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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Lear ACT/SCENE: 5.3 SPEAKER: Edmund CONTEXT: At this time
We sweat and bleed. The friend hath lost his friend,
And the best quarrels, in the heat, are cursed
By those that feel their sharpness.
The question of Cordelia and her father
Requires a fitter place. DUTCH: En in de hitte wordt de beste strijd
Gevloekt door elk, die nog zijn vlijm gevoelt.
MORE: Schmidt:
Quarrel=Cause, occasion and motive of dispute
Sharpness=Severity, harshness
Fitter place=More appropriate location
Compleat:
Quarrel=Krakeel; twist. A quarrel-breeder=Een krakeel-veroorzaaker, twistzoeker
Sharpness (acrimony) of humours=Scherpheid der vochten
Sharpness (Keenness or point)=Scherpheid, puntigheid Topics: dispute, dignity, resolution

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Joan la Pucelle
CONTEXT:
JOAN LA PUCELLE
(…)Ask me what question thou canst possible,
And I will answer unpremeditated:
My courage try by combat, if thou darest,
And thou shalt find that I exceed my sex.
Resolve on this, thou shalt be fortunate,
If thou receive me for thy warlike mate.
CHARLES
Thou hast astonish’d me with thy high terms:
Only this proof I’ll of thy valour make,
In single combat thou shalt buckle with me,
And if thou vanquishest, thy words are true;
Otherwise I renounce all confidence.

DUTCH:
Vraag mij naar alles wat gij vragen kunt,
Onvoorbereid zal ik u antwoord geven;
Toets in den strijd, indien gij durft, mijn moed,
Bevinden zult gij, meer ben ik dan vrouw.
Neem uw besluit; — gij hebt geluk op aard,
Wanneer gij mij als strijdgenoot aanvaardt.

MORE:
Resolve=Be assured, know this
High terms=Pompous words
Proof=Trial
Buckle=Grapple
Confidence=Trust

Compleat:
To resolve upon something=Iets bepaalen
I know not what to resolve on=Ik weet niet wat ik besluiten zal
Proof=Beproeving
To buckle together=Worstelen, schermutselen
To repose an entire confidence in one=Een volkomen betrouwen op iemand stellen

Topics: trust, language, dispute, truth

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
ABERGAVENNY
A proper title of a peace; and purchased
At a superfluous rate
BUCKINGHAM
Why, all this business
Our reverend cardinal carried.
NORFOLK
Like it your grace,
The state takes notice of the private difference
Betwixt you and the cardinal. I advise you—
And take it from a heart that wishes towards you
Honour and plenteous safety—that you read
The cardinal’s malice and his potency
Together; to consider further that
What his high hatred would effect wants not
A minister in his power. You know his nature,
That he’s revengeful, and I know his sword
Hath a sharp edge: it’s long and, ‘t may be said,
It reaches far, and where ’twill not extend,
Thither he darts it. Bosom up my counsel,
You’ll find it wholesome. Lo, where comes that rock
That I advise your shunning.

DUTCH:
Neem mijn raad ter harte,
En ‘t zal u goed doen. Zie, daar komt de rots,
Die ik u ried te ontwijken.

MORE:
Proverb: Kings have long arms
Purchased=Gained
Rate=Cost
To carry=To manage
Difference=Dispute
Read=Consider, view
High=Haughty
Bosom up=Take to heart, heed
Wholesome=Beneficial
Compleat:
Purchase=Verkrygen
Rate=Prys, waardy
To carry=Draagen, voeren, brengen
Difference=Verschhil, onderscheyd
Read=Leezen
High=Hoog, verheven
Wholesom=Gezond, heylzaam, heelzaam

Topics: proverbs and idioms, caution, dispute, authority

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Alas, the part I had in Woodstock’s blood
Doth more solicit me than your exclaims,
To stir against the butchers of his life!
But since correction lieth in those hands
Which made the fault that we cannot correct,
Put we our quarrel to the will of heaven;
Who, when they see the hours ripe on earth,
Will rain hot vengeance on offenders’ heads.

DUTCH:
Doch wijl de straf in de eigen handen rust,
Die pleegden, wat wij zelf niet kunnen straffen,
Bevelen we onze zaak den hemel aan.

MORE:

Proverb: Vengeance belongs only to God

To solicit=Entreat, petition
Stir=Act
Put we our quarrel to=Put our dispute before, submit our dispute to
See the hours ripe=The time has come
Rain hot vengeance=Divine punishent (Genesis 19:24-5)
Correction=Punishment

Compleat:
Correction=Verbetering, tuchtiging, berisping
Ripe=Ryp
When things are ripe for action=Als het tyd is om aan ‘t werk te gaan
A design ripe for execution=Een ontwerp dat ryp is om ter uitvoer te brengen
Vengeance=Wraak

Topics: dispute, offence, resolution, justice, punishment, proverbs and idioms, time

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
PLANTAGENET
[Aside] Plantagenet, I see, must hold his tongue,
Lest it be said ‘Speak, sirrah, when you should;
Must your bold verdict enter talk with lords?’
Else would I have a fling at Winchester.
KING HENRY VI
Uncles of Gloucester and of Winchester,
The special watchmen of our English weal,
I would prevail, if prayers might prevail,
To join your hearts in love and amity.
O, what a scandal is it to our crown,
That two such noble peers as ye should jar!
Believe me, lords, my tender years can tell
Civil dissension is a viperous worm
That gnaws the boels of the commonwealth.

DUTCH:
Geloof mij, lords, mijn teed’re jeugd bevroedt reeds,
Dat burgertwist een giftige adder is ,
Die de ingewanden van den staat doorknaagt.

MORE:
Bold=Daring, insolent
Verdict=Judgment, opinion
Enter=Engage in, interrupt
Weal=Commonwealth
Jar=Quarrel

Compleat:
Jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
The common-weal=’t Welvaaren van ‘t algemeen
A common-wealths man=Een republyks gezinde

Burgersdijk notes:
Mijn teed’re jeugd bevroedt reeds. Eigenlijk was Hendrik VI slechts vijf jaar oud, toen het parlement
bijeenkwam om de twisten tusschen Gloster en Winchester te beslechten.

Topics: dispute, consequence, resolution, judgment

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
DROMIO OF EPHESUS
I pray you, jest, sir, as you sit at dinner.
I from my mistress come to you in post;
If I return, I shall be post indeed,
For she will scour your fault upon my pate.
Methinks your maw, like mine, should be your clock,
And strike you home without a messenger.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Come, Dromio, come, these jests are out of season.
Reserve them till a merrier hour than this.
Where is the gold I gave in charge to thee?
DROMIO OF EPHESUS
To me, sir? Why, you gave no gold to me!
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Come on, sir knave, have done your foolishness,
And tell me how thou hast disposed thy charge.

DUTCH:
Kom, Dromio, kom, ontijdig is die scherts;
Bewaar ze tot ik vroolijker gestemd ben.
Waar is het goud, dat ik u toevertrouwde?

MORE:
Out of season=Badly timed, inconvenient
Jest=Each believes the other to be joking (in ‘sportive humour’). The confusion about the delivery of a gold chain is a reference to a cause célèbre case in 1591 and 1592, Underwood v Manwood. This would have been appreciated by an audience in Gray’s Inn in 1594.
Maw=appetite

Compleat:
Maw=Maag
Out of season=Uit de tyd
To jest=Boerten, schertsen, jokken, gekscheeren

Topics: time, debt/obligation, misunderstanding, dispute

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
I have rubbed this young quat almost to the sense,
And he grows angry. Now, whether he kill Cassio
Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other,
Every way makes my gain. Live Roderigo,
He calls me to a restitution large
Of gold and jewels that I bobbed from him
As gifts to Desdemona.
It must not be. If Cassio do remain
He hath a daily beauty in his life
That makes me ugly. And besides, the Moor
May unfold me to him—there stand I in much peril.
No, he must die. But so, I hear him coming.

DUTCH:
Ik kneep tot berstens toe dien jongen windbuil;
Hij wordt nu boos. Nu, ‘t zij hij Cassio doode,
Of Cassio hem, of dat ze elkander vellen,
Hoe ‘t loop’, ik win er bij.

MORE:

Quat=Contemptible youth; boil or pimple
To the sense=To the quick, raw
Makes my gain=Is to my advantage
Bobbed=Swindled
Unfold=Expose

Compleat:
Unfold=Ontvouwen, open leggen
To bob=Begekken, bedriegen, loeren, foppen

Burgersdijk notes:
Dien jongen windbuil. In ‘t Engelsch staat quat, welk woord tegelijk een blaar of vin, en een ellendig, verachtelijk wezen beteekent.

Topics: age/experience, learning and education, dispute, appearance, perception

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
JOHN OF GAUNT
God’s is the quarrel; for God’s substitute,
His deputy anointed in His sight,
Hath caused his death: the which if wrongfully,
Let heaven revenge; for I may never lift
An angry arm against His minister.
DUCHESS
Where then, alas, may I complain myself?
JOHN OF GAUNT
To God, the widow’s champion and defence.

DUTCH:
Aan God de wrake, want zijn plaatsvervanger,
Zijn stedehouder, voor zijn oog gezalfd,
Is de oorzaak van zijn dood; is deze een gruwel,
Dan wreke ‘t God, want ik mag nimmer toornig
Den arm verheffen tegen zijn gezant.

MORE:

Minister=Representative, proxy (the King)
God’s quarrel=It is in God’s hands
Complain myself=Complain

Topics: dispute, offence, death, punishment

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them.
Good signior, you shall more command with years
Than with your weapons.
BRABANTIO
O thou foul thief, where hast thou stowed my daughter?
Damned as thou art, thou hast enchanted her!
For I’ll refer me to all things of sense,
If she in chains of magic were not bound,
Whether a maid so tender, fair, and happy,
So opposite to marriage that she shunned
The wealthy curlèd darlings of our nation,
Would ever have, t’ incur a general mock,
Run from her guardage to the sooty bosom
Of such a thing as thou—to fear, not to delight.

DUTCH:
Steekt op uw blanke klingen, want de nachtdauw
Zal die doen roesten. — Edel Heer, uw leeftijd
Dwingt eér ontzag af, dan uw zwaard het doet.

MORE:

Keep up=Put away
Stowed=Hidden away
Command with years=Respect for age and status
General mock=Public ridicule

Topics: status, respect, age/experience, dispute, resolution, relationship, marriage

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
A good traveller is something at the latter end of a
dinner; but one that lies three thirds and uses a
known truth to pass a thousand nothings with, should
be once heard and thrice beaten. God save you, captain.
BERTRAM
Is there any unkindness between my lord and you,
monsieur?
PAROLLES
I know not how I have deserved to run into my lord’s
displeasure.
LAFEW
You have made shift to run into ‘t, boots and spurs
and all, like him that leaped into the custard; and
out of it you’ll run again, rather than suffer
question for your residence.
BERTRAM
It may be you have mistaken him, my lord.
LAFEW
And shall do so ever, though I took him at ‘s
prayers. Fare you well, my lord; and believe this
of me, there can be no kernel in this light nut; the
soul of this man is his clothes. Trust him not in
matter of heavy consequence; I have kept of them
tame, and know their natures. Farewell, monsieur:
I have spoken better of you than you have or will to
deserve at my hand; but we must do good against evil.

DUTCH:
BERTRAM.
Bestaat er eenig misverstand tusschen dezen edelman
en u, monsieur?
PAROLLES
Ik weet niet, hoe ik het verdiend heb, de ongenade
van dezen heer te beloopen .
LAFEU
Gij hebt het er op toegelegd, om er in te loopen, gelaarsd,
gespoord en al, zooals de nar van den Lord-Mayor, die in de pastei sprong; en gij zult er wel eer weder uitspringen, dan verslag geven over uw verblijf er in.

MORE:
Proverb: A traveller may lie with authority
Proverb: Set good against evil (Do good for evil)
Made shift=Managed, contrived
Leaped into the custard=Reference to the custom at the Lord Mayor of London’s show, of a jester leaping into an enormous custard
Residence=Presence
Compleat:
To make a shift=Zich behelpen, zich redden

Topics: dispute

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
YORK
Lords, let him go. Please it your majesty,
This is the day appointed for the combat;
And ready are the appellant and defendant,
The armourer and his man, to enter the lists,
So please your highness to behold the fight.
QUEEN MARGARET
Ay, good my lord; for purposely therefore
Left I the court, to see this quarrel tried.
KING HENRY VI
O God’s name, see the lists and all things fit:
Here let them end it; and God defend the right!
YORK
I never saw a fellow worse bestead,
Or more afraid to fight, than is the appellant,
The servant of this armourer, my lords.

DUTCH:
Nog nooit zag ik een knaap, zoo erg ontdaan,
Zoo angstig om te vechten, als de klager,
De dienaar van den wapensmid, mylords.

MORE:

Day appointed=Date scheduled
Lists=Enclosure designated for fights
Quarrel=Dispute
Bestead=(or bested) in a worse plight, worse prepared

Compleat:
To appoint (time and place)=Tijd en plaats bestemmen
Quarrel=Krakeel; twist
To bestead one=Iemand eenen goeden dienst doen

Topics: defence, law/legal, justice, dispute, preparation

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
I humbly thank your highness;
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnow’d, where my chaff
And corn shall fly asunder: for, I kno§w,
There’s none stands under more calumnious tongues
Than I myself, poor man.
KING HENRY VIII
Stand up, good Canterbury:
Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
In us, thy friend: give me thy hand, stand up:
Prithee, let’s walk. Now, by my holidam.
What manner of man are you? My lord, I look’d
You would have given me your petition, that
I should have ta’en some pains to bring together
Yourself and your accusers; and to have heard you,
Without endurance, further.

DUTCH:
Mylord, ik dacht,
Dat gij mij zoudt verzoeken, een’ge moeite
Te nemen, uw beschuldigers terstond
Te ontbieden en u, zonder uitstel, verder
Te hooren.

MORE:
Winnow=Process of sorting wheat from chaff, i.e. in the wind (cleared)
Stands under=Suffers
Calumnious=Slanderous
Holidame=Holy dame (also Holydame, halidom)
Looked=Expected
Petition=Request
Endurance=Hardship
Compleat:
To winnow=Wannen, ziften
Calumnious=Faamroovend, lasterlyk
Petition=Verzoek, smeekschrift
To endure=Verdraagen, harden, duuren

Topics: innocence, evidence, claim, dispute

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
BENVOLIO
We talk here in the public haunt of men.
Either withdraw unto some private place,
And reason coldly of your grievances,
Or else depart. Here all eyes gaze on us.
MERCUTIO
Men’s eyes were made to look and let them gaze.
I will not budge for no man’s pleasure, I.

DUTCH:
Ik wijk van hier om niemands wil een haar.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Haunt = a “place much frequented”
Coldly = coolly, rationally
Shakespeare is said to have popularised use of the verb ‘to budge’, usually in a negative context to mean intransigence, refusal to change position. (See also Sly in Taming of the Shrew “I’ll not budge an inch”.)
Double negatives were common in Old English and weren’t a problem for Shakespeare (or Chaucer and other writers of the time). In fact, they weren’t condemned until the 18th century when grammarians declared that double negatives cancel each other out or amounted to an affirmative.

Topics: dispute, reason, civility

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
Judge me the world, if ’tis not gross in sense
That thou hast practised on her with foul charms,
Abused her delicate youth with drugs or minerals
That weakens motion. I’ll have’t disputed on;
‘Tis probable and palpable to thinking.
I therefore apprehend and do attach thee
For an abuser of the world, a practiser
Of arts inhibited and out of warrant.

DUTCH:
De wereld oordeele, of ‘t niet zonneklaar is,
Dat gij door euv’le kunsten haar verlokt,
Haar teed’re jeugd door kruid of steen verdoofd,
Verbijsterd hebt.

MORE:

Arden:
Gross in sense=Palpable, obvious
Weakens motion=Dulls the normal perceptive faculties
Disputed on=Contested, debated
Abuser of the world=Corrupter of society
Attach=Arrest
Palpable to thinking=Obvious, manifest

Compleat:
To dispute, to agitate, or maintain a question=Een veschil verdedigen, handhaven
To dispute=Twistredenen, betwisten, zintwisten, disputeeren
Disputer=Een twistredenaar, zintwister, woordentwister, disputant
Attach=Beslaan, de hand opleggen, in verzekering neemen

Topics: dispute, law/legal, corruption

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
I do not care. I’ll give thrice so much land
To any well-deserving friend;
But in the way of bargain, mark you me,
I’ll cavil on the ninth part of a hair.
Are the indentures drawn? Shall we be gone?

DUTCH:
t Is me onverschillig; driemaal zooveel land
Geef ik den eersten, besten, trouwen vriend;
Maar geldt het een verdrag of koop, let wel,
Dan twist ik om het tiende van een haar.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cavil=To quarrel, to find fault (the phrase “splitting hairs” was recorded in the 1652 OED and would mean one who is very persistent, stubborn)
Well-deserving=Full of merit, worthy (deserving)
Indentures=Contracts
Compleat:
Cavil=Haairkloovery, woordentwist
To cavil=Knibbelen, kibbelen, haairklooven, woordvitten, bedillen, schimpen
Indenture=Een verdragsbrief [zo genoemd] om dat men daar van twee al-eens luidende kopyen maakt, en die met tanden of hoeken van malkanderen snydt.
CITED IN US LAW:
United States v. Jones, 176 F.2d 278, 289-90 (9th Cir. 1949)(Yankwich, J.) (In a government contract dispute: “To use Hotspur’ s phrasing, the Government was not ‘in the way of bargain’ caviling ‘on the ninth part of a hair.’ …”

Topics: cited in law, contract, merit, dispute

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Tullus Aufidius
CONTEXT:
By the elements,
If e’er again I meet him beard to beard,
He’s mine, or I am his: mine emulation
Hath not that honour in’t it had; for where
I thought to crush him in an equal force,
True sword to sword, I’ll potch at him some way
Or wrath or craft may get him.

DUTCH:
Bij de goden,
Als ik hem ooit weer, baard aan baard, mag staan,
Dan valle hij of ik!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Emulation=Endeavour or ambition to equal or excel, envious rivalry
Potch=Poach; thrust

Compleat:
Emulation=Volgzucht, afgunst
Potch=Eieren zacht kooken

Topics: dispute, emotion and mood

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Edward
CONTEXT:
RICHARD
Brother, though I be youngest, give me leave.
EDWARD
No, I can better play the orator.
MONTAGUE
But I have reasons strong and forcible.
YORK
Why, how now, sons and brother! At a strife?
What is your quarrel? How began it first?
EDWARD
No quarrel, but a slight contention.
YORK
About what?
RICHARD
About that which concerns your grace and us;
The crown of England, father, which is yours.
YORK
Mine boy? not till King Henry be dead.

DUTCH:
Geen twist, alleen een kleine woordenstrijd.

MORE:

Give me leave=Permit me
At a strife=In a fight, dispute
Slight contention=Debate, dispute

Compleat:
To give leave=Verlof geeven, veroorloven
Give me leave to do it=Vergun het my te doen
Strife=Twist, tweedragt, krakkeel, pooging
Contention=Twist, krakkeel, geharrewar

Topics: reason, justification, dispute, persuasion

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.8
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
MARTIUS
I’ll fight with none but thee; for I do hate thee
Worse than a promise-breaker.
AUFIDIUS
We hate alike:
Not Afric owns a serpent I abhor
More than thy fame and envy. Fix thy foot.
MARTIUS
Let the first budger die the other’s slave,
And the gods doom him after!

DUTCH:
Gelijk is onze haat;
‘k Verfoei geen Afrikaansch gedrocht zoo diep,
Als uw gehaten roem. Sta vast.

MORE:
Proverb:
Africa is always producing something new (monsters, serpents)

Schmidt:
Budger=One who gives way

Compleat:
Promise-breaker=Een belofte-breeker
To budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, dispute, envy

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Guildenstern
CONTEXT:
HAMLET
What, are they children? Who maintains ’em? How are they escoted? Will they pursue the quality no longer than they can sing? Will they not say afterwards, if they should grow themselves to common players (as it is most like if their means are no better), their writers do them wrong to make them exclaim against their own succession?
ROSENCRANTZ
Faith, there has been much to do on both sides, and the nation holds it no sin to tar them to controversy. There was, for a while, no money bid for argument unless the poet and the player went to cuffs in the question.
HAMLET
Is ’t possible?
GUILDENSTERN
O, there has been much throwing about of brains.
HAMLET
Do the boys carry it away?
ROSENCRANTZ
Ay, that they do, my lord. Hercules and his load too.

DUTCH:
O daar is heel wat hersenverspilling over geweest .

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
People v. Langston, 131 Cal. App.3d 7 (1982)(Brown, J.).

Schmidt:
Much throwing about of brains=There has been much mental effort, a battle of wits
Escote=To pay
Quality=Profession
Common=Adult
Argument=Plot outline, play
A dry brain=A dull brain, incapable of thinking
Tar=(Also tarre) Incite, set on to fight (esp. dogs)
Controversy=Quarrel
Cuffs=Come to blows
Question=Dispute, action

Compleat:
Argument=Kort begrip der zaak die te bewyzen staat
Tarred=Geteerd
Controversy=Geschil, redenstryd, twist
To cuff=Om de ooren slaan
Question=Verschil, twyfel

Topics: dispute, cited in law

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
I humbly thank your highness;
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnow’d, where my chaff
And corn shall fly asunder: for, I kno§w,
There’s none stands under more calumnious tongues
Than I myself, poor man.
KING HENRY VIII
Stand up, good Canterbury:
Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
In us, thy friend: give me thy hand, stand up:
Prithee, let’s walk. Now, by my holidam.
What manner of man are you? My lord, I look’d
You would have given me your petition, that
I should have ta’en some pains to bring together
Yourself and your accusers; and to have heard you,
Without endurance, further.

DUTCH:
En gaarne aanvaard ik, wat de tijd mij biedt,
Dat door een wan mijn kaf en koren zuiver
Gescheiden worden.

MORE:
Winnow=Process of sorting wheat from chaff, i.e. in the wind (cleared)
Stands under=Suffers
Calumnious=Slanderous
Holidame=Holy dame (also Holydame, halidom)
Looked=Expected
Petition=Request
Endurance=Hardship
Compleat:
To winnow=Wannen, ziften
Calumnious=Faamroovend, lasterlyk
Petition=Verzoek, smeekschrift
To endure=Verdraagen, harden, duuren

Topics: innocence, evidence, claim, dispute

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
O world, thy slippery turns! Friends now fast sworn,
Whose double bosoms seems to wear one heart,
Whose hours, whose bed, whose meal and exercise
Are still together, who twin, as ’twere, in love
Unseparable, shall within this hour,
On a dissension of a doit, break out
To bitterest enmity; so fellest foes,
Whose passions and whose plots have broke their sleep
To take the one the other, by some chance,
Some trick not worth an egg, shall grow dear friends
And interjoin their issues. So with me:
My birthplace hate I, and my love’s upon
This enemy town. I’ll enter. If he slay me,
He does fair justice; if he give me way,
I’ll do his country service.

DUTCH:
En zij, die felle vijandschap steeds scheidde,
Wien haat en woede, door verdelgingsplannen,
Niet slapen liet, — zij worden door een toeval,
Een gril, geen ei zelfs waard, tot boezemvrienden,
Verzwaag’ren hunne kind’ren

MORE:
Slippery turns=Instability, sudden changes
Dissenion of a doit=An insignificant, trifling dispute
Interjoin issues=Marry their children

Schmidt:
Doit=Smallest piece of money, a trifle
Fell=Fierce, savage, cruel, pernicious

Compleat:
Doit=Een duit (achtste deel van een stuiver)
Fell (cruel)=Wreede, fel

Topics: friendship, loyalty, dispute, betrayal, life

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Plantagenet
CONTEXT:
PLANTAGENET
Tut, tut, here is a mannerly forbearance:
The truth appears so naked on my side
That any purblind eye may find it out.
SOMERSET
And on my side it is so well apparell’d,
So clear, so shining and so evident
That it will glimmer through a blind man’s eye.
PLANTAGENET
Since you are tongue-tied and so loath to speak,
In dumb significants proclaim your thoughts:
Let him that is a true-born gentleman
And stands upon the honour of his birth,
If he suppose that I have pleaded truth,
From off this brier pluck a white rose with me.

DUTCH:
Aan mijne zijde is zij zoo welgekleed;
Zoo helder, glansrijk, zoo volkomen duid’lijk,
Dat zij een blinde zelfs in ‘t oog moet stralen.

MORE:
Mannerly=Polite
Forbearance=Reserve
Purblind=Partially blind
Apparelled=Dressed up
Dumb significants=Mute signs

Compleat:
Purblind=Stikziende
Signification=Beeteknis, betekening, beduidenis, beduidsel
To forbear (let alone)=Staan laaten, nalaaten, vermyden

Topics: dispute, truth, merit, evidence

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Thou art sure of me. Go, make money. I have told thee often, and I re-tell thee again and again, I hate the Moor. My cause is hearted. Thine hath no less reason. Let us be conjunctive in our revenge against him. If thou canst cuckold him, thou dost thyself a pleasure, me a sport. There are many events in the womb of time which will be delivered. Traverse, go, provide thy money. We will have more of this tomorrow. Adieu.

DUTCH:
De tijd gaat groot van allerlei voorvallen, die in de geboorte zijn. Opgerukt, ga, zorg voor geld.

MORE:

Be conjunctive=Join forces
Hearted=Seated in the heart
Cuckold=To make a cuckold

Topics: time, money, reason, dispute, trust, unity/collaboration, revenge, conspiracy

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
The service of the foot
Being once gangrened, is not then respected
For what before it was.
BRUTUS
We’ll hear no more.
Pursue him to his house, and pluck him thence:
Lest his infection, being of catching nature,
Spread further.
MENENIUS
One word more, one word.
This tiger-footed rage, when it shall find
The harm of unscann’d swiftness, will too late
Tie leaden pounds to’s heels. Proceed by process;
Lest parties, as he is beloved, break out,
And sack great Rome with Romans.
BRUTUS
If it were so,—
SICINIUS
What do ye talk?
Have we not had a taste of his obedience?
Our aediles smote? ourselves resisted? Come.

DUTCH:
Nog één woord, één woord.
Die tijgerwoede zal, ontdekt zij ‘t onheil
Van haren blinden sprong, te laat haar zolen
Met lood bezwaren. Volgt den weg van ‘t recht;
Wis zou verdeeldheid, — want hij is bemind, —
Losbrekend, door Romeinen Rome slechten.

MORE:
Proverb: To have lead on one’s heels

Tiger-footed=Moving in leaps and bounds,swift, fleet
Unscanned swiftness=Wild, inconsiderate speed (Arden)
Leaden heels=Leaden-heeled=Dragging heels, moving slowly
Taste=Proof, trial, specimen (see King Lear 1.2: “He wrote this but as an essay or taste of my virtue.”)
Aediles=Offiials in charge of public works, police and grain supply

Compleat:
Taste (discerning faculty)=Goede smaak, onderscheidend vermoogen
Taste=Proeven
Taster=Proefschaaltje

Burgersdijk notes: Het ambt der Aedilen, namelijk der Aediles plebeii, was tegelijk met dat der volkstribunen ingesteld. De Aedilen waren belast met de stedelijke policie en hadden ook de tribunen bij te staan en op hun bevel beschuldigden in hechtenis te nemen; werd het plebs gehoond, dan traden zij als aanklagers op. Zij waren, aanvankelijk ten minste sacrosancti, onschendbaar.

Topics: anger, haste, error, dispute, law/legal, justice, resolution, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Joan la Pucelle
CONTEXT:
JOAN LA PUCELLE
(…)Ask me what question thou canst possible,
And I will answer unpremeditated:
My courage try by combat, if thou darest,
And thou shalt find that I exceed my sex.
Resolve on this, thou shalt be fortunate,
If thou receive me for thy warlike mate.
CHARLES
Thou hast astonish’d me with thy high terms:
Only this proof I’ll of thy valour make,
In single combat thou shalt buckle with me,
And if thou vanquishest, thy words are true;
Otherwise I renounce all confidence.

DUTCH:
Ik sta verbaasd van uwe fiere taal;
En deze proef slechts wensch ik van uw moed

MORE:
Resolve=Be assured, know this
High terms=Pompous words
Proof=Trial
Buckle=Grapple
Confidence=Trust

Compleat:
To resolve upon something=Iets bepaalen
I know not what to resolve on=Ik weet niet wat ik besluiten zal
Proof=Beproeving
To buckle together=Worstelen, schermutselen
To repose an entire confidence in one=Een volkomen betrouwen op iemand stellen

Topics: trust, language, dispute, truth

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
Thou wilt quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes;–what eye but such an eye would spy out such a quarrel?

DUTCH:
Gij krijgt met iemand twist, als hij een kastanje schilt, alleen omdat gij kastanje-bruine oogen hebt.

MORE:
Shakespeare is said to have been the first to use hazel as a description of eye colour. It was considered then to be a reddish brown.

Topics: dispute, conflict, appearance

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
My Lord of Winchester, I know your mind;
‘Tis not my speeches that you do mislike,
But ’tis my presence that doth trouble ye.
Rancour will out: proud prelate, in thy face
I see thy fury: if I longer stay,
We shall begin our ancient bickerings.
Lordings, farewell; and say, when I am gone,
I prophesied France will be lost ere long.

DUTCH:
Mylord van Winchester, ik ken u wel;
Niet mijn gezegden zijn ‘t, die u mishagen,
‘t Is mijn aanwezigheid, die u verdriet.
Wrok baant zich lucht: hoogmoedige prelaat,
‘k Lees in uw blik uw woede

MORE:

Lordings=My lords, gentlemen
Ancient=Long-standing
Bickerings=Arguments, quarrels
Prelate=Church dignitary

Compleat:
Anciently=Van ouds, oulings
To bicker=Kibbelen, harrewarren, krakkeelen
Bickering=Gekrakkeel
Prelate=’t Opperhoofd van een Domkerk, een Aartsbisschop, Bisschop, Kerkvoogd, Prelaat

Topics: dispute, anger

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Many years of happy days befall
My gracious sovereign, my most loving liege!
THOMAS MOWBRAY
Each day still better other’s happiness;
Until the heavens, envying earth’s good hap,
Add an immortal title to your crown!
KING RICHARD II
We thank you both: yet one but flatters us,
As well appeareth by the cause you come;
Namely to appeal each other of high treason.
Cousin of Hereford, what dost thou object
Against the Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray?

DUTCH:
Hebt beiden dank; doch een is slechts een vleier;
De reden van uw hierzijn spreekt dit uit:
Gij legt elkander hoogverraad te last.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Liege=Term used to express allegiance to the king
Hap=Fortune
Appeal=Accuse

Compleat:
A liege Lord=Een Opperheer, die onder niemand staat

Topics: fate/destiny, law/legal, blame, dispute

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Hold your hands,
Both you of my inclining and the rest.
Were it my cue to fight, I should have known it
Without a prompter. Whither will you that I go
To answer this your charge?
BRABANTIO
To prison, till fit time
Of law and course of direct session
Call thee to answer.
OTHELLO
What if I do obey?
How may the Duke be therewith satisfied,
Whose messengers are here about my side
Upon some present business of the state
To bring me to him?

DUTCH:
Steekt op die zwaarden ,
Niet gij slechts aan mijn zij, gij and’ren ook!
Waar’ strijd mijn wachtwoord, ‘k wist het zelf, al blies
Het niemand in. Waar wilt gij, dat ik ga,
Opdat ik mij verantwoord?

MORE:

Hold your hands=Don’t strike
Of my inclining=On my side
Course of direct session=Specially convened court hearing

Compleat:
To hold back=Te rugge houden, onthouden
Session=Een zitting

Topics: dispute, law/legal, punishment, reply

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
YORK
Will not this malice, Somerset, be left?
SOMERSET
Your private grudge, my Lord of York, will out,
Though ne’er so cunningly you smother it.
KING HENRY VI
Good Lord, what madness rules in brainsick men,
When for so slight and frivolous a cause
Such factious emulations shall arise!
Good cousins both, of York and Somerset,
Quiet yourselves, I pray, and be at peace.

DUTCH:
God! welk een waanzin heerscht in dolle mannen,
Als om zoo nietige en zoo ijd’le reden
Zoo vinnige partijschap zich verheft! —

MORE:
Be left (leave)=To cease, desist, discontinue
Factious=Dissentious, rebellious, partisan
Emulation=Rivalry

Compleat:
Factious=Oproerig, muitzuchtig, muitziek
Emulation=Naayver, volgzucht, afgunst

Topics: dispute, envy, truth, madness

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Basset
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
What is that wrong whereof you both complain?
First let me know, and then I’ll answer you.
BASSET
Crossing the sea from England into France,
This fellow here, with envious carping tongue,
Upbraided me about the rose I wear;
Saying, the sanguine colour of the leaves
Did represent my master’s blushing cheeks,
When stubbornly he did repugn the truth
About a certain question in the law
Argued betwixt the Duke of York and him;
With other vile and ignominious terms:
In confutation of which rude reproach
And in defence of my lord’s worthiness,
I crave the benefit of law of arms.

DUTCH:
Toen die de waarheid vinnig had weerstreefd
Bij zeek’ren redetwist om recht en wetten,
Dien hij gehad had met den hertog York,
Met verdre lage schimp- en lastertaal

MORE:
Wrong=Wrongdoing, offence, trespass
Envious=Malicious, spiteful, jealous of another’s good fortune
Carping=Mocking
Upbraid=To reproach
Sanguine=Blood-red
Repugn=Reject
Confutation=Legal refutation
Law of arms=A duel

Compleat:
Wrong=Nadeel
Envious=Nydig, afgunstig, wangunstig
To upbraid=Verwyten, smaadelyk toedryven
Sanguine=Bloed-rood
To repugn=Wederstreeven, bestryden, tegenstryden, wederstaan
Confutation=Wederlegging

Topics: dispute, envy, truth, language

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
Now, by God’s mother, priest,
I’ll shave your crown for this,
Or all my fence shall fail.
CARDINAL
Medice, teipsum—
Protector, see to’t well, protect yourself.
KING HENRY VI
The winds grow high; so do your stomachs, lords.
How irksome is this music to my heart!
When such strings jar, what hope of harmony?
I pray, my lords, let me compound this strife.

DUTCH:
Als zulke snaren valsche tonen geven,
Hoe is er dan ooit hoop op harmonie?

MORE:

Crown=Tonsure (shaved part of a priest’s head)
“Medice, teipsum”=Physician heal thyself (ref. Luke 4:23)
Stomach=Anger
Compound=Settle ambicably
Jar=conflict, discord (as in jarring notes)

Compleat:
Jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
To jar (in music)=Uit de maat zyn

Topics: dispute, resolution

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
That can I.
At least, the whisper goes so: our last king,
Whose image even but now appeared to us,
Was, as you know, by Fortinbras of Norway,
Thereto pricked on by a most emulate pride,
Dared to the combat; in which our valiant Hamlet
(For so this side of our known world esteemed him)
Did slay this Fortinbras, who by a sealed compact
Well ratified by law and heraldry,
Did forfeit, with his life, all those his lands
Which he stood seized of to the conqueror,
Against the which a moiety competent
Was gagèd by our king, which had returned
To the inheritance of Fortinbras
Had he been vanquisher, as, by the same covenant
And carriage of the article designed,
His fell to Hamlet. Now, sir, young Fortinbras,
Of unimprovèd mettle hot and full,
Hath in the skirts of Norway here and there
Sharked up a list of lawless resolutes,

DUTCH:
Maar onze dapp’re Hamlet, –
Want heel deez’ zijde der bekende wereld
Geeft hem dien roem, – versloeg dien Fortinbras,
Die, bij verdrag, gczegeld en bekrachtigd
Door wet en kamprecht, met het leven tevens
Den overwinnaar heel zijn land verbeurde

MORE:
Pricked=incited
Sealed compact=Signed and sealed agreement
Well ratified=In full accordance with
Law and heraldry=Law and the rules of combat
Seized of=Possessed of

Topics: law/legal, inheritance, dispute, conflict, contract

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Wrath-kindled gentlemen, be ruled by me.
Let’s purge this choler without letting blood.
This we prescribe, though no physician.
Deep malice makes too deep incision.
Forget, forgive; conclude and be agreed;
Our doctors say this is no month to bleed.
Good uncle, let this end where it begun;
We’ll calm the Duke of Norfolk, you your son.

DUTCH:
Gramstorige edellieden, volgt mijn raad.
Verdrijft de galzucht zonder aderlating.
Ofschoon geen arts, schrijf ik u dit toch voor: —
Een diepe wrok snijdt al te diep, snijdt door, —
Vergeeft, vergeet, houdt op elkaar te haten;
Het is, zegt de arts, geen maand van aderlaten

MORE:

Proverb: Forgive and forget

Wrath-kindled=Furious
Be ruled=To prevail on, to persuade (used only passively)
Choler=Anger, bile
Purge=To cure, to restore to health
Month to bleed=Physicians would consult the almanac to determine best time for bloodletting

Compleat:
Wrath=Toorn, gramschap
Wrathfull=Toornig, vertoornd, vergramd, grimmig
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
Purge=Zuiveren, reinigen, den buik zuiveren, purgeeren
To purge (clear) one’s self of a crime=Zich van eene misdaad zuiveren
To bleed one=Iemand bloed aftappen, laaten; bloedlaating, bloeding

Topics: proverbs and idioms, anger, dispute, justice

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Yea, dost thou jeer and flout me in the teeth?
Think’st thou I jest? Hold, take thou that and that (beats Dromio of S.)
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Hold, sir, for God’s sake! Now your jest is earnest.
Upon what bargain do you give it me?

DUTCH:
Antipholus van Syracuse.
Zoo, waagt gij ‘t weer, den draak met mij te steken?
Acht gij dat scherts? Hier, neem dan dit, en dat!
Dromio van Syracuse.
Om gods wil, heer! houd op, uw jok wordt ernst,
Wat jokte ik dan, dat gij mij zoo betaalt?

MORE:
Proverb: Leave jesting while it pleases lest it turn to earnest
Proverb: To cast (hit) in the teeth

Schmidt:
Bargain=Mercantile transaction

Compleat:
Bargain=Een verding, verdrag, koop
To flout=Bespotten, beschimpen
To flout and jeer at one=Iemand uitjouwen
To lay in the teeth=Verwyten, braaveren
To trow something in one’s teeth=Iemand iets in de neus wryven, voor de scheenen werpen, verwyten
To jest=Boerten, schertsen, jokken, gekscheeren
To speak a thing betwixt jest and earnest=Iets zeggen half jok half ernst

Topics: misunderstanding, money, debt/obligation, dispute

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Vernon
CONTEXT:
And that is my petition, noble lord:
For though he seem with forged quaint conceit
To set a gloss upon his bold intent,
Yet know, my lord, I was provoked by him;
And he first took exceptions at this badge,
Pronouncing that the paleness of this flower
Bewray’d the faintness of my master’s heart.

DUTCH:
Hetzelfde is mijn verzoek, doorluchte vorst;
Want, schoon hij ook, met sluw bedachte vonden,
Zijn driest vermetel doel vernissen moog’,
Verneem toch, heer, dat ik door hem getart werd,
Dat hij het eerst zich ergerde aan dit teeken,
En zeide, dat de bleekheid dezer bloem
De lafheid van mijns meesters hart verried.

MORE:
Forged=Feigned, false
Quaint conceit=Ingenuity, invention
Set a gloss=Smooth interpretation
Bewray=Reveal

Compleat:
Forge=Smeden; uitvinden
Quaint=Aardig, cierlyk, net
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening
To set a gloss upon a thing=Iets een schoonen opschik geeven
To bewray=Ontdekken, beklappen; bevuilen

Topics: dispute, judgment, discovery

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
You know neither me, yourselves nor any thing. You are ambitious for poor knaves’ caps and legs: you wear out a good wholesome forenoon in hearing a cause between an orange wife and a fosset-seller; and then rejourn the controversy of three pence to a second day of audience. When you are hearing a matter between party and party, if you chance to be pinched with the colic, you make faces like mummers; set up the bloody flag against all patience; and, in roaring for a chamber-pot, dismiss the controversy bleeding the more entangled by your hearing: all the peace you make in their cause is calling both the parties knaves. You are a pair of strange ones.
BRUTUS
Come, come, you are well understood to be a
perfecter giber for the table than a necessary
bencher in the Capitol.

DUTCH:
Kom, kom, het is overbekend, dat gij veeleer een onverbeterlijk grappenmaker aan tafel zijt, dan een onontbeerlijk bijzitter op het Kapitool.

MORE:
Proverb: Know thyself

Ambitious for caps and legs=Wanting people to bow and doff caps
Bencher=member of a court or council
Set up the bloody flag=Declare war on (patience)

Schmidt:
Fosset, forset, faucet=Kind of tap for drawing liquor from a barrel; only in “faucet-seller”
Giber=entertainer, (aftr-dinner) jester
Mummer=Someone wearing a mask
The more entangled=To make (the dispute) more confused and intricate

Compleat:
To gibe=Boerten, gekscheeren
Bencher=Een byzitter, Raad, een Rechtsgeleerde van den eersten rang in ‘t Genootschap
Mummer=Een vermomde
Faucet (or peg)=Zwikje, pennetje tot een vat

Topics: language, intellect, reputation, judgment, dispute

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
O sir, we quarrel in print, by the book, as you have books for good manners. I will name you the degrees. The first, the Retort Courteous; the second, the Quip Modest; the third, the Reply Churlish; the fourth, the Reproof Valiant; the fifth, the Countercheck Quarrelsome; the sixth, the Lie with Circumstance; the seventh, the Lie Direct. All these you may avoid but the Lie Direct; and you may avoid that, too, with an ‘if’. I knew when seven justices could not take up a quarrel, but when the parties were met themselves, one of them thought but of an ‘if’, as ‘If you said so, then I said so’, and they shook hands and swore brothers. Your ‘if’ is the only peacemaker; much virtue in ‘if’.

DUTCH:
Zoo’n „indien” is de ware vredestichter; ontzachlijk
krachtig dat „indien”!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quarrel=To wrangle, to seek occasion of a fray, to pick a q+C68:G68uarrel.
Met=Had come together
Peace-maker=One who composes differences

“O Sir, we quarrel in print:: Ref. Fleming, A Panoplie of Epistles (1576), 357: Considering that whatsoever is uttered in such men’s hearing, must be done in print, as we say in our common proverb.

Burgersdijk notes:
Door een logenstraffing, zevenmaal herhaald. Hier en in het volgende wordt gezinspeeld op een boek, dat in 1595 in Londen werd uitgegeven, van Vincentio Saviolo, een schermmeester, waarschijnlijk uit Padua afkomstig en door Essex begunstigd. Het heet: „Vincentio Saviolo his Practise. In two Bookes. The first intreating of the use of the Rapier and Dagger. The second of honour and honourable Quarrels.” Van het tweede deel zegt de schrijver: A discourse most necessarie for all gentlemen that have in regard their honours, touching the giving and receiving of the Lie, where upon the Duello and the Combats in divers sortes doth insue, and many other inconveniences, for lack only of the trite Knowledge of honour and the contrary and the right understanding of wordes. Onder de hoofdstukken vindt men o. a.: What the reason is that the portie unto whom the lye is given ought to become Challenger: and of the nature of Lies; — Of the manner and diversitie of Lies; — Of Lies certaine; — Of conditionall Lies, enz.
Hier en daar ontleent Toetssteen het een en ander woordelijk uit dit boek; zoo leest men in het laatstgenoemd kapittel: „Conditionall lyes be such as are given conditionally; as if a man should saie or write these wordes: If thou hast saide that 1 have offered my Lord abuse, thou lyest; or if thou saiest so hereafter, thou shalt lye. Of these kind of lyes given in this manner often arise much contention in wordes whereof no sure conclusion can arise.” — Vandaar zegt Toetssteen dan ook „Ons twisten gaat naar de boeken”; er staat: in print, by the book: ,,zooals ‘t gedrukt is, naar het boek.”

Topics: law, language, civility, learning/education, dispute, proverbs and idioms

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