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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors ACT/SCENE: 2.2 SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse CONTEXT: Because that I familiarly sometimes
Do use you for my fool and chat with you,
Your sauciness will jest upon my love
And make a common of my serious hours.
When the sun shines, let foolish gnats make sport,
But creep in crannies when he hides his beams.
If you will jest with me, know my aspect,
And fashion your demeanour to my looks,
Or I will beat this method in your sconce.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
“Sconce” call you it? So you would leave battering,
I had rather have it a “head.” An you use these blows long, I must get a sconce for my head and ensconce it too, or else I shall seek my wit in my shoulders. But I pray, sir, why am I beaten? DUTCH: Omdat ik soms gemeenzaam scherts en keuvel,
Als met een nar, misbruikt ge in overmoed
Mijn vriendlijkheid en neemt mijn ernstige uren,
Alsof ze u toebehoorden, in beslag.
Maar dans’ de mug ook in den zonneschijn,
Zij kruipt in reten, als de lucht betrekt
MORE: Proverb: He has more wit in his head than you in both your shoulders

Jest upon= Trifle with
Sauciness=Impertinence, impudence
Make a common of my serious hours=Treat my hours of business as common property (reference to property law, where racts of ground were allocated to common use and known as “commons”)
Aspect=Look, glance; possible reference to astrology, with the aspect being the position of one planet in relation to others and its potential to exert influence
Sconce=(1) Head; (2) Fortification, bulwark
Fashion your demeanour to my looks=Check my mood and act accordingly

Compleat:
To jest=Boerten, schertsen, jokken, gekscheeren
Sconce=(Sconse) Een bolwerk of blokhuis
To sconce (university word to signify the setting up so much in the buttery-book, upon one’s head, to be paid as a punishment for a duty neglected or an offence committed)=In de boete beslaan, eene boete opleggen, straffen
Sconsing=Beboeting, beboetende
To fashion=Een gestalte geeven, vormen, fatzoeneeren

Burgersdijk notes:
Op mijn bol? In ‘t Engelsch een woordspeling met sconce, dat „bol” of „hoofd” beteekent, en ook, schans”, waarom ook het woord ensconce, ,,verschansen” volgt. Bij het maken der aanteekeningen komt het mij voor, dat het woord bolwerk had kunnen dienen om het origineel nauwkeuriger terug te geven: „Mijn bol noemt gij dit, heer? als gij het slaan wildet laten, zou ik het liever voor een hoofd houden, maar als gij met dat ranselen voortgaat, moet ik een bolwerk voor mijn hoofd zien te krijgen en het goed dekken (of versterken), of mijn verstand in mijn rug gaan zoeken.” Topics: respect, misunderstanding, punishment, emotion and mood

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls:
Who steals my purse steals trash; ’tis something, nothing;
’twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to thousands;
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him,
And makes me poor indeed.

DUTCH:
Een voortreffelijke reputatie, waarde heer, is zowel bij mannen als vrouwen het duidelijkst zichtbare sieraad van hun innerlijk.

MORE:

CITED IN EU LAW: LINDON, OTCHAKOVSKY-LAURENS AND JULY v. FRANCE – 21279/02 [2007] ECHR 836 (22 October 2007)/46 EHRR 35, (2008) 46 EHRR 35, [2007] ECHR 836.
CITED IN US LAW:
According to William Domnarski (Shakespeare in the Law, 1993) the second most frequently cited passage in US law (27 times at that time). Some examples:
Milkovich v Lorain Journal Co., 497 US 1, 110 Supreme Court 2695, 2702, 111 L.Ed.2d 1 (1990) (Rehnquist, C.J.).

Cited by Abraham Lincoln when he was a defence lawyer.

Schmidt:
Immediate=Direct, without the intervention of another; needs no other considerations to enforce its importance
Filch=To steal, to pilfer
Trash=Worthless matter, dross, lumber (Also a scornful term to describe money; See J.Caesar 4.3)

Compleat:
Filch=Ontfutzelen, afhandig maaken, ontloeren, onsteelen
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed

Topics: reputation, respect, emotion and mood, secrecy, cited in law

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
So let the Turk of Cyprus us beguile,
We lose it not so long as we can smile;
He bears the sentence well that nothing bears
But the free comfort which from thence he hears;
But he bears both the sentence and the sorrow
That to pay grief must of poor patience borrow.
These sentences, to sugar or to gall,
Being strong on both sides, are equivocal.
But words are words; I never yet did hear
That the bruised heart was pierced through the ear.
Beseech you now, to the affairs of the state.

DUTCH:
Doch woord blijft woord, en dat het spreuken horen, een krank hart heelde, kwam mij nooit ter oren./
Die uitspraken, geschikt voor zuur en zoet,
doen het aan beide zijden even goed:
het zijn maar woorden; ik heb nooit gehoord
van ’t wonde hart dat baat vond bij een woord.

MORE:

Sentence that nothing bears=Indifferent platitude
Gall=Bitterness, to embitter
Pierced=lanced (and cured)(See LLL, 5.2: Honest plain words best pierce the ear of grief)

Compleat:
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten; to gall (or vex)=Tergen, verbitteren
To pierce=Doordringen, doorbooren

Topics: language, deceit, appearance, emotion and mood, wisdom, understanding

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:

IAGO
Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls.
Who steals my purse steals trash. ’Tis something,
nothing;
’Twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to
thousands.
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him
And makes me poor indeed
OTHELLO
By heaven, I’ll know thy thoughts.
IAGO
You cannot, if my heart were in your hand,
Nor shall not, whilst ’tis in my custody.

DUTCH:
Mijn hemel, ik wil weten wat jij denkt!

MORE:

Immediate=Direct, without the intervention of another; needs no other considerations to enforce its importance
Trash=Worthless matter, dross, lumber (Also a scornful term to describe money; See J.Caesar 4.3)
Filch=To steal, pilfer

Compleat:
To filch=Ontfutzelen, afhandig maaken, ontloeren, ontsteelen
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed

Topics: reputation, respect, emotion and mood, confidentiality, secrecy

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Second Witch
CONTEXT:
By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes.
Open, locks,
Whoever knocks.

DUTCH:
t Jeuken van mijn duim zegt mij:
Iets, dat boos is, komt nabij!

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: emotion and mood, fate/destiny, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
What, man! Ne’er pull your hat upon your brows.
Give sorrow words. The grief that does not speak
Whispers the o’erfraught heart and bids it break.

DUTCH:
Geef verdriet woorden: Het verdriet dat niet spreekt fluistert in het overbelaste hart, en vraagt het te breken./
Geef jammer woorden; ingehouden smart, breekt door zijn fluisteren het overladen hart./
Geef Uw jammer woorden! Ingehouden smart Breekt door zijn fluist’ren ‘t overladen hart.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb: “Grief pent up will break the heart” (1589)
CITED IN US LAW:
Baxter v. State, 503 S.W.2d 226,228 (Tenn. 1973): The court observes that “Shakespeare was right, as students of emotion know, when he advised, ‘give sorrows words. The grief that does not speak whispers the o’erfraught heart and bids it break'”.

Topics: grief, cited in law, emotion and mood, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
What sense had I in her stol’n hours of lust?
I saw ’t not, thought it not, it harmed not me.
I slept the next night well, fed well, was free and merry.
I found not Cassio’s kisses on her lips.
He that is robbed, not wanting what is stol’n,
Let him not know’t, and he’s not robbed at al

DUTCH:
Wie wordt beroofd en daarna niet iets mist –
vertel hem niets en hij is niet beroofd.

MORE:

Alluding to the proverb ‘He that is not sensible of his loss has lost nothing’ (c1526).

Wanting=Missing

Schmidt:
Sense=Mental power, faculty of thinking and feeling, spirit, mind

Compleat:
Sense=Het gevoel; gevoeligheid; besef; reden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, betrayal, emotion and mood, satisfaction

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
What piles of wealth hath he accumulated
To his own portion! and what expense by the hour
Seems to flow from him! How, i’ the name of thrift,
Does he rake this together! Now, my lords,
Saw you the cardinal?
NORFOLK
My lord, we have
Stood here observing him: some strange commotion
Is in his brain: he bites his lip, and starts;
Stops on a sudden, looks upon the ground,
Then lays his finger on his temple, straight
Springs out into fast gait; then stops again,
Strikes his breast hard, and anon he casts
His eye against the moon: in most strange postures
We have seen him set himself.
KING HENRY VIII
It may well be;
There is a mutiny in’s mind. This morning
Papers of state he sent me to peruse,
As I required: and wot you what I found
There,—on my conscience, put unwittingly?
Forsooth, an inventory, thus importing;
The several parcels of his plate, his treasure,
Rich stuffs, and ornaments of household; which
I find at such proud rate, that it out-speaks
Possession of a subject.

DUTCH:
Bij al wat winst is, hoe
Schraapt hij dit alles saam ? — Gij daar, mylords?
Zaagt gij den kardinaal?

MORE:
Wot=Know
To his own portion=For himself
Start=Jump
Straight=Straight away
Mutiny=Discord
Importing=Concerning
On my conscience=I believe
Stuff=Fabric
Compleat:
I wot=Ik weet
To start=Schrikken
Straightway=Eenswegs, terstond, opstaandevoet
Mutiny=Oproer, muytery
To import=Medebrengen, betekenen
Conscience=Het geweeten
A court of conscience=Een gerechtshof om kleynigheden te beslechten
Stuff=Stof, stoffe

Topics: poverty and wealth, money, emotion and mood

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Claudius
CONTEXT:
CLAUDIUS
How is it that the clouds still hang on you?
HAMLET
Not so, my lord. I am too much i’ the sun.

DUTCH:
Van waar, dat over u steeds wolken hangen?/
Waarom zie ik u steeds in wolkenschauw?

MORE:

The clouds still hang on you=Why are you so down/out of sorts?
Punning on son/sun.
(Compleat):
A clouded countenance = een beneveld gelaat

Topics: emotion and mood

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Gonzalo
CONTEXT:
I have great comfort from this fellow. Methinks he hath no drowning mark upon him. His complexion is perfect gallows. Stand fast, good Fate, to his hanging. Make the rope of his destiny our cable, for our own doth little advantage. If he be not born to be hanged, our case is miserable.

DUTCH:
Die kerel is mij een ware troost; hij ziet er mij niet naar uit om te verdrinken; hij heeft een echte galgentronie.

MORE:
Proverb: “He that is born to be hanged shall never be drowned.”
Advantage=Benefit
Complexion=According to the four humours the four complexions were: sanguine, melancholic, choleric and phlegmatic.
Rope=Halter, hangman’s noose
Compleat:
Rope=Een touw, strop, koord, kabel
Complexion=Aart, gesteltenis, gesteldheid
Gallows=Een Galg

Topics: punishment, fate/destiny, emotion and mood

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
I have seen a medicine
That’s able to breathe life into a stone,
Quicken a rock, and make you dance canary
With spritely fire and motion, whose simple touch
Is powerful to araise King Pippen, nay,
To give great Charlemain a pen in ‘s hand
And write to her a love-line.

DUTCH:
k Heb
Een arts gezien, die steenen leven inblaast,
Een rots bezielt, en u kan dansen doen
Met vuur en vaart, door handoplegging koning
Pepijn kan doen herrijzen, en aan Karel
Den Groote een pen zou drukken in de hand,
Dat hij een vers haar schreef.

MORE:
Canary dance was a ‘fiery wooing dance’ originating from or inspired by the dance and song of the Canary Islands.
Medicine=Physician
Araise=Raise from the dead
Compleat:
Arisen=Opgestaan, ontstaan

Burgersdijk notes:
Dansen doen. Het Engelsch noemt den dans: make you dance canary . Canary was een levendige Fransche dans; Shakespeare maakt er een werkwoord van in „Veel gemin, Geen gewin”.

Topics: emotion and mood, remedy

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
In sooth, I know not why I am so sad:
It wearies me; you say it wearies you;
But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,
What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is born,
I am to learn;
And such a want-wit sadness makes of me,
That I have much ado to know myself

DUTCH:
k Weet waarlijk niet, hoe ik zoo somber ben;
Ik ben het moe; gij zegt, dat zijt gij ook;
Maar hoe ‘t mij aanwoei, hoe ik er aan kwam,
Van welken aard het is, en hoe ontstaan,
Dat is me een raadsel;
Die somberheid maakt mij tot zulk een zwakhoofd,
Dat ik te nauwernood mij zelf herken.

MORE:
Antonio opens the play with a description of his inexplicable sadness, his language (‘caught’, ‘came by’) implying a curse or an infection.
In sooth=In truth (Note: sometimes misquoted with “Forsooth” instead of “In sooth”.)
Want-wit=Idiot(ic).
Compleat:
Sooth=Zéker, voorwaar

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
What, are there masques? Hear you me, Jessica.
Lock up my doors, and when you hear the drum
And the vile squealing of the wry-necked fife,
Clamber not you up to the casements then,
Nor thrust your head into the public street
To gaze on Christian fools with varnished faces.
But stop my house’s ears—I mean my casements—
Let not the sound of shallow foppery enter
My sober house. By Jacob’s staff, I swear,
I have no mind of feasting forth tonight.
But I will go.—Go you before me, sirrah.
Say I will come.

DUTCH:
t Geraas dier flauwe zotternij niet hoore. —
Ik zweer bij Jakobs staf, ik heb geen zin
Om buitenshuis van avond feest te vieren

MORE:
Masque=Masked ball, party
Shallow foppery=wantonness
I have no mind of = I am not in the mood to
Compleat:
Foppery=Zotte kuuren, grillen, snaakerij.
‘T is a mere foppery=Het is loutere dwaasheid

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Gentle cousin,
Let us go thank him and encourage him.
My father’s rough and envious disposition
Sticks me at heart. Sir, you have well deserved.
If you do keep your promises in love
But justly, as you have exceeded all promise,
Your mistress shall be happy.
ROSALIND
Gentleman,
Wear this for me—one out of suits with fortune
That could give more but that her hand lacks means.
Shall we go, coz?
CELIA
Ay. Fare you well, fair gentleman.
ORLANDO
Can I not say “I thank you”? My better parts
Are all thrown down, and that which here stands up
Is but a quintain, a mere lifeless block.

DUTCH:
Mijn beter deel
Ligt neergeveld, en wat nog overeind staat,
Is als een pop bij ‘t steekspel, roerloos, dood.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quintain=a post or figure set up for beginners in tilting to run at.

Burgersdijk notes:
Een pop bij ‘t steekspel. A quintain: een houten figuur, die vooral bij oefeningen in het toernooirijden als doel voor de lans diende. Volgens Douce was dit doel, in zijn meest volkomen vorm, een afgezaagde boomstam, waarop een menschelijke figuur geplaatst was, die aan den linkerarm een schild, in de rechterhand een zak met zand vasthield. De toernooiruiters poogden in galop met hun lans den kop of het lijf van de pop te treffen; mislukte dit en raakten zij het schild, dan draaide de pop snel om en gaf hun, tot groot vermaak der toeschouwers, een slag met den zandzak.

Topics: emotion and mood, civility, merit, promise, respect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
So did I yours. Good your grace, pardon me.
Neither my place nor aught I heard of business
Hath raised me from my bed, nor doth the general care
Take hold on me, for my particular grief
Is of so flood-gate and o’erbearing nature
That it engluts and swallows other sorrows
And it is still itself.

DUTCH:
Zoo ik uw hulp. Genadig heer, vergeef mij,
Geen ambtszaak, geen gerucht van wat hier omging,
Riep van mijn bed mij op; geen staatszorg is ‘t,
Die mij vervult, want mijn, mijn eigen leed
Breekt dam en sluis en stroomt zoo machtig, dat
Het iedere andre smart verzwelgt, verslindt,
En toch zichzelf steeds blijft.

MORE:

Flood-gate=Strong stream, torrent; Adjectively=torrential
Englut=To swallow, engulf

Compleat:
Englut=Verkroppen.
A glut of rain=Een stortregen
Floud-gate=Een sluis, doortogt

Topics: emotion and mood, work, satisfaction, sorrow

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
They shall be married tomorrow, and I will bid the duke to the nuptial. But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man’s eyes. By so much the more shall I tomorrow be at the height of heart-heaviness, by how much I shall think my brother happy in having what he wishes for.

DUTCH:
Hoe bitter is het in het geluk te kijken door de ogen van een ander./
Maar ach! hoe bitter is het, gelukzaligheid door eens anders oogen te zien!

MORE:
Schmiddt:
Heart-heaviness=Sadness

Topics: life, satisfaction, emotion and mood, envy

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Thou think’st ’tis much that this contentious storm
Invades us to the skin. So ’tis to thee.
But where the greater malady is fixed
The lesser is scarce felt. Thou’dst shun a bear,
But if thy flight lay toward the raging sea
Thou’dst meet the bear i’ th’ mouth. When the mind’s free,
The body’s delicate. The tempest in my mind
Doth from my senses take all feeling else
Save what beats there—filial ingratitude.
Is it not as this mouth should tear this hand
For lifting food to ’t? But I will punish home.
No, I will weep no more. In such a night
To shut me out! Pour on, I will endure.
In such a night as this! O Regan, Goneril,
Your old kind father, whose frank heart gave all—
Oh, that way madness lies. Let me shun that.
No more of that.

DUTCH:
O, Regan, Goneril,
uw goede vader die u alles gaf…
nee, daar niet heen, daar wacht de waanzin mij;
niet meer daarover.

MORE:
Contentious=Tempestuous
Greater malady=Mental torment (here)
Fixed=Established, diagnosed
Meet the bear i’ th’ mouth=Meet the bear face to face
Home=Thoroughly
Frank=Liberal, bountiful
Compleat:
Home=Goed
Fix=Vaststellen, besluiten

Topics: emotion and mood, wellbeing, madness, punishment

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners. So that if we will plant nettles or sow lettuce, set hyssop and weed up thyme, supply it with one gender of herbs or distract it with many—either to have it sterile with idleness, or manured with industry—why, the power and corrigible authority of this lies in our wills.

DUTCH:
Ons lichaam is onze tuin, waarvan onze wil de tuiman is.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Corrigible=Corrective
Sterile=Barren, not fertile
Gender of herbs=Race, kind, sort
Compleat:
Corrigible=Verbeterlyk

Topics: free will, independence, authority, emotion and mood, reason, intellect

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Lucio
CONTEXT:
LUCIO
Assay the power you have.
ISABELLA
My power? Alas, I doubt—
LUCIO
Our doubts are traitors
And make us lose the good we oft might win
By fearing to attempt.

DUTCH:
Onze twijfels zijn onze verraders, die ons vaak het goede dat wij konden winnen laten verliezen door de vrees voor de poging

MORE:
Onions:
Assay=To trial, test
Compleat:
Assay=Beproeven, toetsen

Topics: uncertainty, purpose, emotion and mood

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
Scarce can I speak, my choler is so great:
O, I could hew up rocks and fight with flint,
I am so angry at these abject terms;
And now, like Ajax Telamonius,
On sheep or oxen could I spend my fury.
I am far better born than is the king,
More like a king, more kingly in my thoughts:
But I must make fair weather yet a while,
Till Henry be more weak and I more strong,—
Buckingham, I prithee, pardon me,
That I have given no answer all this while;
My mind was troubled with deep melancholy.
The cause why I have brought this army hither
Is to remove proud Somerset from the king,
Seditious to his grace and to the state.

DUTCH:
Ik spreek met moeite, zoo vergramd ben ik.
0, rotsen kon ik kloven, keiën werpen,
Zoo toornig word ik bij die trotsche taal

MORE:

Proverb: To make fair weather

Choler=Anger
Make fair weather=Appear civil, friendly
Abject terms=Terrible words
Ajax Telamonius=Ajax, son of Telamon, who slaughtered a flock of sheep in a fit of anger

Compleat:
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
Term=Woord, uitdrukking

Topics: emotion and mood, loyalty, betrayal

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Gonzalo
CONTEXT:
SEBASTIAN
You were kneeled to and importuned otherwise
By all of us, and the fair soul herself
Weighed between loathness and obedience, at
Which end o’ th’ beam should bow. We have lost your son,
I fear, forever. Milan and Naples have
More widows in them of this business’ making
Than we bring men to comfort them.
The fault’s your own.
ALONSO
So is the dearest o’ th’ loss.
GONZALO
My lord Sebastian,
The truth you speak doth lack some gentleness
And time to speak it in. You rub the sore
When you should bring the plaster.
SEBASTIAN
Very well.
ANTONIO
And most chirurgeonly.
GONZALO
It is foul weather in us all, good sir,
When you are cloudy.

DUTCH:
Mijn prins Sebastiaan, wat gij waars daar zegt,
Mist zachtheid en den juisten tijd voor de uiting;
Gij schrijnt de wond, die gij verbinden moest.

MORE:
Schmidt/Arden:
Importune (in the sense of ‘ask urgently and persistently’ usu. with a person as obj.)
Weighed=Considered, balanced (between loathness and obedience)
Loathness=Unwillingness, reluctance; repulsion, dislike
Dearest=Bitterest, heaviest, coming at a high price
Time=The appropriate time
Chirurgeonly=In the manner of a surgeon:
Compleat:
To importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
Loathsomness=Walgelykheid
Chirurgery=De heelkunst, wondheelkunde
Chirurgion=een Heelmeester, wondheeler, wondarts. Beter ‘Surgeon’
Dear-bought experience=Een duurgekogte ondervinding

Topics: truth, language, civility, emotion and mood

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:

KING
O Westmoreland, thou art a summer bird,
Which ever in the haunch of winter sings
The lifting up of day.
Enter HARCOURT
Here comes more news.
HARCOURT
From enemies heaven keep your Majesty,
And when they stand against you, may they fall
As those that I am come to tell you of.
The Earl Northumberland and the Lord Bardolph,
With a great power of English and of Scots,
Are by the shrieve of Yorkshire overthrown.
The manner and true order of the fight
This packet, please it you, contains at large.

DUTCH:
O, Westmoreland, gij zijt een zomervogel,
Die aan des winters verz’nen steeds den opgang
Des nieuwen dags bezingt.

MORE:

Haunch=Hind part, towards the end (of winter)
Shrieve=Sheriff

Topics: emotion and mood, wellbeing

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
For even the day before, she broke her brow.
And then my husband—God be with his soul!
He was a merry man—took up the child.
“Yea,” quoth he, “Dost thou fall upon thy face?
Thou wilt fall backward when thou hast more wit,
Wilt thou not, Jule?” and, by my holy dame,
The pretty wretch left crying and said “ay.”
To see now, how a jest shall come about!

DUTCH:
Gij valt wel achterover, als gij wijs wordt

MORE:

Topics: insult, intellect, emotion and mood

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
I have been studying how I may compare
This prison where I live unto the world:
And for because the world is populous
And here is not a creature but myself,
I cannot do it; yet I’ll hammer it out.
My brain I’ll prove the female to my soul,
My soul the father; and these two beget
A generation of still-breeding thoughts,
And these same thoughts people this little world,
In humours like the people of this world,
For no thought is contented. The better sort,
As thoughts of things divine, are intermix’d
With scruples and do set the word itself
Against the word:
As thus, ‘Come, little ones,’ and then again,
‘It is as hard to come as for a camel
To thread the postern of a small needle’s eye.’
Thoughts tending to ambition, they do plot
Unlikely wonders; how these vain weak nails
May tear a passage through the flinty ribs
Of this hard world, my ragged prison walls,
And, for they cannot, die in their own pride.

DUTCH:
Eerzuchtige gedachten vormen plannen,
Zoo dol als moog’lijk, als: met zwakke nagels
Door dezer harde wereld kiezelribben

MORE:

Humours=Disposition, temperament
Scruples=Doubts
“Come, little ones”=Reference to the ease (and difficulty) of entering heaven. “Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God” and “It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God” (Matthew 19:24)
Ambition=Desire of superiority, of honour and power
Plot=Contrive
Unlikely=Improbable
Flinty ribs=Castle walls

Compleat:
Every man bath his humour=Yder mensch heeft zyn eigen aart
Scrupule, scruple=Zwaarigheid
Ambition=Staatzucht, eergierigheid
Unlikely=Onwaarschynelyk

Topics: emotion and mood, plans/intentions/, imagination

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lady Percy
CONTEXT:
Thy spirit within thee hath been so at war,
And thus hath so bestirred thee in thy sleep,
That beads of sweat have stood upon thy brow
Like bubbles in a late-disturbèd stream,
And in thy face strange motions have appeared,
Such as we see when men restrain their breath
On some great sudden hest. O, what portents are these?

DUTCH:
Uw geest in u was zoozeer bij den krijg,
En heeft u zoo in uwen slaap verhit,
Dat parels zweet u op het voorhoofd stonden,
Als blazen op een pas verwoeden stroom;

MORE:

Some great sudden hest=A sudden important command
Schmidt:
Soul=Represented as the seat of real, not only professed, sentiments
Hest=behest
CITED IN IRISH LAW:
Murtagh -v- Minister for Defence & Ors [2008] IEHC 292 (22 July 2008) /[2008] IEHC 292

Topics: madness, conflict, wellbeing, emotion and mood

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Abbess
CONTEXT:
It seems his sleeps were hinder’d by thy railing,
And therefore comes it that his head is light.
Thou sayst his meat was sauced with thy upbraidings.
Unquiet meals make ill digestions.
Thereof the raging fire of fever bred,
And what’s a fever but a fit of madness?

DUTCH:
Zijn maal werd, zegt gij, met uw twist gekruid;
Onrustig eten stoort de spijsvertering.

MORE:
Upbraidings=Reproaches
To rail=To reproach, scold
Sauced with=Accompanied by

Compleat:
Upbraiding=Verwyting
To rail=Schelden

Topics: emotion and mood, wellbeing, madness

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Thou think’st ’tis much that this contentious storm
Invades us to the skin. So ’tis to thee.
But where the greater malady is fixed
The lesser is scarce felt. Thou’dst shun a bear,
But if thy flight lay toward the raging sea
Thou’dst meet the bear i’ th’ mouth. When the mind’s free,
The body’s delicate. The tempest in my mind
Doth from my senses take all feeling else
Save what beats there—filial ingratitude.
Is it not as this mouth should tear this hand
For lifting food to ’t? But I will punish home.
No, I will weep no more. In such a night
To shut me out! Pour on, I will endure.
In such a night as this! O Regan, Goneril,
Your old kind father, whose frank heart gave all—
Oh, that way madness lies. Let me shun that.
No more of that.

DUTCH:
Een ongestoorde geest
maakt onze leden broos; mijn zielenstorm
ontneemt mijn zinnen alles wat ik voel,
behalve wat dáár klopt:

MORE:
Contentious=Tempestuous
Greater malady=Mental torment (here)
Fixed=Established, diagnosed
Meet the bear i’ th’ mouth=Meet the bear face to face
Home=Thoroughly
Frank=Liberal, bountiful
Compleat:
Home=Goed
Fix=Vaststellen, besluiten
Some translations into Dutch have “Als de geest gewillig is, is het lichaam zwak”, which is not a translation of Shakespeare’s text but of Matthew 26:41, ‘the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak”

Topics: emotion and mood, wellbeing, madness, punishment

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
Madam, you have bereft me of all words.
Only my blood speaks to you in my veins.
And there is such confusion in my powers
As after some oration fairly spoke
By a belovèd prince there doth appear
Among the buzzing pleasèd multitude,
Where every something, being blent together,
Turns to a wild of nothing, save of joy,
Expressed and not expressed. But when this ring
Parts from this finger, then parts life from hence.
O, then be bold to say Bassanio’s dead!

DUTCH:
Gelijk zich, als een aangebeden vorst
Door schoone taal de schare heeft geboeid,
Een blij gemurmel onder ‘t volk doet hooren,
Waar iedre klank en elk gebaar, schoon niets,
Tot de uiting samensmelt van loutre vreugd,
Welsprekend zonder spraak

MORE:
Pleasèd multitude=gratified, amused crowd.
A wild=wilderness
Blent=Blended
Bold=Have confidence
Bereft me=Robbed me
Powers=Vital organ, physical or intellectual faculties
Compleat:
Wilds=wildernissen
Bereft=Beroofd

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Salarino
CONTEXT:
SALERIO
Your mind is tossing on the ocean,
There, where your argosies with portly sail,
Like signors and rich burghers on the flood—
Or, as it were, the pageants of the sea—
Do overpeer the petty traffickers
That curtsy to them, do them reverence
As they fly by them with their woven wings.
SOLANIO
Believe me, sir, had I such venture forth,
The better part of my affections would
Be with my hopes abroad. I should be still
Plucking the grass to know where sits the wind,
Peering in maps for ports and piers and roads.
And every object that might make me fear
Misfortune to my ventures out of doubt
Would make me sad.

DUTCH:
Uw geest wordt op den oceaan geslingerd,
Waar uw galjoenen, fier het zeil in top,
Als eed’len en grootburgers van de zee,
Door statigheid hun hoogen rang verkonden
En neerzien op de kleine handelslul,
Die needrig buigend hem begroeten, als
Zij langs hen vliegen met geweven vleug’len.

MORE:
Argosies=Large merchant ships
Portly=Stately, imposing.
Overpeer=Rise above, look down on
Trafficker=Merchant
Do reverence=accord respect
Compleat:
Portly=Deftig van gestatalte, wel gemaakt.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

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