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PLAY: The Comedy of Errors ACT/SCENE: 5.1 SPEAKER: Abbess CONTEXT: Renownèd duke, vouchsafe to take the pains
To go with us into the abbey here
And hear at large discoursed all our fortunes,
And all that are assembled in this place
That by this sympathizèd one day’s error
Have suffered wrong. Go, keep us company,
And we shall make full satisfaction.—
Thirty-three years have I but gone in travail
Of you, my sons, and till this present hour
My heavy burden ne’er deliverèd.—
The Duke, my husband, and my children both,
And you, the calendars of their nativity,
Go to a gossips’ feast, and go with me.
After so long grief, such nativity! DUTCH: En meegeleden hebt door al de dwaling
Van éénen dag, treedt binnen; allen zullen
Ten volle, zoo ik hoop, bevredigd zijn.
MORE: Schmidt:
Vouchsafe=Deign to (go)
Sympathized=Share in (by all)
Discourse=Relate, tell
Nativity=Birth

Compleat:
Vouchsafe=Vergun
Discourse=Redeneeren Topics: error, resolution

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
And let me speak to th’ yet-unknowing world
How these things came about. So shall you hear
Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts,
Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters,
Of deaths put on by cunning and forced cause,
And, in this upshot, purposes mistook
Fall’n on th’ inventors’ heads. All this can I
Truly deliver.

DUTCH:
En eind’lijk van bedoelingen, mislukt, Die haar ontwerpers troffen /
Hoe bij dit einde, ongeslaagde plannen, Hem die ze smeedde, troffen. /
En, aan het eind, mislukte plannen, die neerkwamen op het hoofd der samenzweerders.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Mistook= Committed an error, misjudged
Purpose=Design, plan, project
Inventor=Contriver, author
Compleat
Art (cunning or industry)=Behendigheid, Schranderheid, Naarstigheid

Topics: justification, reason, error, purpose, defence

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Peace, tender sapling; thou art made of tears,
And tears will quickly melt thy life away.
What dost thou strike at, Marcus, with thy knife?
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
At that that I have killed, my lord; a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Out on thee, murderer! thou kill’st my heart;
Mine eyes are cloyed with view of tyranny:
A deed of death done on the innocent
Becomes not Titus’ brother: get thee gone:
I see thou art not for my company.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Alas, my lord, I have but killed a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
But how, if that fly had a father and mother?
How would he hang his slender gilded wings,
And buzz lamenting doings in the air!
Poor harmless fly, That, with his pretty buzzing melody, Came here to make us merry! and thou hast killed him.

DUTCH:
Foei, schaam u, moord’naar! mij doodt gij het hart.
Mijn oogen zijn verzaad van ‘t zien van gruw’len

MORE:
Cloyed=Satiated
View=Perception
Becomes not=Is not becoming for
But=Only
Compleat:
To cloy=Verkroppen, overlaaden
To view=Beschouwen, bezien
Become=Betaamen
But=Maar, of, dan, behalven, maar alleen

Topics: life, regret, nature, error, guilt

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
What devil was ’t
That thus hath cozened you at hoodman-blind?
Eyes without feeling, feeling without sight,
Ears without hands or eyes, smelling sans all,
Or but a sickly part of one true sense
Could not so mope. O shame, where is thy blush?

DUTCH:
Schaamte, waar is uw blos? / O, schaamte, waar ‘s uw blos? / Schaamt’, waar is uw blos?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cozen=deceive/delude
Hoodman-blind=blind man’s bluff.
Compleat:
Cozen=Bedriegen

Topics: error, guilt, conscience

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Escalus
CONTEXT:
Well, heaven forgive him! and forgive us all!
Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall:
Some run from brakes of vice, and answer none:
And some condemned for a fault alone.

DUTCH:
Sommigen rijzen door ondeugd, anderen komen door deugd ten val/
De een stijgt door schuld, door deugd moet de ander vallen

MORE:
Also versions with ‘brakes of ice’.
Schmidt:
Meaning of brakes is disputed; from the context it should be understood in the sense of “engines of torture”. Brakes was used to mean a collection.

Topics: good and bad, corruption, virtue, error, punishment, fate/destiny

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
Yes, my lord, and of very valiant approof.
LAFEW
You have it from his own deliverance.
BERTRAM
And by other warranted testimony.
LAFEW
Then my dial goes not true: I took this lark for a bunting.
BERTRAM
I do assure you, my lord, he is very great in knowledge, and accordingly valiant.
LAFEW
I have then sinned against his experience and transgressed against his valour; and my state that way is dangerous, since I cannot yet find in my heart to repent. Here he comes ; I pray you, make us friends ; I will pursue the amity.

DUTCH:
Dan gaat mijn uurwerk niet goed. Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors.

MORE:
Proverb: To take a bunting for a lark
“The bunting is, in feather, size, and form, so like the skylark, as to require nice attention to discover the one from the other; it also ascends and sinks in the air nearly in the same manner; but it has little or no song, which gives estimation to the skylark.” (Johnson).
Approof=Proven (valour)
Deliverance=Account
Accordingly=Correspondingly
Dangerous=At risk (of damnation)
Amity=Friendship

Burgersdijk notes:
Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors. De bedoelde gors, in het Engelsch bunting, is de grauwe gors, ook wel gierstvogel genoemd. Terwijl de leeuwrik zich hoog in de lucht verheft en aangenaam zingt, zet de gors zich op steenen palen, struiken of lage boomen en laat daar vaak zijn schor, bijna knarsend geluid hooren, dat nauwelijks een zang te noemen is. Het zeggen van Lafeu doet zien, hoe goed Sh. de vogels kende, want de gors en Ieeuwrik gelijken in kleur van gevederte veel op elkaar, en de gorzen, die in den herfst en den winter in troepen bijeen leven, worden, omdat zij dan zeer vet zijn, in Engeland en elders vaak gevangen en, onder den naam van leeuwriken, voor de tafel verkocht.

Topics: gullibility, appearance, offence, error, regret, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.
You urged me as a judge; but I had rather
You would have bid me argue like a father.
O, had it been a stranger, not my child,
To smooth his fault I should have been more mild:
A partial slander sought I to avoid,
And in the sentence my own life destroy’d.
Alas, I look’d when some of you should say,
I was too strict to make mine own away;
But you gave leave to my unwilling tongue
Against my will to do myself this wrong.

DUTCH:
Wat zoet smaakt, is vaak moeilijk te verteren.

MORE:

Proverb: What is sweet in the mouth is oft sour (bitter) in the maw (stomach)

Urge=To press (here: for an opinion)
Partial slander=Accusation of bias, reproach of partiality
Strict=Severe, proceeding by exact rules

Compleat:
Partial=Eenzydig, partydig
Slander=Laster, lasterkladde

Topics: proverbs and idioms, judgment, justice, resolution, error

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
The service of the foot
Being once gangrened, is not then respected
For what before it was.
BRUTUS
We’ll hear no more.
Pursue him to his house, and pluck him thence:
Lest his infection, being of catching nature,
Spread further.
MENENIUS
One word more, one word.
This tiger-footed rage, when it shall find
The harm of unscann’d swiftness, will too late
Tie leaden pounds to’s heels. Proceed by process;
Lest parties, as he is beloved, break out,
And sack great Rome with Romans.
BRUTUS
If it were so,—
SICINIUS
What do ye talk?
Have we not had a taste of his obedience?
Our aediles smote? ourselves resisted? Come.

DUTCH:
Nog één woord, één woord.
Die tijgerwoede zal, ontdekt zij ‘t onheil
Van haren blinden sprong, te laat haar zolen
Met lood bezwaren. Volgt den weg van ‘t recht;
Wis zou verdeeldheid, — want hij is bemind, —
Losbrekend, door Romeinen Rome slechten.

MORE:
Proverb: To have lead on one’s heels

Tiger-footed=Moving in leaps and bounds,swift, fleet
Unscanned swiftness=Wild, inconsiderate speed (Arden)
Leaden heels=Leaden-heeled=Dragging heels, moving slowly
Taste=Proof, trial, specimen (see King Lear 1.2: “He wrote this but as an essay or taste of my virtue.”)
Aediles=Offiials in charge of public works, police and grain supply

Compleat:
Taste (discerning faculty)=Goede smaak, onderscheidend vermoogen
Taste=Proeven
Taster=Proefschaaltje

Burgersdijk notes: Het ambt der Aedilen, namelijk der Aediles plebeii, was tegelijk met dat der volkstribunen ingesteld. De Aedilen waren belast met de stedelijke policie en hadden ook de tribunen bij te staan en op hun bevel beschuldigden in hechtenis te nemen; werd het plebs gehoond, dan traden zij als aanklagers op. Zij waren, aanvankelijk ten minste sacrosancti, onschendbaar.

Topics: anger, haste, error, dispute, law/legal, justice, resolution, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
BRABANTIO
(…) It is a judgment maimed and most imperfect
That will confess perfection so could err.
Against all rules of nature, and must be driven
To find out practices of cunning hell
Why this should be. I therefore vouch again
That with some mixtures powerful o’er the blood
Or with some dram, conjured to this effect,
He wrought upon her.
DUKE
To vouch this is no proof,
Without more wider and more overt test
Than these thin habits and poor likelihoods
Of modern seeming do prefer against him.
FIRST SENATOR
But, Othello, speak.
Did you by indirect and forcèd courses
Subdue and poison this young maid’s affections?
Or came it by request and such fair question
As soul to soul affordeth?

DUTCH:
Betuigd is niet bewezen,
Tenzij gij beter gronden hebt, meer klemmend,
Dan ‘t los vermoeden, dat, met krachtloos uitzicht,
En dun gekleed, nu optreedt tegen hem.

MORE:

Proverb: Accusation is no proof

Vouch again=Reaffirm expressly
Wider=Fuller
Test=Testimony, evidence
Thin habits=Scant, insubstantial exterior
Poor=Tenuous
Likelihood=Circumstantial evidence, somethng from which inferences may be drawn, indication, sign
Indirect=Underhand
Forced=Constrained, unnatural, false (against the will of)
Modern seeming=Common assumption
Compleat:
Testable=Die volgens de rechten getuigen mag
Indirect=Niet rechts weegs, zydelings. Indirect means=Slinksche middelen
Directly or indirectly=Middelyk of onmiddelyk, voor de vuist of heimelyk

Topics: proverbs and idioms, nature, error, evidence

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: First Lord
CONTEXT:
AUFIDIUS
I have not deserved it.
But, worthy lords, have you with heed perused
What I have written to you?
LORDS
We have.
FIRST LORD
And grieve to hear’t.
What faults he made before the last, I think
Might have found easy fines: but there to end
Where he was to begin and give away
The benefit of our levies, answering us
With our own charge, making a treaty where
There was a yielding,—this admits no excuse.

DUTCH:
En ‘t wekte ons kommer.
Voor elke feil, voorafgaand aan de laatste,
Volstond een boete; doch het werk te staken,
Waar hij beginnen moest, de winst der waap’ning
Zoo weg te schenken, enkel onze kosten

MORE:
With heed=Heedfulness, attention, care
Easy fines=Light penalties
Give away the benefit=Squander a lead, advantage
Answering us=Satisfying, rewarding
Yielding=Lack of opposition, weakness
Admits no excuse=There is no excuse

Compleat:
Heed=Hoede, zorg, acht, toezit
Take heed=Draag zorg, heb acht, zie toe
Give away for lost=Iets verlooren rekenen
Yielding=Overgeeving, toegeeving, uitlevering; overgeevende, toegeeflyk, meegeeflyk
To admit of one’s excuse=Iemands verschooning plaats geven

Topics: caution, punishment, error, pity, negligence, failure

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Constable
CONTEXT:
Oh peace, Prince Dauphin!
You are too much mistaken in this king.
Question your Grace the late ambassadors
With what great state he heard their embassy,
How well supplied with noble counselors,
How modest in exception, and withal
How terrible in constant resolution,
And you shall find his vanities forespent
Were but the outside of the Roman Brutus,
Covering discretion with a coat of folly,
As gardeners do with ordure hide those roots
That shall first spring and be most delicate.

DUTCH:
Want dan erkent gij, dat zijn vroeg’re dwaasheid
De mom van den Romeinschen Brutus was,
Wijsheid bedekkend met een narrenmantel,
Gelijk tuiniers met vuil die wortels dekken,
Die teer en vroeg, voor de andren, schieten moeten.

MORE:

In Roman history, Lucius Junius Brutus pretended to be slow-witted so that he wouldn’t be regarded as a threat.
(See The Rape of Lucrece, 1594: “Brutus… Began to clothe his wit in state and pride, Burying in Lucrece’ wound his folly’s show. (…) But now he throws that shallow habit by, Wherein deep policy did him disguise And armed his long-hid wits advisedly…”)

Vanities=Empty and vain pursuit, frivolity
Forespent=Past, foregone
Discretion=wisdom
Ordure=manure

Compleat:
Vanity (unprofitableness)=Onprofytelykheid
Vanity (vain-glory)=Idele glorie
Ordure=Vuiligheid, drek, afgang
Discretion=Bescheidenheid, omzigtigheid

Topics: appearance, skill/talent, error

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