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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry V ACT/SCENE: 2.4 SPEAKER: Exeter CONTEXT: From him, and thus he greets your Majesty:
He wills you, in the name of God almighty,
That you divest yourself and lay apart
The borrowed glories that, by gift of heaven,
By law of nature and of nations, ’longs
To him and to his heirs—namely, the crown
And all wide-stretchèd honours that pertain
By custom and the ordinance of times
Unto the crown of France. That you may know
’Tis no sinister nor no awkward claim
Picked from the wormholes of long-vanished days
Nor from the dust of old oblivion raked,
He sends you this most memorable line. DUTCH: Opdat gij weten moogt,
Dat dit geen slinksche, wraakb’re vord’ring is,
Ontdekt in ‘t molm van lang vervlogen dagen,
Gerakeld uit vergetelheids oud stof.
MORE:
Ordinance of times=Law of centuries
‘longs=Belongs
Sinister=Unfair, wrong; deceitful
Awkward=Perverse, unbecoming

Compleat:
Awkward=Averechts
Aukward=Averechts, verkeerd
Sinister (or unlawful)=Onbetaamelyk, ongeoorloofd Topics: claim, value, deceit, honour

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
The quality of mercy is not strained.
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
‘Tis mightiest in the mightiest. It becomes
The thronèd monarch better than his crown.
His scepter shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings,
But mercy is above this sceptered sway.
It is enthronèd in the hearts of kings.
It is an attribute to God himself.
And earthly power doth then show likest God’s
When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,
Though justice be thy plea, consider this—
That in the course of justice none of us
Should see salvation. We do pray for mercy,
And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much
To mitigate the justice of thy plea,
Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice
Must needs give sentence ‘gainst the merchant there.

DUTCH:
Daarom,
Beroept ge u, jood, op ‘t recht, bedenk ook dit,
Dat, naar gerechtigheid, geen onzer ooit
Behouden wordt; wij bidden om genade;
En de eigen bede leert ons, zelf aan and’ren
Genade te oef’nen.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Monroe v. United Air Lines, Inc., Docket No. 79 C 360, 3 slip opinion (Ill., 1983)

The justice=the justness, merit (of your argument)
Needs (always used with must or will): indispensably, absolutely
Compleat:
Salvation=Zaligheid, behoudenis
It must needs be so=Het moet noodzaakelyk zo zyn
Do it no more than needs must=Doet het niet meer als volstrekt noodzaakelyk is.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
When we grow stronger, then we’ll make our claim:
Till then, ’tis wisdom to conceal our meaning.
HASTINGS
Away with scrupulous wit! Now arms must rule.
GLOUCESTER
And fearless minds climb soonest unto crowns.
Brother, we will proclaim you out of hand:
The bruit thereof will bring you many friends.
KING EDWARD IV
Then be it as you will; for ’tis my right,
And Henry but usurps the diadem.

DUTCH:
Wie moedig klimt, bereikt het eerst de kroon.

MORE:

Meaning=Intention
Scrupulous=Full of doubt and perplexity, too nice in determinations of conscience (Schmidt)
Wit=Reasoning, intellect
Out of hand=Immediately
Bruit=News, rumour
Diadem=Crown

Compleat:
Out of hand=Terstond, op staande voet
He came with a bad meaning=Hy kwam met een kwaad opzet
Wit (wisdom, judgement)=Wysheid, oordeel
Out of hand=Op staande voet, terstond
Bruit=Gerucht, geraas
Diadem=Een kroon, wrongkroon

Topics: claim, courage, achievement, wisdom

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Ephesus
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
Here is thy fee. Arrest him, officer.
I would not spare my brother in this case
If he should scorn me so apparently.
OFFICER
I do arrest you, sir. You hear the suit.
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
I do obey thee till I give thee bail.
But, sirrah, you shall buy this sport as dear
As all the metal in your shop will answer.
ANGELO
Sir, sir, I will have law in Ephesus,
To your notorious shame, I doubt it not.

DUTCH:
Ik onderwerp mij, tot ik borgtocht stel. —
Maar, heerschap, gij bekoopt die scherts zoo duur,
Dat heel uw winkel zoo veel goud niet levert.

MORE:
Apparently=Openly, evidently
Sport=Jest, mockery
Buy=Pay (dearly) for

Topics: law/legal, offence, security, debt/obligation, claim

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
CORIOLANUS
Whoever gave that counsel to give forth
The corn o’ th’ storehouse gratis, as ’twas used
Sometime in Greece—
MENENIUS Well, well, no more of that.
CORIOLANUS
Though there the people had more absolute power,
I say they nourished disobedience, fed
The ruin of the state.
BRUTUS
Why shall the people give
One that speaks thus their voice?
CORIOLANUS
I’ll give my reasons,
More worthier than their voices. They know the corn
Was not our recompense, resting well assured
They ne’er did service for ’t. Being pressed to th’ war,
Even when the navel of the state was touched,
They would not thread the gates. This kind of service
Did not deserve corn gratis. Being i’ the war,
Their mutinies and revolts, wherein they show’d
Most valour, spoke not for them. The accusation
Which they have often made against the senate,
All cause unborn, could never be the motive
Of our so frank donation.

DUTCH:
Schoon daar het volk veel grooter macht bezat,
Die, zeg ik, kweekte muiterij en voedde
‘t Verderf des staats.

MORE:
Was not our recompense=Was not a reward we granted
Cause unborn=No existing cause

Schmidt:
Sometime=For a while, used to do
Pressed=Impressed (into military service)
Navel=Centre (of the state)
Thread=Pass through

Compleat:
Press (or force) soldiers=Soldaaten pressen, dat is hen dwingen om dienst te neemen

Topics: poverty and wealth, reason, order/society, claim, work

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
I humbly thank your highness;
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnow’d, where my chaff
And corn shall fly asunder: for, I kno§w,
There’s none stands under more calumnious tongues
Than I myself, poor man.
KING HENRY VIII
Stand up, good Canterbury:
Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
In us, thy friend: give me thy hand, stand up:
Prithee, let’s walk. Now, by my holidam.
What manner of man are you? My lord, I look’d
You would have given me your petition, that
I should have ta’en some pains to bring together
Yourself and your accusers; and to have heard you,
Without endurance, further.

DUTCH:
Mylord, ik dacht,
Dat gij mij zoudt verzoeken, een’ge moeite
Te nemen, uw beschuldigers terstond
Te ontbieden en u, zonder uitstel, verder
Te hooren.

MORE:
Winnow=Process of sorting wheat from chaff, i.e. in the wind (cleared)
Stands under=Suffers
Calumnious=Slanderous
Holidame=Holy dame (also Holydame, halidom)
Looked=Expected
Petition=Request
Endurance=Hardship
Compleat:
To winnow=Wannen, ziften
Calumnious=Faamroovend, lasterlyk
Petition=Verzoek, smeekschrift
To endure=Verdraagen, harden, duuren

Topics: innocence, evidence, claim, dispute

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Son
CONTEXT:
Ill blows the wind that profits nobody.
This man, whom hand to hand I slew in fight,
May be possessed with some store of crowns ;
And I, that haply take them from him now,
May yet ere night yield both my life and them
To some man else, as this dead man doth me.
Who’s this? O God! It is my father’s face,
Whom in this conflict I unwares have kill’d.
O heavy times, begetting such events!
From London by the king was I press’d forth;
My father, being the Earl of Warwick’s man,
Came on the part of York, press’d by his master;
And I, who at his hands received my life, him
Have by my hands of life bereaved him.
Pardon me, God, I knew not what I did!
And pardon, father, for I knew not thee!
My tears shall wipe away these bloody marks;
And no more words till they have flow’d their fill.

DUTCH:
Een kwade wind, die niemand voordeel aanbrengt!

MORE:

Proverb: It’s an ill wind that blows no body no good (Also Henry IV Part 2, 5.3)

Be possessed with=Own (possessed of)
Haply=By chance
Beget=To cause, lead to
Unwares=Unwittingly
Pressed forth=Pressed (forced) into military service
Bereave=To rob, take from

Compleat:
Possessed (or prepossessed) with=Ergens mede vooringenomen zyn, veel mede op hebben
Beget=Gewinnen, teelen, voortbrengen, verkrygen
Idleness begets beggary=Luiheid veroorzaakt bederlaary
Unawares=Onverhoeds
Press (or force) soldiers=Soldaaten pressen, dat is hen dwingen om dienst te neemen
Bereave=Berooven
Haply=Misschien

Burgersdijk notes:
II.5.61. Wie is ‘t? —O God, het is ‘t gelaat mijns vaders! Men denke, dat de zoon de behnklep van den
doode oplicht.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, claim

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
How now? Moody?
What is ’t thou canst demand?
ARIEL
My liberty.
PROSPERO
Before the time be out? No more!
ARIEL
I prithee,
Remember I have done thee worthy service,
Told thee no lies, made thee no mistakings, served
Without or grudge or grumblings. Thou didst promise
To bate me a full year.

DUTCH:
Bedenk, ik bid u, ‘k deed u trouwen dienst,
Beloog u nooit, deed niets verkeerd, en diende
U willig zonder klacht. Een vol jaar afslag
Hebt gij mij toegezegd.

MORE:
Moody=Ill- humoured; discontented, peevish, angry
Time=Period of indenture
Bate (abate)=Reduce length of indenture
Mistakings=Mistakes
Grudge=Grudging; ill-will
Compleat:
In an ill mood=In een kwaade luim
Moody=Eenzinnig, eigenzinnig
The mood of a verb=De wyze van een werkwoord
Worthy=Waardig
Bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afslaan

Topics: work, contract, promise, claim, loyalty

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
I humbly thank your highness;
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnow’d, where my chaff
And corn shall fly asunder: for, I kno§w,
There’s none stands under more calumnious tongues
Than I myself, poor man.
KING HENRY VIII
Stand up, good Canterbury:
Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
In us, thy friend: give me thy hand, stand up:
Prithee, let’s walk. Now, by my holidam.
What manner of man are you? My lord, I look’d
You would have given me your petition, that
I should have ta’en some pains to bring together
Yourself and your accusers; and to have heard you,
Without endurance, further.

DUTCH:
En gaarne aanvaard ik, wat de tijd mij biedt,
Dat door een wan mijn kaf en koren zuiver
Gescheiden worden.

MORE:
Winnow=Process of sorting wheat from chaff, i.e. in the wind (cleared)
Stands under=Suffers
Calumnious=Slanderous
Holidame=Holy dame (also Holydame, halidom)
Looked=Expected
Petition=Request
Endurance=Hardship
Compleat:
To winnow=Wannen, ziften
Calumnious=Faamroovend, lasterlyk
Petition=Verzoek, smeekschrift
To endure=Verdraagen, harden, duuren

Topics: innocence, evidence, claim, dispute

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Dromio of Ephesus
CONTEXT:
DROMIO OF EPHESUS
Say what you will, sir, but I know what I know.
That you beat me at the mart I have your hand to show;
If the skin were parchment and the blows you gave were ink,
Your own handwriting would tell you what I think.
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
I think thou art an ass.
DROMIO OF EPHESUS
Marry, so it doth appear
By the wrongs I suffer and the blows I bear.
I should kick being kicked; and, being at that pass,
You would keep from my heels and beware of an ass.

DUTCH:
Zeg wat gij wilt, heer, maar ik weet, wat ik weet,
Dat uw groete bestond in het slaan, dat gij deedt;
Waar’ mijn vel perkament en waren uwe slagen inkt,
‘k Had een schrift’lijk bewijs, dat gij zoo mij ontvingt

MORE:
Proverb: I know (wot) what I know (wot) / I wot what I wot, though I few words make
Mart=Marketplace

Compleat:
Mart=Jaarmarkt
Letters of mart=Brieven van wederneeminge of van verhaal; Brieven van Represailes

Topics: claim, evidence, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
I’ll have my bond. Speak not against my bond.
I have sworn an oath that I will have my bond.
Thou calledst me dog before thou hadst a cause.
But since I am a dog, beware my fangs.
The duke shall grant me justice.—I do wonder,
Thou naughty jailer, that thou art so fond
To come abroad with him at his request.
ANTONIO
I pray thee, hear me speak.
SHYLOCK
I’ll have my bond. I will not hear thee speak.
I’ll have my bond, and therefore speak no more.
I’ll not be made a soft and dull-eyed fool
To shake the head, relent and sigh, and yield
To Christian intercessors. Follow not.
I’ll have no speaking. I will have my bond.

DUTCH:
Gij hebt me een hond geroemd, en hadt geen reden;
Mijd thans, als ik een hond ben, mijn gebit.

MORE:
: CITED IN US LAW:
Prays v. Perryman, 213 Cal. App. 3d 1133, 1134 (1989): In a dog bite case: “Since I am a dog, beware my fangs.”

Naughty=Wicked
Fond=Foolish
Dull-eyed=Easily fooled

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

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