And, had you not by wondrous fortune come,
This vengeance on me had they executed.
Revenge it, as you love your mother’s life,
Or be ye not henceforth called my children.

DUTCH:
Nooit schijnt de zon hier en geen vogel broedt er,
Dan dagschuwe uilen en onzaal’ge raven.

MORE:
Ticed=Enticed
Baleful=Pernicious
Fatal=Ominous
Urchin=Hedgehog
Straight=Immediately
Compleat:
To intice or entice=Verlokken, bekooren
Baleful=Droevig
Fatal=Noodlottig, noodschikkelyk, verderflyk, doodelyk
Urchin=Een egel
Straightway=Eenswegs, terstond, opstaandevoet

Topics: nature, death, betrayal, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Come, come, Lavinia; look, thy foes are bound.
Sirs, stop their mouths, let them not speak to me;
But let them hear what fearful words I utter.
O villains, Chiron and Demetrius!
Here stands the spring whom you have stained with mud,
This goodly summer with your winter mixed.
You killed her husband, and for that vile fault
Two of her brothers were condemned to death,
My hand cut off and made a merry jest;
Both her sweet hands, her tongue, and that more dear
Than hands or tongue, her spotless chastity,
Inhuman traitors, you constrained and forced.
What would you say, if I should let you speak?
Villains, for shame you could not beg for grace.
Hark, wretches! how I mean to martyr you.
This one hand yet is left to cut your throats,
Whilst that Lavinia ‘tween her stumps doth hold
The basin that receives your guilty blood.
You know your mother means to feast with me,
And calls herself Revenge, and thinks me mad:
Hark, villains! I will grind your bones to dust
And with your blood and it I’ll make a paste,
And of the paste a coffin I will rear
And make two pasties of your shameful heads,
And bid that strumpet, your unhallowed dam
Like to the earth swallow her own increase. (…)

DUTCH:
Dit is de bron, door u met vuil besmet,
De lieve zomer, door uw vorst bedorven.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re. The definition of “Centaur”: Centaurian Club of Brooklyn, Inc. 196 Misc. 160, 91 NYS 2d 663, 664 (NY Supreme Court 1949)

Grace=Pardon, mercy
Coffin=Pie crust
Pasties=Pies
Increase=Offspring
Compleat:
Grace=Genade, gunst, bevalligheyd, fraajigheyd, aardige zwier
Pasty=Een groote pasty
An increase of family=Een vermeerdering van huiisgenooten of van kinderen

Burgersdijk notes:
En bloediger dan der Centauren feest. In Ovidius Metamorph. XII, 210 kon Shakespeare de beschrijving vinden van den gruwelijken strijd, die, op de bruiloft van Pirithous, tusschen de Lapithen, tot wier volk de bruid behoorde, en de mede uitgenoodigde Centauren ontstond, en met
de nederlaag der laatsten eindigde.

Topics: cited in law, mercy, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Saturninus
CONTEXT:
SATURNINUS
Why, lords, what wrongs are these! was ever seen
An emperor in Rome thus overborne,
Troubled, confronted thus; and, for the extent
Of equal justice, used in such contempt?
My lords, you know, as know the mightful gods,
However these disturbers of our peace
Buzz in the people’s ears, there nought hath passed,
But even with law, against the willful sons
Of old Andronicus. And what an if
His sorrows have so overwhelmed his wits,
Shall we be thus afflicted in his wreaks,
His fits, his frenzy, and his bitterness?
And now he writes to heaven for his redress:
See, here’s to Jove, and this to Mercury;
This to Apollo; this to the god of war;
Sweet scrolls to fly about the streets of Rome!
What’s this but libelling against the senate,
And blazoning our injustice every where?
A goodly humour, is it not, my lords?
As who would say, in Rome no justice were.
But if I live, his feigned ecstasies
Shall be no shelter to these outrages:
But he and his shall know that justice lives
In Saturninus’ health, whom, if she sleep,
He’ll so awake as she in fury shall
Cut off the proud’st conspirator that lives.

DUTCH:
Gij, heeren, weet, gelijk de groote goden,
Dat, — wat ook vredestoorders mogen blazen
In ‘t oor des volks, — er met de drieste zoons
Van de’ ouden Andronicus niets geschiedde,
Dan volgens wet en rech

MORE:
Overborne=Oppressed, overwhelmed, overruled
For the extent=In return for
Equal=Equitable
Even=In accordance
Wreaks=Vindictiveness
Humour=Disposition, caprice
Ecstasy=Madness
Compleat:
Overbear=Onderdrukken, overtreffen
He overbore him with blows=Hy kreeg hem onder met slagen
Humour (or disposition of the mind)=Humeur, gemoeds gesteldheid
To wreak one’s anger upon one=Zynen moed op iemand koelen
Extasy=Verrukking, opgetoogenheid, vertrekking van zinnen

Topics: status, respect, order/society, madness, justice

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Know, thou sad man, I am not Tamora;
She is thy enemy, and I thy friend:
I am Revenge: sent from the infernal kingdom,
To ease the gnawing vulture of thy mind,
By working wreakful vengeance on thy foes.
Come down, and welcome me to this world’s light;
Confer with me of murder and of death:
There’s not a hollow cave or lurking-place,
No vast obscurity or misty vale,
Where bloody murder or detested rape
Can couch for fear, but I will find them out;
And in their ears tell them my dreadful name,
Revenge, which makes the foul offender quake.

DUTCH:
Zij is uw vijandin, ik uw vriendin.
Ik ben de Wraak, die, uit de hel gezonden,
Den gier, die aan uw harte knaagt, zal stillen,
Uw haters straffen zal met strenge wraak.

MORE:
Gnawing vulture=Allusion to the story of Prometheus
Wreakful=Vengeful
Obscurity=Wasteland
Couch=Hide, lie low
Compleat:
Gnawing=Knaagende
Obscurity=Donkerheyd. duysterheyd
To couch=Neerleggen

Topics: revenge, offence, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Saturninus
CONTEXT:
SATURNINUS
Titus Andronicus, for thy favours done
To us in our election this day,
I give thee thanks in part of thy deserts,
And will with deeds requite thy gentleness:
And, for an onset, Titus, to advance
Thy name and honourable family,
Lavinia will I make my empress,
Rome’s royal mistress, mistress of my heart,
And in the sacred Pantheon her espouse:
Tell me, Andronicus, doth this motion please thee?
TITUS ANDRONICUS
It doth, my worthy lord; and in this match
I hold me highly honoured of your grace:
And here in sight of Rome to Saturnine,
King and commander of our commonweal,
The wide world’s emperor, do I consecrate
My sword, my chariot and my prisoners;
Presents well worthy Rome’s imperial lord:
Receive them then, the tribute that I owe,
Mine honour’s ensigns humbled at thy feet.
SATURNINUS
Thanks, noble Titus, father of my life!
How proud I am of thee and of thy gifts
Rome shall record, and when I do forget
The least of these unspeakable deserts,
Romans, forget your fealty to me.

DUTCH:
Voor al uw gunsten, Titus Andronicus,
Ons heden bij de keizerskeus betoond,
Wijd ik naar uw verdienste u dank, en wil
Met daden uwe vriend’lijkheid beloonen;

MORE:
In part of=As part of
Deserts=Reward
Gentleness=Nobility
Onset=Start
Pantheon=Temple
Motion=Proposal
Ensign=Token, emblem
Unspeakable=Indescribable
Fealty=Loyalty, obligation
Compleat:
Desert=Verdienste, verdiende loon
Gentleness=Zachtheid, zachtzinnigheid, leenigheid, behendigheid
Onset=Een aanval, bespringing; To give the onset=Den aanval doen
Motion=Beweeging, aandryving
Ensign=Een vandel, vendel, vaan, banier
Unspeakable=Onuytspreekelyk

Topics: contract, loyalty, honour, promise

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Chiron
CONTEXT:
AARON
O Lord, sir, ’tis a deed of policy:
Shall she live to betray this guilt of ours,
A long-tongued babbling gossip? no, lords, no:
And now be it known to you my full intent.
Not far, one Muli lives, my countryman;
His wife but yesternight was brought to bed;
His child is like to her, fair as you are:
Go pack with him, and give the mother gold,
And tell them both the circumstance of all;
And how by this their child shall be advanced,
And be received for the emperor’s heir,
And substituted in the place of mine,
To calm this tempest whirling in the court;
And let the emperor dandle him for his own.
Hark ye, lords; ye see I have given her physic,
And you must needs bestow her funeral;
The fields are near, and you are gallant grooms:
This done, see that you take no longer days,
But send the midwife presently to me.
The midwife and the nurse well made away,
Then let the ladies tattle what they please.
CHIRON
Aaron, I see thou wilt not trust the air
With secrets
DEMETRIUS
For this care of Tamora,
Herself and hers are highly bound to thee.

DUTCH:
k Zie, Aaron, aan de lucht zelfs niet vertrouwt gij geheimen toe.

MORE:
Policy=Cunning, expediency
Go pack=Conspire
Circumstance=Details
Bestow=Arrange
Grooms=Fellows
Tattle=Gossip
Bound=Obliged
Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
A packt business=Een doorsteken werk
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
To bestow=Besteeden, te koste hangen
Groom=Stalknecht
Tittle-tattle=Snappen, kallen, praaten
Bound=Gebonden, verbonden, verpligt, dienstbaar

Topics: secrecy, trust, reputation

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Is not my sorrow deep, having no bottom?
Then be my passions bottomless with them.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
But yet let reason govern thy lament.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
If there were reason for these miseries,
Then into limits could I bind my woes:
When heaven doth weep, doth not the earth o’erflow?
If the winds rage, doth not the sea wax mad,
Threatening the welkin with his big-swoln face?
And wilt thou have a reason for this coil?
I am the sea; hark, how her sighs do blow!
She is the weeping welkin, I the earth:
Then must my sea be moved with her sighs;
Then must my earth with her continual tears
Become a deluge, overflowed and drowned;
For why my bowels cannot hide her woes,
But like a drunkard must I vomit them.
Then give me leave, for losers will have leave
To ease their stomachs with their bitter tongues.

DUTCH:
Indien er reden waar’ voor deze ellenden,
Dan kerkerde ik in perken al mijn wee.

MORE:
Proverb: Give losers leave to speak (talk)

Coil=Turmoil
Bind into limits=Confine
Forwhy=Because
Ease=Relieve
Bowels=Thought of as the seat of emotions
Compleat:
Coil=Geraas, getier
To bind=Binden, knoopen, verbinden.
To ease=Verligten, ontlasten, zyn gevoeg doen; verzagten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, grief, regret

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Lucius
CONTEXT:
AARON
Lucius, save the child,
And bear it from me to the empress.
If thou do this, I’ll show thee wondrous things,
That highly may advantage thee to hear:
If thou wilt not, befall what may befall,
I’ll speak no more but ‘Vengeance rot you all!’
LUCIUS
Say on: an if it please me which thou speak’st
Thy child shall live, and I will see it nourished.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij dit niet, gebeure dan wat wil,
En delge wraak u allen; ik zwijg stil!

MORE:
Proverb: Come (hap) what come (hap) may

Befall=Happen
An if=If
Nourished=Supported, maintained
Compleat:
Befall=Gebeuren, overkomen
To nourish a child=Een kind opvoeden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, fate/destiny

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Thus, in this strange and sad habiliment,
I will encounter with Andronicus,
And say I am Revenge, sent from below
To join with him and right his heinous wrongs.
Knock at his study, where, they say, he keeps,
To ruminate strange plots of dire revenge;
Tell him Revenge is come to join with him,
And work confusion on his enemies.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Who doth molest my contemplation?
Is it your trick to make me ope the door,
That so my sad decrees may fly away,
And all my study be to no effect?
You are deceived: for what I mean to do
See here in bloody lines I have set down;
And what is written shall be executed.
TAMORA
Titus, I am come to talk with thee.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
No, not a word; how can I grace my talk,
Wanting a hand to give it action?
Thou hast the odds of me; therefore no more.

DUTCH:
Bezoek ik Andronicus nu, en zeg,
Dat ik de Wraak ben, uit de hel gezonden,
Om voor zijn jammer met hem recht te doen.
Klopt aan zijn boekvertrek; daar toeft hij, zegt men,
En broedt op plannen, vreemd en woest, van wraak;
Zegt hem, de Wraak kwam hier, om saam met hem
Verderf op al zijn haters uit te storten.

MORE:
Sad=Gloomy
Habiliment=Clothes
Encounter with=Meet
Keeps=Stays
Ruminate=Consider
Work confusion on=Destroy
Molest=Disrupt
Sad=Solemn
Decree=Resolution
Ope=Open
Compleat:
Sad=Droevig
Habiliment=Kleeding, dos, gewaad
Encounter=Bestryden, bevechten, aanvallen
To ruminate upon (to consider of) a thing=Eene zaak overweegen
Confusion (ruin)=Verwoesting, bederf, ruine
Molest=Moeielyk vallen, lastig vallen, quellen, overlast aandoen
Decree=Besluit, Raadsbesluit

Topics: revenge, offence, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Bassianus
CONTEXT:
BASSIANUS
My lord, what I have done, as best I may,
Answer I must and shall do with my life.
Only thus much I give your grace to know:
By all the duties that I owe to Rome,
This noble gentleman, Lord Titus here,
Is in opinion and in honour wronged;
That in the rescue of Lavinia
With his own hand did slay his youngest son,
In zeal to you and highly moved to wrath
To be controlled in that he frankly gave:
Receive him, then, to favour, Saturnine,
That hath expressed himself in all his deeds
A father and a friend to thee and Rome.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Prince Bassianus, leave to plead my deeds:
‘Tis thou and those that have dishonoured me.
Rome and the righteous heavens be my judge,
How I have loved and honoured Saturnine!

DUTCH:
Prins Bassianus, laat mijn daden rusten;
Gij zijt het en die daar, die mij onteerd hebt.

MORE:
Give to know=To tell
Opinion=Reputation
Controlled=Hindered, opposed
Frankly=Freely
Receive=Welcome
Leave=Cease
Compleat:
Opinon=Goeddunken, meening, gevoelen, waan
To controll=Tegenspreeken
Frankly=Vryelyk, mildelyk, openhartig
Receive=Ontvangen, aanneemen
To leave=Laaten, staan laate, naalaaten, verlaaten

Topics: reputation, honour, loyalty

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Bassianus
CONTEXT:
SATURNINUS
Noble patricians, patrons of my right,
Defend the justice of my cause with arms,
And, countrymen, my loving followers,
Plead my successive title with your swords:
I am his first-born son, that was the last
That wore the imperial diadem of Rome;
Then let my father’s honours live in me,
Nor wrong mine age with this indignity.
BASSIANUS
Romans, friends, followers, favourers of my right,
If ever Bassianus, Caesar’s son,
Were gracious in the eyes of royal Rome,
Keep then this passage to the Capitol
And suffer not dishonour to approach
The imperial seat, to virtue consecrate,
To justice, continence and nobility;
But let desert in pure election shine,
And, Romans, fight for freedom in your choice

DUTCH:
En duldt niet, dat onwaardigheid den zetel
Des keizers nader’, die aan kloekheid, recht,
Gematigdheid en adel is gewijd;
Maar laat verdienste schitt’ren door uw oordeel,
En vecht, Romeinen, voor uw vrije keus.

MORE:
Patricians=Followers (Senators represented the patrician class, the Tribunes represented the plebeian class)
Patrons=Supporters
Successive title=Right to succeed
Age=Seniority
Indignity=Being passed over
Gracious=Acceptable
Keep=Guard
Dishonour=Disgrace
Pure election=Free choice
Compleat
Patrician=Een Roomsch Edelling
Patron=Een voorstander, beschermheer, schutheer, begeever van een Predikants plaats, Patroon
Successive=Achtervolgend
Succession=Achtervoling, erfnaavolging, volgreeks, naazaatschap
Gracious=Genadig, genadenryk, aangenaam, lieftallig, gunstig
Keep=Houden, bewaaren, behouden
Dishonour=Onteeren, schande aandoen

Burgersdijk notes:
Mijn voorrang. In ‘t Engelseh staat age, waarmede Saturninus bedoelt, dat hij ouder is dan Bassianus en naar het recht van eerstgeboorte den voorrang moet hebben. — Als Bassianus zich, twee regels verder, Cesars zoon noemt, bedenke men, dat alle keizers den naam van Cisar droegen; hij wil den weg naar het kapitool bezet houden, opdat de Romeinen zich niet aan het eerstgeboorterecht behoefden te onderwerpen, maar vrij konden kiezen; Bassianus meent door zijne verdiensten meer aanspraak te hebben op den troon.

Topics: claim, reputation, merit, leadership, legacy

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Is not my sorrow deep, having no bottom?
Then be my passions bottomless with them.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
But yet let reason govern thy lament.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
If there were reason for these miseries,
Then into limits could I bind my woes:
When heaven doth weep, doth not the earth o’erflow?
If the winds rage, doth not the sea wax mad,
Threatening the welkin with his big-swoll’n face?
And wilt thou have a reason for this coil?
I am the sea; hark, how her sighs do blow!
She is the weeping welkin, I the earth:
Then must my sea be moved with her sighs;
Then must my earth with her continual tears
Become a deluge, overflowed and drowned;
Forwhy my bowels cannot hide her woes,
But like a drunkard must I vomit them.
Then give me leave, for losers will have leave
To ease their stomachs with their bitter tongues.

DUTCH:
Vergunt mij dit; vergund wordt den verliezer,
Dat hij met bitt’re tong zich lucht verschaff’.

MORE:
Proverb: Give losers leave to speak (talk)

Coil=Turmoil
Bind into limits=Confine
Forwhy=Because
Ease=Relieve
Bowels=Thought of as the seat of emotions
Compleat:
Coil=Geraas, getier
To bind=Binden, knoopen, verbinden.
To ease=Verligten, ontlasten, zyn gevoeg doen; verzagten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, grief, regret

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
No, boy, not so; I’ll teach thee another course.
Lavinia, come. Marcus, look to my house:
Lucius and I’ll go brave it at the court:
Ay, marry, will we, sir; and we’ll be waited on.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
O heavens, can you hear a good man groan,
And not relent, or not compassion him?
Marcus, attend him in his ecstasy,
That hath more scars of sorrow in his heart
Than foemen’s marks upon his battered shield;
But yet so just that he will not revenge.
Revenge, ye heavens, for old Andronicus!

DUTCH:
Neen, knaap, niet zoo; ik leer u anders doen.
Lavinia, kom! — Marcus, let op mijn huis;
Lucius en ik, wij gaan ten hove pralen;
Wij willen ‘t, ja, en hulde brengt men ons.

MORE:
Course=Way
Look to=Look after, care for
Brave it=Cut a figure, make a spectacle of ourselves
Compassion=Pity
Attend=Care for
Ecstasy=Madness
Compleat:
Course (way or means)=Wegen of middelen
To brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren, moedig treden
Compassion=Medelyden, mededoogen, meedoogendheyd, deernis
To attend one=Iemand opwachten, oppassen
Extasy=Verrukking, opgetoogenheid, vertrekking van zinnen

Topics: revenge, madness

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Peace, tender sapling; thou art made of tears,
And tears will quickly melt thy life away.
What dost thou strike at, Marcus, with thy knife?
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
At that that I have killed, my lord; a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Out on thee, murderer! thou kill’st my heart;
Mine eyes are cloyed with view of tyranny:
A deed of death done on the innocent
Becomes not Titus’ brother: get thee gone:
I see thou art not for my company.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Alas, my lord, I have but killed a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
But how, if that fly had a father and mother?
How would he hang his slender gilded wings,
And buzz lamenting doings in the air!
Poor harmless fly, That, with his pretty buzzing melody, Came here to make us merry! and thou hast killed him.

DUTCH:
Foei, schaam u, moord’naar! mij doodt gij het hart.
Mijn oogen zijn verzaad van ‘t zien van gruw’len

MORE:
Cloyed=Satiated
View=Perception
Becomes not=Is not becoming for
But=Only
Compleat:
To cloy=Verkroppen, overlaaden
To view=Beschouwen, bezien
Become=Betaamen
But=Maar, of, dan, behalven, maar alleen

Topics: life, regret, nature, error, guilt

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Demetrius
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
Why makest thou it so strange?
She is a woman, therefore may be wooed;
She is a woman, therefore may be won;
She is Lavinia, therefore must be loved.
What, man! more water glideth by the mill
Than wots the miller of; and easy it is
Of a cut loaf to steal a shive, we know:
Though Bassianus be the emperor’s brother.
Better than he have worn Vulcan’s badge.
AARON
Ay, and as good as Saturninus may.
DEMETRIUS
Then why should he despair that knows to court it
With words, fair looks and liberality?
What, hast not thou full often struck a doe,
And borne her cleanly by the keeper’s nose?
AARON
Why, then, it seems, some certain snatch or so
Would serve your turns.

DUTCH:
Kom, man, meer water loopt den molen langs,
Dan ooit de mool’naar weet; en ‘t is gemakk’lijk
Van aangesneden brood een brok te stelen.

MORE:
Proverb: It is safe taking a shive of a cut loaf
Proverb: All women may be won
Proverb: Much water goes by the mill that the miller knows not of

Shive=Slice
Worn Vulcan’s badge=Cuckolded
Knows to=Knows how to
Snatch=Quick burst
Turns=Purposes
Compleat:
Snatch=Een ruk, hap, beet
Turn (office)=Dienst, trek, poets; She did it only to serve a turn=Zy deed het enkelyk uit eigenbaat

Burgersdijk notes:
Vulkanus’ tool. Shakespeare maakt ook elders van Venus en Mars gewag; men zie Antonius en Cleopatra, en Venus en Adonis.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, trust, secrecy

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Lucius
CONTEXT:
LUCIUS
Then, noble auditory, be it known to you,
That cursed Chiron and Demetrius
Were they that murdered our emperor’s brother;
And they it were that ravished our sister:
For their fell faults our brothers were beheaded;
Our father’s tears despised, and basely cozened
Of that true hand that fought Rome’s quarrel out,
And sent her enemies unto the grave.
Lastly, myself unkindly banished,
The gates shut on me, and turned weeping out,
To beg relief among Rome’s enemies:
Who drowned their enmity in my true tears.
And oped their arms to embrace me as a friend.
I am the turned forth, be it known to you,
That have preserved her welfare in my blood;
And from her bosom took the enemy’s point,
Sheathing the steel in my adventurous body.
Alas, you know I am no vaunter, I;
My scars can witness, dumb although they are,
That my report is just and full of truth.
But, soft! methinks I do digress too much,
Citing my worthless praise: O, pardon me;
For when no friends are by, men praise themselves.

DUTCH:
Litteekens mogen stom zijn, toch getuigen
De mijne, dat ik zuiv’re waarheid spreek.

MORE:
Auditory=Listeners
Fell=Cruel
Cozened=Cheated
Fought out=Fought and settled
Vaunter=Boastful person
Patience=Endurance
Ragged=Rugged
Closure=End
Compleat:
Auditory=Een hoorplaats, gehoorplaaats
To speak before a great auditory=Voor eene groote menigte van toehoorderen redenvoeren
Fell (cruel)=Wreede, fel
To cozen=Bedriegen
To close=Overeenstemmen; besluiten; eindigen
To vaunt=Pochen, snorken, opsnuiven
Patience=Geduld, lydzaamheid, verduldigheid
To fight it out=Een geschil vechtenderhand beslissen

Topics: order/society, revenge, honesty, pride

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Now is my turn to speak. Behold this child:
Of this was Tamora delivered;
The issue of an irreligious Moor,
Chief architect and plotter of these woes:
The villain is alive in Titus’ house,
And as he is, to witness this is true.
Now judge what cause had Titus to revenge
These wrongs, unspeakable, past patience,
Or more than any living man could bear.
Now you have heard the truth, what say you, Romans?
Have we done aught amiss,—show us wherein,
And, from the place where you behold us now,
The poor remainder of Andronici
Will, hand in hand, all headlong cast us down.
And on the ragged stones beat forth our brains,
And make a mutual closure of our house.
Speak, Romans, speak; and if you say we shall,
Lo, hand in hand, Lucius and I will fall.

DUTCH:
En nu gij alles weet, spreekt nu, Romeinen:
Is iets door ons misdreven?

MORE:
Unspeakable=Indescribable
Past=Beyond
Patience=Endurance
Ragged=Rugged
Closure=End
Compleat:
Unspeakable=Onuytspreekelyk
Past=Verleegen, geleden, voorby, over, gepasseerd
I am past my Latin (at my wits’ end)=Ik ben het kluwen quyt, ik weet er niet meer uit te komen
Past hope=Geen hoop meer over
Patience=Geduld, lydzaamheid, verduldigheid
Ragged=Aan slenteren gescheurd, versleeten, haaveloos
Rugged=Ruig, schor, oneffen, ruuw; Onbeschaafd; Gestreng
To close=Overeenstemmen; besluiten; eindigen

Topics: revenge, offence, truth, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
What’s here? A scroll; and written round about?
Let’s see;
‘Integer vitae, scelerisque purus,
Non eget Mauri jaculis, nec arcu.’
CHIRON
O, ’tis a verse in Horace; I know it well:
I read it in the grammar long ago.
AARON
Ay, just; a verse in Horace; right, you have it.
Now, what a thing it is to be an ass!
Here’s no sound jest! the old man hath found their
guilt;
And sends them weapons wrapped about with lines,
That wound, beyond their feeling, to the quick.
But were our witty empress well afoot,
She would applaud Andronicus’ conceit:
But let her rest in her unrest awhile.
And now, young lords, was’t not a happy star
Led us to Rome, strangers, and more than so,
Captives, to be advanced to this height?
It did me good, before the palace gate
To brave the tribune in his brother’s hearing.

DUTCH:
Een vers is ‘t uit Horatius; ik ken het;
Ik las het in mijn spraakkunst, lang geleên.

MORE:
Proverb: He touches him to the quick

“The man who is of pure life and free from crime needs not the bows and arrows of the Moor” (Horace)
Grammar=Latin grammar book. This is quoted in William Lily’s grammar, which was popular in Elizabethan schools
Just=Precisely
Sound=Straightforward
Afoot=Up and about
Conceit=Design, plan
Stranger=Foreigner
Brave=Confront, defy
Compleat:
Cut to the quick=Tot aan ‘t leeven snyden
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening
To brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren, moedig treden
Sound=Gaaf
Stranger=Vreemdeling

Burgersdijk notes:
Integer vitae enz. Daar de regels uit Horatius (Od. 1. 22. 1.) zeggen, dat de reine en schuldelooze geen Mauretanische pijl en boog, met andere woorden, geen wapenen behoeft, is door de toezending van wapenen uitgedrukt, dat Tamora’s zonen niet rein en schuldeloos zijn. Als de slimme Tamora niet juist wegens hare zwangerschap onwel was, zou zij de schranderheid van den vond toelachen. — Men merke op, dat het adjectivische Manris van Horatius hier in Mauri “van den Moor”, veranderd is.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, learning/education, intellect, dignity, wisdom

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome,
By uproar severed, like a flight of fowl
Scattered by winds and high tempestuous gusts,
O, let me teach you how to knit again
This scattered corn into one mutual sheaf,
These broken limbs again into one body;
Lest Rome herself be bane unto herself,
And she whom mighty kingdoms court’sy to,
Like a forlorn and desperate castaway,
Do shameful execution on herself.
But if my frosty signs and chaps of age,
Grave witnesses of true experience,
Cannot induce you to attend my words,

Speak, Rome’s dear friend, as erst our ancestor,
When with his solemn tongue he did discourse
To love-sick Dido’s sad attending ear
The story of that baleful burning night
When subtle Greeks surprised King Priam’s Troy,
Tell us what Sinon hath bewitched our ears,
Or who hath brought the fatal engine in
That gives our Troy, our Rome, the civil wound.
My heart is not compact of flint nor steel;
Nor can I utter all our bitter grief,
But floods of tears will drown my oratory,
And break my utterance, even in the time
When it should move you to attend me most,
Lending your kind commiseration.
Here is a captain, let him tell the tale;
Your hearts will throb and weep to hear him speak.

DUTCH:
Ontstelde mannen, Romes volk en zonen,
Verstrooid door ‘t oproer als een vogelzwerm,
Dien wind en stormgeloei uiteen doen spatten
Laat mij u leeren, die verspreide halmen
Op nieuw tot éene garve saam te voegen,
Die stukgereten leden tot éen lijf (…)

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: Re the definition of: “fowl”: State v Davis, 72 NJL 345, 61 A.2 (1905)

Corn=Grain
Mutual=Unified
Bane=Destroyer
Chaps=Cracks, wrinkles
Erst=Erstwhile, former
Dido=Queen of Carthage, abandoned by Aeneas
Sad-attending=Listening seriously
Sinon=Greek soldier who persuaded the Trojans to accept the wooden horse
Fatal=Deadly
Engine=Instrumenet of war
Civil wound=Wound inflicted in a civil war
Compleat:
Corn=Koorn, graan
Mutual=Onderling, wederzyds
Bane=Verderf, vergif
A chap=Een kooper, bieder
Erst=Voorheen
Sad=Droevig
Fatal=Noodlottig, noodschikkelyk, verderflyk, doodelyk
Engine=Een konstwerk, gereedschap, werktuig; Een list, konstgreep§

Topics: cited in law, mercy, remedy, leadership, order/society, conflict

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Marcus
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
O, that delightful engine of her thoughts
That blabbed them with such pleasing eloquence,
Is torn from forth that pretty hollow cage,
Where, like a sweet melodious bird, it sung
Sweet varied notes, enchanting every ear!
LUCIUS
O, say thou for her, who hath done this deed?
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
O, thus I found her, straying in the park,
Seeking to hide herself, as doth the deer
That hath received some unrecuring wound.

DUTCH:
Helaas! dat lieflijk werktuig der gedachten,
Dat die zoo zoet en zoo welsprekend uitte,
Is weggereten uit de schoone kooi,
Waar ‘t als een vogel melodiën zong,
Toonrijk, welluidend, ieder oor betoov’rend.

MORE:
Proverb: As the stricken deer withdraws himself to die

Engine=Instrument
Blabbed=Spoke
Unrecuring=Incurable
Compleat:
Engine=Een konstwerk, gereedschap, werktuig; Een list, konstgreep
To blab out=Uitlabben,, snabben, snateren

Topics: proverbs and idioms, punishment, suspicion

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Now, madam, are you prisoner to an emperor;
To him that, for your honour and your state,
Will use you nobly and your followers.
SATURNINUS
A goodly lady, trust me; of the hue
That I would choose, were I to choose anew.
Clear up, fair queen, that cloudy countenance:
Though chance of war hath wrought this change of cheer,
Thou comest not to be made a scorn in Rome:
Princely shall be thy usage every way.
Rest on my word, and let not discontent
Daunt all your hopes: madam, he comforts you
Can make you greater than the Queen of Goths.
Lavinia, you are not displeased with this?
LAVINIA
Not I, my lord; sith true nobility
Warrants these words in princely courtesy.
SATURNINUS
Thanks, sweet Lavinia. Romans, let us go;
Ransomless here we set our prisoners free:
Proclaim our honours, lords, with trump and drum.

DUTCH:
Vertrouw mijn woord, en geen mismoedigheid
Verschrikke uw hoop; die thans u troost, kan grooter
U maken, dat gij bij de Gothen waart

MORE:
Hue=Appearance (not only colour)
Cheer=Expression
Rest=Rely
Can=Who can
Sith=Since
Warrant=Justify
Trump=Trumpets
Compleat:
Hue=Kolour
Cheer or chear=Gelaat, myne, cier, toestel; of good cheer=Goeds moeds
Sith=Naardien, nademaal
Rest on=Op rusten
Warrant (assure, promise)=Verzekeren, belooven, ervoor instaan
Trump=Een blaas-hoorn

Topics: status, punishment, free will

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Soft! see how busily she turns the leaves!
What would she find? Lavinia, shall I read?
This is the tragic tale of Philomel,
And treats of Tereus’ treason and his rape:
And rape, I fear, was root of thine annoy.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
See, brother, see; note how she quotes the leaves.

DUTCH:
Stil, zie, wat bladert zij er haastig in!

MORE:
Busily=Earnestly, actively
Would=Is hoping to
Philomel=Athenian princess raped by Tereus, who cut out her tongue to stop her talking
Root=Cause
Annoy=Pain, suffering
Quotes=Examines
Compleat:
To annoy=Beschaadigen, quetsen, beleedigne, afbreuk doen
To annoy the enemy=Den Vyand abreuk doen

Topics: learning/education, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
How now! has sorrow made thee dote already?
Why, Marcus, no man should be mad but I.
What violent hands can she lay on her life?
Ah, wherefore dost thou urge the name of hands;
To bid AEneas tell the tale twice o’er,
How Troy was burnt and he made miserable?
O, handle not the theme, to talk of hands,
Lest we remember still that we have none.
Fie, fie, how franticly I square my talk,
As if we should forget we had no hands,
If Marcus did not name the word of hands!
Come, let’s fall to; and, gentle girl, eat this:
Here is no drink! Hark, Marcus, what she says;
I can interpret all her martyred signs;
She says she drinks no other drink but tears,
Brewed with her sorrow, meshed upon her cheeks:
Speechless complainer, I will learn thy thought;
In thy dumb action will I be as perfect
As begging hermits in their holy prayers:
Thou shalt not sigh, nor hold thy stumps to heaven,
Nor wink, nor nod, nor kneel, nor make a sign,
But I of these will wrest an alphabet
And by still practise learn to know thy meaning.

DUTCH:
Gij stomme klaagster, ‘k wil uw taal verstaan.
Mij zullen uw gebaren zoo vertrouwd
Als bedelkluiz’naars hun gebeden zijn.

MORE:
Dote=Become irrational
Square=Judge, adjust
Signs=Gestures
Mashed or meshed=Brewed
Perfect=Expert, complete
Wrest=Force
Still=Continued
Compleat:
To dote=Suffen, dutten, mymeren
To mash=Mengel, een mengsel maaken, vergruizen
Perfect=Volmaakt, volkomen, voltoid, voleind
To wrest=Verdraaijen, wringen
Still=Altijd

Topics: madness, regret, sorrow, understanding, communication

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Marcus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
How, sir! are you in earnest then, my lord?
BASSIANUS
Ay, noble Titus; and resolved withal
To do myself this reason and this right.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
‘Suum cuique’ is our Roman justice:
This prince in justice seizeth but his own.
LUCIUS
And that he will, and shall, if Lucius live.

DUTCH:
Het suum cuique geldt in Rome als recht;
De prins neemt niets, dan wat naar recht het zijne is.

MORE:
Resolved=Prepared
Suum cuique=To each his own
But his own=Only what he is entitled to
Compleat:
Resolve=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel
But=Maar, of, dan, behalven, maar alleen

Topics: dispute, claim, rivalry

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Stay, Roman brethren! Gracious conqueror,
Victorious Titus, rue the tears I shed,
A mother’s tears in passion for her son:
And if thy sons were ever dear to thee,
O, think my son to be as dear to me!
Sufficeth not that we are brought to Rome,
To beautify thy triumphs and return,
Captive to thee and to thy Roman yoke,
But must my sons be slaughtered in the streets,
For valiant doings in their country’s cause?
O, if to fight for king and commonweal
Were piety in thine, it is in these.
Andronicus, stain not thy tomb with blood:
Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods?
Draw near them then in being merciful:
Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge:
Thrice noble Titus, spare my first-born son.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Patient yourself, madam, and pardon me.
These are their brethren, whom you Goths beheld
Alive and dead, and for their brethren slain
Religiously they ask a sacrifice:
To this your son is marked, and die he must,
To appease their groaning shadows that are gone.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij in aard den goden nader komen,
Zoo kom hun nader in barmhartigheid;
Want deernis is des adels echtste merk;
Hoogeed’le Titus , spaar mijn eerstgeboor’ne!

MORE:
Rue=Pity
Passion=Grief
Sufficeth not=Is not enough
Commonweal=The common good (‘commonwealth’, community)
Patient yourself=Calm down
Brethren=Brothers
Religiously=Solemnly
Growning shadows that are gone=Ghosts of the dead
Compleat:
Passion=Lyding, hartstogt, drift, ingenomenheyd, zydigheyd, zucht
Suffice=Genoeg zyn
It suffices that it is so=’t Is genoeg dat het zo is
Commonwealth=Gemeenebest

Topics: grief, sorrow, mercy, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
My lovely Aaron, wherefore look’st thou sad,
When every thing doth make a gleeful boast?
The birds chant melody on every bush,
The snake lies rolled in the cheerful sun,
The green leaves quiver with the cooling wind
And make a chequered shadow on the ground:
Under their sweet shade, Aaron, let us sit,
And, whilst the babbling echo mocks the hounds,
Replying shrilly to the well-tuned horns,
As if a double hunt were heard at once,
Let us sit down and mark their yelping noise;
And, after conflict such as was supposed
The wandering prince and Dido once enjoyed,
When with a happy storm they were surprised
And curtained with a counsel-keeping cave,
We may, each wreathed in the other’s arms,
Our pastimes done, possess a golden slumber;
Whiles hounds and horns and sweet melodious birds
Be unto us as is a nurse’s song
Of lullaby to bring her babe asleep

DUTCH:
Uit ied’re struik klinkt voog’lenmelodie;
De slang ligt in den zonn’schijn saâmgerold ;
De blaad’ren trillen in den koelen wind,
En teek’nen schaduwplekken op den grond.

MORE:
Boast=Display
Prince=Aeneas
Happy=Lucky
With=By
Compleat:
Boast=Geroem, gepoch
Supposed=Vermoed, ondersteld, gewaand

Topics: nature, wellbeing, love

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
King, be thy thoughts imperious, like thy name.
Is the sun dimmed, that gnats do fly in it?
The eagle suffers little birds to sing,
And is not careful what they mean thereby,
Knowing that with the shadow of his wings
He can at pleasure stint their melody:
Even so mayst thou the giddy men of Rome.
Then cheer thy spirit: for know, thou emperor,
I will enchant the old Andronicus
With words more sweet, and yet more dangerous,
Than baits to fish, or honey-stalks to sheep,
When as the one is wounded with the bait,
The other rotted with delicious feed.

DUTCH:
Wees keizer, heer, in denken als in naam.
Taant ooit de zon, wijl muggen in haar dansen?
Zie, de aad’laar laat de kleine vogels zingen,
En wat zij er meê meenen, deert hem niet

MORE:
Careful=Worried
Stint=Stop
Giddy=Fickle
Honey-stalks=Clover
When as=When
Rotted=The rot (disease in sheep)
Compleat:
Carefull=Zorgvuldig, bezorgd, zorgdraagend, bekommerd
To stint=Bepaalen; bedwingen
Giddy=Duizelig.
Giddy-headed=Ylhoofdig, hersenloos, wervelziek
Rot=Een sterfte onder de schaapen door al te vochtig voedsel

Topics: nature, flattery, status

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Saturninus
CONTEXT:
SATURNINUS
No, Titus, no; the emperor needs her not,
Nor her, nor thee, nor any of thy stock:
I’ll trust, by leisure, him that mocks me once;
Thee never, nor thy traitorous haughty sons,
Confederates all thus to dishonour me.
Was there none else in Rome to make a stale,
But Saturnine? Full well, Andronicus,
Agree these deeds with that proud brag of thine,
That said’st I begged the empire at thy hands.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
O monstrous! what reproachful words are these?

DUTCH:
De keizer, Titus, neen! behoeft haar niet,
Noch haar, noch u, noch iemand van uw stam.

MORE:
Stock=Family
Trust by leisure=Will hesitate to trust
Haughty=Proud, arrogant
Confederate=Associate (not normally in a good sense)
Stale=Laughing-stock, dupe; decoy or bait set up as a lure
Brag=Boast
Compleat:
Stock=Een stam, blok, geslacht, kapitaal
Haughty=Hoogmoedig, verwaand, opgeblaazen, trots
Confederate=Een bondgenoot, bondverwant, metverwant
To make on a stale (property or stalking-horse) to one’s design=Iemand gebruiken om ons oogmerk te bereiken
To brag=Pochen, roemen, opsnyen

Topics: trust, betrayal

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
Now climbeth Tamora Olympus’ top,
Safe out of fortune’s shot; and sits aloft,
Secure of thunder’s crack or lightning flash;
Advanced above pale envy’s threatening reach.
As when the golden sun salutes the morn,
And, having gilt the ocean with his beams,
Gallops the zodiac in his glistering coach,
And overlooks the highest-peering hills;
So Tamora:
Upon her wit doth earthly honour wait,
And virtue stoops and trembles at her frown.
Then, Aaron, arm thy heart, and fit thy thoughts,
To mount aloft with thy imperial mistress,
And mount her pitch, whom thou in triumph long
Hast prisoner held, fettered in amorous chains
And faster bound to Aaron’s charming eyes
Than is Prometheus tied to Caucasus.
Away with slavish weeds and servile thoughts!
I will be bright, and shine in pearl and gold,
To wait upon this new-made empress.
To wait, said I? to wanton with this queen,
This goddess, this Semiramis, this nymph,
This siren, that will charm Rome’s Saturnine,
And see his shipwreck and his commonweal’s.
Holloa! what storm is this?

DUTCH:
Zooals de gouden zon den morgen groet
En met haar stralen de’ oceaan verguldt,
Daarna op vuur’ge kar haar baan doorrent
En neerblikt op de hoogste heuveltoppen,
Zoo Tamora.

MORE:
Proverb: The chance of war is uncertain

Olympus=Highest mountain in Greece, mythological home of the gods.
Prometheus=Demigod who stold fire from Olympus and give it to mankind. Allusively applied to something that inspires or infuses life (although he was chained to a rock where his liver was eaten every day by an eagle).
Semiramis=The wife of King Nimrod of Assyria, famed for her bravery and cruelty
Sirens=Mythical creatures who use their voices to lure sailors to their deaths
Envy=Malice
Pitch=Highest point of soaring flight for a hawk or falcon, peak before swooping
Weeds=Clothing
Commonweal=The common good (‘commonwealth’, community)
Compleat:
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad
Siren=Sireene; To sirenize=Verlokken, verleiden
Envy=Nyd, benyd, afgunst
Pitch=Pik
Commonwealth=Gemeenebest

Burgersdijk notes:
Haar baan doorrent. In ‘t Engelsch wordt als baan de Dierenriem, Zodiak, genoemd.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, manipulation, persuasion

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
My gracious lord, my lovely Saturnine,
Lord of my life, commander of my thoughts,
Calm thee, and bear the faults of Titus’ age,
The effects of sorrow for his valiant sons,
Whose loss hath pierced him deep and scarred his heart;
And rather comfort his distressed plight
Than prosecute the meanest or the best
For these contempts.
Why, thus it shall become
High-witted Tamora to gloze with all:
But, Titus, I have touched thee to the quick,
Thy life-blood out: if Aaron now be wise,
Then is all safe, the anchor’s in the port.

DUTCH:
Maar Titus, ‘k heb in ‘t leven u geraakt
En tapte uws harten bloed. — Is Aaron wijs,
Dan zijn wij veilig, ank’ren in de haven.

MORE:
High-witted=Cunning, clever
Gloze=Smooth talk
Compleat:
To gloze=Vleijen, flikflooijen
Cut to the quick=Tot aan ‘t leeven snyden

Topics: plans/intentions, emotion and mood, deceit

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Lucius
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Now let hot Etna cool in Sicily,
And be my heart an ever-burning hell!
These miseries are more than may be borne.
To weep with them that weep doth ease some deal;
But sorrow flouted at is double death.
LUCIUS
Ah, that this sight should make so deep a wound,
And yet detested life not shrink thereat!
That ever death should let life bear his name,
Where life hath no more interest but to breathe!

DUTCH:
Dit leed is grooter dan te dragen is.
Meêschreien met die schreien brengt wel troost,
Maar leed, door hoon verscherpt, is dubb’le dood.

MORE:
Weep with them that week=Biblical (Romans)
Flouted at=Mocked
Some deal=Somewhat
Interest=Concern
Compleat:
Flout=Spotterny, schimpscheut
Interest=Belang

Topics: grief, regret, life

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
SATURNINUS
But go thy ways; go, give that changing piece
To him that flourished for her with his sword
A valiant son-in-law thou shalt enjoy;
One fit to bandy with thy lawless sons,
To ruffle in the commonwealth of Rome.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
These words are razors to my wounded heart.

DUTCH:
Elk woord vlijmt als een dolk mijn bloedend hart.

MORE:
Proverb: As sharp as a razor
Changing=Fickle
Flourished=Drew his sword
To bandy=Squabble, brawl
Ruffle=Swagger
Compleat:
Flourish (with a sword)=Een Zwenking met een degen
Bandy=Betwisten

Topics: relationship, rivalry, insult

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
CHIRON
For that I am prepared and full resolved.
Foul-spoken coward, that thunder’st with thy tongue,
And with thy weapon nothing darest perform!
AARON
Away, I say!
Now, by the gods that warlike Goths adore,
This petty brabble will undo us all.
Why, lords, and think you not how dangerous
It is to jet upon a prince’s right?
What, is Lavinia then become so loose,
Or Bassianus so degenerate,
That for her love such quarrels may be broached
Without controlment, justice, or revenge?
Young lords, beware! and should the empress know
This discord’s ground, the music would not please.

DUTCH:
Daartoe ben ik bereid en vast besloten,
Gij laffe smaler, die uw tong laat dond’ren,
Maar met uw zwaard niets uit te voeren waagt.

MORE:
Resolved=Convinced, Fixed in a determination
Brabble=Quarrel
Jet=Encroach
Controlment=Check. Without controlment=Unchecked
Ground=Basis
Compleat:
To resolve (untie, decide, determine a hard question, difficulty etc.)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopten
To resolve (deliberation, decision)=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel
Brabble=Krakkeel; To brabble=Krakkeelen, harrewarren
To jet=Uitstooten, uitwaards loopen

Burgersdijk notes:
Zoo de keizerin dien wanklank hoort.
In ‘t Engelsch: An should the empress know This discord’s ground; een woordspeling, die ook in K. Richard III voorkomt; ground beteekent zoowel „grond”, oorzaak”, als „muzikaal thema”; bovendien beteekent discord zoowel dissonant” als „tweedracht.”
Evenals hier vindt men de beide heteekenissen tegelijk bedoeld in Troilus en Cressida

Topics: dispute, rivalry, justice, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Why, I have not another tear to shed:
Besides, this sorrow is an enemy,
And would usurp upon my watery eyes
And make them blind with tributary tears:
Then which way shall I find Revenge’s cave?
For these two heads do seem to speak to me,
And threat me I shall never come to bliss
Till all these mischiefs be returned again
Even in their throats that have committed them.
Come, let me see what task I have to do.
You heavy people, circle me about,
That I may turn me to each one of you,
And swear unto my soul to right your wrongs.
The vow is made. Come, brother, take a head;
And in this hand the other I will bear.
Lavinia, thou shalt be employed: these arms!
Bear thou my hand, sweet wench, between thy teeth.
As for thee, boy, go get thee from my sight;
Thou art an exile, and thou must not stay:
Hie to the Goths, and raise an army there:
And, if you love me, as I think you do,
Let’s kiss and part, for we have much to do.

DUTCH:
Ik heb geen tranen meer te storten over;
En dan, die jammer is een vijand, die
Mijn vochtige oogen overmeest’ren wil,
Ze door een cijns van tranen blind wil maken;

MORE:
Proverb: Care will kill a cat

Usurp upon=Encroach on, intrude
Tributary=Paying tribute
Mischiefs=Calamity, misfortune
Returned=Turned back on
Heavy=Sad
Hie=Hasten
Compleat:
Mischief=Onheil, kwaad, ongeluk, ramp, verderf, heilloosheid
To usurp=’t Onrecht aanmaatigen, met geweld in ‘t bezit dringen, overweldigen
Usurpation=Een onrechtmaatige bezitneeming, of indrang, dwinggebruik, overweldiging
Tributary=Cynsbaar
Mischief=Onheil, kwaad, ongeluk, ramp, verderf, heilloosheid
Returned=Wedergekeerd, weergekomen
Heavy=(sad) Droevig, verdrietig
Hie thee=Rep u, haast u

Topics: proverbs and idioms, sorrow, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Chiron
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
Chiron, thy years want wit, thy wit wants edge,
And manners, to intrude where I am graced;
And may, for aught thou know’st, affected be.
CHIRON
Demetrius, thou dost overween in all;
And so in this, to bear me down with braves.
‘Tis not the difference of a year or two
Makes me less gracious or thee more fortunate:
I am as able and as fit as thou
To serve, and to deserve my mistress’ grace;
And that my sword upon thee shall approve,
And plead my passions for Lavinia’s love.

DUTCH:
Demetrius, steeds blijkt gij overmoedig,
En wilt ook thans met pochen mij verslaan.
Die afstand van een jaar of twee maakt mij
Niet min begaafd en u niet meer geliefd.

MORE:
Want=Lack
Graced=Favoured
Affected=Loved
Overween=To be arrogant or presumptuous
Bear down=Overwhelm
Braves=Threats
Approve=Prove
Compleat:
Want=Gebrek
To grace=Vercieren, bevallig maaken
Affect=Liefde toedragen, ter harte gaan, beminnen
Overwean or overween=Al te veel van zich zelven houden, zich vleijen
To bear down=Neerdrukken, overhaalen, onderhouden, omverre stooten
To brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren, moedig treden

Topics: love, rivalry, age/experience

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
Why, so, brave lords! when we join in league,
I am a lamb: but if you brave the Moor,
The chafed boar, the mountain lioness,
The ocean swells not so as Aaron storms.
But say, again; how many saw the child?
NURSE
Cornelia the midwife and myself;
And no one else but the delivered empress.
AARON
The empress, the midwife, and yourself:
Two may keep counsel when the third’s away:
Go to the empress, tell her this I said.

DUTCH:
De keizerin, de vroedvrouw en gijzelf;
Twee zwijgen wel, wanneer de derde ontbreekt.

MORE:
Proverb: Three (two) may keep counsel if two (one) be away
Proverb: Two people can keep a secret when one is subtracted

Brave=Confront, defy
Chafed=Enraged
Swells not=Doesn’t rage
Compleat:
To brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren, moedig treden
To chafe=Verhitten, tot toorn ontsteeken, verhit zyn van gramschap, woeden
In a chafe=Hy brandt van toorn
To swell=Opblaazen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, secrecy, trust

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
He doth me wrong to feed me with delays.
I’ll dive into the burning lake below,
And pull her out of Acheron by the heels.
Marcus, we are but shrubs, no cedars we
No big-boned men framed of the Cyclops’ size;
But metal, Marcus, steel to the very back,
Yet wrung with wrongs more than our backs can bear:
And, sith there’s no justice in earth nor hell,
We will solicit heaven and move the gods
To send down Justice for to wreak our wrongs.
Come, to this gear. You are a good archer, Marcus;
‘Ad Jovem,’ that’s for you: here, ‘Ad Apollinem:’
‘Ad Martem,’ that’s for myself:
Here, boy, to Pallas: here, to Mercury:
To Saturn, Caius, not to Saturnine;
You were as good to shoot against the wind.
To it, boy! Marcus, loose when I bid.

DUTCH:
Daar aard noch hel gerechtigheid nu huisvest,
Zoo smeeken wij ten hemel, dat de goden
Haar nederzenden om ons wee te wreken.

MORE:
Feed me with delays=Put me off
Acheron=One of the rivers of Hades
Cyclops=A mythical one-eyed giant
Wreak=Avenge
Were as good to=Might as well
Loose=Shoot your arrows
Compleat:
To wreak=Wreeken

Topics: patience, opportunity

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: First Goth
CONTEXT:
LUCIUS
Approved warriors, and my faithful friends,
I have received letters from great Rome,
Which signify what hate they bear their emperor
And how desirous of our sight they are.
Therefore, great lords, be, as your titles witness,
Imperious and impatient of your wrongs,
And wherein Rome hath done you any scath,
Let him make treble satisfaction.
FIRST GOTH
Brave slip, sprung from the great Andronicus,
Whose name was once our terror, now our comfort;
Whose high exploits and honourable deeds
Ingrateful Rome requites with foul contempt,
Be bold in us: we’ll follow where thou lead’st,
Like stinging bees in hottest summer’s day
Led by their master to the flowered fields,
And be avenged on cursed Tamora.
ALL THE GOTHS
And as he saith, so say we all with him.

DUTCH:
Vertrouw op ons; wij volgen waar ge ons leidt,
Als angelbijën, die op ‘t heetst des zomers
De koningin naar bloemenbeemden voert;
En wreek u op de vloekb’re Tamora.

MORE:
Proverb: He is like the master bee that leads forth the swarm

Approved=Proven, tested
Scath=Harm
Slip=Offspring
Bold in=Have confidence in
Requite=Repays
Master=The queen bee was thought to be a male at the time
Compleat:
Approved=Beproefd; goedgekeurd
Scathe=Quetsuur, ongemak. To do scathe=Bezeeren
Bold=Stout, koen, vrymoedig, onbevreesd, onverslaagd, vrypostig
To requite=Vergelden
To requite a man in his own way=Iemand met gelyke munt betaalen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, leadership, loyalty

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Faint-hearted boy, arise, and look upon her.
Speak, Lavinia, what accursed hand
Hath made thee handless in thy father’s sight?
What fool hath added water to the sea,
Or brought a faggot to bright-burning Troy?
My grief was at the height before thou camest,
And now like Nilus, it disdaineth bounds.
Give me a sword, I’ll chop off my hands too;
For they have fought for Rome, and all in vain;
And they have nursed this woe, in feeding life;
In bootless prayer have they been held up,
And they have served me to effectless use:
Now all the service I require of them
Is that the one will help to cut the other.
‘Tis well, Lavinia, that thou hast no hands;
For hands, to do Rome service, are but vain.

DUTCH:
Zwakhartig jongling, rijs, en zie haar aan. —
Lavinia, spreek! wat vloekb’re hand heeft u
HandIoos gemaakt voor de oogen van uw vader?
En welke dwaas goot water in de zee,
En wierp in Troja’s laaien brand een mutsaard?

MORE:
Proverb: To cast water into the sea (Thames)

Faint-hearted=Weak
Bootless=Futile, pointless
Martyred=Mutilated
Compleat:
Faint-hearted=Flaauwhartig, lafhartig, slaphartig
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos
Martyred=Gemarteld, gepynigd

Topics: proverbs and idioms, fate/destiny, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
Madam, though Venus govern your desires,
Saturn is dominator over mine:
What signifies my deadly-standing eye,
My silence and my cloudy melancholy,
My fleece of woolly hair that now uncurls
Even as an adder when she doth unroll
To do some fatal execution?
No, madam, these are no venereal signs:
Vengeance is in my heart, death in my hand,
Blood and revenge are hammering in my head.
Hark Tamora, the empress of my soul,
Which never hopes more heaven than rests in thee,
This is the day of doom for Bassianus:
His Philomel must lose her tongue to-day,
Thy sons make pillage of her chastity
And wash their hands in Bassianus’ blood.
Seest thou this letter? take it up, I pray thee,
And give the king this fatal plotted scroll.
Now question me no more; we are espied;
Here comes a parcel of our hopeful booty,
Which dreads not yet their lives’ destruction.

DUTCH:
Of wat beduidt mijn dood’lijk starend oog,
Mijn zwijgen en mijn diep zwaarmoedig voorhoofd,
Mijn wollig hoofdhaar, dat zich nu ontkroest,
Gelijk een adder, als hij zich ontrolt
Om fel een onontwijkb’ren dood te brengen?

MORE:
Deadly-standing=Death stare
Philomel=Athenian princess raped by Tereus, who cut out her tongue to stop her talking
Fatal plotted=Plot with a fatal outcome
Parcel=Part
Booty=Spoils
Compleat:
Fatal=Noodlottig, noodschikkelyk, verderflyk, doodelyk
Plotted=Aangespannen, bestoken, bekuipt
To parcel=In hoopen verdeelen, in partyen deelen
Booty=Buyt, roof
A judge that plays booty=Een rechter die zich laat omloopen

Burgersdijk notes:
Besture Venus uw begeerten enz. Aan de planeet Venus werd een verhittende, aan Saturnus een verkoelende invloed toegeschreven op wie onder haar gesternte geboren waren.

Topics: love, death, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
For shame, be friends, and join for that you jar:
‘Tis policy and stratagem must do
That you affect; and so must you resolve,
That what you cannot as you would achieve,
You must perforce accomplish as you may.
Take this of me: Lucrece was not more chaste
Than this Lavinia, Bassianus’ love.
A speedier course than lingering languishment
Must we pursue, and I have found the path.
My lords, a solemn hunting is in hand;
There will the lovely Roman ladies troop:
The forest walks are wide and spacious;
And many unfrequented plots there are
Fitted by kind for rape and villainy:
Single you thither then this dainty doe,
And strike her home by force, if not by words:
This way, or not at all, stand you in hope.
Come, come, our empress, with her sacred wit
To villainy and vengeance consecrate,
Will we acquaint with all that we intend;
And she shall file our engines with advice,
That will not suffer you to square yourselves,
But to your wishes’ height advance you both.
The emperor’s court is like the house of Fame,
The palace full of tongues, of eyes, and ears:
The woods are ruthless, dreadful, deaf, and dull;
There speak, and strike, brave boys, and take
your turns;
There serve your lusts, shadowed from heaven’s eye,
And revel in Lavinia’s treasury.
CHIRON
Thy counsel, lad, smells of no cowardice.

DUTCH:
Door overleg en list moet gij verwerven,
Wat gij beoogt; en dit sta bij u vast,
Dat, kunt gij ‘t niet, zooals gij wilt, bekomen,
Gij ‘t met geweld, zooals gij ‘t kunt, erlangt..

MORE:
Proverb: Men must do as they may (can), not as they would

Jar=Quarrels
Lucrece=A virtuous Roman woman who was raped by Tarquin after rejecting his advances.
Affect=Aim at, seek to practise
Perforce=Are compelled to
Solemn=Ceremonial
Plot=Plot of land
Single=Single out, select
Engine=Plot, contrivance
Square=Quarrel with. Square yourselves=Quarrel with each other
Fame=Rumour
Ruthless=Pitiless
Dull=Insensible
Compleat:
Jar=Getwist, geharrewar, gekrakkeel, gekyf
Affect=Behartigen, trachtten, raaken, ontroeren
Perforce=Met geweld
Solemn=Plechtig; prachtig, staatelyk
To single out=Uitoznderen, uitpikken, uitzoeken
Engine=Een konstwerk, gereedschap, werktuig; Een list, konstgreep
Fame=Faam, gerucht, vermaardheid; goede naam
Ruthless (pitiless)=Wreed, onbarmhartig
Dull=Lui, traag; lomp, ongevoelig

Topics: dispute, plans/intentions, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: First Goth
CONTEXT:
AARON
Indeed, I was their tutor to instruct them:
That codding spirit had they from their mother,
As sure a card as ever won the set;
That bloody mind, I think, they learned of me,
As true a dog as ever fought at head.
Well, let my deeds be witness of my worth.
I trained thy brethren to that guileful hole
Where the dead corpse of Bassianus lay:
I wrote the letter that thy father found
And hid the gold within the letter mentioned,
Confederate with the queen and her two sons:
And what not done, that thou hast cause to rue,
Wherein I had no stroke of mischief in it?
I played the cheater for thy father’s hand,
And, when I had it, drew myself apart
And almost broke my heart with extreme laughter:
I pryed me through the crevice of a wall
When, for his hand, he had his two sons’ heads;
Beheld his tears, and laughed so heartily,
That both mine eyes were rainy like to his:
And when I told the empress of this sport,
She swooned almost at my pleasing tale,
And for my tidings gave me twenty kisses.
FIRST GOTH
What, canst thou say all this, and never blush?
AARON
Ay, like a black dog, as the saying is.

DUTCH:
Kunt gij dit alles zeggen zonder blozen ?

MORE:
Proverb: To blush like a black dog (shamelessness)

Codding=Lecherous
Set=Game, trick
Trained=Lured
Pried or pryed=Peered
Compleat:
Set=Zetsel, stelsel
Train (trap or wheedle)=Agterlaage, strik, val
To prie=Verspieden, doorsnuffelen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, conscience, betrayal

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Good Lord, how like the empress’ sons they are!
And you, the empress! but we worldly men
Have miserable, mad, mistaking eyes.
O sweet Revenge, now do I come to thee;
And, if one arm’s embracement will content thee,
I will embrace thee in it by and by.
TAMORA
This closing with him fits his lunacy
Whate’er I forge to feed his brain-sick fits,
Do you uphold and maintain in your speeches,
For now he firmly takes me for Revenge;
And, being credulous in this mad thought,
I’ll make him send for Lucius his son;
And, whilst I at a banquet hold him sure,
I’ll find some cunning practise out of hand,
To scatter and disperse the giddy Goths,
Or, at the least, make them his enemies.
See, here he comes, and I must ply my theme.

DUTCH:
Zoo met hem om te gaan past bij zijn waanzin.
Wat ik nu uitdenk voor zijn dolle vlagen,
Steunt gij dat, zet het voort door wat gij zegt;
Want hij gelooft nu vast, dat ik de Wraak ben;

MORE:
Worldly=Mortal, of this world
Closing=Agreeing
Fits=Is appropriate to
Humours=Moods, whims
Sure=Safe
Practice=Scheme
Out of hand=Off the cuff, spontaneously
Ply my theme=Keep up my performance
Compleat:
Worldly=Waereldsch
To close=Overeenstemmen; besluiten
To fit=Passen, pas maaken
Humour (dispositon of the mind)=Humeur, of gemoeds gesteldheid
Sure=Zeker, vast, wis, veilig, getrouw
Practice (underhand dealing, intrigue, way of proceeding)=Praktyk, bedekten handel, list
Out of hand=Op staande voet, terstond
To ply=Wakker op iets aanvallen
He plies me too hard=Hy valt my al te hard hy wil al te veel werks van my hebben

Topics: revenge, deceit, betrayal, gullibility

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Lucius
CONTEXT:
LUCIUS
Then, noble auditory, be it known to you,
That cursed Chiron and Demetrius
Were they that murdered our emperor’s brother;
And they it were that ravished our sister:
For their fell faults our brothers were beheaded;
Our father’s tears despised, and basely cozened
Of that true hand that fought Rome’s quarrel out,
And sent her enemies unto the grave.
Lastly, myself unkindly banished,
The gates shut on me, and turned weeping out,
To beg relief among Rome’s enemies:
Who drowned their enmity in my true tears.
And oped their arms to embrace me as a friend.
I am the turned forth, be it known to you,
That have preserved her welfare in my blood;
And from her bosom took the enemy’s point,
Sheathing the steel in my adventurous body.
Alas, you know I am no vaunter, I;
My scars can witness, dumb although they are,
That my report is just and full of truth.
But, soft! methinks I do digress too much,
Citing my worthless praise: O, pardon me;
For when no friends are by, men praise themselves.

DUTCH:
Doch stil! mij dunkt, te verre dwaal ik af,
Mijn luttel doen zoo roemend; — o, vergeeft,
Elk prijst, is hem geen vriend nabij, zichzelf.

MORE:
Auditory=Listeners
Fell=Cruel
Cozened=Cheated
Fought out=Fought and settled
Vaunter=Boastful person
Patience=Endurance
Ragged=Rugged
Closure=End
Compleat:
Auditory=Een hoorplaats, gehoorplaaats
To speak before a great auditory=Voor eene groote menigte van toehoorderen redenvoeren
Fell (cruel)=Wreede, fel
To cozen=Bedriegen
To close=Overeenstemmen; besluiten; eindigen
To vaunt=Pochen, snorken, opsnuiven
Patience=Geduld, lydzaamheid, verduldigheid
To fight it out=Een geschil vechtenderhand beslissen

Topics: order/society, revenge, honesty, pride

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Thus, in this strange and sad habiliment,
I will encounter with Andronicus,
And say I am Revenge, sent from below
To join with him and right his heinous wrongs.
Knock at his study, where, they say, he keeps,
To ruminate strange plots of dire revenge;
Tell him Revenge is come to join with him,
And work confusion on his enemies.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Who doth molest my contemplation?
Is it your trick to make me ope the door,
That so my sad decrees may fly away,
And all my study be to no effect?
You are deceived: for what I mean to do
See here in bloody lines I have set down;
And what is written shall be executed.
TAMORA
Titus, I am come to talk with thee.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
No, not a word; how can I grace my talk,
Wanting a hand to give it action?
Thou hast the odds of me; therefore no more.

DUTCH:
Wie stoort mij in mijn overdenking? Is dit
Een kunstgreep om mijn deur mij te doen oop’nen

MORE:
Sad=Gloomy
Habiliment=Clothes
Encounter with=Meet
Keeps=Stays
Ruminate=Consider
Work confusion on=Destroy
Molest=Disrupt
Sad=Solemn
Decree=Resolution
Ope=Open
Compleat:
Sad=Droevig
Habiliment=Kleeding, dos, gewaad
Encounter=Bestryden, bevechten, aanvallen
To ruminate upon (to consider of) a thing=Eene zaak overweegen
Confusion (ruin)=Verwoesting, bederf, ruine
Molest=Moeielyk vallen, lastig vallen, quellen, overlast aandoen
Sad=Droevig
Decree=Besluit, Raadsbesluit

Topics: revenge, offence, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Lucius
CONTEXT:
LUCIUS
Who should I swear by? thou believest no god:
That granted, how canst thou believe an oath?
AARON
What if I do not? as, indeed, I do not;
Yet, for I know thou art religious
And hast a thing within thee called conscience,
With twenty popish tricks and ceremonies,
Which I have seen thee careful to observe,
Therefore I urge thy oath; for that I know
An idiot holds his bauble for a god
And keeps the oath which by that god he swears,
To that I’ll urge him: therefore thou shalt vow
By that same god, what god soe’er it be,
That thou adorest and hast in reverence,
To save my boy, to nourish and bring him up;
Or else I will discover nought to thee.

DUTCH:
Waarbij? voor u, die aan geen god gelooft?
Is dit zoo, kunt gij dan een eed gelooven?

MORE:
Popish=A term for Catholic practices
Urge=Insist on
For that=Because
Bauble=Jester’s stick
Compleat:
Popish=Pauzelyk; paapsch
Urge=Dringen, pressen, aandringen, aanstaan
Bauble=Spulletje, grol

Topics: promise, conscience

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Demetrius
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
Why makest thou it so strange?
She is a woman, therefore may be wooed;
She is a woman, therefore may be won;
She is Lavinia, therefore must be loved.
What, man! more water glideth by the mill
Than wots the miller of; and easy it is
Of a cut loaf to steal a shive, we know:
Though Bassianus be the emperor’s brother.
Better than he have worn Vulcan’s badge.
AARON
Ay, and as good as Saturninus may.
DEMETRIUS
Then why should he despair that knows to court it
With words, fair looks and liberality?
What, hast not thou full often struck a doe,
And borne her cleanly by the keeper’s nose?
AARON
Why, then, it seems, some certain snatch or so
Would serve your turns.

DUTCH:
Nu, ‘t.schijnt dan, dat een schaking of zoo iets
U dienstig waar?

MORE:
Proverb: It is safe taking a shive of a cut loaf
Proverb: All women may be won
Proverb: Much water goes by the mill that the miller knows not of

Shive=Slice
Worn Vulcan’s badge=Cuckolded
Knows to=Knows how to
Snatch=Quick burst
Turns=Purposes
Compleat:
Snatch=Een ruk, hap, beet
Turn (office)=Dienst, trek, poets; She did it only to serve a turn=Zy deed het enkelyk uit eigenbaat

Burgersdijk notes:
Vulkanus’ tool. Shakespeare maakt ook elders van Venus en Mars gewag; men zie Antonius en Cleopatra, en Venus en Adonis.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, trust, secrecy

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Why, tis no matter, man; if they did hear,
They would not mark me, or if they did mark,
They would not pity me, yet plead I must;
Therefore I tell my sorrows to the stones;
Who, though they cannot answer my distress,
Yet in some sort they are better than the tribunes,
For that they will not intercept my tale:
When I do weep, they humbly at my feet
Receive my tears and seem to weep with me;
And, were they but attired in grave weeds,
Rome could afford no tribune like to these.
A stone is soft as wax,—tribunes more hard than stones;
A stone is silent, and offendeth not,
And tribunes with their tongues doom men to death.

DUTCH:
t Is eender, knaap; al hoorden ze ook, zij zouden
Er niet op letten; letten zij er op,
Er niet geroerd door zijn; toch moet ik spreken,
Hoe nutt’loos ook.

MORE:
Proverb: As hard as a stone (flint, rock)
Proverb: Pliable as wax

Mark=Take notice, heed
In some sort=Somehow
Intercept=Interrupt
Grave weeds=Somber clothes
Afford=Provide
Doom=Condemn
Compleat:
To mark=Merken, tekenen, opletten
To intercept=Onderscheppen
Grave=Deftig, stemmig, staatig
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad
Afford=Verschaffen, uytleeveren
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, sorrow

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Chiron
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
So, now go tell, an if thy tongue can speak,
Who ’twas that cut thy tongue and ravished thee.
CHIRON
Write down thy mind, bewray thy meaning so,
An if thy stumps will let thee play the scribe.
DEMETRIUS
See, how with signs and tokens she can scrowl.
CHIRON
Go home, call for sweet water, wash thy hands.
DEMETRIUS
She hath no tongue to call, nor hands to wash;
And so let’s leave her to her silent walks.
CHIRON
An ’twere my case, I should go hang myself.
DEMETRIUS
If thou hadst hands to help thee knit the cord.

DUTCH:
Schrijf neder wat gij weet, onthul het zoo;
Speel, laten dit uw stompen toe, voor schrijver.

MORE:
Bewray=Reveal
Sweet=Perfumed
Compleat:
To bewray=Ontedekken, beklappen
Sweet=Frisch

Topics: plans/intentions, deceit, betrayal, punishment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Why, I have not another tear to shed:
Besides, this sorrow is an enemy,
And would usurp upon my watery eyes
And make them blind with tributary tears:
Then which way shall I find Revenge’s cave?
For these two heads do seem to speak to me,
And threat me I shall never come to bliss
Till all these mischiefs be returned again
Even in their throats that have committed them.
Come, let me see what task I have to do.
You heavy people, circle me about,
That I may turn me to each one of you,
And swear unto my soul to right your wrongs.
The vow is made. Come, brother, take a head;
And in this hand the other I will bear.
Lavinia, thou shalt be employed: these arms!
Bear thou my hand, sweet wench, between thy teeth.
As for thee, boy, go get thee from my sight;
Thou art an exile, and thou must not stay:
Hie to the Goths, and raise an army there:
And, if you love me, as I think you do,
Let’s kiss and part, for we have much to do.

DUTCH:
Gij zwaar bezochten, schaart u om mij heen,
Opdat ik mij tot ieder uwer keere
En aan mijn ziele zweer’, uw leed te wreken.

MORE:
Proverb: Care will kill a cat

Usurp upon=Encroach on, intrude
Tributary=Paying tribute
Mischiefs=Calamity, misfortune
Returned=Turned back on
Heavy=Sad
Hie=Hasten
Compleat:
Mischief=Onheil, kwaad, ongeluk, ramp, verderf, heilloosheid
To usurp=’t Onrecht aanmaatigen, met geweld in ‘t bezit dringen, overweldigen
Usurpation=Een onrechtmaatige bezitneeming, of indrang, dwinggebruik, overweldiging
Tributary=Cynsbaar
Mischief=Onheil, kwaad, ongeluk, ramp, verderf, heilloosheid
Returned=Wedergekeerd, weergekomen
Heavy=(sad) Droevig, verdrietig
Hie thee=Rep u, haast u

Topics: proverbs and idioms, sorrow, revenge

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Aemilius
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
If Tamora entreat him, then he will:
For I can smooth and fill his aged ear
With golden promises; that, were his heart
Almost impregnable, his old ears deaf,
Yet should both ear and heart obey my tongue.
Go thou before, be our ambassador:
Say that the emperor requests a parley
Of warlike Lucius, and appoint the meeting
Even at his father’s house, the old Andronicus.
SATURNINUS
Aemilius, do this message honourably:
And if he stand on hostage for his safety,
Bid him demand what pledge will please him best.
AEMILIUS
Your bidding shall I do effectually.

DUTCH:
Ik zal met alle zorg mijn last volbrengen.

MORE:
Entreat=Asks
Smooth=Flatter
Stand on=Demand
Hostage=Security
Pledge=Surety
Effectually=Efficaciously
Compleat:
To entreat=Bidden, ernstig verzoeken
Smooth=Glad maaken, stryken; Iemand streelen, liefkoozen
To stand (or insist) upon one’s privilege=Op zyne voorrechten staan, dezelven vorderen
Hostage=Gyzelaar; pandsman
Pledge=Pand, onderpand, borg
Effectually=Krachtiglyk met der daad

Topics: flattery, honour, persuasion, remedy

Go to Top