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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Macbeth ACT/SCENE: 4.1 SPEAKER: Second Witch CONTEXT: Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn
The power of man, for none of woman born
Shall harm Macbeth. DUTCH: Wees bloedig, moedig, stout; spot, onvervaard,
Met menschenmacht; geen, door een vrouw gebaard,
Deert ooit Macbeth.
MORE: Schmidt:
Laugh to scorn=Deride, make a mockery of Topics: courage, purpose, ambition

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
What need I fear of thee?
But yet I’ll make assurance double sure,
And take a bond of fate. Thou shalt not live,
That I may tell pale-hearted fear it lies,
And sleep in spite of thunder.

DUTCH:
Toch, dubbel zeker zij mijn zekerheid!
Ik neem een pand van ‘t noodlot

MORE:
Schmidt:
Assurance= Confidence, certain knowledge
Bond=A deed or obligation to pay a sum perform a contract, which may come near the sense of porn or pledge (“to make assurance double sure and take a bond of fate”)
Pale-hearted=Wanting courage, cowardly
Compleat:
Bond=een Band, verband, verbinding, verbindschrift, obligatie
Bond for appearance=een Borgstelling om voor ‘t Recht te zullen verschynen

Topics: plans/intentions, guilt, conscience, security, courage

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Now, brother of Clarence, how like you our choice,
That you stand pensive, as half malcontent?
CLARENCE
As well as Lewis of France, or the Earl of Warwick,
Which are so weak of courage and in judgment
That they’ll take no offence at our abuse.
KING EDWARD IV
Suppose they take offence without a cause,
They are but Lewis and Warwick: I am Edward,
Your king and Warwick’s, and must have my will.
GLOUCESTER
And shall have your will, because our king:
Yet hasty marriage seldom proveth well.

DUTCH:
Dit doet hij, wijl gij onze koning zijt;
Maar toch, een haastige echt blijkt zelden best.

MORE:

Proverb: Marry in haste and repent at leisure

Malcontent=Disaffected
Weak of courage=Lacking in courage

Compleat:
Pensive=Peinzend, peinsachtig, beducht, bedrukt, zwaarmoedig, suf
Malecontent=Misnoegd, ‘t onvrede

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, marriage, courage

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
My brave spirit!
Who was so firm, so constant, that this coil
Would not infect his reason?
ARIEL
Not a soul
But felt a fever of the mad and played
Some tricks of desperation. All but mariners
Plunged in the foaming brine and quit the vessel,
Then all afire with me. The king’s son, Ferdinand,
With hair up-staring – then like reeds, not hair –
Was the first man that leaped; cried “Hell is empty
And all the devils are here.”

DUTCH:
Vóór de and’ren
Sprong Ferdinand, des konings zoon, wien ‘t haar, —
Het scheen eer riet, — te berge stond; hij riep:
„De hel is ledig, alle duivels hier !”

MORE:
Schmidt:
Coil=Confusion, turmoil
Up-staring=Standing on end
Compleat:
Coil=Geraas, getier

Topics: courage, madness, nature, good and bad

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Who calls me “villain”? Breaks my pate across?
Plucks off my beard and blows it in my face?
Tweaks me by the nose? Gives me the lie i’ th’ throat
As deep as to the lungs? Who does me this?
Ha!
‘Swounds, I should take it, for it cannot be
But I am pigeon-livered and lack gall
To make oppression bitter, or ere this
I should have fatted all the region kites
With this slave’s offal.

DUTCH:
Dus is ‘t toch waar, Dat ‘k heb een duiven-lever, mis de gal, Die maakt verdrukking bitter /
‘t Is niet anders, Ik heb een duivelever en mis gal, Die hartzeer bitter maakt /
Vervloekt, ik zou ’t verdragen, want ik heb een duivelever, ’k mis de gal die mijn bedruktheid kan verbitteren

MORE:
Merriam-Webster definition of pigeon-livered:
Applying the belief of the time that the liver and large quantities of yellow bile provided a courageous temperament, the Bard used “pigeon-livered” to describe Hamlet’s lack of gall to seek revenge (with the apparent logic that anyone with a pigeon’s liver would be deficient in the courage-producing bile).

Pigeon-livered=Too mild-tempered

Compleat:
A white-livered fellow=Een ongevoelige vent, een nydigaart

Topics: courage, revenge

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Poins
CONTEXT:
I know them to be as true-bred cowards as ever turned back; and for the third, if he fight longer than he sees reason, I’ll forswear arms. The virtue of this jest will be the incomprehensible lies that this same fat rogue will tell us when we meet at supper: how thirty at least he fought with, what wards, what blows, what extremities he endured; and in the reproof of this lies the jest.

DUTCH:
t Mocht wat; twee van hen ken ik voor zoo volbloedlafaards,
als er ooit de hielen gelicht hebben; en de derde, als hij langer vecht dan hij raadzaam acht, wil ik nooit meer een zwaard ter hand nemen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Forswear=To refuse or renounce upon oath, to swear that one will have nothing to do with a person or thing
Jest=Any thing ludicrous and amusing uttered or done
Ward=Guard made in fencing, posture of defence
Compleat:
Forswear (or renounce)=afzweeren
To ward off a blow=Eenen slag afweeren

Topics: courage, honesty, truth

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Ten o’clock: within these three hours ’twill be
time enough to go home. What shall I say I have
done? It must be a very plausive invention that
carries it: they begin to smoke me; and disgraces
have of late knocked too often at my door. I find
my tongue is too foolhardy; but my heart hath the
fear of Mars before it and of his creatures, not
daring the reports of my tongue.
SECOND LORD
This is the first truth that e’er thine own tongue
was guilty of.

DUTCH:
Wat zal ik zeggen, dat ik gedaan heb? Het meet een zeer waarschijnlijke vond zijn, als zij mij helpen zal.

MORE:
Proverb: I will smoke you
Plausive=Plausible
Smoke=Scent (suspect)
Creatures=Soldiers
Daring=Daring to do
Compleat:
Plausible=Op een schoonschynende wyze, met toejuyghinge

Topics: proverbs and idioms, suspicion, honesty, courage

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
LADY MACBETH
Was the hope drunk
Wherein you dressed yourself? Hath it slept since?
And wakes it now, to look so green and pale
At what it did so freely? From this time
Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard
To be the same in thine own act and valor
As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that
Which thou esteem’st the ornament of life,
And live a coward in thine own esteem,
Letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would, ”
Like the poor cat i’ th’ adage?
MACBETH
Prithee, peace:
I dare do all that may become a man;
Who dares do more is none.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij dat bezitten,
Wat gij des levens sieraad schat, en wilt gij
In eigen schatting als een lafaard leven,
Die „’k Durf niet” volgen laat op: „O, ik wilde!”
Als de arme kat in ‘t spreekwoord?
Ik durf en waag al wat een man betaamt; Wie meer durft, is geen man.

MORE:
The cat in the adage: “The Cat would eat fish but she will not wet her feet” (1225).
P.G. Wodhouse quoted this in Right Ho, Jeeves:
“I remember. Yes, I recall the Sipperley case. He couldn’t bring himself to the scratch. A marked coldness of the feet, was there not? I recollect you saying he was letting–what was it?–letting something do something. Cats entered into it, if I am not mistaken.”
“Letting ‘I dare not’ wait upon ‘I would’, sir.”
“That’s right. But how about the cats?”
“Like the poor cat i’ the adage, sir.”
“Exactly. It beats me how you think up these things. And Gussie, you say, is in the same posish?”

Topics: courage, ambition, purpose

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Third apparition
CONTEXT:
Be lion-mettled, proud, and take no care
Who chafes, who frets, or where conspirers are.
Macbeth shall never vanquished be until
Great Birnam Wood to high Dunsinane Hill
Shall come against him.

DUTCH:
Macbeth wordt niet bedwongen, eer het woud
Van Birnam op te rukken zich verstout
Naar ‘t hooge Dunsinan.

MORE:
Schmidt:
lion-mettled=having the bravery of a lion
chafe=fret, fume, rage
Compleat:
Mettled=Vol vuurs, moedig
REFERENCED IN UK HOUSE OF LORDS: George Stewart, Younger of Grandtully, Esq., and Henry Hepburn, Slater in Perth, Appellents v. John Bell, Slater in Muirend, and James Bell, Slater in Scone [1790] UKHL 3_Paton_158 (12 April 1790)

Topics: courage, ambition, security

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Lord Talbot
CONTEXT:
My thoughts are whirled like a potter’s wheel;
I know not where I am, nor what I do;
A witch, by fear, not force, like Hannibal,
Drives back our troops and conquers as she lists:
So bees with smoke and doves with noisome stench
Are from their hives and houses driven away.
They call’d us for our fierceness English dogs;
Now, like to whelps, we crying run away.

DUTCH:
Mijn hoofd is als eens pottenbakkers wiel;
Ik weet niet wat ik ben, noch wat ik doe.

MORE:
Hannibal, a renowned general of Carthage from the third century, who vanquished a larger Roman army in the Battle of Ager Falernus, by tying fagots to the horns of oxen
Noisome=Noxious, harmful
Lists=Pleases

Compleat:
Noisom=Besmettelyk, schaadelyk, vuns, leelyk, vuil
To list=Genegen zijn, lust hebben

Burgersdijk notes:
Als Hannibal. Toespeling op Hannibals krijgslist, die den Romeinen ontkwam, door ossen met brandende struiken aan de horens naar hen toe te drijven.

Topics: preparation, conflict, courage

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Never call a true piece of gold a counterfeit. Thou art essentially made, without seeming so.
PRINCE HENRY
And thou a natural coward without instinct.
FALSTAFF
I deny your major. If you will deny the Sheriff, so; if not, let him enter. If I become not a cart as well as another man, a plague on my bringing up. I hope I shall as soon be strangled with a halter as another.
PRINCE HENRY
Go, hide thee behind the arras. The rest walk up above.—
Now, my masters, for a true face and good conscience.

DUTCH:
Noem een echt goudstuk nooit een valsche munt; gij zijt in waarheid dol, al schijnt gij het niet.

MORE:
Essentially made=Truly royal
Major=The main part of your argument; the first proposition of a syllogism
Cart=hanging cart that carries criminals to execution
Become not=Do not look as good as
Bringing up=Upbringing
Compleat:
To bring up=Opbrengen, opvoeden
A Bringer up of children=Een Opbrenger van kinderen
Burgersdijk notes:
Uw gevolg wijs ik af. In ‘t Engelsch staat: „Ik ontken uw major”. Major is de hoofdstelling van een syllogisme; het woord is gebezigd om tusschen major of mayor en het volgende sheriff een tegenstelling te zoeken.
Verberg u achter het wandtapijt. De tapijten werden wel is waar niet zelden aan haken tegen den muur, maar dikwijls ook op eenigen afstand er van opgehangen, zoodat men er zich zeer wel achter kon verbergen.

Topics: deceit, value, appearance, courage, conscience

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Dauphin
CONTEXT:
Turn head and stop pursuit, for coward dogs
Most spend their mouths when what they seem to threaten
Runs far before them. Good my sovereign,
Take up the English short, and let them know
Of what a monarchy you are the head.
Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin
As self-neglecting.

DUTCH:
Beste heer en vorst,
Geef dien gezanten kort bescheid, en toon hun,
Van welk een koninkrijk gij ‘t hoofd zijt, heer;
Want zelfmin is een minder snoode zonde
Dan zelfverzuim.

MORE:

Proverb: Cowardly dogs bark much

Turn head=turn around and stand at bay

Topics: courage, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold:
What hath quenched them hath given me fire.

DUTCH:
Wat hen bedwelmde, heeft mij stout gemaakt;
Wat hen verdoofde, gaf mij vuur

MORE:

Topics: courage, ambition, purpose

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Orleans
CONTEXT:
Foolish curs, that run winking into the mouth of a Russian bear and have their heads crushed like rotten apples. You may as well say, that’s a valiant flea that dare eat his breakfast on the lip of a lion.

DUTCH:
Gij kunt even goed zeggen, dat het een dappere vloo is, die haar ontbijt durft nuttigen op de lip
van een leeuw./
Het is een dappere vlo die zijn ontbijt durft te eten op de lip van een leeuw.

MORE:
Proverb: That’s a valiant flea that dare eat his breakfast on the lip of a lion

Topics: courage, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Counterfeit? I lie. I am no counterfeit. To die is to be a counterfeit, for he is but the counterfeit of a man who hath not the life of a man; but to counterfeit dying when a man thereby liveth is to be no counterfeit, but the true and perfect image of life indeed. The better part of valor is discretion, in the which better part I have saved my life. Zounds, I am afraid of this gunpowder Percy, though he be dead. How if he should counterfeit too and rise? By my faith, I am afraid he would prove the better counterfeit.

DUTCH:
Het beste deel van moed is voorzichtigheid./ Het betere deel van de dapperheid is voorzichtigheid.

MORE:
Frequently misquoted, or rearranged, as “Discretion is the better part of valour”.

Topics: misquoted, proverbs and idioms, risk, courage, caution

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
There’s neither honesty, manhood, nor good fellowship in thee, nor thou cam’st not of the blood royal, if thou darest not stand for ten shillings.

DUTCH:
Er is in u geen eerlijkheid, geen manhaftigheid, noch goede kameraadschap, en gij zijt ook niet van koninklijken bloede, als gij het hart niet hebt, een paar kronen in den zak te steken.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Fellowship=Companionableness, a spirit and disposition as they ought to be among comrades
Darest, durst=to have courage, to be bold enough, to venture
Compleat:
You durst not do it=Gy durft het niet doen.

Topics: insult, honesty, friendship, courage

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Lord Ross
CONTEXT:
NORTHUMBERLAND
(…) If then we shall shake off our slavish yoke,
Imp out our drooping country’s broken wing,
Redeem from broking pawn the blemish’d crown,
Wipe off the dust that hides our sceptre’s gilt
And make high majesty look like itself,
Away with me in post to Ravenspurgh;
But if you faint, as fearing to do so,
Stay and be secret, and myself will go.
LORD ROSS
To horse, to horse! urge doubts to them that fear.
LORD WILLOUGHBY
Hold out my horse, and I will first be there.

DUTCH:
Te paard, te paard! nooit ducht de moed gevaar.

MORE:

Imp out=Mend (another falconry term, to imp a hawk, meaning to repair feathers that were broken or had dropped out)
Broking pawn=The custody of the pawnbroker
Sceptre’s gilt=Superficial display of gold (with ref also to ‘guilt’)
Faint=Are fearful, hesitant
Urge doubts=Speak about doubts
Hold out my horse=If my horse holds out

Compleat:
To shake off the yoke=Het juk afwerpen
To imp=Enten, korten, afknippen
To imp a feather in a hawk’s wing=Een veder in de vleugel van een valk steeken
To imp the wings of one’s fame=Iemands befaamdheid besnoeijen
To imp the feathers of time=Den tyd kortwieken
To hold out=Uithouden, duuren

Topics: courage, statuds, appearance

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