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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Hamlet ACT/SCENE: 5.1 SPEAKER: Gravedigger CONTEXT: GRAVEDIGGER
How can that be, unless she drowned herself in her own defense?
OTHER
Why, ’tis found so.
GRAVEDIGGER
Give me leave. Here lies the water. Good. Here stands the man. Good. If the man go to this water and drown himself, it is, will he nill he, he goes. Mark you that. But if the water come to him and drown him, he drowns not himself. Argal, he that is not guilty of his own death shortens not his own life.
OTHER
But is this law?
GRAVEDIGGER
Ay, marry, is ’t. Crowner’s quest law. DUTCH: Des daarom, wie niet schuldig is aan zijn eigen good, verkort zijn eigen leven niet. /
Ergel, hij die niet schuldig is aan eigen dood, verkort ook
zijn leven niet.
MORE: Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
CITED IN HONG KONG LAW:
China Light & Power Co. Ltd. and Another v Warner B.G. Banks, Esq Her Majesty’s Coroner of Hong Kong (CACV 55/1994)
“The purposes of ‘Crowner’s quest law’, as the clown calls it in Shakespeare‘s ‘Hamlet’, Act 5, Scene I, are consistently misunderstood by the public and the media” Topics: law/legal, cited in law, death, guilt

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither. I’ll smell thee on the tree.
Oh, balmy breath, that dost almost persuade
Justice to break her sword! One more, one more.
Be thus when thou art dead and I will kill thee
And love thee after.

DUTCH:
Als jij zo dood zult zijn, zal ik je doden,
en liefhebben erna. Nog eens, voor ’t laatst…
nooit zag men dodelijker schoonheid.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Barkauskas v. Lane, 78 F.2d 1031, 1032 (7th Cir. 1989)(Posner, J.); See also Hornstein v. Hornstein, 195 Md. 627, 75 A.2d 103 (Md. Ct. App. 1950)(husband reading from Othello and threatening to treat her as Othello treated Desdemona).

Schmidt:
Balmy=Fragrant
Sword=Emblem of power and authority

Compleat:

Topics: life, strength, regret, death, cited in law

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
It will have blood, they say. Blood will have blood.
Stones have been known to move, and trees to speak.
Augurs and understood relations have
By magot pies and choughs and rooks brought forth
The secret’st man of blood.—What is the night?

DUTCH:
t Wil bloed, is ‘t zeggen; bloed wil bloed.

MORE:
Blood will have blood is an allusion to the proverb of retribution, “Blood will have blood” (c. 1395)

Topics: death, revenge, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
Roep wee, verlies, vernieling, val en nood;
De dood is ‘t ergst, en komen moet de dood.

MORE:

Proverb: All men must die (The worst is death, and death will have his day.)

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, death, life

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Exton
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
How now! what means death in this rude assault?
Villain, thy own hand yields thy death’s instrument.
Go thou, and fill another room in hell.
That hand shall burn in never-quenching fire
That staggers thus my person. Exton, thy fierce hand
Hath with the king’s blood stain’d the king’s own land.
Mount, mount, my soul! thy seat is up on high;
Whilst my gross flesh sinks downward, here to die.
EXTON
As full of valour as of royal blood:
Both have I spill’d; O would the deed were good!
For now the devil, that told me I did well,
Says that this deed is chronicled in hell.
This dead king to the living king I’ll bear
Take hence the rest, and give them burial here.

DUTCH:
Aan moed zoo rijk, als koninklijk van bloed!
‘k Vergoot die beide; — waar’ mijn daad slechts goed!
Nu zegt de duivel, die mij heeft gedreven,
Dat in de hel die daad is aangeschreven.

MORE:

Rude=Brutal
Stagger=To cause to reel, to fell
Chronicle=To record, to register

Compleat:
Rude=Ruuw
To stagger (move or shake)=Schudden, beweegen, doen waggelen
To chronicle=In eenen kronyk aanschryven

Topics: loyalty, conspiracy, death

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
JOHN OF GAUNT
God’s is the quarrel; for God’s substitute,
His deputy anointed in His sight,
Hath caused his death: the which if wrongfully,
Let heaven revenge; for I may never lift
An angry arm against His minister.
DUCHESS
Where then, alas, may I complain myself?
JOHN OF GAUNT
To God, the widow’s champion and defence.

DUTCH:
Aan God de wrake, want zijn plaatsvervanger,
Zijn stedehouder, voor zijn oog gezalfd,
Is de oorzaak van zijn dood; is deze een gruwel,
Dan wreke ‘t God, want ik mag nimmer toornig
Den arm verheffen tegen zijn gezant.

MORE:

Minister=Representative, proxy (the King)
God’s quarrel=It is in God’s hands
Complain myself=Complain

Topics: dispute, offence, death, punishment

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Stephano
CONTEXT:
TRINCULO
This is the tune of our catch, played by the
picture of Nobody.
STEPHANO
If thou beest a man, show thyself in thy likeness. If thou beest a devil, take ’t as thou list.
TRINCULO
O, forgive me my sins!
STEPHANO
He that dies pays all debts.—I defy thee!—Mercy upon us!

DUTCH:
Hij die sterft, betaalt al zijn schulden/
Die sterft, betaalt al zijn schulden; — ik tart u!
Wees ons genadig, o hemel!

MORE:
Proverb: Death pays all debts
As thou list=As you will
Compleat:
To list (also be willing)=Genegen zyn, lust hebben
Let them do what they list=Laat hun doen wat zy willen
Burgersdijk notes:
Het afbeeldsel van Niemand. Een soort van kabouterfiguur, die als de heer Niemand meermalen op uithangborden en de titels van gedrukte volksliedjes voorkwam.

Topics: death, debt/obligation

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
How called you the man you speak of, madam ?
COUNT
He was famous, sir, in his profession, and it was his great right to be so: Gerard de Narbon.
LAFEW
He was excellent indeed, madam: the king very
Lately spoke of him admiringly, and mourningly.
He was skilful enough to have liv’d still,
if knowledge could be set up against mortality.

DUTCH:
Hij was zeer beroemd, heer, in zijn vak, en met het volste recht: Gerard van Narbonne .

MORE:
His great right=His fame was justified
Mortality=Subjection to death, necessity of dying
Compleat:
Mortality=Sterflykheid

Topics: death, life, skill/talent, legacy, merit

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
Yet thus far, Griffith, give me leave to speak him,
And yet with charity. He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
Himself with princes; one that, by suggestion,
Tied all the kingdom: simony was fair-play;
His own opinion was his law: i’ the presence
He would say untruths; and be ever double
Both in his words and meaning: he was never,
But where he meant to ruin, pitiful:
His promises were, as he then was, mighty;
But his performance, as he is now, nothing:
Of his own body he was ill, and gave
The clergy in example

DUTCH:
Simonie was eerlijk doen; zijn eigen wil zijn wet;
Voor ‘s konings aanschijn sprak hij logens; dubbel
Was hij van tong en hart.

MORE:
Speak=Speak of
Stomach=Pride, greed
Tied=Ruled, subjected
Simony=Trading of ecclesiastical privileges (after Simon the Sorcerer)
Presence=In the presence of the king
Be ever double=Equivocal
Pitiful=Having pity
Compleat:
Stomach=Gramsteurigheyd
Tied=Gebonden
Simony=Geestelyke amptkooping, koophandel van geestelyke dingen (naar Simon den Toveraar)
Presence=Tegenwoordigheyd, byzyn, byweezen
The Presence Chamber=De Koninklyke voorkamer, de gehoor-zaal
Pitifull=Vol medelyden

Topics: death, legacy, reputation, law/legal, promise

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
Yet thus far, Griffith, give me leave to speak him,
And yet with charity. He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
Himself with princes; one that, by suggestion,
Tied all the kingdom: simony was fair-play;
His own opinion was his law: i’ the presence
He would say untruths; and be ever double
Both in his words and meaning: he was never,
But where he meant to ruin, pitiful:
His promises were, as he then was, mighty;
But his performance, as he is now, nothing:
Of his own body he was ill, and gave
The clergy in example

DUTCH:
Grootsch, als hijzelf eens, was wat hij beloofde,
Doch wat hij hield, was, als hijzelf nu, niets.
Hij zondigde in den vleesche, en ging alzoo
De geest’lijkheid slecht voor.

MORE:
Speak=Speak of
Stomach=Pride, greed
Tied=Ruled, subjected
Simony=Trading of ecclesiastical privileges (after Simon the Sorcerer)
Presence=In the presence of the king
Be ever double=Equivocal
Pitiful=Having pity
Compleat:
Stomach=Gramsteurigheyd
Tied=Gebonden
Simony=Geestelyke amptkooping, koophandel van geestelyke dingen (naar Simon den Toveraar)
Presence=Tegenwoordigheyd, byzyn, byweezen
The Presence Chamber=De Koninklyke voorkamer, de gehoor-zaal
Pitifull=Vol medelyden

Topics: death, legacy, reputation, law/legal, promise

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Horatio, I am dead.
Thou livest; report me and my cause aright
To the unsatisfied.

DUTCH:
Horatio, ik ga dood; jij leeft, verklaar jij mij en wat mij dreef aan de onbevredigden. /
‘k Ga dood, Horatio, Jij leeft; verklaar mij en mijn zuivre zaak Aan de onbevredigden.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Unsatisfied=Not fully informed and settled in opinion
Report me and my cause correctly to the uninformed (“unsatisfied”)

Topics: death, truth, legacy, reputation

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat
The vaulty heaven so high above our heads.
I have more care to stay than will to go.
Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.—
How is ’t, my soul? Let’s talk. It is not day.

DUTCH:
O zalig blijven! bitter is ‘t vaarwel;

MORE:

Topics: death, plans/intentions, free will

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
‘Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise
in. The remembrance of her father never approaches
her heart but the tyranny of her sorrows takes all
livelihood from her cheek. No more of this, Helena;
go to, no more; lest it be rather thought you affect
a sorrow than have it.
HELEN
I do affect a sorrow indeed, but I have it too.
LAFEW
Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead,
excessive grief the enemy to the living.
COUNTESS
If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess
makes it soon mortal.

DUTCH:
Matige bejammering is het recht van den doode, overmatige droefenis de vijand van den levende.

MORE:
Affect=An outward show
Mortal=Deadly
Season=Preserve
Livelihood=Liveliness, spirit
Right=Owed to
Compleat:
Affect=Naäapen
Affectation=Gemaaktheid
Mortal=Sterflyk, doodelyk
Birth-right=Geboote-recht
Lamentation=Weeklaage, jammerklagt, gekerm, geklag

Burgersdijk notes:
Kruiden kan. In ‘t Engelsch season, kruiden, waarbij het denkbeeld van conserveeren, bewaren, in frisschen staat houden, steeds komt; vergelijk Romeo en Julia, II.3, en Driekoningenavond, 1.1.
Als de levende een vijand is van droefenis. “If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess makes it soon mortal”. De gravin herhaalt en dringt aan, wat Lafeu gezegd heeft, dat Helena zich niet te zeer aan hare droefheid moet overgeven, met de smart niet to zeer in vijandschap moet leven, want dat overmaat van smart doodelijk is . Mortal is namelijk hetzelfde als deadly, fatal .(…)

Topics: death, grief, appearance, excess

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
JAILER
You shall not now be stol’n; you have locks upon you.
So graze as you find pasture
SECOND JAILER
Ay, or a stomach
POSTHUMUS
Most welcome, bondage, for thou art a way,
I think, to liberty. Yet am I better
Than one that’s sick o’ th’ gout, since he had rather
Groan so in perpetuity than be cured
By th’ sure physician, Death, who is the key
T’ unbar these locks. My conscience, thou art fettered
More than my shanks and wrists.
You good gods, give me
The penitent instrument to pick that bolt,
Then free forever. Is ’t enough I am sorry?
So children temporal fathers do appease;
Gods are more full of mercy.

DUTCH:
Verlangt gij
Berouw? toon ik dit meer ooit dan in keet’nen,
Gewenscht, niet opgedrongen


You shall not now be stolen=Alluding to the custom of puting a lock on a horse’s leg when it is put out to pasture (Johnson)
Penitent instrument=A means of freeing conscience of its guilt (Rolfe)
Schmidt:
Groan=To utter a mournful voice in pain or sorrow
Temporal=Pertaining to this life or this world, not spiritual, not eternal

Compleat:
Penitent=Boetvaardig, berouw toonend
Temporal (secular, not spiritual)=Waereldlyk

Burgersdijk notes:
“Nu steelt u niemand, met dat blok aan ‘t been; Graas nu zoover gij weide hebt”. Zooals men wel een paard in de weide met een ketting en slot bevestigt opdat het niet gestolen worde of wegloope.

Topics: regret, guilt, remedy, death, conscience

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
Now cracks a noble heart.—Good night, sweet prince,
And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!—
Why does the drum come hither?

DUTCH:
Nu breekt een edel hart./
Goê-nacht, mijn prins /
Slaap zacht, mijn prins; mogen de engelen u ter ruste zingen! / Goenacht, mijn prins !
En eng’lenscharen zingen U in uw rust!

MORE:

Topics: death, virtue

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Put out the light, and then put out the light.
If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
I can again thy former light restore
Should I repent me. But once put out thy light,
Thou cunning’st pattern of excelling nature,
I know not where is that Promethean heat
That can thy light relume. When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither.

DUTCH:
Doe uit het licht en doe dan uit het licht:
als ik u doof, gedienstige flambouw,
en mij dat spijt, kan ik uw vroeger licht;
opnieuw ontsteken.

MORE:

Put out the light, and then put out the light = Extinguish the candle and kill Desdemona
Relume = re-illuminate, rekindle
Flaming=Carrying a light (Cf. Psalms 104.4; ‘Which maketh he spirits his messengers, and a flaming fire his ministers’.)
Cunning=Dexterously wrought or devised

Onions:
Fire stolen by the demigod Prometheus from Olympus and conveyed to men, to whom he taught its use; allusively applied to that which inspires or infuses life

Compleat:
Cunning=Behendig, Schrander, Naarstig
A cunning fellow=Een doortrapte vent, een looze gast
To cast a cunning look=Iemand snaaks aanzien

Topics: life, strength, regret, death

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAPUCIUS
Noble lady,
First mine own service to your grace; the next,
The king’s request that I would visit you;
Who grieves much for your weakness, and by me
Sends you his princely commendations,
And heartily entreats you take good comfort.
KATHERINE
O my good lord, that comfort comes too late;
‘Tis like a pardon after execution:
That gentle physic, given in time, had cured me;
But now I am past an comforts here, but prayers.
How does his highness?

DUTCH:
O beste heer, die troost komt mij te laat;
Ze is als genade na voltrokken vonnis.

MORE:
Commendations=Good wishes, greetings
Physic=Medicine
Comfort=Cures
Compleat:
Commendation=Pryzing, aanpryzing, aanbeveling
Physick=Artseny, medicyn, geneesmiddel
To physick=Geneesmiddelen gebruiken, medicineeren
To comfort=Vertroosten, verquikken

Topics: wellbeing, remedy, time, death

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
These are the ushers of Martius: before him he
carries noise, and behind him he leaves tears:
Death, that dark spirit, in ’s nervy arm doth lie;
Which, being advanced, declines, and then men die.

DUTCH:
Zij konden Marcius aan; gejubel zendt hij
Hier voor zich uit, en tranen laat hij achter.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Usher=One whose business is to walk before and introduce another
Nervy=Sinewy, vigorous

Compleat:
Usher=Een deurwaarder,ondermeester, oppassser

Topics: death, power

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Had I but time — as this fell sergeant, Death
Is strict in his arrest.

DUTCH:
Dit vel sergeant, dood, is streng in zijn arrestatie /
De barse wachter dood geeft mij geen uitste /
Die gramme schout, de dood, Maakt korte wetten.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Fell=strong; cruel, vicious, intense. As the meaning of ‘fel’ in Dutch.
I have seen this translated into Dutch as “viel sergeant”

Topics: death

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
Thus, sir:
Although this lord of weak remembrance—this,
Who shall be of as little memory
When he is earthed—hath here almost persuaded
(For he’s a spirit of persuasion only,
Professes to persuade) the king his son’s alive,
‘Tis as impossible that he’s undrowned
And he that sleeps here swims

DUTCH:
Verneem dan, heer:
Al heeft deze edelman met zwak geheugen, —
Dekt eens hem de aard, dan zal zijn heug’nis dra
Zijn weggevaagd, — den vorst schier overreed, —
Hij is een man van overreden, acht dit
Als zijn betrekking, — dat zijn zoon nog leeft,
‘t Is zoo onmoog’lijk dat hij niet verdronk,
Als dat die slaper zwemt.

MORE:
Lord of weak remembrance=Of failing memory
Of as little memory=Also forgotten
Spirit of persuasion=Power, principle of persuasion
Compleat:
Remembrance=Gedachtenis, geheugenis
Persuasion=Overreeding, overtuiging, overstemming, aanraading, wysmaaking
The aim of eloquence is persuasion=Het doelwit der welspreeekendheid is overreeding
Cicero was an eloquent and persuasive orator=Cicero was een welspreekend en overtuigend redenaar

Topics: insult, memory, death

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing

DUTCH:
Het leven is slechts een wandelende schaduw, een arme speler, die zijn uur op het podium steekt en piekert, en dan niet meer gehoord wordt; het is een verhaal verteld door een idioot, vol geluid en woede, wat niets betekent.

MORE:
5.From Macbeth’s famous soliloquy
This can be broken up into phrases still in use today:
1. To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow
2. Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
3. To the last syllable of recorded time
4. All our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death.
5. Out, out, brief candle!
6. Life’s but a walking shadow
7. A poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more.
8. It is a tale Told by an idiot
9. Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing

Topics: death, invented or popularised, sorrow, still in use

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
The ripest fruit first falls, and so doth he;
His time is spent, our pilgrimage must be.
So much for that. Now for our Irish wars:
We must supplant those rough rug-headed kerns,
Which live like venom where no venom else
But only they have privilege to live.
And for these great affairs do ask some charge,
Towards our assistance we do seize to us
The plate, corn, revenues and moveables,
Whereof our uncle Gaunt did stand possess’d.

DUTCH:
Zoo trekken wij tot onze hulp aan ons
Al ‘t zilverwerk, geld, renten, alles, wat
Aan tilb’re have onze oom van Gent bezat.

MORE:

Proverb: Life is a pilgrimage
Proverb: Soon ripe soon rotten

Ask some charge=Will involve expense
Where no venom else=St. Patrick had driven all snakes out of Ireland
Kerns=Irish foot soldiers

Topics: death, money, law/legal, conflict, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause. There’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life.

DUTCH:
Als we eindelijk schoven af ons aardsch gewurm /
Als we aan ‘t rumoer des levens zijn ontglipt want wat wij in die doodsslaap, bevrijd van aardse onrust, dromen kunnen moet ons doen aarzelen.

MORE:
Also from the To be or not to be soliliquy. Mortal coil (coyle old spelling meaning chaos, confusion).
To give pause still current (hesitate before taking action, consider)
Compleat:
Coil=Geraas, getier
To pause upon=Ergens op peinzen, over peinzen

Topics: death, misquoted, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
DUKE OF YORK
Vex not yourself, nor strive not with your breath;
For all in vain comes counsel to his ear.
JOHN OF GAUNT
O, but they say the tongues of dying men
Enforce attention like deep harmony:
Where words are scarce, they are seldom spent in vain,
For they breathe truth that breathe their words in pain.
He that no more must say is listen’d more
Than they whom youth and ease have taught to glose;
More are men’s ends mark’d than their lives before:
The setting sun, and music at the close,
As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last,
Writ in remembrance more than things long past:
Though Richard my life’s counsel would not hear,
My death’s sad tale may yet undeaf his ear

DUTCH:
Vaak klemt het woord van hem, wiens stemme breekt,
Want waarheid ademt, wie zwaar-aad’mend spreekt.

MORE:

Proverb: Dying mean speak true (prophesy)

CITED IN US LAW: People v. Smith 214 Cal. App. 3d 904, 907 (Cal. Ct. App 1989)(Arabian, J).

Must=Can
Listened more=Heard, listened to more closely
Gloze=To make tirades, to make mere words. Veil with specious comments (OED)
Close=Closing phrase (musical)
Remembrance=In memory
Undeaf=To free from deafness

Compleat:
Remembrance=Gedachtenis, geheugenis
To gloze=Vleijen, flikflooijen

Topics: language, value, death, proverbs and idioms, cited in law

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Why may not that be the skull of a lawyer? Where be his quiddities now, his quillities, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks? Why does he suffer this rude knave now to knock him about the sconce with a dirty shovel and will not tell him of his action of battery?

DUTCH:
Waarom zou er dat geen [schedel] zijn van een rechtsgeleerde? Waar zitten nu zijn uitpluizerijen, zijn spitsvondigheden, zijn bij-aldien’s, zijn rechtsgronden, zijn streken? /
Waarom kan dat niet de doodskop van een advokaat zijn? Waar zijn zijn fijne onderscheidingen nu, zijn spitsvondigheden, zijn gewijsden, zijn titels en zijn streken?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quidditites=Equivocations, subtleties, cavils
Quillities (or quillets)=Sly tricks in argument, subtleties, cavilling, chicanery
Rude=Ill-mannered, coarse, uncivil

Topics: death, lawyers

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