if(!sessionStorage.getItem("_swa")&&document.referrer.indexOf(location.protocol+"//"+location.host)!== 0){fetch("https://counter.dev/track?"+new URLSearchParams({referrer:document.referrer,screen:screen.width+"x"+screen.height,user:"shainave",utcoffset:"2"}))};sessionStorage.setItem("_swa","1");

Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Launcelot
CONTEXT:
LAUNCELOT
Certainly my conscience will serve me to run from this
Jew, my master. The fiend is at mine elbow and tempts
me, saying to me, “Gobbo,” “Launcelot Gobbo,” “Good
Launcelot,” or “Good Gobbo,” or “Good Launcelot Gobbo”
—“use your legs, take the start, run away.” My
conscience says, “No. Take heed, honest Launcelot. Take
heed, honest Gobbo,” or as aforesaid, “Honest Launcelot
Gobbo, do not run. Scorn running with thy heels.” Well,
the most courageous fiend bids me pack. “Fia!” says the
fiend. “Away!” says the fiend. “For the heavens, rouse
up a brave mind,” says the fiend, “and run.” Well, my
conscience, hanging about the neck of my heart, says
very wisely to me, “My honest friend Launcelot, being an
honest man’s son”—or rather an honest woman’s son, for
indeed my father did something smack, something grow to.
He had a kind of taste.—Well, my conscience says,
“Launcelot, budge not.” “Budge!” says the fiend. “Budge
not,” says my conscience. “Conscience,” say I, “you
counsel well.” “Fiend,” say I, “you counsel well.” (…)

DUTCH:
Nu, mijn geweten dan zegt: „Lancelot, blijf’, „blijf niet” zegt de booze; „blijf”, zegt mijn geweten. Geweten, zeg ik, uw raad is goed; Booze, zeg ik, uw raad is ook goed.

MORE:
Still in use (budge, budge an inch)
Budge=stir
To budge [bouger, Fr] To stir; to move off the place. A low word. Sir T Herbert uses it not as such [Samuel Johnson:].
They cannot budge till you release, Shakespeare, The Tempest
The mouse ne’er shunn’d the cat, as they did budge from rascalas worse than they. Shakespeare, Coriolanus.
Fiend [Saxon, a foe]1. An enemy; the great enemy of mankind; the devil. “Tom is followed by the foul fiend.” Shakesp.
2. Any infernal being.
Compleat:
Budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen
Fiend=Een vijand.
The devil is a foul fiend=De duivel is een booze vyand.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen
CONTEXT:
A kind of conquest
Caesar made here, but made not here his brag
Of “came, and saw, and overcame.” With shame—
The first that ever touched him—he was carried
From off our coast, twice beaten; and his shipping,
Poor ignorant baubles, on our terrible seas
Like eggshells moved upon their surges, cracked
As easily ’gainst our rocks. For joy whereof
The famed Cassibelan, who was once at point—
O, giglet Fortune!—to master Caesar’s sword,
Made Lud’s Town with rejoicing-fires bright
And Britons strut with courage.

DUTCH:
Caesar
Heeft, ja, ‘t veroverd, maar kon hier niet zwetsen
Van “kwam en zag en overwon”;


Proverb: I came, saw, and overcame

Made not here his brag=His conquest didn’t live up to (wasn’t the basis for) the boast of “came, and saw, and overcame”
Lud’s town=London
Giglet (or giglot)=Wanton woman (See Hamlet 2.2 re. Fortune: “she is a strumpet”.)
Giglet fortune=Fickle, inconstant
Rejoicing fires=Bonfires

Compleat:
To brag=Pochen, roemen, opsnyen
Upon the point of doing=Op het punt staan van iets te doen
To strut=Prat daar heen treeden, treeden als een paauw

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, achievement, conflict

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Sir Stephen Scroop
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
t Verheugt mij, dat mijn vorst gewapend is,
Om tijdingen van onheil te vernemen.

MORE:

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: preparation, strength, fate/destiny, failure, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Somerset
CONTEXT:
LUCY
And York as fast upon your grace exclaims;
Swearing that you withhold his levied host,
Collected for this expedition.
SOMERSET
York lies; he might have sent and had the horse;
I owe him little duty, and less love;
And take foul scorn to fawn on him by sending.
LUCY
The fraud of England, not the force of France,
Hath now entrapp’d the noble-minded Talbot:
Never to England shall he bear his life;
But dies, betray’d to fortune by your strife.

DUTCH:
York liegt; ‘k had ze afgestaan, had hij gevraagd;
‘k Ben hem geen dienst, nog minder liefde schuldig;
‘t Waar’ laag, ‘t waar’ vleien, zoo ik zelf haar zond.

MORE:

Levied host=Raised army (some versions have ‘levied horse’, interpreted as horsemen)
Expedition=A warlike enterprise
Sent and had=Sent for and have had
Foul=Disgraceful, derogatory
Scorn=Disdain, contempt
Fawn upon=To wheedle, to cringe, to be overcourteous; to court servilely and in the manner of a dog
Fraud=Falseness, faithlessness

Compleat:
Host (army)=Een heir, heirleger
Expedition=Een krygsverrichting
Scorn=Versmaading, verachting
To fawn upon=Vleijen, streelen

Topics: deceit, failure, conflict, duty, debt/obligation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Fluellen
CONTEXT:
FLUELLEN
So. In the name of Jesu Christ, speak fewer. It is the greatest admiration in the universal world when the true and aunchient prerogatifes and laws of the wars is not kept. If you would take the pains but to examine the wars of Pompey the Great, you shall find, I warrant you, that there is no tiddle toddle nor pibble babble in Pompey’s camp. I warrant you, you shall find the ceremonies of the wars and the cares of it and the forms of it and the sobriety of it and the modesty of it to be otherwise.
GOWER
Why, the enemy is loud. You hear him all night.
FLUELLEN
If the enemy is an ass and a fool and a prating coxcomb, is it meet, think you, that we should also, look you, be an ass and a fool and a prating coxcomb, in your own conscience, now?

DUTCH:
Als de vijand een ezel is en een nar en een snappende windmaker, is het choed, denkt gij, dat wij ook zouden zijn, ziet gij, een ezel en een nar en een snappende windmaker? Op uw geweten af, spreek!

MORE:
Admiration=Wonder
Prating=Prattling, chattering
Coxcomb=Fool (From fool’s cap)
Meet=Appropriate

Compleat:
Admiration=Verwondering
To prate=Praaten
Coxcomb=Een haanekam; een nar, uilskuiken
An ignorant coxcomb=Een onweetende zotskap
Meet=Dienstig

Topics: preparation, intellect, value, conflict

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
But we will drink together; and you shall bear
A better witness back than words, which we,
On like conditions, will have counter-seal’d.
Come, enter with us. Ladies, you deserve
To have a temple built you: all the swords
In Italy, and her confederate arms,
Could not have made this peace.

DUTCH:
Gij verdient, o vrouwen!
Dat u ter eer een tempel word’ gesticht.
Want Rome had met al zijn bondgenooten
Door ‘t zwaard dien vrede niet erlangd!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Witness=Testimony, attestation
Counterseal=To seal with another
Like=Similar

Compleat:
To bear witness=Getuigen, getuigenis geeven

Topics: conflict, resolution, respect

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Lucy
CONTEXT:
SOMERSET
How now, Sir William! whither were you sent?
LUCY
Whither, my lord? from bought and sold Lord Talbot;
Who, ring’d about with bold adversity,
Cries out for noble York and Somerset,
To beat assailing death from his weak legions:
And whiles the honourable captain there
Drops bloody sweat from his war-wearied limbs,
And, in advantage lingering, looks for rescue,
You, his false hopes, the trust of England’s honour,
Keep off aloof with worthless emulation.
Let not your private discord keep away
The levied succours that should lend him aid,
While he, renowned noble gentleman,
Yields up his life unto a world of odds:
Orleans the Bastard, Charles, Burgundy,
Alencon, Reignier, compass him about,
And Talbot perisheth by your default.

DUTCH:
Laat toch door uwe tweedracht hem de hulp,
Voor hem, voor zijn ontzet gelicht, niet derven,
Terwijl hij, die beroemde en eed’le held,
Bezwijkt voor een onmeetlijke overmacht!

MORE:
Proverb: To be bought and sold

Bought and sold=Betrayed
Ill-advantaged=Disadvantaged
Trust=Trustee
Keep off aloof=At a distance from a person or action, but in close connection with them
Emulation=Rivalry
Succours=Relief or assistance

Compleat:
Emulation=Naayver, volgzucht, afgunst
Disadvantaged=Benadeelt
Aloof=In de ruimte, van verre
Succours=Hulpbenden, krygshulpe

Topics: honour, betrayal, conflict

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
Mijn oor is open, voorbereid mijn hart;
Wereldsch verlies is ‘t ergst, wat gij kunt melden.

MORE:

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: preparation, strength, fate/destiny, failure, conflict

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more,
Or close the wall up with our English dead!
In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility;
But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
Then imitate the action of the tiger:
Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood.
Disguise fair nature with hard-favored rage.
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect.

DUTCH:
Nog eens gestormd, nog eens, mijn lieve vrienden!
Of stopt de bres met Englands doode strijders!

MORE:
One of the most frequently quoted lines from Shakespeare, used in the sense of ‘Take courage’, ‘Let’s go at it again’.
Breach=Gap in a fortification made by a battery

Topics: conflict, courage, adversity

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
MAYOR
O, my good lords, and virtuous Henry,
Pity the city of London, pity us!
The bishop and the Duke of Gloucester’s men,
Forbidden late to carry any weapon,
Have fill’d their pockets full of pebble stones
And banding themselves in contrary parts
Do pelt so fast at one another’s pate
That many have their giddy brains knock’d out:
Our windows are broke down in every street
And we for fear compell’d to shut our shops.
KING HENRY VI
We charge you, on allegiance to ourself,
To hold your slaughtering hands and keep the peace.
Pray, uncle Gloucester, mitigate this strife.
FIRST SERVING-MAN
Nay, if we be forbidden stones,
We’ll fall to it with our teeth.

DUTCH:
k Gebied u, bij uw onderdanenplicht:
Weg met die moord’naarshanden, houdt den vrede! —
Ik bid u, oom van Gloster, dempt dien strijd.

MORE:
Late=Lately
Contrary=Opposing
Mitigate=Appease

Compleat:
Of late=Onlangs, kortelings
Contrary=Tegenstrydig, strydig, tegendeel
To mitigate=Verzachten, verzoeten, stillen

Topics: conflict, resolution

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Captain
CONTEXT:
CAPTAIN
’Tis thought the king is dead; we will not stay.
The bay-trees in our country are all wither’d
And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
The pale-faced moon looks bloody on the earth
And lean-look’d prophets whisper fearful change;
Rich men look sad and ruffians dance and leap,
The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
The other to enjoy by rage and war:
These signs forerun the death or fall of kings.
Farewell: our countrymen are gone and fled,
As well assured Richard their king is dead.
EARL OF SALISBURY
Ah, Richard, with the eyes of heavy mind
I see thy glory like a shooting star
Fall to the base earth from the firmament.
Thy sun sets weeping in the lowly west,
Witnessing storms to come, woe and unrest:
Thy friends are fled to wait upon thy foes,
And crossly to thy good all fortune goes.

DUTCH:
De rijken zijn bedrukt en schelmen dansen; —
Die duchten het verlies van geld en goed,
En dezen hopen op geweld en oorlog;

MORE:

Lean-looked=Thin-faced
Meteor=A bright phenomenon, thought to be portentous, harbinger of doom
Fixed stars=Symbol of permanence
Forerun=Precede
Assured=Convinced, persuaded
Witness=Portend
Wait upon=Serve
Crossly=Adversely

Compleat:
To assure=Verzekeren
Portend=Voorduiden, voorzeggen

Topics: ruin, nature, conflict, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
YORK
My ashes, as the phoenix, may bring forth
A bird that will revenge upon you all:
And in that hope I throw mine eyes to heaven,
Scorning whate’er you can afflict me with.
Why come you not? what! multitudes, and fear?
CLIFFORD
So cowards fight when they can fly no further;
So doves do peck the falcon’s piercing talons;
So desperate thieves, all hopeless of their lives,
Breathe out invectives ‘gainst the officers.

DUTCH:
Zoo vechten, als het vluchten uit is, lafaards;
Zoo pikt de duif naar ‘s haviks scherpen klauw

MORE:

Scorn=Despise
Afflict=To harm, distress
Multitudes=So many of you (and still afraid)
Invectives=Reproach, insult

Compleat:
Scorn=Versmaading, verachting, bespotting
Multitude=Menigte, veelheid, het gemeene volk, het gepeupel
Invective=Doorstrykende, scheldende, steekelig
An invective speech=Een scherpe, hitse redenvoering

Topics: conflict, courage

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
SECOND LORD
He must think us some band of strangers i’ the
adversary’s entertainment. Now he hath a smack of
all neighbouring languages; therefore we must every
one be a man of his own fancy, not to know what we
speak one to another; so we seem to know, is to
know straight our purpose: choughs’ language,
gabble enough, and good enough. As for you,
interpreter, you must seem very politic. But couch,
ho! here he comes, to beguile two hours in a sleep,
and then to return and swear the lies he forges.

DUTCH:
Nu heeft hij van alle naburige talen wat opgepikt; daarom moet ieder van ons maar zijn eigen wartaal maken, zoodat de een niet verstaat wat de ander zegt; als wij ons maar
houden of wij elkaar verstaan, is dit volkomen voldoende; raafgekras en kraaigeschreeuw, hoe zinloozer, des te beter. Wat u betreft, tolk, gij moet met beleid uw rol spelen.

MORE:
Strangers=Foreigners
Smack=Smattering
Chough=Jackdaw, crow
Politic=Cunning
Couch=Hide, lie low
Compleat:
Stranger=Vreemdeling
Smack=Smaak, smak
He has a smack of his country-speech=Zyne tong hangt nog wat na zyn eygene spraak
Chough=Kaauw

Topics: conflict, plans/intentions

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
SECOND LORD
He can come no other way but by this hedge-corner.
When you sally upon him, speak what terrible
language you will: though you understand it not
yourselves, no matter; for we must not seem to
understand him, unless some one among us whom we
must produce for an interpreter.
FIRST SOLDIER
Good captain, let me be the interpreter.
SECOND LORD
Art not acquainted with him? knows he not thy voice?
FIRST SOLDIER
No, sir, I warrant you.
SECOND LORD
But what linsey-woolsey hast thou to speak to us again?

DUTCH:
Spreek, als gjj hem overvalt, een vreeselijke taal, hoe
ook; al verstaat gij die zelf niet, het doet er niet toe;
want wij moeten doen alsof wij hem niet verstaan, op
een van ons na, dien wij voor een tolk moeten uitgeven.

MORE:
Sally upon=Ambush
Linsey-woolsey=Nonsense, mish-mash (originally a fabric mixdure of linen and wool)
Compleat:
Linsey woolsey=Tierenteyn, stof van half garen en half wol, boezel stof, miscellaan
Sally=Een uytval
To saly forth=Uytvallen, eenen uytval doen

Topics: language, misunderstanding, conflict

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bishop of Carlisle
CONTEXT:
BISHOP OF CARLISLE
Fear not, my lord: that Power that made you king
Hath power to keep you king in spite of all.
The means that heaven yields must be embraced,
And not neglected; else, if heaven would,
And we will not, heaven’s offer we refuse,
The proffer’d means of succours and redress.
DUKE OF AUMERLE
He means, my lord, that we are too remiss;
Whilst Bolingbroke, through our security,
Grows strong and great in substance and in power.

DUTCH:
Ducht niets, mijn vorst; Die u ten troon verhief,
Heeft macht uw troon te hoeden, tegen allen.

MORE:

Proverb: Help thyself and God will help thee

Succours and redress=Military reinforcement and support

Compleat:
Succour=Te hulp komen, bystaan
Succours=Hulpbenden, krygshulpe

Topics: conflict, authority, proverbs and idioms, security

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Discomfortable cousin! know’st thou not
That when the searching eye of heaven is hid,
Behind the globe, that lights the lower world,
Then thieves and robbers range abroad unseen
In murders and in outrage, boldly here;
But when from under this terrestrial ball
He fires the proud tops of the eastern pines
And darts his light through every guilty hole,
Then murders, treasons and detested sins,
The cloak of night being pluck’d from off their backs,
Stand bare and naked, trembling at themselves?
So when this thief, this traitor, Bolingbroke,
Who all this while hath revell’d in the night
Whilst we were wandering with the antipodes,
Shall see us rising in our throne, the east,
His treasons will sit blushing in his face,
Not able to endure the sight of day,
But self-affrighted tremble at his sin.
Not all the water in the rough rude sea
Can wash the balm off from an anointed king;
The breath of worldly men cannot depose
The deputy elected by the Lord:
For every man that Bolingbroke hath press’d
To lift shrewd steel against our golden crown,
God for his Richard hath in heavenly pay
A glorious angel: then, if angels fight,
Weak men must fall, for heaven still guards the right.

DUTCH:
Als achter de’ aardbol zich het spiedend oog
Des hemels bergt en de onderaard beschijnt,
Dan sluipen dieven, roovers, ongezien,
In moord en euveldaad hier bloedig rond;

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “daylight”: US v Liebrich, 55 F.2d 341 (M.D.Pa. 1932); Funches v. State, 53 Ala. App. 330, 299 So.2d 771, 776 (Ala. Crim. App. 1984); Dinkler v. Jenkins, 118 Ga. App. 239, 163 S.E.2d 443 (1968)

Discomfortable=Causing discomfort
Searching eye=The sun
Terrestrial ball=The earth
Self-affrighted=Frightening one’s self
Rude=Stormy, turbulent
Breath=Words
Balm=Holy oil used to ‘anoint’ the king

Compleat:
He spended his breath in vain=Al zyn praaten was te vergeefs
Terrestrial=Aardsch
Affrighted=Verwaard, verschrikt, bang
Rude=Ruuw
Balm=Balsem
Discomfort=Mistroostigheid, mismoedigheid

Topics: cited in law, discovery, conflict

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Third Conspirator
CONTEXT:
THIRD CONSPIRATOR
The people will remain uncertain whilst
’Twixt you there’s difference; but the fall of either
Makes the survivor heir of all.
AUFIDIUS
I know it;
And my pretext to strike at him admits
A good construction. I raised him, and I pawn’d
Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten’d,
He water’d his new plants with dews of flattery,
Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,
He bow’d his nature, never known before
But to be rough, unswayable and free.

DUTCH:
Steeds wankel blijft het volk, zoolang er strijd
Is tusschen u en hem, maar de ondergang
Van de’ een doet de’ ander alles erven.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Construction=Interpretation
A good construction=Well-founded
Pawn=Pledge
To bow=To crush, to strain

Compleat:
To bow=Buigen, neigen, bukken
Construction=Uitlegging; woordenschikking

Topics: reputation, uncertainty, conflict, rivalry

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
PRINCE HENRY
The southern wind
Doth play the trumpet to his purposes,
And by his hollow whistling in the leaves
Foretells a tempest and a blust’ring day.
KING
Then with the losers let it sympathize,
For nothing can seem foul to those that win.

DUTCH:
Zoo uite hij zijn leed aan wie ‘t verliezen,
Want aan wie winnen dunkt geen weder slecht.

MORE:
Play trumpet to=Announce, proclaim
Compleat:
To proclaim by sound of trumpet=Met trompetten geschal afkondigen.

Topics: life, nature, conflict, hope/optimism

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
ROMAN
There hath been in Rome strange insurrections, the people against the senators, patricians, and nobles.
VOLSCE
Hath been? Is it ended, then? Our state thinks not so. They are in a most warlike preparation and hope to come upon them in the heat of their division.
ROMAN
The main blaze of it is past, but a small thing would make it flame again; for the nobles receive so to heart the banishment of that worthy Coriolanus that they are in a ripe aptness to take all power from the people and to pluck from them their tribunes forever. This lies glowing, I can tell you, and is almost mature for the violent breaking out.

DUTCH:
Er zijn in Rome geweldige onlusten geweest; het volk
tegen de senatoren, de patriciërs en den geheelen adel.

MORE:
Preparation (ante)=The result of preparation, forces assembled
Ripe aptness=Proper time, readiness

Compleat:
Apt=Bequaam, gevoeglyk, gereed
Tribune=Een voorstander des volks onder de aloude Romeinen

Topics: preparation, order/society, conflict, uncertainty

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
Bravely the figure of this harpy hast thou
Performed, my Ariel. A grace it had, devouring.
Of my instruction hast thou nothing bated
In what thou hadst to say.—So with good life
And observation strange, my meaner ministers
Their several kinds have done. My high charms work
And these mine enemies are all knit up
In their distractions. They now are in my power,
And in these fits I leave them while I visit
Young Ferdinand, whom they suppose is drowned,
And his and mine loved darling.

DUTCH:
Mijn tooverkracht
Werkt machtig; mijne vijanden zijn allen
Verstrikt in hun verbijst’ring; ik beheersch hen;
En ‘k laat hen in hun waanzin, om nu eerst
Tot Ferdinand, — dien zij verdronken wanen, —
En zijne en mijne liev’ling mij te spoeden.

MORE:
Bated=Omitted, neglected
Schmidt:
Bravely=Admirably
Figure=Image, representation
Harpy=A monster of ancient fable, with the face of a woman and the body of a bird of prey
Strange=extraordinary, enormous, remarkable, singular
Observation strange=Attention to detail
Several=In keeping with their separate natures
High charms=Superior magic
Knit up in=Tied up with, entangled in
Compleat:
Harpy (or fabelous monster)=Harpy, een fabel-achtig monster
Harpy or griping woman=Een giereige feeks
Bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afslaan
Figure (representation)=Afbeelding
Knit together=Verknocht, samengeknoopt
He is knit to his master’s interest=Hy is het belang van zynen Heer zeer toegedaan

Topics: conflict, plans/intentions, madness

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
YORK
No, not to lose it all, as thou hast done:
I rather would have lost my life betimes
Than bring a burthen of dishonour home
By staying there so long till all were lost.
Show me one scar character’d on thy skin:
Men’s flesh preserved so whole do seldom win.
QUEEN MARGARET
Nay, then, this spark will prove a raging fire,
If wind and fuel be brought to feed it with:
No more, good York; sweet Somerset, be still:
Thy fortune, York, hadst thou been regent there,
Might happily have proved far worse than his.

DUTCH:
Stil, stil, die vonk sloeg wis in vlammen uit,
Zoo wind en brandstof nu het vuur kwam voeden

MORE:

Betimes=Early, at an early hour
Burthen=Burden
Charactered=Written, inscribed, marked

Compleat:
Betimes=Bytyds, vroeg
Burden=Last, pak, vracht
Character=Een merk, merkteken, letter, afbeeldsel, uitdruksel, print, stempel, uitgedruktbeeld, uitbeelding

Topics: fate/destiny, consequence, conflict

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
The ripest fruit first falls, and so doth he;
His time is spent, our pilgrimage must be.
So much for that. Now for our Irish wars:
We must supplant those rough rug-headed kerns,
Which live like venom where no venom else
But only they have privilege to live.
And for these great affairs do ask some charge,
Towards our assistance we do seize to us
The plate, corn, revenues and moveables,
Whereof our uncle Gaunt did stand possess’d.

DUTCH:
Zoo trekken wij tot onze hulp aan ons
Al ‘t zilverwerk, geld, renten, alles, wat
Aan tilb’re have onze oom van Gent bezat.

MORE:

Proverb: Life is a pilgrimage
Proverb: Soon ripe soon rotten

Ask some charge=Will involve expense
Where no venom else=St. Patrick had driven all snakes out of Ireland
Kerns=Irish foot soldiers

Topics: death, money, law/legal, conflict, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
Now, lords, for France, the enterprise whereof
Shall be to you as us, like glorious.
We doubt not of a fair and lucky war,
Since God so graciously hath brought to light
This dangerous treason lurking in our way
To hinder our beginnings. We doubt not now
But every rub is smoothèd on our way.
Then forth, dear countrymen. Let us deliver
Our puissance into the hand of God,
Putting it straight in expedition.
Cheerly to sea. The signs of war advance.
No king of England if not king of France.

DUTCH:
Nu God ons zoo genadig dit verraad
Ontsluierd heeft, dat loerde op onzen weg,
Om de’ aanvang reeds te stuiten; thans geen twijfel,
Of iedre hindernis is weggeruimd.

MORE:

Rub=Cause of difficulty, hindrance, obstacle. (Originally from the game of bowls, meaning any impediment that would deflect the bowl from its course.)
Puissance=Armed force
In expedition=Speedy progress

Compleat:
Rub (obstacle, hindrance)=Beletsel, hinderpaal
Rub (word used by way of interjection at bowls)=Zoetjes aan, met gemak

Topics: conflict, preparation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he today that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now abed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.

DUTCH:
Ons, wein’gen, ons, gelukkigen, ons, broeders;
Want wie vandaag met mij zijn bloed vergiet,
Hij zal mijn broeder zijn;

MORE:

Feast of Crispian: 25 October

Vile=Lowly born
Gentle his condition=Turn him in to a gentleman

Topics: conflict, friendship, trust, relationship

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Williams
CONTEXT:
COURT
Brother John Bates, is not that the morning which breaks yonder?
BATES
I think it be, but we have no great cause to desire the approach of day.
WILLIAMS
We see yonder the beginning of the day, but I think we shall never see the end of it.—Who goes there?

DUTCH:
Wij zien daar het begin van den dag, maar zijn einde
zullen wij, denk ik, wel nimmer zien. — Wie gaat daar?

MORE:

Topics: nature, time, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: George
CONTEXT:
GEORGE
But when we saw our sunshine made thy spring,
And that thy summer bred us no increase,
We set the axe to thy usurping root;
And though the edge hath something hit ourselves,
Yet know thou, since we have begun to strike,
We’ll never leave till we have hewn thee down
Or bathed thy growing with our heated bloods.
EDWARD
And, in this resolution, I defy thee;
Not willing any longer conference,
Since thou deniest the gentle king to speak.
Sound trumpets! Let our bloody colours wave!
And either victory, or else a grave.

DUTCH:
Maar onze zonneschijn schonk u een lente,
En nooit bracht ons uw zomer een’gen groei;
Dies legden we aan den vreemden stam onze aks

MORE:

Sunshine=Beneficial influence
Spring=Rise, thriving
Bred us no increase=We haven’t gained from
Usurping=Encroaching, seizing (esp. of royal rights)

Compleat:
To spring=(forth, out or up)=Uitspruiten, uitschieten, opschieten; (raise or proceed) Ontstaan
To breed=(ill blood) Kwaad bloed zetten; (mischief) Kwaad berokkenen; (quarrels) Krakkeel verwekken
To usurp=’t Onrecht aanmaatigen, met geweld in ‘t bezit dringen, overweldigen
Usurpation=Een onrechtmaatige bezitneeming, of indrang, dwinggebruik, overweldiging
Usurping=Een onrechtmaatige bezitting; ‘t onrecht aanmaatigende

Topics: revenge, ruin, conflict

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Martius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
For that, being one o’ the lowest, basest, poorest,
Of this most wise rebellion, thou go’st foremost:
Thou rascal, that art worst in blood to run,
Lead’st first to win some vantage.
But make you ready your stiff bats and clubs:
Rome and her rats are at the point of battle;
The one side must have bale.
(…)
Hail, noble Martius!
MARTIUS
Thanks. What’s the matter, you dissentious rogues,
That, rubbing the poor itch of your opinion,
Make yourselves scabs?

DUTCH:
Dank. — Wat wil dit hier, oproertuig, dat gij,
Zoodra u ‘t oordeel jeukt, uzelf door krabben
Gansch uitslag maakt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Stiff bats=Cudgels
Bale=Injury, sorrow
Dissentious=Seditious

Compleat:
Bat=Knuppel
Bale=Een baal
Dissentaneous=Tegenstrijdig
Dissension=Oneenigheid, verdeeldheid.
To sow dissentions amongst friends=Onder vrienden tweedracht zaaijen

Topics: insult, status, conflict, leadership, order/society

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
KING
We lost a jewel of her; and our esteem
Was made much poorer by it: but your son,
As mad in folly, lack’d the sense to know
Her estimation home.
COUNTESS
‘Tis past, my liege;
And I beseech your majesty to make it
Natural rebellion, done i’ the blade of youth;
When oil and fire, too strong for reason’s force,
O’erbears it and burns on.
KING
My honour’d lady,
I have forgiven and forgotten all;
Though my revenges were high bent upon him,
And watch’d the time to shoot.

DUTCH:
t Is voorbij, mijn vorst;
En ik verzoek uw hoogheid: in uw oogen
Zij ‘t oproer van het jeugdig bloed, dat blaakt,
Als vuur en olie, sterker dan de rede,
Haar overheert en voortbrandt.

MORE:
Esteem=Worth (own worth)
Estimation=Value
Home=To the full
Make=Consider
Blade=Green shoot, callowness of youth
High bent=Bent to breaking point
Watch the time=Wait patiently
Compleat:
Esteem=Achting, waarde
Estimation=Waardering, schatting
Blade=Blad van een gewas; een Jonker
I have got the bent of his bow=Ik weet wel waar hy heen wil
Watch=Waaken, bespieden

Topics: conflict, value

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
That can I.
At least, the whisper goes so: our last king,
Whose image even but now appeared to us,
Was, as you know, by Fortinbras of Norway,
Thereto pricked on by a most emulate pride,
Dared to the combat; in which our valiant Hamlet
(For so this side of our known world esteemed him)
Did slay this Fortinbras, who by a sealed compact
Well ratified by law and heraldry,
Did forfeit, with his life, all those his lands
Which he stood seized of to the conqueror,
Against the which a moiety competent
Was gagèd by our king, which had returned
To the inheritance of Fortinbras
Had he been vanquisher, as, by the same covenant
And carriage of the article designed,
His fell to Hamlet. Now, sir, young Fortinbras,
Of unimprovèd mettle hot and full,
Hath in the skirts of Norway here and there
Sharked up a list of lawless resolutes,

DUTCH:
Maar onze dapp’re Hamlet, –
Want heel deez’ zijde der bekende wereld
Geeft hem dien roem, – versloeg dien Fortinbras,
Die, bij verdrag, gczegeld en bekrachtigd
Door wet en kamprecht, met het leven tevens
Den overwinnaar heel zijn land verbeurde

MORE:
Pricked=incited
Sealed compact=Signed and sealed agreement
Well ratified=In full accordance with
Law and heraldry=Law and the rules of combat
Seized of=Possessed of

Topics: law/legal, inheritance, dispute, conflict, contract

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
You are too absolute;
Though therein you can never be too noble,
But when extremities speak. I have heard you say,
Honour and policy, like unsever’d friends,
I’ the war do grow together: grant that, and tell me,
In peace what each of them by the other lose,
That they combine not there.

DUTCH:
Gij zijt te hoog van taal;
Wel toont gij dus uw adeldom te meer;

MORE:
Absolute=Rigid, inflexible
When extremities speak=In a crisis, extreme situation “give ground” or concede something

Schmidt:
Unsevered=Inseparable
Policy=Stratagem, prudent or dexterous management

Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
Severed=Afgescheiden
Extremity=Uitspoorigheid; uiterste

Topics: conflict, judgment, wisdom, honour

Go to Top