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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2 ACT/SCENE: 3.1 SPEAKER: Warwick CONTEXT: Such things become the hatch and brood of time,
And by the necessary form of this,
King Richard might create a perfect guess
That great Northumberland, then false to him,
Would of that seed grow to a greater falseness,
Which should not find a ground to root upon
Unless on you.
KING
Are these things then necessities?
Then let us meet them like necessities.
And that same word even now cries out on us.
They say the Bishop and Northumberland
Are fifty thousand strong. DUTCH: Zijn deze dingen noodzaak?
Dijn haar bejegend, als men noodzaak doet!
MORE:
Proverb: He that once deceives is ever suspected

Guess=Conjecture
False=Betraying

Compleat:
Guess=Gissen, raamen, raaden
False (treacherous)=Verraderlyk Topics: betrayal, age/experience, necessity

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1 Prologue
SPEAKER: Rumour
CONTEXT:
But what mean I
To speak so true at first? My office is
To noise abroad that Harry Monmouth fell
Under the wrath of noble Hotspur’s sword,
And that the King before the Douglas’ rage
Stooped his anointed head as low as death.
This have I rumoured through the peasant towns
Between that royal field of Shrewsbury
And this worm-eaten hold of ragged stone,
Where Hotspur’s father, old Northumberland,
Lies crafty-sick. The posts come tiring on,
And not a man of them brings other news
Than they have learnt of me. From Rumour’s tongues
They bring smooth comforts false, worse than true wrongs.

DUTCH:
Waar Heetspoors vader, graaf Northumberland,
Sluw krank ligt. Moede boden komen aan,
Doch geen brengt ander nieuws dan ik hem leerde,
Elk zoeten schijntroost, komende uit mijn mond,
Veel erger dan een waar bericht, dat wondt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
To noise abroad=Verb meaning to report or spread rumour
Peasant=Condescending description of village inhabitants as ignorant
Crafty-sick=Feigning illness
Post=Courier, messenger

Compleat:
To noise abroad=Uitbrommen, uittrompetten
Peasant=Landman, boer
Crafty=Loos, listig, schalk, doortrapt, leep

Topics: betrayal, deceit, appearance, perception, language

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
EDGAR
The foul fiend bites my back.
FOOL
He’s mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a horse’s health, a boy’s love, or a whore’s oath.

DUTCH:
Hij is gek die vertrouwt op de makheid van een wolf, de gezondheid van een paard, de liefde van een jongen of de eed van een hoer./
Alleen een gek vertrouwt op de tamheid van een wolf, de ge-
zondheid van een paard, de liefde van een jongen of de eed van een hoer.

MORE:

Topics: gullibility, madness, betrayal, trust, deceit

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Please your highness, note
This dangerous conception in this point.
Not friended by his wish, to your high person
His will is most malignant; and it stretches
Beyond you, to your friends.
QUEEN KATHARINE
My learn’d lord cardinal,
Deliver all with charity.
KING HENRY VIII
Speak on:
How grounded he his title to the crown,
Upon our fail? to this point hast thou heard him
At any time speak aught?

DUTCH:
Hoe grondde hij zijn aanspraak op de kroon
Na ons verscheiden? Heeft hij hieromtrent
Zich uitgelaten ?

MORE:
Conception=Plan, idea
Friended=Supported
Deliver=Speak
Grounded=Based
Fail=Death (heirless)
Point=Matter, question
Compleat:
Conception=Bevatting
To deliver a message=Een boodschap afleggen
To deliver a speech handsomly=Een reeden gevoeglyk voortbrengen
To ground upon=Op steunen, op bouwen, grondeeren, vast staat op maaken
Point=Punt, zaak
The matter is come to this point=De zaak is hier toe gekomen

Topics: revenge, plans/intentions, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Westmorland
CONTEXT:

NYM
The king is a good king, but it must be as it may.
He passes some humours and careers.
PISTOL
Let us condole the knight, for, lambkins, we will live.
BEDFORD
’Fore God, his Grace is bold to trust these traitors.
EXETER
They shall be apprehended by and by.
WESTMORELAND
How smooth and even they do bear themselves,
As if allegiance in their bosoms sat
Crownèd with faith and constant loyalty.
BEDFORD
The king hath note of all that they intend,
By interception which they dream not of.

DUTCH:
Wat doen zij zich eenvoudig, arg’loos voor,
Alsof de oprechtheid in hun boezem woonde,
Gekroond door liefde en ongekrenkte trouw.

MORE:

Passes humours=Indulges in strange tendencies
Careers=Short sprints, race
Smooth=unruffled, even, balanced
Hath note of=Is informed of
Interception=The stopping and seizing of something in its passage
Constant=Faithful

Compleat:
The humours=De humeuren van het lichaam; grillen
Humour (dispositon of the mind)=Humeur, of gemoeds gesteldheid

Topics: deceit, conspiracy, appearance, loyalty, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile,
And cry ‘Content’ to that which grieves my heart,
And wet my cheeks with artificial tears,
And frame my face to all occasions.
I’ll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall;
I’ll slay more gazers than the basilisk;
I’ll play the orator as well as Nestor,
Deceive more slily than Ulysses could,
And, like a Sinon, take another Troy.
I can add colours to the chameleon,
Change shapes with Proteus for advantages,
And set the murderous Machiavel to school.
Can I do this, and cannot get a crown?
Tut, were it farther off, I’ll pluck it down.

DUTCH:
Ik kan ‘t kameleon zelfs kleuren leenen,
Als Proteus mij verand’ren , beter zelfs,
Den wreeden Macchiavelli lesjens geven;

MORE:

Proverb: The chameleon can change to all colours save white
Proverb: As many shapes as Proteus
Proverb: The basilisk’s eye is fatal

Artificial=Fake, feigned
Basilisk=Serpent whose gaze was fatal
Nestor=A wise and eloquent warrior in the Trojan War.
Ulysses (or Odysseus)=King of Ithaca, known for his cunning.
Sinon=The Greek soldier responsible for the fall of Troy, who delivered the Wooden Horse concealing the soldiers who attacked the city
Proteus=A shape-shifting sea god.
Machieavel=Niccolò Machiavelli, Italian political philosopher known for ruthless political deception and cunning.

Compleat:
Artificial=Konstig, behendig, aardig, dat niet natuurlyk is
Basilisk=Een basiliskus, als ook zeker zwaar geschut, een Slang genaamd

Topics: deceit, proverbs and idioms, deceit, appearance, betrayal

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Earl of Salisbury
CONTEXT:
CAPTAIN
’Tis thought the king is dead; we will not stay.
The bay-trees in our country are all wither’d
And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
The pale-faced moon looks bloody on the earth
And lean-look’d prophets whisper fearful change;
Rich men look sad and ruffians dance and leap,
The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
The other to enjoy by rage and war:
These signs forerun the death or fall of kings.
Farewell: our countrymen are gone and fled,
As well assured Richard their king is dead.
EARL OF SALISBURY
Ah, Richard, with the eyes of heavy mind
I see thy glory like a shooting star
Fall to the base earth from the firmament.
Thy sun sets weeping in the lowly west,
Witnessing storms to come, woe and unrest:
Thy friends are fled to wait upon thy foes,
And crossly to thy good all fortune goes.

DUTCH:
0 Richard, met een blik vol hangen kommer
Zie ik, gelijk een sterre die verschiet,
Uw glans van ‘t firmament ter aarde ploffen.

MORE:

Lean-looked=Thin-faced
Meteor=A bright phenomenon, thought to be portentous, harbinger of doom
Fixed stars=Symbol of permanence
Forerun=Precede
Assured=Convinced, persuaded
Witness=Portend
Wait upon=Serve
Crossly=Adversely

Compleat:
To assure=Verzekeren
Portend=Voorduiden, voorzeggen

Topics: reputation, failure, betrayal, friendship, loyalty, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
A giant traitor!
WOLSEY
Now, madam, may his Highness live in freedom
And this man out of prison?
QUEEN KATHERINE
God mend all.
KING
There’s something more would out of thee.
What sayst?
SURVEYOR
After ‘the duke his father,’ with ‘the knife,’
He stretch’d him, and, with one hand on his dagger,
Another spread on’s breast, mounting his eyes
He did discharge a horrible oath; whose tenor
Was,—were he evil used, he would outgo
His father by as much as a performance
Does an irresolute purpose.
KING
There’s his period,
To sheathe his knife in us. He is attached;
Call him to present trial: if he may
Find mercy in the law, ’tis his: if none,
Let him not seek ‘t of us: by day and night,
He’s traitor to the height.

DUTCH:
Vindt hij genade
In ‘t oog der wet, het zij; zoo niet, hij wachte
Ze niet bij ons te vinden.

MORE:
Would out of thee=You are trying to say
Tenor=To the effect
Evil used=Treated badly
Outgo=Outdo
Irresolute=Vague
Period=Objective
Attached=Seized, arrested
Compleat:
Tenor=Inhoud, orde, schikking.
According to the tenor of the writing=Naar luyd des geschrifts.
Irresolute=Wankelmoeding, twyfelmoedig, wispeltuurig, wuft
To bring to a period=Tot een eynde brengen
Attached=Beslagen

Topics: betrayal, mercy

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
This villain of mine comes under the prediction—there’s son against father. The king falls from bias of nature—there’s father against child. We have seen the best of our time. Machinations, hollowness, treachery, and all ruinous disorders follow us disquietly to our graves.

DUTCH:
De tijd onthult, wat slinksche list ook heel’;
Aan heim’lijk kwaad valt schande in ‘t eind ten deel.
Het ga u wel.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Hollowness= Emptiness and insincerity
Disquietly= In a manner destroying tranquillity and ease (unquietly)
Bias of nature= Natural course or tendency
Compleat:
Hollow=Hol. A hollow heart=Een geveynsd hart
Treachery=Trouwloosheyd, verraadery
Unquietly=Onrustiglyk

Topics: deceit, reputation, legacy, conspiracy, betrayal

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Men should be what they seem;
Or those that be not, would they might seem none!
OTHELLO
Certain, men should be what they seem.
IAGO
Why then, I think Cassio’s an honest man.
OTHELLO
Nay, yet there’s more in this.
I prithee speak to me as to thy thinkings,
As thou dost ruminate, and give thy worst of thoughts
The worst of words.
IAGO
Good my lord, pardon me;
Though I am bound to every act of duty,
I am not bound to that all slaves are free to.
Utter my thoughts! Why, say they are vile and false?
As where’s that palace, whereinto foul things
Sometimes intrude not? Who has a breast so pure,
But some uncleanly apprehensions
Keep leets and law-days, and in session sit
With meditations lawful?

DUTCH:
Men móét zijn wat men schijnt.
Wie niet oprecht is, moet dat juist niet schijnen.

MORE:

Proverb: Be what thou would seem to be
Proverb: Thought is free

Schmidt:
Ruminate=To muse, to meditate, to ponder
Leet=A manor court, court-leet, private jurisdiction; a day on which such court is held
Apprehensions=Ideas

Compleat:
To ruminate upon (to consider of) a thing=Eene zaak overweegen
Leet, Court leet=Een gerechtshof
Leet-days=Recht-dagen
Apprehension=Bevatting, begryping; jaloezy, achterdogt

Topics: proverbs and idioms, language, duty, betrayal

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Caliban
CONTEXT:
CALIBAN
Why, as I told thee, ’tis a custom with him,
I’ th’ afternoon to sleep. There thou mayst brain him,
Having first seized his books; or with a log
Batter his skull; or paunch him with a stake;
Or cut his weasand with thy knife. Remember
First to possess his books, for without them
He’s but a sot, as I am, nor hath not
One spirit to command. They all do hate him
As rootedly as I. Burn but his books.
He has brave utensils—for so he calls them—
Which when he has a house, he’ll deck withal.

DUTCH:
Maar bedenkt,
Dat ge eerst zijn boeken kaapt, want zonder die
Is hij zoo dom als ik, en dan gehoorzaamt
Geen enk’le geest hem, want zij haten allen
Hem even diep als ik. Verbrandt zijn boeken!

MORE:
Possess=To take possession of, seize, take
Brave utensils=Impressive instruments
Deck=Decorate, furnish
Sot=Dolt, blockhead
Weasand (wezand)=Windpipe
Rootedly=Fixedly, inveterately, from the heart
Compleat:
To take possession of=Bezit neemen
Sot (blockhead)=Zot, domkop
Weasand (windpipe or weasand pipe)=De luchtpyp of gorgel pyp
Rooted=Geworteld, gewroet
Burgersdijk notes:
Dat ge eerst zijn boeken kaapt. Zonder deze is geen geestenbezwering mogelijk.

Topics: learning/education, conspiracy, betrayal, plans/intentions

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
Scarce can I speak, my choler is so great:
O, I could hew up rocks and fight with flint,
I am so angry at these abject terms;
And now, like Ajax Telamonius,
On sheep or oxen could I spend my fury.
I am far better born than is the king,
More like a king, more kingly in my thoughts:
But I must make fair weather yet a while,
Till Henry be more weak and I more strong,—
Buckingham, I prithee, pardon me,
That I have given no answer all this while;
My mind was troubled with deep melancholy.
The cause why I have brought this army hither
Is to remove proud Somerset from the king,
Seditious to his grace and to the state.

DUTCH:
Ik spreek met moeite, zoo vergramd ben ik.
0, rotsen kon ik kloven, keiën werpen,
Zoo toornig word ik bij die trotsche taal

MORE:

Proverb: To make fair weather

Choler=Anger
Make fair weather=Appear civil, friendly
Abject terms=Terrible words
Ajax Telamonius=Ajax, son of Telamon, who slaughtered a flock of sheep in a fit of anger

Compleat:
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
Term=Woord, uitdrukking

Topics: emotion and mood, loyalty, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Hume
CONTEXT:
Hume must make merry with the duchess’ gold;
Marry, and shall. But how now, Sir John Hume!
Seal up your lips, and give no words but mum:
The business asketh silent secrecy.
Dame Eleanor gives gold to bring the witch:
Gold cannot come amiss, were she a devil.
Yet have I gold flies from another coast;
I dare not say, from the rich cardinal
And from the great and new-made Duke of Suffolk,
Yet I do find it so; for to be plain,
They, knowing Dame Eleanor’s aspiring humour,
Have hired me to undermine the duchess
And buz these conjurations in her brain.
They say ‘A crafty knave does need no broker;’
Yet am I Suffolk and the cardinal’s broker.
Hume, if you take not heed, you shall go near
To call them both a pair of crafty knaves.
Well, so it stands; and thus, I fear, at last
Hume’s knavery will be the duchess’ wrack,
And her attainture will be Humphrey’s fall:
Sort how it will, I shall have gold for all.

DUTCH:
Maar wat nu, John Hume?
Steeds mondjendicht; geen ander woord, dan. . . mum!

MORE:

Proverb: A cunning (crafty) knave needs no broker

Modern usage: Mum’s the word
Not invented by Shakespeare: the word was first used in the 14th century, although Shakespeare probably helped to make it popular. The word ‘mum’ may refer to the humming sound made by a closed mouth.
Asketh=Demands, requires
Buz=(or buzz) Whisper
Conjurations=Incantations; obsecration
Wrack=Ruin
Attainture=Shame; conviction

Compleat:
Knave=Een guit, boef
To buzz into one’s ears=Iemand in ‘t oor blaazen
Conjuration=Samenzweering, eedgespan, vloekverwantschap, bezweering
Wrack=(a ship): Een schip aan stukken stooten
To go to wrack=Verlooren gaan, te gronde gaan
To attaint=Overtuigen van misdaad, schuldig verklaaren, betichten; bevlekken, bederf aanzetten
Attainture (of blood)=Bederving of aansteeking des bloeds

Topics: secrecy, ambition, status, betrayal, invented or popularised

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
O world, thy slippery turns! Friends now fast sworn,
Whose double bosoms seems to wear one heart,
Whose hours, whose bed, whose meal and exercise
Are still together, who twin, as ’twere, in love
Unseparable, shall within this hour,
On a dissension of a doit, break out
To bitterest enmity; so fellest foes,
Whose passions and whose plots have broke their sleep
To take the one the other, by some chance,
Some trick not worth an egg, shall grow dear friends
And interjoin their issues. So with me:
My birthplace hate I, and my love’s upon
This enemy town. I’ll enter. If he slay me,
He does fair justice; if he give me way,
I’ll do his country service.

DUTCH:
En zij, die felle vijandschap steeds scheidde,
Wien haat en woede, door verdelgingsplannen,
Niet slapen liet, — zij worden door een toeval,
Een gril, geen ei zelfs waard, tot boezemvrienden,
Verzwaag’ren hunne kind’ren

MORE:
Slippery turns=Instability, sudden changes
Dissenion of a doit=An insignificant, trifling dispute
Interjoin issues=Marry their children

Schmidt:
Doit=Smallest piece of money, a trifle
Fell=Fierce, savage, cruel, pernicious

Compleat:
Doit=Een duit (achtste deel van een stuiver)
Fell (cruel)=Wreede, fel

Topics: friendship, loyalty, dispute, betrayal, life

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
The prince of Cumberland! That is a step
On which I must fall down, or else o’erleap,
For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires;
Let not light see my black and deep desires.
The eye wink at the hand, yet let that be
Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.

DUTCH:
Taant, sterren! dat uw gloed
Den zwarten wensch niet zie van mijn gemoed!

MORE:

Topics: deceit, conspiracy, plans/intentions, guilt, betrayal, foul play

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
But ’tis strange.
And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
Win us with honest trifles, to betray ’s
In deepest consequence.

DUTCH:
t Is vreemd; doch vaak
Verkonden, om ons in ‘t verderf te lokken,
De werktuigen der duisternis ons waarheid,
En winnen ons door eerlijkheid in ‘t kleine,
Om in het grootste ons te verraden!

MORE:
Schmidt:
To win=To gain in a moral sense; to move and prevail with by persuasion or any kind of influence

Topics: deceit, reason, betrayal, truth

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I am glad of this, for now I shall have reason
To show the love and duty that I bear you
With franker spirit. Therefore, as I am bound,
Receive it from me. I speak not yet of proof.
Look to your wife, observe her well with Cassio.
Wear your eyes thus, not jealous nor secure.
I would not have your free and noble nature
Out of self-bounty be abused. Look to ’t.
I know our country disposition well.
In Venice they do let God see the pranks
They dare not show their husbands. Their best conscience
Is not to leave ’t undone, but keep’t unknown.

DUTCH:
Ik ben met onzen landaard wel vertrouwd;
Men laat bij ons den hemel treken zien,
Die de gemaal niet zien mag; ‘t reinst geweten
Zegt daar niet:laat het na”, maar: houdt verborgen.”

MORE:

Proverb: Live charily if not chastely

Secure=Free from suspicion
Self-bounty-Innate generosity
Revolt=Unfaithfulness
Best conscicence=Highest morality

Topics: love, honesty, trust, betrayal, suspicion, evidence, marriage, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Emilia
CONTEXT:
Yes, a dozen, and as many to th’ vantage as
would store the world they played for.
But I do think it is their husbands’ faults
If wives do fall. Say that they slack their duties
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
And pour our treasures into foreign laps,
Or else break out in peevish jealousies,
Throwing restraint upon us. Or say they strike us,
Or scant our former having in despite.
Why, we have galls, and though we have some grace,
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
Their wives have sense like them. They see and smell
And have their palates both for sweet and sour,
As husbands have. What is it that they do
When they change us for others? Is it sport?
I think it is. And doth affection breed it?
I think it doth. Is ’t frailty that thus errs?
It is so too. And have not we affections,
Desires for sport, and frailty, as men have?
Then let them use us well, else let them know,
The ills we do, their ills instruct us so.

DUTCH:
Dus, dat ze ons goed behand’len of bedenken,
Dat, zoo ze ons krenken, zij ons leeren krenken.

MORE:

In despite=Out of spite
Peevish=Silly, spiteful
Galls=Tempers or spirits to cause resentment
Affection=Passion

Compleat:
Peevish=Kribbig, gemelyk

Topics: marriage, trust, betrayal, revenge, age/experience, equality, respect

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
They flattered me like a dog and told me I had white hairs in my beard ere the black ones were there. To say “Ay” and “No” to everything that I said “Ay” and “No” to was no good divinity. When the rain came to wet me once, and the wind to make me chatter, when the thunder would not peace at my bidding—there I found ’em, there I smelt ’em out. Go to, they are not men o’ their words. They told me I was everything. ‘Tis a lie, I am not ague-proof.

DUTCH:
Zij zeiden mij, dat ik alles en nog wat was ;
gelogen is ‘t – ik kan niet eens tegen de koorts op./
Loop heen, hun woorden betekenden
niets, ze zeiden dat ik alles voor hen was. Dat is een leugen.
Ik ben niet onvatbaar voor koorts.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Ague-proof=Able to resist the causes which produce agues (also: Immune to severe chill)
Divinity=Theology
Compleat:
Ague=Koorts die met koude komt, een verpoozende koorts

Topics: flattery, deceit, truth, promise, betrayal

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
Corrupters of my faith, you shall no more
Be stomachers to my heart. Thus may poor fools
Believe false teachers. Though those that are betrayed
Do feel the treason sharply, yet the traitor
Stands in worse case of woe. And thou, Posthumus,
That didst set up
My disobedience ’gainst the King my father
And make me put into contempt the suits
Of princely fellows, shalt hereafter find
It is no act of common passage, but
A strain of rareness: and I grieve myself
To think, when thou shalt be disedged by her
That now thou tirest on, how thy memory
Will then be panged by me.—Prithee, dispatch.
The lamb entreats the butcher. Where’s thy knife?
Thou art too slow to do thy master’s bidding
When I desire it too.

DUTCH:
Van hier, van hier,
Die mijn geloof vervalscht hebt! Weg! niet langer
Dekt gij mij ‘t hart! O, arme dwazen schenken
Geloof aan valsche leeraars. Doch hoe diep
‘t Verraad ook de bedroog’nen griev’, toch treft
Hem, die verraadt, veel erger wee.


Disedged=Blunted, with the edge taken off (Cf. Hamlet 3.2, “It would cost you a groaning to take off my edge”)
False teachers=Teachers of heresy

Onions:
Stomacher=Ornamental covering for the breast worn by women
To tire=To prey or feed ravenously “upon”, rend prey to pieces
Pang=To afflict with great pain, to torment

Compleat:
To blunt=Stomp maaken, verstompen
A false prophet=Een valsch Propheet
A false (erroneous) opinion=Een dwaalend gevoelen

Topics: corruption, manipulation, betrayal, order/society, memory, consequences

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1 Prologue
SPEAKER: Rumour
CONTEXT:
Open your ears, for which of you will stop
The vent of hearing when loud Rumour speaks?
I, from the orient to the drooping west,
Making the wind my post-horse, still unfold
The acts commenced on this ball of earth.
Upon my tongues continual slanders ride,
The which in every language I pronounce,
Stuffing the ears of men with false reports.
I speak of peace while covert enmity
Under the smile of safety wounds the world.

DUTCH:
Voortdurend zweeft er laster op mijn topgen,
En dien verkondig ik in elke taal ,
Der menschen oor met valsche tijding vullend.
Van vrede spreek ik, als verholen haat,
Schijngoedig lachend, diep de wereld wondt;

MORE:

Stop=Block
Vent of hearing=Ears
Post-horse=A horse kept at a post-house or the inn for messengers or travellers; emblem of swiftness
Drooping=West, where the sun sets
Unfold=Reveal

Compleat:
Unfold=Ontvouwen, open leggen
Drooping=Neerslagtig, moedeloosheid; quynenende

Topics: betrayal, deceit, appearance, perception, language

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Donalbain
CONTEXT:
Our separated fortune
Shall keep us both the safer. Where we are,
There’s daggers in men’s smiles. The near in blood,
The nearer bloody.

DUTCH:
Naar Ierland ik; het veiligst voor ons beiden
Is, dat we uiteengaan; in een glimlach schuilt
Hier licht een dolk. Hoe nader in den bloede,
Des te eerder bloedig.

MORE:
An allusion to a ‘received truth’/proverb, “The nearer in kin the less in kindness” (1565).

Topics: conspiracy, deceit, appearance, betrayal, relationship, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Ah, what’s more dangerous than this fond affiance!
Seems he a dove? His feathers are but borrowed,
For he’s disposed as the hateful raven:
Is he a lamb? His skin is surely lent him,
For he’s inclined as is the ravenous wolf.
Who cannot steal a shape that means deceit?
Take heed, my lord; the welfare of us all
Hangs on the cutting short that fraudful man.

DUTCH:
Is hij een lam? zijn vacht in hem geleend;
Als van een fellen wolf is zijn gemoed.
Wie steelt geen mom, als hij bedriegen wil?
Vrees op uw hoede, heer; ons aller welzijn
Hangt aan ‘t voorkómen van dien valschen man.

MORE:

Proverb: A wolf in sheep’s clothing (‘His skin is surely lent him’)

Raven=Symbolic of a bad omen
Fond=Foolish
Affiance=Confidence
Steal a shape=Create a false impression or appearance
Hateful=Deserving hate
Hangs on=Depends on

Compleat:
Fond (foolish)=Dwaas
Affiance=Vertrouwen, hoop
Hatefull=Haatelyk
These things seem to hang one upon the other=Deeze zaaken schynen van malkander af te hangen

Topics: deceit, appearance, good and bad, trust, betrayal, caution

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Gower
CONTEXT:
Go, go. You are a counterfeit cowardly knave. Will you mock at an ancient tradition begun upon an honorable respect and worn as a memorable trophy of predeceased valour, and dare not avouch in your deeds any of your words? I have seen you gleeking and galling at this gentleman twice or thrice. You thought because he could not speak English in the native garb, he could not therefore handle an English cudgel. You find it otherwise, and henceforth let a Welsh correction teach you a good English condition. Fare you well.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij spotten over een oud gebruik, dat uit een eervolle aanleiding ontsproot en als een gedenkwaardig teeken van vroegere dapperheid gedragen wordt, en waagt gij het niet, zelfs éen uwer woorden door daden waar te maken?

MORE:

To gleek=Scoff, sneer
Schmidt:
To gall (with at)=To quiz, to scoff: “gleeking and galling at this gentleman”
Predeceased valour=Brave men who have died
Garb=Fashion
Correction=Chastisement
Condition=Disposition

Compleat:
Condition=Staat, gesteltenis
Good-conditioned=Goedaardig
Correction=Verbetering, tuchtiging, berisping
Garb=Kleeding; (carriage)=houding

Topics: betrayal, language, promise, appearance, intellect

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