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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors ACT/SCENE: 4.2 SPEAKER: Adriana CONTEXT: LUCIANA
Who would be jealous, then, of such a one?
No evil lost is wailed when it is gone.
ADRIANA
Ah, but I think him better than I say,
And yet would herein others’ eyes were worse.
Far from her nest the lapwing cries away.
My heart prays for him, though my tongue do curse. DUTCH: O, maar ik acht hem beter, dan ik zeg;
Als and’rer oog hem maar zoo haatlijk vond!
De kieviet schreeuwt, is hij van ‘t nest ver weg;
Mijn harte bidt voor hem, al vloekt mijn mond.
MORE: Proverb: The lapwing cries most when farthest from her nest

Burgersdijk notes:
De kievit schreeuwt, enz. In Sh’s. tijd werd de kievit meermalen hiervoor aangehaald, ja de uitdrukking schijnt spreekwoordelijk geweest te zijn. In LILY’s Campaspe leest men:
„You resemble the lapwing, who crieth most where her nest is not.” Shakespeare zelf herhaalt het beeld in ,Maat voor Maat,” I.4. Topics: deceit, perception, insult, proverbs and idioms, envy, manipulation

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Second Gentleman
CONTEXT:
SECOND GENTLEMAN
That trick of state
Was a deep envious one.
FIRST GENTLEMAN
At his return
No doubt he will requite it.
This is noted,
And generally: whoever the King favors,
The Card’nal instantly will find employment,
And far enough from court too.
SECOND GENTLEMAN
All the commons
Hate him perniciously and, o’ my conscience,
Wish him ten fathom deep. This duke as much
They love and dote on, call him bounteous Buckingham,
The mirror of all courtesy.
FIRST GENTLEMAN
Stay there, sir,
And see the noble ruined man you speak of.

DUTCH:
Dit is bekend,
En aan een elk: is iemand bij den koning
In gunst, de kardinaal geeft hem een zending,
En ver genoeg van ‘t hof.

MORE:
Envious=Malicious
Requite=Revenge
Commons=The common people, commoners
Mirror=Example
Compleat:
Envious=Nydig, afgunstig, wangunstig
To requite=Vergelden
To requite a man in his own way=Iemand met gelyke munt betaalen
The common (vulgar) people=Het gemeene Volk

Topics: envy, manipulation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Exeter
CONTEXT:
EXETER
Well didst thou, Richard, to suppress thy voice;
For, had the passions of thy heart burst out,
I fear we should have seen decipher’d there
More rancorous spite, more furious raging broils,
Than yet can be imagined or supposed.
But howsoe’er, no simple man that sees
This jarring discord of nobility,
This shouldering of each other in the court,
This factious bandying of their favourites,
But that it doth presage some ill event.
‘Tis much when sceptres are in children’s hands;
But more when envy breeds unkind division;
There comes the ruin, there begins confusion.

DUTCH:
t Is erg, indien een kind den scepter zwaait,
Maar erger nog, zoo haat verdeeldheid broedt,
Dan gaan we ellende en omkeer te gemoet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Deciphered=Be revealed, detected
Rancorous=Malignant, hateful
Broil=(a) tumult, noisy quarrel, contention; (b) war, combat, battle
Simple=Common
Jarring=Clashing, discordant
Bandy=To beat to and fro (fig. of words, looks)
Shoulder=To push with violence and with a view of supplanting
Unkind=Unnatural

Compleat:
Deciphered=Ontcyferd
Rancorous=Nydig, vik afgunst en nyd
Broil=Oproer, beroerte, gewoel
Simple=Eenvoudig, onnozel
To jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
Bandy=Een bal weer toeslaan; een zaak voor en tegen betwisten
Shoulder=Schouderen

Topics: envy, conflict, consequence, ruin

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL CAMPEIUS
They will not stick to say you envied him,
And fearing he would rise, he was so virtuous,
Kept him a foreign man still; which so grieved him,
That he ran mad and died.
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Heaven’s peace be with him!
That’s Christian care enough: for living murmurers
There’s places of rebuke. He was a fool;
For he would needs be virtuous: that good fellow,
If I command him, follows my appointment:
I will have none so near else. Learn this, brother,
We live not to be grip’d by meaner persons.

DUTCH:
Schenk’ God hem vrede!
Ziedaar eens christens wensch; voor hen, die leven
En morren, zijn er plaatsen, waar men straft.

MORE:
Stick=Hesitate
Murmurers=Gossip mongers
Appointment=Command
Griped=Seized
Compleat:
Stick=Schroomen
To murmur=Morren, murmureeren
To murmur against=Tegen morren
Appointer=Een bestemmer, verordineerdeer
To gripe=Grypen, vatten, nypen

Topics: envy, order/society

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
MIRANDA
I should sin
To think but nobly of my grandmother;
Good wombs have borne bad sons.
PROSPERO
Now the condition.
This King of Naples, being an enemy
To me inveterate, hearkens my brother’s suit,
Which was that he, in lieu o’th’ premises
Of homage, and I know not how much tribute,
Should presently extirpate me and mine
Out of the dukedom and confer fair Milan,
With all the honours, on my brother. Whereon –
A treacherous army levied – one midnight
Fated to th’ purpose did Antonio open
The gates of Milan and i’th’ dead of darkness
The ministers for th’ purpose hurried thence
Me and thy crying self.

DUTCH:
t Waar’ zonde, zoo ik
Zelfs in gedachte een blaam wierp op uw moeder;
Reeds menig eed’le schoot droeg slechte zoons.

MORE:
In lieu o’th’ premises=In exchange for the stipulations (of the agreement with the King of Naples)
Schmidt:
Homage=Fealty and service professed to a superior lord
Tribute=Stated payment made in acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace, or by virtue of a treaty
Extirpate=To root out, to remove completely
Fated=Destined by fate
Ministers=Agents (assigned to the task)
Compleat:
Homage=Hulde, hulding, manschap, onderdaanigheid
Tribute=Cynsgeld, schatting; Tol, impost
He was the principal minister (or instrument) of his revenge=Hy was het voornaamste werktuig van zyne wraak
Fated=Door’t noodlot beschooren

Topics: contract, promise, fate/destiny, good and bad, envy, honour, revenge

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
Happy thou art not;
For what thou hast not, still thou strivest to get,
And what thou hast, forget’st. Thou art not certain;
For thy complexion shifts to strange effects,
After the moon.

DUTCH:
Gelukkig zijt gij niet,
Want steeds begeert gij, wat gij niet bezit,
Vergetend wat gij hebt .

MORE:
Schmidt:
Effects=Outward manifestation, expression, show, sign, token
After=According to, conformable to
Compleat:
After=Naa, achter, volgens, naar. After this manner=Volgens (of naar) deeze manier.

Topics: satisfaction, ambition, ingratitude, uncertainty, envy

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Iden
CONTEXT:
Lord, who would live turmoiled in the court,
And may enjoy such quiet walks as these?
This small inheritance my father left me
Contenteth me, and worth a monarchy.
I seek not to wax great by others’ waning,
Or gather wealth, I care not, with what envy:
Sufficeth that I have maintains my state
And sends the poor well pleased from my gate.

DUTCH:
Hier zoek ik niet door and’rer val te stijgen ,
Niet rijk te worden, aangegluurd door nijd;

MORE:

Turmoiled=In the turmoil of
Sufficieth that=It is enough that (what I have)

Compleat:
Turmoiled=Gehulderd, afgesloofd
Suffice=Genoeg zyn
It suffices that it is so=’t Is genoeg dat het zo is

Topics: order/society, satisfaction, envy

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Charles
CONTEXT:
Tis known already that I am possess’d
With more than half the Gallian territories,
And therein reverenced for their lawful king:
Shall I, for lucre of the rest unvanquish’d,
Detract so much from that prerogative,
As to be call’d but viceroy of the whole?
No, lord ambassador, I’ll rather keep
That which I have than, coveting for more,
Be cast from possibility of all.

DUTCH:
Neen, heer gezant, neen, ik behoud veeleer
Dat wat ik heb, dan dat ik, meer begeerend,
De moog’lijkheid mij van ‘t geheel ontneem.

MORE:
Proverb: All covet all lose

Possessed with=Possess, control
Reverenced=Respected
Lucre=Gain
Cast from=Excluded from

Compleat:
To possess one’s self of a thing=Zich in het bezit van een ding stellen
To possess one’s self of a place=Bezit neemen van een plaats
To reverence=Eeren, ontzien, eer bewyzen
Lucre=Gewin, voordeel, profyt
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben

Topics: envy, satisfaction, value

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Cranmer
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
My good lords, hitherto, in all the progress
Both of my life and office, I have labour’d,
And with no little study, that my teaching
And the strong course of my authority
Might go one way, and safely; and the end
Was ever, to do well: nor is there living,
I speak it with a single heart, my lords,
A man that more detests, more stirs against,
Both in his private conscience and his place,
Defacers of a public peace, than I do.
Pray heaven, the king may never find a heart
With less allegiance in it! Men that make
Envy and crooked malice nourishment
Dare bite the best. I do beseech your lordships,
That, in this case of justice, my accusers,
Be what they will, may stand forth face to face,
And freely urge against me.
SUFFOLK
Nay, my lord,
That cannot be. You are a councillor,
And by that virtue no man dare accuse you.

DUTCH:
Een mensch,
Die zich van haat en slinksche boosheid voedt,
Bijt driest den beste.

MORE:
No little=Significant
End=Objective
Ever=Always
Single=True
Urge against=Accuse
By that virtue=By virtue of that
Compleat:
End=Eynde, oogmerk
Ever=Altoos, altyd
Urge=Dringen, pressen, aandringen, aanstaan
By virtue of=Uyt krachte van

Topics: envy, work, learning/education, loyalty

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.8
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
MARTIUS
I’ll fight with none but thee; for I do hate thee
Worse than a promise-breaker.
AUFIDIUS
We hate alike:
Not Afric owns a serpent I abhor
More than thy fame and envy. Fix thy foot.
MARTIUS
Let the first budger die the other’s slave,
And the gods doom him after!

DUTCH:
Gelijk is onze haat;
‘k Verfoei geen Afrikaansch gedrocht zoo diep,
Als uw gehaten roem. Sta vast.

MORE:
Proverb:
Africa is always producing something new (monsters, serpents)

Schmidt:
Budger=One who gives way

Compleat:
Promise-breaker=Een belofte-breeker
To budge=Schudden, omroeren, beweegen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, dispute, envy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:

Oh, beware, my lord, of jealousy!
It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock
The meat it feeds on. That cuckold lives in bliss
Who, certain of his fate, loves not his wronger,
But, oh, what damnèd minutes tells he o’er
Who dotes, yet doubts— suspects, yet soundly loves!

DUTCH:
Hoed u voor jaloezie: ’t groenogig monster
—dat met het vlees speelt dat het eet.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
State v. Potter, 60 N.O. 183,233 N.W. 650 (1930)(Burke, J.); Van Meter v. State, 30 Md. App. 406, 353 A.2d 850 (1976)(“appellant’s conviction of murder rested heavily upon the testimony of his paramour Debra Turner, who used appellant’s jealousies to bring about his own misfortune, in much the same way as did Othello … “).

Schmidt:
Mock the meat=To deride, to ridicule, to laugh to scorn (its victim)
Wronger=One who wrongs or injures
Tells=Counts, numbers

Compleat:
To mock=Bespotten, beschimpen, begekken
To tell (count or compute)=Rekenen, begrooten
Dutch: “monster met groene ogen” (“het groene monster”)

Topics: cited in law, offence, envy

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
They shall be married tomorrow, and I will bid the duke to the nuptial. But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man’s eyes. By so much the more shall I tomorrow be at the height of heart-heaviness, by how much I shall think my brother happy in having what he wishes for.

DUTCH:
Hoe bitter is het in het geluk te kijken door de ogen van een ander./
Maar ach! hoe bitter is het, gelukzaligheid door eens anders oogen te zien!

MORE:
Schmiddt:
Heart-heaviness=Sadness

Topics: life, satisfaction, emotion and mood, envy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Poor and content is rich, and rich enough,
But riches fineless is as poor as winter
To him that ever fears he shall be poor.
Good heaven, the souls of all my
OTHELLO
Why, why is this?
Think’st thou I’d make a life of jealousy,
To follow still the changes of the moon
With fresh suspicions? No, to be once in doubt
Is once to be resolved. Exchange me for a goat
When I shall turn the business of my soul
To such exsufflicate and blown surmises
Matching thy inference. ‘Tis not to make me jealous
To say my wife is fair, feeds well, loves company,
Is free of speech, sings, plays, and dances well :
Where virtue is, these are more virtuous. tribe defend
From jealousy!

DUTCH:
Arm en tevreden is rijk, en rijk genoeg

MORE:

Proverb: The greatest wealth is contentment with a little

Fineless=Infinite, boundless
Resolved=Convinced, Fixed in a determination
Once=Once and for all

Schmidt:
Exsufflicate (Exufflicate)=From exsufflare, probably synonymous to blown=`puffed jup, inflated; empty, unsubstantial, frivolous.

Compleat:
Resolve (untie, decide, determine a hard question, difficulty etc.)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopten
Resolve (deliberation, decision)=Beraad, beslissing, uitsluitsel

Topics: poverty and wealth, satisfaction, proverbs and idioms, virtue, envy

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Ah, gracious lord, these days are dangerous.
Virtue is choked with foul ambition,
And charity chased hence by rancor’s hand;
Foul subornation is predominant,
And equity exiled your Highness’ land.
I know their complot is to have my life;
And if my death might make this island happy
And prove the period of their tyranny,
I would expend it with all willingness.
But mine is made the prologue to their play;
For thousands more, that yet suspect no peril,
Will not conclude their plotted tragedy.

DUTCH:
0, beste heer, de tijden zijn gevaarlijk.
Door schandlijke eerzucht wordt de deugd verstikt,
Door hoozen wrok barmhartigheid verjaagd;

MORE:

Subornation=Instigation to perjury
Predominant=Prevalent, in the ascendant (astrolology)
Equity=Justice
Complot=Conspiracy

Compleat:
Subornation=Besteeking, een bestoken werk, omkooping
To suborn a witness=Eenen getuige opmaaken of omkoopen
Equity=Billijkheid
Complot=Saamenrotten
Predominant=’t Geene het hoogste gebied voert, opperheerschend, heerschappy voerend

Topics: virtue, ambition, envy, justice, conspiracy, plans/intentions

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I will in Cassio’s lodging lose this napkin
And let him find it. Trifles light as air
Are to the jealous confirmations strong
As proofs of holy writ. This may do something.
The Moor already changes with my poison :
Dangerous conceits are in their natures poisons,
Which at the first are scarce found to distaste
But, with a little act upon the blood,
Burn like the mines of sulphur. I did say so.

DUTCH:
Nietigheden, ijl als lucht, zijn voor de jaloersen bevestiging, zo sterk als bewijzen uit de Heilige Schrift./
Voor wie jaloers is, Zijn dingen, ijl als lucht, sterker bewijzen, Dan spreuken uit de Schrift.

MORE:

Proverb: As light as air

Schmidt:
Napkin=Handkerchief
Conceits=Conceptions, ideas
To distaste=To be distasteful, unsavoury

Compleat:
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening
Distaste=Weersmaak, weerzin, misnoegen
To give distaste=Misnoegen veroorzaaken
To distaste=Geen smaak in iets vinden; (to take distaste)=Een walg krygen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, envy, perception, imagination

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