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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry V ACT/SCENE: 2.4 SPEAKER: Exeter CONTEXT: From him, and thus he greets your Majesty:
He wills you, in the name of God almighty,
That you divest yourself and lay apart
The borrowed glories that, by gift of heaven,
By law of nature and of nations, ’longs
To him and to his heirs—namely, the crown
And all wide-stretchèd honours that pertain
By custom and the ordinance of times
Unto the crown of France. That you may know
’Tis no sinister nor no awkward claim
Picked from the wormholes of long-vanished days
Nor from the dust of old oblivion raked,
He sends you this most memorable line. DUTCH: Opdat gij weten moogt,
Dat dit geen slinksche, wraakb’re vord’ring is,
Ontdekt in ‘t molm van lang vervlogen dagen,
Gerakeld uit vergetelheids oud stof.
MORE:
Ordinance of times=Law of centuries
‘longs=Belongs
Sinister=Unfair, wrong; deceitful
Awkward=Perverse, unbecoming

Compleat:
Awkward=Averechts
Aukward=Averechts, verkeerd
Sinister (or unlawful)=Onbetaamelyk, ongeoorloofd Topics: claim, value, deceit, honour

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Suffolk
CONTEXT:
Well hath your highness seen into this duke;
And, had I first been put to speak my mind,
I think I should have told your grace’s tale.
The duchess, by his subornation,
Upon my life, began her devilish practises:
Or, if he were not privy to those faults,
Yet, by reputing of his high descent,
As next the king he was successive heir,
And such high vaunts of his nobility,
Did instigate the bedlam brain-sick duchess
By wicked means to frame our sovereign’s fall.
Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep;
And in his simple show he harbours treason.
The fox barks not when he would steal the lamb.
No, no, my sovereign; Gloucester is a man
Unsounded yet and full of deep deceit.

DUTCH:
Neen, neen, mijn koning; Gloster is een man,
Die ondoorgrondlijk is, vol diep bedrog.

MORE:

Still waters run deep. Proverb of Latin origin meaning a placid exterior hiding a passionate nature.
Proverb: The fox barks not when he would steal the lamb.

Seen into=Penetrated, understood
Subornation=Crime of procuring one to offend, specially to bear false witness
Repute=(+of): Setting great store by, prize
Bedlam=Nickname for Bethlem hospital, for the treatment of mental illness, which has become a byword for chaos and mayhem
Unsounded=Unfathomed (as in depth sounding, i.e. measuring the depth of a body of water)

Compleat:
To see into a thing=Een inzigt in eene zaak hebben, ‘er den grond van beschouwen
Subornation=Besteeking, een bestoken werk, omkooping
To repute=Achten
Bedlam (Bethlem)=Een dolhuis, dulhuis, krankzinnighuis; (mad bodey)=Een dul mensch, een uitzinnige
To sound=Peilen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, appearance, deceit

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
SECOND LORD
Nay, good my lord, put him to’t; let him have his
way.
FIRST LORD
If your lordship find him not a hilding, hold me no
more in your respect.
SECOND LORD
On my life, my lord, a bubble.
BERTRAM
Do you think I am so far deceived in him?
SECOND LORD
Believe it, my lord, in mine own direct knowledge,
without any malice, but to speak of him as my
kinsman, he’s a most notable coward, an infinite and
endless liar, an hourly promise-breaker, the owner
of no one good quality worthy your lordship’s
entertainment.
FIRST LORD
It were fit you knew him; lest, reposing too far in
his virtue, which he hath not, he might at some
great and trusty business in a main danger fail you.

DUTCH:
Geloof mij, edel heer; naar mijn eigen onmiddellijke waarneming, zonder eenige de minste boosheid en om van hem te spreken als van een bloedverwant, hij is een erkende lafaard, een oneindige, grenzenlooze leugenaar, een, die om het uur zijn belofte breekt en geene enkele goede eigenschap bezit, die hem den omgang met uwe edelheid waardig kan maken.

MORE:
A hilding=Worthless, wretched being
Bubble=Cheat
Entertainment=Keeping in employment, service
Compleat:
To bubble=Bedriegen
A bubble=Een onnozel hals
Entertainment=Huysvesting, onderhoud

Topics: insult, reputation, deceit

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
A knave very voluble, no further conscionable than in putting on the mere form of civil and humane seeming, for the better compassing of his salt and most hidden loose affection. Why, none, why, none! A slipper and subtle knave, a finder of occasions that has an eye, can stamp and counterfeit advantages, though true advantage never present itself. A devilish knave. Besides, the knave is handsome, young, and hath all those requisites in him that folly and green minds look after. A pestilent complete knave, and the woman hath found him already.

DUTCH:
Een geslepen, gladde schelm; een gelegenheidsnajager, met een oog om voordeeltjens te stempelen en na te bootsen, al bood geen echt voordeel zich ooit aan; een verduivelde schelm!

MORE:

Slipper=Deceitful, slippery
Voluble=Plausible, glib
Conscionable=Conscientious
Humane=Polite, civil
Seeming=Appearance
Salt=Lecherous
Occasions=Opportunities

Compleat:
A slippery (or dangerous) business=Een gevaarlyke bezigheid
Conscionable=Gemoedelyk, billyk
Humane=Menschelyk, beleefd, heusch

Topics: deceit, appearance, relationship, reputation, manipulation

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
LUCIANA
Who would be jealous, then, of such a one?
No evil lost is wailed when it is gone.
ADRIANA
Ah, but I think him better than I say,
And yet would herein others’ eyes were worse.
Far from her nest the lapwing cries away.
My heart prays for him, though my tongue do curse.

DUTCH:
O, maar ik acht hem beter, dan ik zeg;
Als and’rer oog hem maar zoo haatlijk vond!
De kieviet schreeuwt, is hij van ‘t nest ver weg;
Mijn harte bidt voor hem, al vloekt mijn mond.

MORE:
Proverb: The lapwing cries most when farthest from her nest

Burgersdijk notes:
De kievit schreeuwt, enz. In Sh’s. tijd werd de kievit meermalen hiervoor aangehaald, ja de uitdrukking schijnt spreekwoordelijk geweest te zijn. In LILY’s Campaspe leest men:
„You resemble the lapwing, who crieth most where her nest is not.” Shakespeare zelf herhaalt het beeld in ,Maat voor Maat,” I.4.

Topics: deceit, perception, insult, proverbs and idioms, envy, manipulation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Ah, what’s more dangerous than this fond affiance!
Seems he a dove? His feathers are but borrowed,
For he’s disposed as the hateful raven:
Is he a lamb? His skin is surely lent him,
For he’s inclined as is the ravenous wolf.
Who cannot steal a shape that means deceit?
Take heed, my lord; the welfare of us all
Hangs on the cutting short that fraudful man.

DUTCH:
Ach, hoe gevaarlijk is dit blind vertrouwen!
Schijnt hij een duif? zijn veed’ren zijn geborgd
Want als een booze raaf is hij gezind.

MORE:

Proverb: A wolf in sheep’s clothing (‘His skin is surely lent him’)

Raven=Symbolic of a bad omen
Fond=Foolish
Affiance=Confidence
Steal a shape=Create a false impression or appearance
Hateful=Deserving hate
Hangs on=Depends on

Compleat:
Fond (foolish)=Dwaas
Affiance=Vertrouwen, hoop
Hatefull=Haatelyk
These things seem to hang one upon the other=Deeze zaaken schynen van malkander af te hangen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, deceit

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
Upon a lie seven times removed.—Bear your body more seeming, Audrey.—As thus, sir: I did dislike the cut of a certain courtier’s beard. He sent me word if I said his beard was not cut well, he was in the mind it was. This is called “the retort courteous.” If I sent him word again it was not well cut, he would send me word he cut it to please himself. This is called “the quip modest.” If again it was not well cut, he disabled my judgment. This is called “the reply churlish.” If again it was not well cut, he would answer I spake not true. This is called “the reproof valiant.” If again it was not well cut, he would say I lie. This is called “the countercheck quarrelsome,” and so to “the lie circumstantial” and “the lie direct.”

DUTCH:
Die allen kunt gij ontduiken,
behalve de rechtstreeksche logenstraffing; en
ook die kunt gij ontduiken, met een „indien”.

MORE:
CITED IN UK LAW: McNally v Snap Heath Ltd [1998] UKEAT 1013_97_2306 (23 June 1998)
‘and had been met, to quote Shakespeare, by the “countercheck quarrelsome”‘.

Topics: law/legal, cited in law, truth, deceit

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
If his occulted guilt
Do not itself unkennel in one speech,
It is a damnèd ghost that we have seen,
And my imaginations are as foul
As Vulcan’s stithy. Give him heedful note.
For I mine eyes will rivet to his face,
And after we will both our judgments join
In censure of his seeming.

DUTCH:
Let op hem; ik doe het ook; ik houd mijn blik gevestigd op zijn gezicht, en later geven wij ons beider oordeel over zijn gedrag /
Geef zorgvol acht; Ik zal mijn oog vastklinken op zijn aanzicht En later zullen uwe en mijne meening Raad houden saam, hoe hij zich hield. /
Sla goed hem ga; Wat ik mijn blik aan zijn gelaat zal naaglen; En daarna komen wij tot oordeel saâm Om hem te schaten naar den schijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Occulted=committed in secret
Unkennel=to reveal, bring out into the open
Stithy=smithy
Compleat:
Uyt het hok of hol jaagen
Stithy=een Aambeeld als ook een zekere quaal …

Topics: deceit, suspicion, guilt, discovery

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Good night—but go not to mine uncle’s bed.
Assume a virtue if you have it not.
That monster, custom, who all sense doth eat,
Of habits devil, is angel yet in this:
That to the use of actions fair and good
He likewise gives a frock or livery
That aptly is put on.

DUTCH:
Meet je een deugd aan, als je er geen hebt. /
Veins deugdzaamheid, als gij haar niet bezit /
Neem u een deugd, zoo gij die niet bezit.

MORE:
Assume a virtue = pretend to be virtuous, i.e. encouragement here to practice deception.

Topics: deceit, appearance, virtue

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
How ill agrees it with your gravity
To counterfeit thus grossly with your slave,
Abetting him to thwart me in my mood.
Be it my wrong you are from me exempt,
But wrong not that wrong with a more contempt.
Come, I will fasten on this sleeve of thine.
Thou art an elm, my husband, I a vine
Whose weakness, married to thy stronger state,
Makes me with thy strength to communicate.
170If aught possess thee from me, it is dross,
Usurping ivy, brier, or idle moss,
Who, all for want of pruning, with intrusion
Infect thy sap and live on thy confusion.

DUTCH:
Hoe kwalijk strookt het met uw waardigheid ,
Dit guichelspel te spelen met uw slaaf,
Hem aan te zetten i dat hij dus mij terg’!
Lijd ik liet onrecht, dat gij mij verlaat,
Hoop niet op onrecht onrecht door uw smaad.

MORE:
Proverb: The vine embraces the elm

Be it= Accepting that it is
To counterfeit=To feign
Thus grossly= So evidently
Exempt=Separated; not subject to my control; relieved from duty (also denoting a person or institution not subject to the jurisdiction of a particular bishop) (OED)

Compleat:
Ill at ease=Onpasselyk, kwaalyk te pas
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
You grossly mistake my meaning=Gy vergist u grootelyks omtrent myn meening
To counterfeit (feign)=(Zich) Veinzen
A counterfeit friendship=Een gemaakte of geveinsde vriendschap

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, conspiracy, deceit

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Luciana
CONTEXT:
Muffle your false love with some show of blindness.
Let not my sister read it in your eye;
Be not thy tongue thy own shame’s orator;
Look sweet, be fair, become disloyalty;
Apparel vice like virtue’s harbinger.
Bear a fair presence, though your heart be tainted.
Teach sin the carriage of a holy saint.

DUTCH:
Blik zacht, spreek vleiend, huichel, ban haar vrees;
Hul in het vlekk’loos kleed der deugd uw zonde

MORE:
Proverb: Fair face foul heart
Proverb: It is an ill thing to be wicked (wretched) but a worse to be known so (to boast of it)

Become disloyalty=Wear disloyalty in a becoming fashion

Harbinger=Forerunner
Apparel=Dress up, cloak (vice as the forerunner of virtue)

Compleat:
Harbinger=Een bestelmeester, voorloper
To apparel=Optooijen, kleeden,
Apparelled=Gekleed, gedoft, opgetooid

Topics: deceit, appearance, honesty

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
But seeming so, for my peculiar end.
For when my outward action doth demonstrate
The native act and figure of my heart
In compliment extern, ’tis not long after
But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
For daws to peck at. I am not what I am.

DUTCH:
God weet dat ik dat niet uit liefde of plicht
maar voor de schijn, ten eigen bate, doe.
Als mijn gedrag verraadt wat ik beoog
en zien laat wat mij innerlijk beweegt, zal het[5] niet lang meer duren, of ik stel mijn hart aan elke kraai bloot die daarin zijn snavel steekt: ik ben niet wat ik ben.

MORE:

Proverb: To wear one’s heart upon one’s sleeve (1604)

Daws: Jackdaws
Peculiar=Private, particular
End=Purpose
Compliment extern=External show, form
Not what I am=Not what I seem to be

Compleat:
Jack daw=Een exter of kaauw
Extern=Uitwendig, uiterlyk
End=Voorneemen, oogmerk

Topics: deceit, appearance, invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use, purpose

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
We fail?
But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
And we’ll not fail. When Duncan is asleep—
Whereto the rather shall his day’s hard journey
Soundly invite him—his two chamberlains
Will I with wine and wassail so convince
That memory, the warder of the brain,
Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason
A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep
Their drenchèd natures lie as in a death,
What cannot you and I perform upon
The unguarded Duncan? What not put upon
His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt
Of our great quell?

DUTCH:
Mislukken!
Schroef slechts uw moed tot aan het hoogste punt,
En het mislukt ons niet.

MORE:
There are several definitions of ‘sticking place’: Samuel Johnson descibes it as the place of being stopped, unable to proceed. It is also described as the point at which a tuning peg is set in its hole and the mark to which a soldier screwed up the cord of a crossbow (OED).
Schmidt:
Sticking-place= the place in which the peg of a stringed instrument remains fast; the proper degree of tension
Convince=Overcome, defeat
Warder=A guard, a keeper, a sentinel “Memory, the warder of the brain”
A fume=A delusion, a phantasm, anything hindering, like a mist, the function of the brain
Limbeck=An alembic (alchemical still)
Onions:
Sticking-place=Point at which (it) remains firm
The rather=The more quickly
Compleat:
Limbeck=Een afzyphelm
Alembick=Een Destilleerhelm, in de Scheikonst

Topics: invented or popularised, still in use, plans/intentions, conspiracy, deceit, offence

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I am settled, and bend up
Each corporal agent to this terrible feat.
Away, and mock the time with fairest show.
False face must hide what the false heart doth know.

DUTCH:
Een huichelachtig gezicht moet verbergen wat een vals hart weet./
Door ‘t valsch gelaat het valsche hart verheeld!

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb “Fair face foul heart” (1584). Also an earlier form “He that makes the fairest face shall soonest deceive” (c1495)
Still in use today
Schmidt:
Settled=Resolved
Corporal=Bodily
Compleat:
Corporal=Lichaamlyk
To take a corporal oath (which is done by touching with one’s hand some part of the holy Scripture)=Een lyffelyke Eed doen, die geschiedt met het aanraaken van den Bybel.

Topics: deceit, appearance, still in use, offence

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
The woman’s part in me—for there’s no motion
That tends to vice in man but I affirm
It is the woman’s part: be it lying, note it,
The woman’s; flattering, hers; deceiving, hers;
Lust and rank thoughts, hers, hers; revenges, hers;
Ambitions, covetings, change of prides, disdain,
Nice longing, slanders, mutability,
All faults that may be named, nay, that hell knows,
Why, hers, in part or all, but rather all.
For even to vice
They are not constant, but are changing still
One vice but of a minute old for one
Not half so old as that. I’ll write against them,
Detest them, curse them. Yet ’tis greater skill
In a true hate to pray they have their will;
The very devils cannot plague them better.

DUTCH:
O, vond ik slechts
Wat vrouwlijk is in mij! want ied’re neiging
Tot ondeugd in den man, voorwaar, zij is
Zijn vrouwlijk erfdeel; liegen, ja, het is zoo,
Komt van de vrouw; van haar ‘t gevlei, ‘t bedriegen;
Onkuische lust, van haar; van haar, de wraakzucht;
Van haar de zucht naar grootheid, hoovaardij,
Inbeelding, dwaze lusten, lasterzucht,
Laatdunkendheid en wuftheid, alle kwaad,
Wat maar een naam heeft, wat de hel maar kent,
Van haar, gedeelt’lijk of geheel; of ja, geheel;


May be named=That man can name (See Richard III, 1.2 “tongue may name”)
Motion=Impulse
Nice=Fastidious

Compleat:
Motion (instigation)=Aanporring, aandryving
To plague=Plaagen, quellen

Topics: honesty, truth, flattery, deceit, revenge

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
Believe me, on mine honour,
My words express my purpose.
ISABELLA
Ha! little honour to be much believed,
And most pernicious purpose! Seeming, seeming!
I will proclaim thee, Angelo; look for’t:
Sign me a present pardon for my brother,
Or with an outstretch’d throat I’ll tell the world aloud
What man thou art.

DUTCH:
Neen, geloof mij,
Neen, op mijn eer, ik zeg, wat ik bedoel .

MORE:
Onions:
Pernicious=Wicked, villainous
Compleat:
Pernicious=Schadelyk, verderflyk
A pernicious counsel=Een schadelyke, snoode raad
A pernicious maxim or doctrine=Een schadelyke stokregel, verderflyke leer.

Topics: language, honour, plans/intentions, purpose, deceit, manipulation, gullibility

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
Henry now lives in Scotland at his ease,
Where having nothing, nothing can he lose.
And as for you yourself, our quondam queen,
You have a father able to maintain you;
And better ’twere you troubled him than France.
QUEEN MARGARET
Peace, impudent and shameless Warwick, peace,
Proud setter up and puller down of kings!
I will not hence, till, with my talk and tears,
Both full of truth, I make King Lewis behold
Thy sly conveyance and thy lord’s false love;
For both of you are birds of selfsame feather.

DUTCH:
Recht naar zijn wensch leeft Hendrik thans in Schotland,
Waar hij, niets hebbend, niets verliezen kan.

MORE:

Proverb: Birds of a feather flock (fly) together

Will not hence=Won’t go elsewhere
Quondam=Former, as was
Sly conveyance=Underhand dealing, trickery, dishonest actions
Behold=See, recognize

Compleat:
Hence=Van hier, hier uit
Conveyance=Een overwyzing, overvoering, overdragt
To behold=Aanschouwen, zien, aanzien; ziet, let wel

Topics: proverbs and idioms, status, relationship, deceit

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Fluellen
CONTEXT:
GOWER
Why, ’tis a gull, a fool, a rogue, that now and then goes to the wars to grace himself at his return into London under the form of a soldier. And such fellows are perfect in the great commanders’ names, and they will learn you by rote where services were done—at such and such a sconce, at such a breach, at such a convoy; who came off bravely, who was shot, who disgraced, what terms the enemy stood on. And this they con perfectly in the phrase of war, which they trick up with new-tuned oaths; and what a beard of the general’s cut and a horrid suit of the camp will do among foaming bottles and ale-washed wits is wonderful to be thought on. But you must learn to know such slanders of the age, or else you may be marvelously mistook.
FLUELLEN
I tell you what, Captain Gower. I do perceive he is not the man that he would gladly make show to the world he is. If I find a hole in his coat, I will tell him my mind.

DUTCH:
Ik wil u wat zeggen, oferste Gower; ik heb zeer choed gemerkt; hij is niet de man, dien hij gaarne aan de wereld zou laten zien dat hij is; als ik aan zijn rok een steek los vind, zal ik hem zeggen wat ik denk.

MORE:
New-tuned=Newly coined
Slanders=Disgraces
Onions:
Hole in his coat=A chink in his armour (opportunity to expose)

Topics: deceit, appearance, flaw/fault

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
EDGAR
The foul fiend bites my back.
FOOL
He’s mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a horse’s health, a boy’s love, or a whore’s oath.

DUTCH:
Hij is gek die vertrouwt op de makheid van een wolf, de gezondheid van een paard, de liefde van een jongen of de eed van een hoer./
Alleen een gek vertrouwt op de tamheid van een wolf, de ge-
zondheid van een paard, de liefde van een jongen of de eed van een hoer.

MORE:

Topics: gullibility, madness, betrayal, trust, deceit

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Come, swear it, damn thyself.
Lest, being like one of heaven, the devils themselves
Should fear to seize thee. Therefore be double damned,
Swear thou art honest!
DESDEMONA
Heaven doth truly know it.
OTHELLO
Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell.

DUTCH:
God weet dat jij ontrouw bent als de hel.

MORE:
Proverb: As false as hell
Compleat:
False (not true)=Valsch, onwaar
False (counterfeit)=Nagemaakt
False (treacherous)=Verraderlyk

Topics: honesty, truth, deceit, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Chamberlain
CONTEXT:
CHAMBERLAIN
Heaven keep me from such counsel! ‘Tis most true
These news are every where; every tongue speaks ’em,
And every true heart weeps for’t: all that dare
Look into these affairs see this main end,
The French king’s sister. Heaven will one day open
The king’s eyes, that so long have slept upon
This bold bad man.
SUFFOLK
And free us from his slavery.

DUTCH:
Eenmaal opent
God ‘s konings oogen, die zoo lange sliepen,
En doet dien driesten, boozen man hem zien.

MORE:
End=Objective
Slept upon=Have been blind to
Compleat:
End=Eynde, oogmerk

Topics: purpose, marriage, deceit, advice

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
What, doth my Lord of Suffolk comfort me?
Came he right now to sing a raven’s note,
Whose dismal tune bereft my vital powers;
And thinks he that the chirping of a wren,
By crying comfort from a hollow breast,
Can chase away the first-conceived sound?
Hide not thy poison with such sugar’d words;
Lay not thy hands on me; forbear, I say;
Their touch affrights me as a serpent’s sting.
Thou baleful messenger, out of my sight!
Upon thy eye-balls murderous tyranny
Sits in grim majesty, to fright the world.
Look not upon me, for thine eyes are wounding:
Yet do not go away: come, basilisk,
And kill the innocent gazer with thy sight;
For in the shade of death I shall find joy;
In life but double death, now Gloucester’s dead.

DUTCH:
Verberg uw gif niet zoo met suikerwoorden

MORE:

Proverb: The basilisk’s eye is fatal

Raven’s note=Bad news (the raven was symbolic of a bad omen)
Bereft=Deprived me of, spoiled, impaired
Hollow=Faint, insincere, deceitful
First-conceived=Initially heard
Forbear=Abstain, refrain from doing
Affright=Terrify

Compleat:
Bereft, bereaved=Beroofd
Forbear=Zich van onthouden
Hollow=Hol; Hollow-hearted=Geveinst
To affright=Verschrikken, vervaard maaken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, betrayal, honesty, deceit

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
King Lewis and Lady Bona, hear me speak,
Before you answer Warwick. His demand
Springs not from Edward’s well-meant honest love,
But from deceit bred by necessity;
For how can tyrants safely govern home,
Unless abroad they purchase great alliance?
To prove him tyrant this reason may suffice,
That Henry liveth still: but were he dead,
Yet here Prince Edward stands, King Henry’s son.
Look, therefore, Lewis, that by this league and marriage
Thou draw not on thy danger and dishonour;
For though usurpers sway the rule awhile,
Yet heavens are just, and time suppresseth wrongs.

DUTCH:
Want een tyran, hoe vindt hij rust te huis,
Als hij zich geen uitheemsche vrienden koopt?

MORE:

League=Alliance, friendship
Purchase=Acquire, obtain
Sway the rule=Govern, be in power
Draw not on=Will not bring about, cause
Suppresseth wrongs=Stops, quells wrongs (i.e. has a way of righting wrongs)

Compleat:
League=Verbond, verdrag, verbindtenis
To bear sway=Heerschappy voeren
To sway=(govern) Regeeren. To sway the scepter=Den schepter zwaaijen
To draw on=Geleiden, aantrekken
To suppress=(to stifle, stop) Beletten, verhinderen, sluiten

Topics: deceit, necessity, relationship

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Westmorland
CONTEXT:

NYM
The king is a good king, but it must be as it may.
He passes some humours and careers.
PISTOL
Let us condole the knight, for, lambkins, we will live.
BEDFORD
’Fore God, his Grace is bold to trust these traitors.
EXETER
They shall be apprehended by and by.
WESTMORELAND
How smooth and even they do bear themselves,
As if allegiance in their bosoms sat
Crownèd with faith and constant loyalty.
BEDFORD
The king hath note of all that they intend,
By interception which they dream not of.

DUTCH:
Wat doen zij zich eenvoudig, arg’loos voor,
Alsof de oprechtheid in hun boezem woonde,
Gekroond door liefde en ongekrenkte trouw.

MORE:

Passes humours=Indulges in strange tendencies
Careers=Short sprints, race
Smooth=unruffled, even, balanced
Hath note of=Is informed of
Interception=The stopping and seizing of something in its passage
Constant=Faithful

Compleat:
The humours=De humeuren van het lichaam; grillen
Humour (dispositon of the mind)=Humeur, of gemoeds gesteldheid

Topics: deceit, conspiracy, appearance, loyalty, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Why, I can smile, and murder whiles I smile,
And cry ‘Content’ to that which grieves my heart,
And wet my cheeks with artificial tears,
And frame my face to all occasions.
I’ll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall;
I’ll slay more gazers than the basilisk;
I’ll play the orator as well as Nestor,
Deceive more slily than Ulysses could,
And, like a Sinon, take another Troy.
I can add colours to the chameleon,
Change shapes with Proteus for advantages,
And set the murderous Machiavel to school.
Can I do this, and cannot get a crown?
Tut, were it farther off, I’ll pluck it down.

DUTCH:
Ik kan ‘t kameleon zelfs kleuren leenen,
Als Proteus mij verand’ren , beter zelfs,
Den wreeden Macchiavelli lesjens geven;

MORE:

Proverb: The chameleon can change to all colours save white
Proverb: As many shapes as Proteus
Proverb: The basilisk’s eye is fatal

Artificial=Fake, feigned
Basilisk=Serpent whose gaze was fatal
Nestor=A wise and eloquent warrior in the Trojan War.
Ulysses (or Odysseus)=King of Ithaca, known for his cunning.
Sinon=The Greek soldier responsible for the fall of Troy, who delivered the Wooden Horse concealing the soldiers who attacked the city
Proteus=A shape-shifting sea god.
Machieavel=Niccolò Machiavelli, Italian political philosopher known for ruthless political deception and cunning.

Compleat:
Artificial=Konstig, behendig, aardig, dat niet natuurlyk is
Basilisk=Een basiliskus, als ook zeker zwaar geschut, een Slang genaamd

Topics: deceit, proverbs and idioms, deceit, appearance, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Douglas
CONTEXT:
I fear thou art another counterfeit,
And yet, in faith, thou bear’st thee like a king.
But mine I am sure thou art, whoe’er thou be,
And thus I win thee.

DUTCH:
Ik vrees, dat gij ook weer een namaak zijt,
Schoon gij, voorwaar, u voordoet als een koning;
Doch wie gij zijt, mijn zijt gij, dit bezweer ik;
En zoo maak ik u mijn.

MORE:
Counterfeit=Deceitful imitation

Topics: deceit, conflict, insult, suspicion

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Somerset
CONTEXT:
LUCY
And York as fast upon your grace exclaims;
Swearing that you withhold his levied host,
Collected for this expedition.
SOMERSET
York lies; he might have sent and had the horse;
I owe him little duty, and less love;
And take foul scorn to fawn on him by sending.
LUCY
The fraud of England, not the force of France,
Hath now entrapp’d the noble-minded Talbot:
Never to England shall he bear his life;
But dies, betray’d to fortune by your strife.

DUTCH:
York liegt; ‘k had ze afgestaan, had hij gevraagd;
‘k Ben hem geen dienst, nog minder liefde schuldig;
‘t Waar’ laag, ‘t waar’ vleien, zoo ik zelf haar zond.

MORE:

Levied host=Raised army (some versions have ‘levied horse’, interpreted as horsemen)
Expedition=A warlike enterprise
Sent and had=Sent for and have had
Foul=Disgraceful, derogatory
Scorn=Disdain, contempt
Fawn upon=To wheedle, to cringe, to be overcourteous; to court servilely and in the manner of a dog
Fraud=Falseness, faithlessness

Compleat:
Host (army)=Een heir, heirleger
Expedition=Een krygsverrichting
Scorn=Versmaading, verachting
To fawn upon=Vleijen, streelen

Topics: deceit, failure, conflict, duty, debt/obligation

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
I pray you, do not fall in love with me,
For I am falser than vows made in wine.
Besides, I like you not. If you will know my house,
‘Tis at the tuft of olives, here hard by.

DUTCH:
Ik bid u, word toch niet op mij verliefd;
Want valscher ben ‘k, dan eeden bij de wijnkan;
En voorts, ik mag u niet.

MORE:

Topics: deceit, appearance, truth, honesty

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
Pray you, sir, a word. And as I told you, my young lady bid me inquire you out. What she bade me say, I will keep to myself. But first let me tell ye, if ye should lead her into a fool’s paradise, as they say, it were a very gross kind of behavior, as they say. For the gentlewoman is young, and therefore, if you should deal double with her, truly it were an ill thing to be offered to any gentlewoman, and very weak dealing.

DUTCH:
(A)ls gij haar om den tuin wilt leiden, om zoo te zeggen, dat
het een heel leelijke manier van doen zou wezen, om zoo te zeggen,

MORE:
To live in a fool’s paradise: Idiom=in a state of happiness based on a delusion. (Phrase already in use in 1400s before it became popular after inclusion in R&J)

Topics: invented or popularised, proverbs and idioms, still in use, deceit, manipulation

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Luciana
CONTEXT:
What simple thief brags of his own attaint?
‘Tis double wrong to truant with your bed
And let her read it in thy looks at board.
Shame hath a bastard fame, well managèd;
Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word.

DUTCH:
Door fraaie taal redt schande vaak den schijn,
Maar booze taal is dubbel-booze daad.

MORE:
Proverb: Fine words dress ill deeds

Attaint=Offence, disgrace, corruption
Well-managed=Put a good spin on
Bastard fame=Illegitimate honour
Compact of credit=Made of credulity, entirely believable

Compleat:
To attaint=Overtuigen van misdaad, schuldidg verklaaren, betichten; bevlekken, bederf aanzetten
Attainted=Overtuigd van misdaad, misdaadig verklaard
To compact=In een trekken, dicht t’saamenvoegen

Topics: offence, truth, corruption, deceit, vanity, intellect

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
So may the outward shows be least themselves.
The world is still deceived with ornament.
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil? In religion,
What damned error, but some sober brow
Will bless it and approve it with a text,
Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?
There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.
How many cowards whose hearts are all as false
As stairs of sand wear yet upon their chins
The beards of Hercules and frowning Mars,
Who, inward searched, have livers white as milk,
And these assume but valour’s excrement
To render them redoubted…

DUTCH:
In ’t recht, wat zaak is ooit zoo voos en valsch,
Die niet, door schrandre en gladde tong verfraaid,
Den schijn van ’t kwaad bemantelt?

MORE:
: CITED IN IRISH LAW:
Kirwan & Ors -v- The Mental Health Commission [2012] IEHC 217 (28 May 2012)
CITED IN US LAW:
McCauley v. State, 405 So.2d 1350, 1351 (Fla., 1981) (cited in opinion: “In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt but, being seasoned with a gracious voice, Obscures the show of evil?”);
United States v. Powell, 55 M.J. 633, 642 (2001): “The standard of review in this area of the law is difficult to apply because a judge is attempting to peer into an attorney’s heart by relying on his or her words. In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt / But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil.”;
Day v. Rosenthal, 170 Cal. App. 3d 1125, 1180 (1985).

To season=To temper, qualify
Gracious voice=Attractive, graceful, elegant
To season=To fit for any use by time or habit; to mature; to grow fit for any purpose (Samuel Johnson)
Compleat:
Seasoned=Toebereid, bekwaam gemaakt, getemperd.
Children should be season’d betimes to virtue=Men behoorde de kinderen by tyds aan de deugd te gewennen.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I’ll have our Michael Cassio on the hip,
Abuse him to the Moor in the right garb
(For I fear Cassio with my night-cape too)
Make the Moor thank me, love me, and reward me
For making him egregiously an ass
And practicing upon his peace and quiet
Even to madness. ‘Tis here, but yet confused.
Knavery’s plain face is never seen till used.

DUTCH:
De Moor is iemand die geen argwaan kent
en houdt voor eerlijk wie dat schíjnt te zijn;
je neemt hem net zo maklijk bij de neus
als stomme ezels.
Ik heb het, ’t is verwekt! Door hel en nacht
moet deze monstertelg aan ’t licht gebracht.

MORE:

Proverb: To have one on the hip
On the hip=Have the advantage over; have at one’s mercy (See MoV, 1.3 “If I can catch him once upon the hip”)
Schmidt:
Abuse=Slander
Egregiously=In an enormous, shameful manner
Plain=Open, clear, easily understood, evident

Compleat:
Egregiously=Befaamd, berucht, aankerkelyk (in an ill sense)
An egregious knave=Een beruchte boef

Topics: deceit, appearance, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
To beguile the time,
Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
But be the serpent under’t. He that’s coming
Must be provided for; and you shall put
This night’s great business into my dispatch,
Which shall to all our nights and days to come
Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.

DUTCH:
[S]chijn schuldloos als de bloem,
Maar wees de slang er onder

MORE:
Beguile the time=to deceive them; appear as expected, blend in
Schmidt:
Time=Men, the world
Dispatch=The finishing or winding up of a business
Compleat:
To dispatch=Afvaerdigen, afdoen, verrichten, beschikken, aflaaden, afmaaken, aan een kant helpen, ‘t leeven beneemen
The matter is dispatcht=De zaak is beschikt

Topics: deceit, appearance, good and bad

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
This villain of mine comes under the prediction—there’s son against father. The king falls from bias of nature—there’s father against child. We have seen the best of our time. Machinations, hollowness, treachery, and all ruinous disorders follow us disquietly to our graves.

DUTCH:
De tijd onthult, wat slinksche list ook heel’;
Aan heim’lijk kwaad valt schande in ‘t eind ten deel.
Het ga u wel.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Hollowness= Emptiness and insincerity
Disquietly= In a manner destroying tranquillity and ease (unquietly)
Bias of nature= Natural course or tendency
Compleat:
Hollow=Hol. A hollow heart=Een geveynsd hart
Treachery=Trouwloosheyd, verraadery
Unquietly=Onrustiglyk

Topics: deceit, reputation, legacy, conspiracy, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Never call a true piece of gold a counterfeit. Thou art essentially made, without seeming so.
PRINCE HENRY
And thou a natural coward without instinct.
FALSTAFF
I deny your major. If you will deny the Sheriff, so; if not, let him enter. If I become not a cart as well as another man, a plague on my bringing up. I hope I shall as soon be strangled with a halter as another.
PRINCE HENRY
Go, hide thee behind the arras. The rest walk up above.—
Now, my masters, for a true face and good conscience.

DUTCH:
Noem een echt goudstuk nooit een valsche munt; gij zijt in waarheid dol, al schijnt gij het niet.

MORE:
Essentially made=Truly royal
Major=The main part of your argument; the first proposition of a syllogism
Cart=hanging cart that carries criminals to execution
Become not=Do not look as good as
Bringing up=Upbringing
Compleat:
To bring up=Opbrengen, opvoeden
A Bringer up of children=Een Opbrenger van kinderen
Burgersdijk notes:
Uw gevolg wijs ik af. In ‘t Engelsch staat: „Ik ontken uw major”. Major is de hoofdstelling van een syllogisme; het woord is gebezigd om tusschen major of mayor en het volgende sheriff een tegenstelling te zoeken.
Verberg u achter het wandtapijt. De tapijten werden wel is waar niet zelden aan haken tegen den muur, maar dikwijls ook op eenigen afstand er van opgehangen, zoodat men er zich zeer wel achter kon verbergen.

Topics: deceit, value, appearance, courage, conscience

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
To whom should I complain? Did I tell this,
Who would believe me? O perilous mouths,
That bear in them one and the self-same tongue,
Either of condemnation or approof;
Bidding the law make court’sy to their will:
Hooking both right and wrong to the appetite,
To follow as it draws!

DUTCH:
Wien kan ik klagen? Zoo ik dit verhaalde,
Bij wien vond ik geloof? O booze monden,
Die met een enk’le, met dezelfde tong,
Ter dood verdoemen of hun bijval schenken,
De wetten buigen doen naar hunnen wil

MORE:
Schmidt:
Perilous=Dangerous

Topics: law/legal, honesty, truth, deceit, manipulation, dispute, lawyers

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical!
Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despisèd substance of divinest show,
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st.
A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!

DUTCH:
O slangenhart, bij bloemzoet aangezicht!

MORE:
Divine=excellent in the highest degree, heavenly. Superl. –st “divinest show”
Show=appearance, aspect
Compleat:
Divine=Godlyk, voortreffelyk
Show (Shew)=Een vertooning
To make a fine shew=Een fraai figuur maaken, ‘er wel uitzien.

Topics: deceit, appearance

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
O, what may man within him hide,
Though angel on the outward side!
How may likeness made in crimes,
Making practise on the times,
To draw with idle spiders’ strings
Most ponderous and substantial things!

DUTCH:
O, hoe boos kan ‘t harte zijn,
Schoon de mensch een engel schijn’ !

MORE:
Schmidt:
Likeness=Semblance, resembling form. (Specious or seeming virtue)
Corrupt passage: how may likeness made in crimes etc.
Spiders’ strings=webs (flimsiness)
Ponderous=Heavy

Topics: deceit, appearance, integrity, conspiracy, corruption

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
Henry now lives in Scotland at his ease,
Where having nothing, nothing can he lose.
And as for you yourself, our quondam queen,
You have a father able to maintain you;
And better ’twere you troubled him than France.
QUEEN MARGARET
Peace, impudent and shameless Warwick, peace,
Proud setter up and puller down of kings!
I will not hence, till, with my talk and tears,
Both full of truth, I make King Lewis behold
Thy sly conveyance and thy lord’s false love;
For both of you are birds of selfsame feather.

DUTCH:
Zwijg, onbeschaamde, drieste Warwick, zwijg,
Gij trotsche koningsschepper en verdelger!

MORE:

Proverb: Birds of a feather flock (fly) together

Will not hence=Won’t go elsewhere
Quondam=Former, as was
Conveyance=Underhand dealing, trickery, dishonest actions
Behold=See, recognize

Compleat:
Hence=Van hier, hier uit
Conveyance=Een overwyzing, overvoering, overdragt
To behold=Aanschouwen, zien, aanzien; ziet, let wel

Topics: proverbs and idioms, status, relationship, deceit

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
Who will believe thee, Isabel?
My unsoil’d name, the austereness of my life,
My vouch against you, and my place i’ the state,
Will so your accusation overweigh,
That you shall stifle in your own report
And smell of calumny. I have begun,
And now I give my sensual race the rein:
Fit thy consent to my sharp appetite;
Lay by all nicety and prolixious blushes,
That banish what they sue for; redeem thy brother
By yielding up thy body to my will;
Or else he must not only die the death,
But thy unkindness shall his death draw out
To lingering sufferance. Answer me to-morrow,
Or, by the affection that now guides me most,
I’ll prove a tyrant to him. As for you,
Say what you can, my false o’erweighs your true.

DUTCH:
Ik blijk hem een tyran. Gij mij betichten !
O spreek vrij waar, mijn valschheid doet het zwichten.

MORE:
Onions:
Prolixious=Tedious
Nicety=Coyness
Lay by=Take off, put off, set apart

Topics: law/legal, honesty, truth, deceit, manipulation, dispute

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
So may the outward shows be least themselves.
The world is still deceived with ornament.
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil? In religion,
What damned error, but some sober brow
Will bless it and approve it with a text,
Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?
There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.
How many cowards whose hearts are all as false
As stairs of sand wear yet upon their chins
The beards of Hercules and frowning Mars,
Who, inward searched, have livers white as milk,
And these assume but valour’s excrement
To render them redoubted…

DUTCH:
Hoe vaak is ‘t uiterlijk aan ‘t wezen vreemd!
Steeds wordt de wereld door vertoon bedrogen.

MORE:
: CITED IN IRISH LAW:
Kirwan & Ors -v- The Mental Health Commission [2012] IEHC 217 (28 May 2012)
CITED IN US LAW:
McCauley v. State, 405 So.2d 1350, 1351 (Fla., 1981) (cited in opinion: “In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt but, being seasoned with a gracious voice, Obscures the show of evil?”);
United States v. Powell, 55 M.J. 633, 642 (2001): “The standard of review in this area of the law is difficult to apply because a judge is attempting to peer into an attorney’s heart by relying on his or her words. In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt / But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil.”;
Day v. Rosenthal, 170 Cal. App. 3d 1125, 1180 (1985).

To season=To temper, qualify
Gracious voice=Attractive, graceful, elegant
To season=To fit for any use by time or habit; to mature; to grow fit for any purpose (Samuel Johnson)
Compleat:
Seasoned=Toebereid, bekwaam gemaakt, getemperd.
Children should be season’d betimes to virtue=Men behoorde de kinderen by tyds aan de deugd te gewennen.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Divinity of hell !
When devils will the blackest sins put on,
They do suggest at first with heavenly shows
As I do now. For whiles this honest fool
Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes,
And she for him pleads strongly to the Moor,
I’ll pour this pestilence into his ear:
That she repeals him for her body’s lust.
And by how much she strives to do him good
She shall undo her credit with the Moor.
So will I turn her virtue into pitch
And out of her own goodness make the net
That shall enmesh them all.

DUTCH:
En door haar pogen
hem goed te doen, verspeelt ze bij de Moor
al haar krediet – zo maak ik haar pikzwart
en weef uit haar goedhartigheid een net
dat allen zal verstrikken.

MORE:

Proverb: The devil can transform himself into an angel of light.

Put on=Incite
Schmidt:
Repeal=Recall from exile
Credit=A good opinion entertained of a p. and influence derived from it: Reputation
Pitch=1) Something odious; 2) blackness; 3) with power to ensnare

Compleat:
Pitch=Pik
Credit=Aanzien, goede naam
Repeal=Herroepen, afschaffen, weer intrekken

Topics: deceit, appearance, manipulation, , reputation, virtue, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
The prince of Cumberland! That is a step
On which I must fall down, or else o’erleap,
For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires;
Let not light see my black and deep desires.
The eye wink at the hand, yet let that be
Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.

DUTCH:
Taant, sterren! dat uw gloed
Den zwarten wensch niet zie van mijn gemoed!

MORE:

Topics: deceit, conspiracy, plans/intentions, guilt, betrayal, foul play

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
The spirit that I have seen
May be the devil: and the devil hath power
To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps,
Out of my weakness and my melancholy,
As he is very potent with such spirits,
Abuses me to damn me.

DUTCH:
Mocht eens de duivel zijn, en die heeft macht Aantreklijk zich te tooien /
Kon best een duivel zijn en die heeft macht
Een hupschen stal te kiezen /

MORE:
Schmidt:
To abuse= to deceive

Topics: deceit, appearance, manipulation

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
But ’tis strange.
And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
Win us with honest trifles, to betray ’s
In deepest consequence.

DUTCH:
t Is vreemd; doch vaak
Verkonden, om ons in ‘t verderf te lokken,
De werktuigen der duisternis ons waarheid,
En winnen ons door eerlijkheid in ‘t kleine,
Om in het grootste ons te verraden!

MORE:
Schmidt:
To win=To gain in a moral sense; to move and prevail with by persuasion or any kind of influence

Topics: deceit, reason, betrayal, truth

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Ely
CONTEXT:

ELY
The strawberry grows underneath the nettle,
And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best
Neighbored by fruit of baser quality;
And so the Prince obscured his contemplation
Under the veil of wildness, which, no doubt,
Grew like the summer grass, fastest by night,
Unseen yet crescive in his faculty.
CANTERBURY
It must be so, for miracles are ceased,
And therefore we must needs admit the means
How things are perfected.

DUTCH:
De aardbezie ziet men onder netels groeien,
En onder vruchten van geringer aard
Heilzame beziën best tot rijpheid komen.

MORE:

Note: It was commonly thought that plants imbibed the virtues and faults from neighbouring plants. Sweet flowers were planted close to fruit trees to improve the flavour, but the (probably wild) strawberry – symbol of perfect righteousness in religious emblems – was considered to be the exception and would thrive in the midst of ‘evil’ neighbours without being affected.

Crescive=Growing, increasing
Faculty=Inherent power
Means=Causes
Perfected=Brought about

Compleat:
Faculty (power or virtue)=Vermogen, deugd
To perfect=Volmaaken, voltoooijen; tot volmaaktheid brengen

Topics: deceit, appearance, reason

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
So may the outward shows be least themselves.
The world is still deceived with ornament.
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil? In religion,
What damned error, but some sober brow
Will bless it and approve it with a text,
Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?
There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.
How many cowards whose hearts are all as false
As stairs of sand wear yet upon their chins
The beards of Hercules and frowning Mars,
Who, inward searched, have livers white as milk,
And these assume but valour’s excrement
To render them redoubted…

DUTCH:
Ge§en boosheid, die de slimheid mist, om zich
Met de’ uiterlijken schijn van deugd te sieren.

MORE:
No vice so simple=any vice can be disguised.
‘Stairs of sand’ to convey the idea of weakness and instability was coined by Shakespeare.
Also used as the title for a 1929 silent film.

See also:
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil?

Simple=Silly, witless, weak in intellect.
Livers white as milk – white livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare
Compleat:
White livered=Een die ‘er altyd bleek uitziet, een bleek-neus, kwaaraardig, nydig.
Simple=Zot, dwaas, onnozel

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
FALSTAFF
But as the devil would have it, three misbegotten knaves in Kendal green came at my back, and let drive at me, for it was so dark, Hal, that thou couldst not see thy hand.
PRINCE HENRY
These lies are like their father that begets them, gross as a mountain, open, palpable. Why, thou claybrained guts, thou knotty-pated fool, thou whoreson, obscene, greasy tallow- catch—
FALSTAFF
What, art thou mad? Art thou mad? Is not the truth the truth?

DUTCH:
Die leugens zijn even als de vader, die hen verwekt, groot en breed als een berg, in het oog vallend, tastbaar. Zeg eens, gij onthersende rolpens, gij knoestkoppige dwaas, gij afschuwelijk, glibberig, smerig talkvat.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Misbegotten=Of a bad origin
Kendal=Place in Westmoreland, famous for its clothing trade
Claybrained=Stupid, Cf. Clodpole, clotpole
Tallow-catch, reading of O. Edd. in H4A II; supposed by some to be tallow-ketch, i. e. a vessel filled with tallow; by others tallow-keech, i. e. fat rolled up in a round lump.
Compleat:
Clothead or clot-pated fellow=Een Plompaard, botterik

Topics: deceit, truth, insult

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
Upon my life, by some device or other
The villain is o’erraught of all my money.
They say this town is full of cozenage,
As nimble jugglers that deceive the eye,
Dark-working sorcerers that change the mind,
Soul-killing witches that deform the body,
Disguised cheaters, prating mountebanks,
And many suchlike liberties of sin.
If it prove so, I will be gone the sooner.

DUTCH:
Zoo waar ik leef, door de een of and’re streek
Is al mijn geld den kerel afgezet.
De stad is, zegt men, vol bedrog en list,
Vol beurzensnijders, die het oog bedotten,
Nachttoov’naars, die verbijst’ren, heksen, die
De ziel verdervend , ‘t lichaam tevens sloopen,
Marktschreeuwers, tal van sluw vermomde schurken,
Onnoemlijk boos, steeds zondigend geboeft;
Zoo ‘t waarheid blijkt, reis ik onmidd’lijk af.

MORE:
Device=Scheme, plot

Compleat:
Device (cunning trick)=Een listige streek
Device (invention or contrivance)=Uitvinding, vinding
Mountebank=Kwakzalver
Cozenage or Cozening=Bedrieging
To prate=Praaten. Prate and prattle=Keffen en snappen. Prate foolishly=Mal praaten
Cheater=Swindler

Burgersdijk notes:
De stad is, zegt men, vol bedrog en list. De stad Ephesus stond reeds bij de ouden bekend, als een plaats waar veel tooverkunst uitgeoefend wordt. Men vindt dit ook in de Handelingen der Apostelen vermeld, XIX, vs. 13 en 19. Dat Sh. juist daarom zijn stuk te Ephesus liet spelen, is duidelijk genoeg; men vergelijke II 2; als de gedachte aan tooverij den zoekenden Antipholus en zijn dienaar verbijstert, is het verklaarbaar, dat zij, bij al de vergissingen, niet op de gedachte komen, van nader te onderzoeken, of niet misschien juist in Ephesus hunne evenbeelden woonden.

Topics: suspicion, money, deceit

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHARINE
Pray their graces
To come near.
What can be their business
With me, a poor weak woman, fall’n from favour?
I do not like their coming, now I think on ’t.
They should be good men, their affairs as righteous.
But all hoods make not monks.

DUTCH:
Mij bevalt,
Nu ik er over denk, hun komen niet.
Zij moesten goed zijn, hun bedrijf rechtschapen;
Maar elke kap maakt nog geen monnik.

MORE:
Proverb: The hood (habit, cowl) makes not the monk
Proverb: A holy habit cleanses not a foul soul

Topics: proverbs and idioms, honesty, deceit, appearance

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
Pray, give me favour, sir. This cunning cardinal
The articles o’ the combination drew
As himself pleased; and they were ratified
As he cried ‘Thus let be’: to as much end
As give a crutch to the dead: but our count-cardinal
Has done this, and ’tis well; for worthy Wolsey,
Who cannot err, he did it. Now this follows,—
Which, as I take it, is a kind of puppy
To the old dam, treason,—Charles the emperor,
Under pretence to see the queen his aunt—
For ’twas indeed his colour, but he came
To whisper Wolsey,—here makes visitation:
His fears were, that the interview betwixt
England and France might, through their amity,
Breed him some prejudice; for from this league
Peep’d harms that menaced him: he privily
Deals with our cardinal; and, as I trow,—
Which I do well; for I am sure the emperor
Paid ere he promised; whereby his suit was granted
Ere it was ask’d; but when the way was made,
And paved with gold, the emperor thus desired,
That he would please to alter the king’s course,
And break the foresaid peace. Let the king know,
As soon he shall by me, that thus the cardinal
Does buy and sell his honour as he pleases,
And for his own advantage.

DUTCH:
Vergun mij, heer. Die sluwe kardinaal
Heeft al de artikels van ‘t verdrag ontworpen
Naar zijn believen.

MORE:
Combination=League, alliance
Dam=Mother
Colour=Story, excuse
Privily=In private
I trow=I think, believe
Breed=Create, produce
Suit=Request, petition
Paved with gold=Path cleared by bribery
Compleat:
Combination=’t Zamenspanning
Dam=Een dam; de moer van sommige beesten
Colour=Koleur, schyn, dekmantel.
Under colour of=Onder den schyn van.
Privily=Heymelyk, in ‘t geheym
I trow=Ik denk, ik acht
Breed=Teelen, werpen; voortbrengen; veroorzaaken; opvoeden
Suit=Een verzoek, rectsgeding

Topics: value, betrayal, deceit, advantage/benefit

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
What shall I say to thee, Lord Scroop, thou cruel,
Ingrateful, savage, and inhuman creature?
Thou that didst bear the key of all my counsels,
That knew’st the very bottom of my soul,
That almost mightst have coined me into gold,
Wouldst thou have practiced on me for thy use—
May it be possible that foreign hire
Could out of thee extract one spark of evil
That might annoy my finger? ‘Tis so strange
That, though the truth of it stands off as gross
As black and white, my eye will scarcely see it.
Treason and murder ever kept together
As two yoke-devils sworn to either’s purpose,
Working so grossly in a natural cause
That admiration did not whoop at them.

DUTCH:
Het is zoo vreemd,
Dat, schoon de waarheid scherp en duid’lijk afsteek
Als wit en zwart, mijn oog ze nauw’lijks zien wil.

MORE:

Use=Advantage
Grossly=Palpably, evidently
Admiration=Astonishment
Key=Control, mastery or knowledge of the inner workings

Compleat:
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
You grossly mistake my meaning=Gy vergist u grootelyks omtrent myn meening
Admiration=Verwondering

Topics: evidence, good and bad, deceit, truth, conspiracy, loyalty

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Cordelia
CONTEXT:
Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides,
Who covers faults at last with shame derides.
Well may you prosper.

DUTCH:
De tijd brengt alles aan het licht./
Wie fouten maken en dat sluw maskeren,
zal tijd ons later met een spotlach leren.

MORE:
Onions:
To plight=Pleated, folded (concealed)
Cunning=Dissimulation, falseness

Topics: deceit, discovery, time, secrecy

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? Oh, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace!

DUTCH:
Wie gaf een boek van zulk een snooden inhoud
Ooit zulk een schoonen band?

MORE:

Topics: deceit, appearance

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
My life upon her faith!—Honest Iago,
My Desdemona must I leave to thee.
I prithee, let thy wife attend on her,
And bring them after in the best advantage.
Come, Desdemona, I have but an hour
Of love, of worldly matter and direction,
To spend with thee. We must obey the time.

DUTCH:
Kom, Desdemona; slechts een enkel uur
Is mij voor liefde en reeg’ling van ons huis
Met u vergund; de tijd beheerscht ons doen.

MORE:
In the best advantage=Most favourable opportunity (Arden)
Obey the time=Time is pressing

Topics: time, plans/intentions, life, deceit, truth

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Ah, what’s more dangerous than this fond affiance!
Seems he a dove? His feathers are but borrowed,
For he’s disposed as the hateful raven:
Is he a lamb? His skin is surely lent him,
For he’s inclined as is the ravenous wolf.
Who cannot steal a shape that means deceit?
Take heed, my lord; the welfare of us all
Hangs on the cutting short that fraudful man.

DUTCH:
Is hij een lam? zijn vacht in hem geleend;
Als van een fellen wolf is zijn gemoed.
Wie steelt geen mom, als hij bedriegen wil?
Vrees op uw hoede, heer; ons aller welzijn
Hangt aan ‘t voorkómen van dien valschen man.

MORE:

Proverb: A wolf in sheep’s clothing (‘His skin is surely lent him’)

Raven=Symbolic of a bad omen
Fond=Foolish
Affiance=Confidence
Steal a shape=Create a false impression or appearance
Hateful=Deserving hate
Hangs on=Depends on

Compleat:
Fond (foolish)=Dwaas
Affiance=Vertrouwen, hoop
Hatefull=Haatelyk
These things seem to hang one upon the other=Deeze zaaken schynen van malkander af te hangen

Topics: deceit, appearance, good and bad, trust, betrayal, caution

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: LAFEW
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
No, no, no, your son was misled with a snipped-taffeta
fellow there, whose villanous saffron would have
made all the unbaked and doughy youth of a nation in
his colour: your daughter-in-law had been alive at
this hour, and your son here at home, more advanced
by the king than by that red-tailed humble-bee I speak of.
COUNTESS
I would I had not known him; it was the death of the
most virtuous gentlewoman that ever nature had
praise for creating. If she had partaken of my
flesh, and cost me the dearest groans of a mother, I
could not have owed her a more rooted love.

DUTCH:
Neen, neen, neen; uw zoon werd daar ginds verleid
door een uitgesneden-taf-kerel, wiens ellendige saffraanstijfsel de geheele halfbakken en ongare jeugd van zijn volk met zijn kleur had kunnen gerieven

MORE:
Snipped- or snipt-taffeta was silk slashed to show another material underneath (ref to Parolles’ flashy costume).
Saffron=Used as a starch
Humble-bee=Bumble-bee
Compleat:
Saffron=Saffraan
Humble-bee=Hommel

Topics: deceit, influence, manipulation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
QUEEN MARGARET
(…) And what is Edward but ruthless sea?
What Clarence but a quicksand of deceit?
And Richard but a ragged fatal rock?
All these the enemies to our poor barque.
Say you can swim; alas, ’tis but a while!
Tread on the sand; why, there you quickly sink:
Bestride the rock; the tide will wash you off,
Or else you famish; that’s a threefold death.
This speak I, lords, to let you understand,
If case some one of you would fly from us,
That there’s no hoped-for mercy with the brothers
More than with ruthless waves, with sands and rocks.
Why, courage then! What cannot be avoided
‘Twere childish weakness to lament or fear.

DUTCH:
Dus, moed! Om dat te jamm’ren, dat te duchten,
Wat onvermijd’lijk is, waar’ kindervrees.

MORE:

Quicksand=Moving sand, not a solid footing
Ragged=Rough, jagged
Fatal=Deadly
Barque=Ship (bark)
If case=In the event, if it should happen that

Compleat:
Quick sands=Zanden in zee, droogten
Fatal=Noodlottig, noodschikkelyk, verderflyk, doodelyk
Bark=Scheepje

Topics: deceit, adversity, stability

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
Would I had never trod this English earth,
Or felt the flatteries that grow upon it!
Ye have angels’ faces, but heaven knows your hearts.
What will become of me now, wretched lady!
I am the most unhappy woman living.
Alas, poor wenches, where are now your fortunes!
Shipwreck’d upon a kingdom, where no pity,
No friend, no hope; no kindred weep for me;
Almost no grave allow’d me: like the lily,
That once was mistress of the field and flourish’d,
I’ll hang my head and perish.

DUTCH:
Ja, eng’len schijnt gij, doch God kent uw hart.

MORE:
Would=I wish
Flatteries=Deception, manipulation
Compleat:
Would=’t was te wenschen dat; it zou ‘t wel willen
Flattery=Vleyery

Topics: appearance, plans/intentions, deceit, manipulation, regret

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Escalus
CONTEXT:
Troth, and your bum is the greatest thing about you;
so that in the beastliest sense you are Pompey the
Great. Pompey, you are partly a bawd, Pompey,
howsoever you colour it in being a tapster, are you
not? come, tell me true: it shall be the better for you.

DUTCH:
Nu voorwaar, uw pof is het grootste wat er aan u te zien is, zoodat gij, in den grofsten zin, Pompejus de Groote zijt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Bawd=Procurer (pimp)
Tapster=One who draws beer and serves the customers of an alehouse
Compleat:
Tapster=Een tapper, biertapper
Baud (or she-Bawd)=Een Hoerewaardin, koppelaarster
Bawd=Een Hoerewaard
Burgersdijk notes:
De pofbroeken werden in Sh .’s tjjd vaak zoo geweldig groot, met allerlei dingen opgevuld, dat er een
parlementsacte tegen werd uitgevaardigd. Eens bracht men, – zoo verhaalt Nath. Drake, – een overtreder dezer wet voor het gerecht, die uit zijn pofbroek (bum, i. e. great bum of Paris, cul de Paris) de volgende kleinigheden voor den dag haalde: een paar beddelakens, twee tafellakens, tien zakdoeken, vier hemden, een borstel, een spiegel, een kam, verscheidene slaapmutsen enz . Ook met zemelen vulden de modehelden hunne Fransche pofbroeken op. Eens kreeg zulk een fat bij het opstaan van zijn stoel door een splinter een scheur in zijn pofbroek en de zemelen begonnen er uit te loopen. De dames, die het dadelijk opmerkten, begonnen te lachen. De jonge mensch, die meende, dat men om zijne verhalen en invallen lachte, deed harteljk mede, maar hoe meer hij van lachen schudde, des te meer zemelen gaf de molen.

Topics: insult, truth, justice, appearance, deceit

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