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PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.8
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
What counsel, lords? Edward from Belgia,
With hasty Germans and blunt Hollanders,
Hath pass’d in safety through the narrow seas,
And with his troops doth march amain to London;
And many giddy people flock to him.
KING HENRY VI
Let’s levy men, and beat him back again.
CLARENCE
A little fire is quickly trodden out;
Which, being suffer’d, rivers cannot quench.

DUTCH:
Een kleine vlam is schielijk uitgetreden ;
Maar woelt zij voort, dan bluscht een stroom haar niet.


MORE:

CITED IN HONG KONG LAW:
Murder trial of Nancy Ann Kissel v HKSAR (FACC 2/2009)

Proverb: Of a little spark a great fire

Amain=In haste
Giddy=Fickle
Levy=Collect, raise (e.g. raising a force for war)
Suffer=Tolerate

Compleat:
Amain=Zeer geweldig, heftig
To levy=(soldiers) Soldaaten ligten, krygsvolk werven
Giddy=Duizelig.
Giddy-headed=Ylhoofdig, hersenloos, wervelziek
Suffer=Gedoogen, toelaaten

Topics: cited in law, caution, wisdom, consequence

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
MESSENGER
So like you, sir, ambassadors from Rome;
The one is Caius Lucius.
CYMBELINE
A worthy fellow,
Albeit he comes on angry purpose now.
But that’s no fault of his. We must receive him
According to the honour of his sender,
And towards himself, his goodness forespent on us,
We must extend our notice.

DUTCH:
t Is een waardig man,
Al is ook toorn het doel van zijne komst;
Want zijn schuld is dit niet


Goodness forespent=Good offices done/shown previously
Notice=Attention, regard

Topics: value, status, blame, anger, merit

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Exeter
CONTEXT:
EXETER
Well didst thou, Richard, to suppress thy voice;
For, had the passions of thy heart burst out,
I fear we should have seen decipher’d there
More rancorous spite, more furious raging broils,
Than yet can be imagined or supposed.
But howsoe’er, no simple man that sees
This jarring discord of nobility,
This shouldering of each other in the court,
This factious bandying of their favourites,
But that it doth presage some ill event.
‘Tis much when sceptres are in children’s hands;
But more when envy breeds unkind division;
There comes the ruin, there begins confusion.

DUTCH:
t Is erg, indien een kind den scepter zwaait,
Maar erger nog, zoo haat verdeeldheid broedt,
Dan gaan we ellende en omkeer te gemoet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Deciphered=Be revealed, detected
Rancorous=Malignant, hateful
Broil=(a) tumult, noisy quarrel, contention; (b) war, combat, battle
Simple=Common
Jarring=Clashing, discordant
Bandy=To beat to and fro (fig. of words, looks)
Shoulder=To push with violence and with a view of supplanting
Unkind=Unnatural

Compleat:
Deciphered=Ontcyferd
Rancorous=Nydig, vik afgunst en nyd
Broil=Oproer, beroerte, gewoel
Simple=Eenvoudig, onnozel
To jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
Bandy=Een bal weer toeslaan; een zaak voor en tegen betwisten
Shoulder=Schouderen

Topics: envy, conflict, consequence, ruin

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Reignier
CONTEXT:
REIGNIER
Defer no time, delays have dangerous ends,
Enter and cry “The Dauphin!” presently,
And then do execution on the watch.
TALBOT
France, thou shalt rue this treason with thy tears,
If Talbot but survive thy treachery.
Pucelle, that witch, that damned sorceress,
Hath wrought this hellish mischief unawares,
That hardly we escaped the pride of France.

DUTCH:
Thans niet getalmd! Elk uitstel eindigt boos;
Dringt binnen; roept terstond dan: „De Dauphijn!”
En slaat de wachters aan de poort ter neer.

MORE:
Proverb: Delay breeds danger (is dangerous)

The watch=The sentinels
Do execution on=Kill
Unawares=Undetected
Hardly=With difficulty

Compleat:
Unawares=Onverhoeds verrassen; Onbedacht, onvoorzigtig, by vergissing
The watch=De wacht
Hardly=(with much ado) Bezwaarlyk, met veel moeiten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, time, consequence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
Diseas—d nature oftentimes breaks forth
In strange eruptions; oft the teeming earth
Is with a kind of colic pinched and vexed
By the imprisoning of unruly wind
Within her womb, which, for enlargement striving,
Shakes the old beldam earth and topples down
Steeples and moss-grown towers.

DUTCH:
Niet zelden breekt een ziekte der natuur
In dolle krampen uit; de zwangere aard
Wordt vaak, als door koliek gekweld, genepen;

MORE:
Beldam=old woman
Teeming=Fruitful

Topics: nature, life, consequence

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Officer
CONTEXT:
OFFICER
Masters, let him go.
He is my prisoner, and you shall not have him.
PINCH
Go, bind this man, for he is frantic too.
ADRIANA
What wilt thou do, thou peevish officer?
Hast thou delight to see a wretched man
Do outrage and displeasure to himself?
OFFICER
He is my prisoner. If I let him go,
The debt he owes will be required of me.

DUTCH:
t Is mijn gevang’ne; ontsnapt hij mij, dan wordt,
Wat hij betalen moet, op mij verhaald

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
“If a sheriff or gaoler suffers a prisoner to escape upon mesne process (that is, during the pendency of a suit), he is liable to action on the case.” (Cro. Eliz. 625, Bennion v Watson)
Peevish=Silly, spiteful
Displeasure=Offence, harm

Schmidt:
Outrage=Rude violence, contempt shown to law and decency

Compleat:
Peevish=Kribbig, gemelyk
Outrage=Smaad, spyt, overlast, leed
Displeasure=Misnoegen, ongenade
To do a displeasure to one=Iemand verdriet aandoen

Topics: law/legal, debt/obligation, punishment, remedy, consequence

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Caitiff, to pieces shake,
That under covert and convenient seeming
Hast practised on man’s life. Close pent-up guilts,
Rive your concealing continents and cry
These dreadful summoners grace. I am a man
More sinned against than sinning.

DUTCH:
Een man meer gezondigd tegen dan zondigend/
Ik ben een man tegen wie meer gezondigd is dan hij zelf gezondigd heeft

MORE:
Sometimes mistranslated, e.g. “tegen wie je meer gezondigd hebt dan je gezondigd hebt” or “Ik ben een man die meer heeft gezondigd dan de zondigen”
Seeming=Hypocrisy
Caitiff=Wretch
Continent=Container, cover.
Close pent-up guilts=Concealed crimes
Practised on=Plotted against
Rive=open up
Summoner=official who summoned offenders to appear before ecclesiastical courts
Compleat:
To rive asunder=Opscheuren, opsplyten, opbarsten
Summoner=Een gerechtsboode

Topics: mercy, offence, conspiracy, secrecy, blame

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
Here is a purr of fortune’s, sir, or of fortune’s
cat,—but not a musk-cat, —that has fallen into the
unclean fishpond of her displeasure, and, as he
says, is muddied withal: pray you, sir, use the
carp as you may; for he looks like a poor, decayed,
ingenious, foolish, rascally knave. I do pity his
distress in my similes of comfort and leave him to
your lordship.
PAROLLES
My lord, I am a man whom fortune hath cruelly
scratched.
LAFEW
And what would you have me to do? ‘Tis too late to
pare her nails now. Wherein have you played the
knave with fortune, that she should scratch you, who
of herself is a good lady and would not have knaves
thrive long under her? There’s a quart d’ecu for
you: let the justices make you and fortune friends:
I am for other business.

DUTCH:
Edel heer, ik ben een man, die door Fortuin wreed
gekrabd is.

MORE:
Purr or pur=Piece of dung, pun on cat’s purr; asl pun on the knave in a deck of cards
Carp=(1) Fish and (2) Some who talks or complains a lot
Withal=From it, as a consequence
Musk-cat=Musk-deer, valued for its scent (also known as muscat)
Similes of=Comparative
Compleat:
Musk-cat=Civet cat
Carp=Karper
To carp=Bedillen, muggeziften
Simile=Gelykenis, vergelyking

Topics: consequence, fate/destiny

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
If it were done when ’tis done, then ’twere well
It were done quickly. If th’ assassination
Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
With his surcease, success: that but this blow
Might be the be-all and the end-all

DUTCH:
Ware ‘t gedaan, als ‘t is gedaan, dan waar’
Het goed, zoo ‘t ras gedaan werd

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb “The thing done has an end” (c1380). Also Chaucer, “But that is don, is not to be done” (c1380).
Be-all and end-all (OED hyphenates)=the whole thing, perfection, ultimate goal.
Dyce:
Trammel up= To tie up or net up (a trammel is both a kind of draw net and a contrivance for teaching horses to pace or amble).
Compleat:
Tramel=Zekere slach van een vischnet
Trammel=Een beugel

Topics: offence, death, consequence, achievement, risk

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Thomas Mowbray
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
(…) Thou art a traitor and a miscreant,
Too good to be so and too bad to live,
Since the more fair and crystal is the sky,
The uglier seem the clouds that in it fly.
Once more, the more to aggravate the note,
With a foul traitor’s name stuff I thy throat;
And wish, so please my sovereign, ere I move,
What my tongue speaks my right drawn sword may prove.
THOMAS MOWBRAY
Let not my cold words here accuse my zeal:
Tis not the trial of a woman’s war,
The bitter clamour of two eager tongues,
Can arbitrate this cause betwixt us twain;
The blood is hot that must be cool’d for this:
Yet can I not of such tame patience boast
As to be hush’d and nought at all to say:
First, the fair reverence of your highness curbs me
From giving reins and spurs to my free speech;
Which else would post until it had return’d
These terms of treason doubled down his throat.
Setting aside his high blood’s royalty,
And let him be no kinsman to my liege,
60I do defy him, and I spit at him;
Call him a slanderous coward and a villain:
Which to maintain I would allow him odds,
And meet him, were I tied to run afoot
Even to the frozen ridges of the Alps,
Or any other ground inhabitable,
Where ever Englishman durst set his foot.
Mean time let this defend my loyalty,
By all my hopes, most falsely doth he lie.

DUTCH:
Laat niet mijn koude taal mijn moed doen laken.
Niet de schermuts’ling van een vrouwentwist,
De bitt’re smaad van twee verwoede tongen,
Kan deze zaak beslechten tusschen ons;

MORE:

Miscreant=Villain, scoundrel
Good=Noble in rank
Crystal=Bright, transparent
Aggravate the note=Add weight, exacerbate, increase the reproach
Accuse=Belie, impugn
Zeal=Intense and eager interest or endeavour, ardour
Woman’s war=Ref to ‘women are words, men deeds’
Eager=Sharp, acidic
Curbs, reins, spurs=Equestrian metaphors
Post=Gallop

Compleat:
The crystalline heaven=De kristalyne Hemel
Aggravate=Verzwaaren
Zeal=Yver
Eager=Scherp, zuur, wrang

Topics: blame, dispute, language

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1 Prologue
SPEAKER: Rumour
CONTEXT:
And who but Rumour, who but only I,
Make fearful musters and prepared defense,
Whiles the big year, swoll’n with some other grief,
Is thought with child by the stern tyrant war,
And no such matter? Rumour is a pipe
Blown by surmises, jealousies, conjectures,
And of so easy and so plain a stop
That the blunt monster with uncounted heads,
The still-discordant wav’ring multitude,
Can play upon it.

DUTCH:
Een fluit is het Gerucht,
Waar gissing, argwaan, ijverzucht op blaast,
Met kleppen, zoo gemakk’lijk voor den greep,
Dat zelfs het stomp, ontelbaar-hoofdig monster,
De wisselzieke, steeds verdeelde menigt’,
Er op kan spelen

MORE:

Proverb: As many heads as Hydra
Proverb: A multitude of people is a beast of many heads

Blunt monster with uncounted heads=Hydra, a many-headed monster (used to describe the common people)

Schmidt:
Stop=In music, the holes in a flute or pipe to regulate the sounds
Still=Continuously
Discordant=Disagreeing
Blunt=Dull in understanding

Compleat:
Discordant=Tweedragtig, oneenig; – wanluidende.
Blunt=Stomp, bot, plomp, onbebouwen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, good and bad, consequence

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Albany
CONTEXT:
GONERIL
No, no, my lord,
Though I condemn not, yet under pardon
You are much more ataxed for want of wisdom
Than praised for harmful mildness.
ALBANY
How far your eyes may pierce I cannot tell.
Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well.

DUTCH:
Hoe scherp jouw blik is, kan men slechts bevroeden;
het betere is vaak vijand van het goede.

MORE:
Later versions have replaced “ataxt’ (ataxed= text, censured) with “attaskt”.
Proverb: Let well alone or ‘Some men so strive in cunning to excell/That oft they marre the worke before was well’ (Dent)
Schmidt:
Harmful mildness=Gentleness, clemency (leniency resulting in further harm)
Attasked=To reprove, to blame
How far your eyes may pierce=How perceptive you are
Compleat:
To pierce=Doorboren, Doordringen
Taxed=Geschat; Beschuldigd

Topics: blame, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
O, pardon me that I descend so low
To show the line and the predicament
Wherein you range under this subtle King.
Shall it for shame be spoken in these days,
Or fill up chronicles in time to come,
That men of your nobility and power
Did gage them both in an unjust behalf
(As both of you, God pardon it, have done)
To put down Richard, that sweet lovely rose,
And plant this thorn, this canker, Bolingbroke?
And shall it in more shame be further spoken
That you are fooled, discarded, and shook off
By him for whom these shames you underwent?

DUTCH:
Moet men, o schande, in deze tijden zeggen,
Of in kronieken voor de toekomst boeken,
Dat mannen van uw adel, uwe macht,
Zich beiden voor een slechte zaak verpandden

MORE:
Canker’ blossom (or canker rose) was a dog rose or wild rose. Also used to refer to something that would destroy, infect or decay.
Schmidt:
Gage=To engage, to bind
Predicament=Category
Behalf=Affair, cause
Onions:
Range=Occupy a position
Compleat=
To canker=Inkankeren, ineeten
Predicament=Zegwoord, alles dat van iets kan gezegd worden

Topics: cause, deception, blame

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Carlisle
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Go, some of you convey him to the Tower.
KING RICHARD II
O, good! convey? conveyers are you all,
That rise thus nimbly by a true king’s fall.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
On Wednesday next we solemnly set down
Our coronation: lords, prepare yourselves.
ABBOT
A woeful pageant have we here beheld.
BISHOP OF CARLISLE
The woe’s to come; the children yet unborn.
Shall feel this day as sharp to them as thorn.

DUTCH:
Nog volgt het wee; de thans nog ongeboor’nen
Zal deze dag eens steken, fel als doornen.

MORE:

Proverb: As sharp as a thorn

Convey=Carry, transport; to carry away mysteriously (and hence used to mean ‘steal’)
Conveyer=Thief
Pageant=Spectacle

Compleat:
Convey=Voeren, leiden, overvoeren, overdraagen (rechten)
Convey away=Wegvoeren
Conveyer=Overvoerder, vervoerder
Pageant=Een trioomfboog; grootsche vertooning, pracht

Burgersdijk notes:
Inhalen? goed! — Inhalig zijt gij allen. In ‘t Engelsch staat: O, good! convey? conveyers are you all. Convey beteekent: wegbrengen , weggeleiden, maar ook stelen.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, fate/destiny, consequence

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Northumberland, thou ladder wherewithal
The mounting Bolingbroke ascends my throne,
The time shall not be many hours of age
More than it is ere foul sin gathering head
Shalt break into corruption: thou shalt think,
Though he divide the realm and give thee half,
It is too little, helping him to all;
And he shall think that thou, which know’st the way
To plant unrightful kings, wilt know again,
Being ne’er so little urged, another way
To pluck him headlong from the usurped throne.
The love of wicked men converts to fear;
That fear to hate, and hate turns one or both
To worthy danger and deserved death.

DUTCH:
Bij snoode vrienden wordt licht liefde vrees,
De vrees tot haat, en haat brengt éen van beiden,
Of beiden, welverdiend gevaar en dood.

MORE:
Wherewithal=With which, by means of which (he is using your ladder)
Gathering head=Coming to a head
Sin=Transgression of the divine law
Helping=Having helped
Unrightful=Illegitimate
So little urged=With only the slightest encouragement
Headlong=Unceremoniously

Compleat:
Now my designs gathering to a head=Nu beginnen myn voornemens ryp te worden
Urged=Gedrongen, geprest, aangedrongen
Headlong=Vlak voorover, plotseling

Topics: loyalty, betrayal, conspiracy, corruption, consequence

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Sicinius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Get you hence instantly, and tell those friends,
They have chose a consul that will from them take
Their liberties; make them of no more voice
Than dogs that are as often beat for barking
As therefore kept to do so.
SICINIUS
Let them assemble,
And on a safer judgment all revoke
Your ignorant election; enforce his pride,
And his old hate unto you; besides, forget not
With what contempt he wore the humble weed,
How in his suit he scorn’d you; but your loves,
Thinking upon his services, took from you
The apprehension of his present portance,
Which most gibingly, ungravely, he did fashion
After the inveterate hate he bears you.
BRUTUS
Lay
A fault on us, your tribunes; that we laboured,
No impediment between, but that you must
Cast your election on him.
SICINIUS
Say, you chose him
More after our commandment than as guided
By your own true affections, and that your minds,
Preoccupied with what you rather must do
Than what you should, made you against the grain
To voice him consul: lay the fault on us.

DUTCH:
Gaat, spoedt u tot die vrienden; maakt hun duid’lijk,
Dat zij een consul kozen, die hun rechten
Hun nemen zal, hun zooveel stem zal laten
Als honden, die men ranselt om hun blaffen
En toch voor ‘t blaffen houdt.

MORE:
Proverb: Goes against the grain

Took from you the apprehension …portance=Blinded you to his behaviour
Ungravely=Without appropriate gravity or seriousness
Fashion after=Frame to conform with
Gibingly=Mockingly
Portance=Carriage, demeanour
Weeds=Clothing
Inveterate=Long-standing

Compleat:
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad
Inveterate=Verouderd, ingeworteld
The inveterate hatred=Een ingeworteld haat

Topics: appearance, deceit, blame, gullibility, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Cornwall
CONTEXT:
Though well we may not pass upon his life
Without the form of justice, yet our power
Shall do a courtesy to our wrath, which men
May blame, but not control.—Who’s there? The traitor?

DUTCH:
Al mag ik zonder rechtspraak hem niet dooden,
Ik zal mijn macht nu voor mijn toorn doen buigen,
En wie dit ook veroordeelt, niemand zal
Het tegengaan./
Al kan ik hem niet zonder een proces
ter dood veroordelen, mijn rechtsmacht zal
zich voegen naar mijn toorn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Pass upon=Pass judgment on
Courtesy (curtsy in some versions)=Do a courtesy to, yield to (bend to)
Compleat:
To make a courtesy (curtsy)=Neigen
To pass sentence upon one=Vonnis over iemand vellen, vonnis over iemand uitspreeken,
Burgersdijk notes:
Zonder rechtspraak. Men bedenke, dat Gloster onder de pairs van het rijk te rekenen is.

Topics: life, justice, authority, punishment, blame, judgment

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Many years of happy days befall
My gracious sovereign, my most loving liege!
THOMAS MOWBRAY
Each day still better other’s happiness;
Until the heavens, envying earth’s good hap,
Add an immortal title to your crown!
KING RICHARD II
We thank you both: yet one but flatters us,
As well appeareth by the cause you come;
Namely to appeal each other of high treason.
Cousin of Hereford, what dost thou object
Against the Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray?

DUTCH:
Hebt beiden dank; doch een is slechts een vleier;
De reden van uw hierzijn spreekt dit uit:
Gij legt elkander hoogverraad te last.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Liege=Term used to express allegiance to the king
Hap=Fortune
Appeal=Accuse

Compleat:
A liege Lord=Een Opperheer, die onder niemand staat

Topics: fate/destiny, law/legal, blame, dispute

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
O, many
Have broke their backs with laying manors on ’em
For this great journey. What did this vanity
But minister communication of
A most poor issue?
NORFOLK
Grievingly I think
The peace between the French and us not values
The cost that did conclude it.
BUCKINGHAM
Every man,
After the hideous storm that followed, was
A thing inspired and, not consulting, broke
Into a general prophecy: that this tempest,
Dashing the garment of this peace, aboded
The sudden breach on ’t.

DUTCH:
En wat deed die pronk,
Dan dat hij diende voor een samenkomst,
Die luttel vruchts droeg?

MORE:
Proverb: To break one’s back
Manors=Estates
Vanity=Folly
Minister communication=Put into effect
Issue=Outcome
Not values the cost=Isn’t worth the price paid
Dashing=Battering
To abode=To be a (bad) omen
Compleat:
Manor-house=Een huys of slot van den ambachtsheer
Vanity=Ydelheyd
To minister=Bedienen
Issue=Een uytgang, uytslag, uytkomst
Value=Waarderen, achten, schatten
To dash=Slaan, stooten, verbryzelen, spatten
To bode=Voorzeggen, voorspellen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, consequence, value

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Out, damned spot! Out, I say!—One, two. Why, then, ’tis time to do ’t. Hell is murky!—Fie, my lord, fie! A soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account?—Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him.

DUTCH:
Wat behoeven wij te duchten, dat iemand het te weten
komt, als niemand onze macht ter verantwoording kan
roepen

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, guilt, suspicion, consequence, punishment

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Edmund
CONTEXT:
What you have charged me with, that have I done,
And more, much more; the time will bring it out.
‘Tis past, and so am I. But what art thou
That hast this fortune on me? If thou’rt noble,
I do forgive thee.
EDGAR
Let’s exchange charity.
I am no less in blood than thou art, Edmond.
If more, the more th’hast wronged me.
My name is Edgar, and thy father’s son.
The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
Make instruments to plague us.
The dark and vicious place where thee he got
Cost him his eyes.

DUTCH:
Al wat gij mij verweet, ik heb ‘t gedaan,
En meer, veel meer; de tijd zal ‘t openbaren;
‘t Is al voorbij, ik ook. Maar wie zijt gij,
Die mij versloegt ? Zijt gij van adel, dan
Vergeef ik u.

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Schmidt;
Charity=That disposition of heart which inclines men to think favourably of their fellow-men, and to do them good.

Topics: blame, offence, mercy, civility, fate/destiny, status

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