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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1 ACT/SCENE: 2.4 SPEAKER: Falstaff CONTEXT: My own knee? When I was about thy years, Hal, I was not an eagle’s talon in the waist. I could have crept into any alderman’s thumb-ring. A plague of sighing and grief! It blows a man up like a bladder. DUTCH: My own knees? When I was your age, Hal, my waist was as skinny as an eagle’s talon; I could have crawled through a councilman’s thumb ring. But damn all that sighing and sadness! It blows a man up like a balloon. MORE: Schmidt:
Thumb-ring, a ring worn on the thumb as was the custom of grave personages Topics: appearance, age/experience, excess

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Macduff
CONTEXT:
Boundless intemperance
In nature is a tyranny. It hath been
The untimely emptying of the happy throne
And fall of many kings. But fear not yet
To take upon you what is yours. You may
Convey your pleasures in a spacious plenty
And yet seem cold; the time you may so hoodwink.

DUTCH:
Matelooze wellust
Is tyrannie, die meen’gen schoonen troon
Te vroeg ontruimen deed, en meen’gen koning
Ten val bracht.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Intemperance= Want of moderation, licentiousness
Time=Men, the world
Spacious= wide, large, extensive
Plenty=Abundance
Convey=To do or manage with secrecy (i.e. indulge secretly)
Compleat:
Intemperance=Onmaatigheyd, overdaad

Topics: excess, deceit, secrecy, temptation

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
BARDOLPH
Why, you are so fat, Sir John, that you must needs be out of all compass, out of all reasonable compass, Sir John.
FALSTAFF
Do thou amend thy face, and I’ll amend my life. Thou art our admiral, thou bearest the lantern in the poop, but ’tis in the nose of thee. Thou art the knight of the burning lamp.

DUTCH:
Verbeter gij uw gezicht, en ik wil mijn leven beteren.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Compass=Extent in general, limit (“lived well and in good c.; and now I live out of all c.”)
Poop=The hindmost part of a ship.
Compleat:
To keep within compass=Iemand in den band (in bedwang) houden
To keep within compass=Zynen plicht betrachten
To draw a thing within a narrow compass=Iets in een klein begrip besluiten

Topics: insult, appearance, excess

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
PRINCE HENRY
Faith, it does me; though it discolors the complexion of my greatness to acknowledge it. Doth it not show vilely in me to desire small beer?
POINS
Why, a prince should not be so loosely studied as to remember so weak a composition.
PRINCE HENRY
Belike then my appetite was not princely got, for, by my troth, I do now remember the poor creature small beer. But indeed these humble considerations make me out of love with my greatness. What a disgrace is it to me to remember thy name, or to know thy face tomorrow, or to take note how many pair of silk stockings thou hast—with these, and those that were thy peach-colored ones—or to bear the inventory of thy shirts, as, one for superfluity and another for use. But that the tennis-court keeper knows better than I, for it is a low ebb of linen with thee when thou keepest not racket there, as thou hast not done a great while, because the rest of the low countries have made a shift to eat up thy holland; and God knows whether those that bawl out the ruins of thy linen shall inherit His kingdom; but the midwives say the children are not in the fault, whereupon the world increases and kindreds are mightily strengthened.

DUTCH:
Misschien dan, dat mijn trek niet van vorstelijke afkomst
is; want, op mijn woord, ik herinner mij nu dien
armen duivel, dat dunnehier

MORE:

Small beer=Inferior, watered down beer
Loosely=Carelessly
Composition=(a)Weak (beer) (b) Details
Low countries=Brothels (with a pun on “Netherlands”)
Made a shift=Contrivance, trick
Holland=Linen
Kindreds=Families, populations

Compleat:
Small beer=Dun bier
Holland (Holland cloth)=Hollands linnen
To wear holland shirts=Hembden van Hollands linneb draagen
To make shift with any thing=Zich ergens mede behelpen

Topics: order/society, status, learning/education, excess

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Chief Justice
CONTEXT:
MISTRESS QUICKLY
It is more than for some, my lord; it is for all I have. He hath eaten me out of house and home. He hath put all my substance into that fat belly of his. (to FALSTAFF)
But I will have some of it out again, or I will ride thee o’ nights like the mare.
FALSTAFF
I think I am as like to ride the mare if I have any vantage of ground to get up.
CHIEF JUSTICE
How comes this, Sir John? Fie, what man of good temper would endure this tempest of exclamation? Are you not ashamed to enforce a poor widow to so rough a course to come by her own?

DUTCH:
Foei, welk een rechtgeaard
man zou zulk een storm van verwenschingen dulden?
Schaamt gij u niet, dat gij een arme weduwe tot zulke
middelen dwingt om aan het hare te komen?

MORE:
Onions:
Exclamation=loud complaint, ‘vociferous reproach’.
Vantage=Advantage of high ground to mount the horse
Eaten out of house and home: This phase was not coined by Shakespeare; it dates back to the beginnings of the English language and even appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 1129.

Topics: excess, claim

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Peace, good pint-pot. Peace, good tickle-brain.— Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy time, but also how thou art accompanied. For though the camomile, the more it is trodden on, the faster it grows, so youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.

DUTCH:
Al waren er gronden zoo overvloedig als bramen, van mij zou niemand een grond door dwang vernemen, van mij niet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Tickle-brain=A species of strong liquor
Marvel=To find something strange, to wonder
Burgersdijk notes:
De naam Spraakwater is in het Engelsch Ticklebrain, de naam van een likeur.

Topics: life, age/experience, excess, integrity, identity, respect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
It hath pleased the devil drunkenness to give place to the devil wrath; one unperfectness shows me another, to make me frankly despise myself.
IAGO
Come, you are too severe a moraler. As the time, the place, and the condition of this country stands, I could heartily wish this had not befallen; but since it is as it is, mend it for your own good.
CASSIO
I will ask him for my place again; he shall tell me I am a drunkard. Had I as many mouths as Hydra, such an answer would stop them all. To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is unblessed, and the ingredience is a devil.
IAGO
Come, come, good wine is a good familiar creature, if it be well used ; exclaim no more against it.

DUTCH:
Verzoek ik hem mijn plaats terug, dan zal hij zeggen:
„gij zijt een dronkaard.” En al had ik zooveel monden
als de Hydra, met dit antwoord waren zij allen gestopt.
Een verstandig mensch zijn, kort daarna een dwaas, en
plotseling een beest! 0 onbegrijpelijk! — Ieder beker te
veel is vervloekt en zijn inhoud een duivel!

MORE:

Proverb: As many heads as Hydra

Hydra=Serpent in Greek mythology. When one head was cut off, two would grow in its place
Moraler=Moraliser
Ingredience=Content

Schmidt:
Familiar=Pertaining to the house and family, attached and serviceable to men
Inordinate=Improper, immoderate

Topics: excess, reply, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Archbishop
CONTEXT:
Wherefore do I this? So the question stands.
Briefly, to this end: we are all diseased,
And with our surfeiting and wanton hours
Have brought ourselves into a burning fever,
And we must bleed for it; of which disease
Our late King Richard, being infected, died.
But, my most noble Lord of Westmoreland,
I take not on me here as a physician,
Nor do I as an enemy to peace
Troop in the throngs of military men,
But rather show awhile like fearful war
To diet rank minds sick of happiness
And purge th’ obstructions which begin to stop
Our very veins of life. Hear me more plainly.
I have in equal balance justly weighed
What wrongs our arms may do, what wrongs we suffer,
And find our griefs heavier than our offences.

DUTCH:
Ik heb op juiste schalen streng gewogen,
Wat leed onze oorlog brengt, wat leed wij lijden,
En vind de grieven zwaarder dan ‘t vergrijp.

MORE:
Surfeiting=Gluttony, self-indulgence
Bleed=Be bled
Take on me=Assume the role of
Rank=Sick, corrupted, morbid

Compleat:
To bleed one=Iemand bloed aftappen, laaten; bloedlaating, bloeding
To surfeit (satiate or glut)=Ergens zat van worden, het moede worden
Surfeiting=Overlaading van de maag

Topics: excess, judgment, remedy, resolution

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
But to say I know more harm in him than in myself were to say more than I know. That he is old, the more the pity, his white hairs do witness it. But that he is, saving your reverence, a whoremaster, that I utterly deny. If sack and sugar be a fault, God help the wicked. If to be old and merry be a sin, then many an old host that I know is damned. If to be fat be to be hated, then Pharaoh’s lean kine are to be loved. No, my good lord, banish Peto, banish Bardolph, banish Poins, but for sweet Jack Falstaff, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Falstaff, valiant Jack Falstaff, and therefore more valiant being, as he is, old Jack Falstaff,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company.
Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.

DUTCH:
Als sek met suiker boos is, dan sta God de zondaars bij! Als oud en vroolijk zijn zonde is, dan is menig oude waard, dien ik ken, verdoemd; als vet te zijn hatenswaardig is, dan zijn Pharao’s magere koeien beminnelijk.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Sack=The generic name of Spanish and Canary wines
Kine=Cow (Pharaoh’s lean kine: a sign that times of starvation are ahead (Genesis 41))
Host=Innkeeper
Saving your reverence=With respect (used before an impolite remark)
Compleat:
Kine=Koeien
Sack=Sek, een soort van sterke wyn
Host=een Waerd, herbergier
Burgersdijk:
In de wijnhuizen kregen de gasten hij den wijn een zakjen suiker. Men mag er uit vermoeden, dat of de wijn of die hem dronk vaak niet al te best van smaak was.

Topics: life, age/experience, excess, offence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
But to say I know more harm in him than in myself were to say more than I know. That he is old, the more the pity, his white hairs do witness it. But that he is, saving your reverence, a whoremaster, that I utterly deny. If sack and sugar be a fault, God help the wicked. If to be old and merry be a sin, then many an old host that I know is damned. If to be fat be to be hated, then Pharaoh’s lean kine are to be loved. No, my good lord, banish Peto, banish Bardolph, banish Poins, but for sweet Jack Falstaff, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Falstaff, valiant Jack Falstaff, and therefore more valiant being, as he is, old Jack Falstaff,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company.
Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.

DUTCH:
Als sek met suiker boos is, dan sta God de zondaars bij! Als oud en vroolijk zijn zonde is, dan is menig oude waard, dien ik ken, verdoemd; als vet te zijn hatenswaardig is, dan zijn Pharao’s magere koeien beminnelijk.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Sack=The generic name of Spanish and Canary wines
Kine=Cow
Compleat:
Kine=Koeien
Sack=Sek, een soort van sterke wyn

Topics: life, age/experience, excess, offence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
‘Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise
in. The remembrance of her father never approaches
her heart but the tyranny of her sorrows takes all
livelihood from her cheek. No more of this, Helena;
go to, no more; lest it be rather thought you affect
a sorrow than have it.
HELEN
I do affect a sorrow indeed, but I have it too.
LAFEW
Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead,
excessive grief the enemy to the living.
COUNTESS
If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess
makes it soon mortal.

DUTCH:
Matige bejammering is het recht van den doode, overmatige droefenis de vijand van den levende.

MORE:
Affect=An outward show
Mortal=Deadly
Season=Preserve
Livelihood=Liveliness, spirit
Right=Owed to
Compleat:
Affect=Naäapen
Affectation=Gemaaktheid
Mortal=Sterflyk, doodelyk
Birth-right=Geboote-recht
Lamentation=Weeklaage, jammerklagt, gekerm, geklag

Burgersdijk notes:
Kruiden kan. In ‘t Engelsch season, kruiden, waarbij het denkbeeld van conserveeren, bewaren, in frisschen staat houden, steeds komt; vergelijk Romeo en Julia, II.3, en Driekoningenavond, 1.1.
Als de levende een vijand is van droefenis. “If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess makes it soon mortal”. De gravin herhaalt en dringt aan, wat Lafeu gezegd heeft, dat Helena zich niet te zeer aan hare droefheid moet overgeven, met de smart niet to zeer in vijandschap moet leven, want dat overmaat van smart doodelijk is . Mortal is namelijk hetzelfde als deadly, fatal .(…)

Topics: death, grief, appearance, excess

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Well, happiness to their sheets! Come, lieutenant, I have a stoup of wine, and here without are a brace of Cyprus gallants, that would fain have a measure to the health of the black Othello.
CASSIO
Not tonight, good Iago. I have very poor and unhappy brains for drinking. I could well wish courtesy would invent some other custom of entertainment.

DUTCH:
Vanavond niet, beste Jago, ik heb een heel slechte en ongelukkige dronk. Ik zou heel graag willen dat de etiquette een andere vorm van gezelligheid zou verzinnen.

MORE:

Stoup=Two quarts
Have a measure=Drink a toast
Schmidt:
Fain=Gladly, willingly; always joined with would; followed by a clause
Unhappy=Evil, mischievous, fatal, pernicious (but often in a somewhat milder sense)
Courtesy=Politeness

Compleat:
Courtesy=Beleefdheid, hoflykheid

Topics: excess, welbeing

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
You or any man living may be drunk at a time, man. I tell you what you shall do. Our general’s wife is now the general. I may say so in this respect, for that he hath devoted and given up himself to the contemplation, mark, and denotement of her parts and graces. Confess yourself freely to her, importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter, and, my fortunes against any lay worth naming, this crack of your love shall grow stronger than it was before.

DUTCH:
De vrouw van onzen Generaal is nu de Generaal; — ik
mag dit wel in zoo verre zeggen, als hij zich geheel
heeft toegewijd en overgegeven aan de beschouwing,
waarneming en opsomming van hare gaven en bevalligheden

MORE:

Proverb: A broken bone is the stronger when it is well set

Denotement=Contemplation; mark, indication: “in a man that’s just they are close –s, working from the heart”.
Importune (in the sense of ‘ask urgently and persistently’ usu. with a person as obj.)
Parts=Accomplishments, qualities

Compleat:
To importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen

Topics: excess, marriage, authority, marriage, love, skill/talent, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: First Jailer
CONTEXT:
A heavy reckoning for you, sir. But the comfort
is, you shall be called to no more payments, fear
no more tavern bills, which are often the sadness
of parting as the procuring of mirth. You come in
faint for want of meat, depart reeling with too
much drink; sorry that you have paid too much,
and sorry that you are paid too much; purse and
brain both empty; the brain the heavier for being
too light; the purse too light, being drawn of heaviness:
of this contradiction you shall now be
quit. O, the charity of a penny cord! It sums up
thousands in a trice: you have no true debitor and
creditor but it; of what’s past, is, and to come,
the discharge: your neck, sir, is pen, book and
counters; so the acquittance follows.

DUTCH:
Hoofd en beurs
beide leeg, het hoofd des te zwaarder, naarmate het
lichter is, de beurs des te opgeruimder, naarmate zij
meer zwaarte verloren heeft.


Proverb: A heavy purse makes a light heart
Proverb: In a trice

Heavier=Sleepier with drink
Drawn=Emptied
Drawn of heaviness=Lighter, being emptied of coins
Paid too much=Punished by excess drinking
To quit=To set at liberty, to free, to deliver
Acquittance=Receipt in full

Compleat:
To quit (dispense with, excluse)=Bevryden, verschoonen, ontslaan
I quit you from it=Ik ontsla ‘er u van
Forbearance is no acquittance=Uitstellen is geen quytschelden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, intellect, excess, money, debt/obligation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Not all these lords do vex me half so much
As that proud dame, the lord protector’s wife.
She sweeps it through the court with troops of ladies,
More like an empress than Duke Humphrey’s wife:
Strangers in court do take her for the queen:
She bears a duke’s revenues on her back,
And in her heart she scorns our poverty:
Shall I not live to be avenged on her?
Contemptuous base-born callet as she is,
She vaunted ‘mongst her minions t’other day,
The very train of her worst-wearing gown
Was better worth than all my father’s lands,
Till Suffolk gave two dukedoms for his daughter.

DUTCH:
Een vreemde aan ‘t hof houdt haar voor koningin;
Zij draagt eens hertogs inkomsten aan ‘t lijf,
En op onze armoe schimpt zij in haar hart.

MORE:

Scorn=Despise
Base-born=Of low birth
Callet=(or callat) Trull, drab, jade
Vaunt=Boast
Worst-wearing=Least expensive, least fashionable
Better worth=Worth more

Compleat:
To scorn=Versmaaden, verachten, bespotten, ‘t zich een schande achten
Base born=Een onechteling, bastaard
To vaunt=Pochen, snorken, opsnuiven
To make a vaunt=Ergens veel mede op hebben, zich ergens op verbovaardigen

Topics: poverty and wealth, appearance, excess

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Let the superfluous and lust-dieted man,
That slaves your ordinance, that will not see
Because he doth not feel, feel your power quickly.
So distribution should undo excess,
And each man have enough. Dost thou know Dover?

DUTCH:
Dan zal verdeeling overdaad goedmaken,
En elk heeft dan genoeg.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Lust-dieted=Faring and feeding voluptuously
Slave=To make subject or subservient to
Ordinance=Rules, dispensation
Feel (1)= Sympathise. Feel (2)= Experience
Distribution=Administration of justice; Sharing out
Compleat:
Superfluous (or overmuch)=Meer als genoeg overvloedig
Ordinance=Inzetting, instelling, willekeur, ordinancie
Distribution=Uitdeeling
The distributive Justice=De uitdeelbaare gerechtigheid

Topics: poverty and wealth, equality, excess

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Nerissa
CONTEXT:
NERISSA
You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries were in the
same abundance as your good fortunes are. And yet for
aught I see, they are as sick that surfeit with too much
as they that starve with nothing. It is no mean
happiness, therefore, to be seated in the mean.
Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency
lives longer.
PORTIA
Good sentences, and well pronounced.
NERISSA
They would be better if well followed.

DUTCH:
Het is daarom geen middelmatig geluk juist in de middelmaat
te zijn; overvloed krijgt vroeger grijze haren, maar juist van pas leeft langer.

MORE:
Superfluity=Surplus
Comes sooner by=Acquires sooner (to come by something)
Sentences=Maxims
Compleat:
Superfluity=Overtolligheyd, overvloedigheyd
Sentence=Spreuk, zinspreuk

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Martius
CONTEXT:
MARTIUS
Hang ’em! They say!
They’ll sit by the fire, and presume to know
What’s done i’ the Capitol; who’s like to rise,
Who thrives and who declines; side factions and give out
Conjectural marriages; making parties strong
And feebling such as stand not in their liking
Below their cobbled shoes. They say there’s
grain enough!
Would the nobility lay aside their ruth,
And let me use my sword, I’ll make a quarry
With thousands of these quarter’d slaves, as high
As I could pick my lance.
MENENIUS
Nay, these are almost thoroughly persuaded;
For though abundantly they lack discretion,
Yet are they passing cowardly. But, I beseech you,
What says the other troop?

DUTCH:
Hang ze op! Zij zeggen!
Aan ‘t haardvuur zittend willen ze alles weten,
Wat op het Kapitool geschiedt: wie rijst,
Wie heerscht, wie daalt; partijen doen ze ontstaan,
En gissen echt op echt; verheffen dezen,
En treden niet gelapten schoen op genen,
Die hun mishaagt!

MORE:
Like=Likely
Side=Take the side of, side with
Quarry=A heap of dead (usually game) given as a reward to hounds
Pick=Pitch, throw
To feeble=Enfeeble, weaken

Schmidt:
Ruth=Pity (hence ruthless, which is still used)
Conjectural=Founded on conjecture, formed by guess

Topics: poverty and wealth, equality, order/society, excess

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Lucio
CONTEXT:
FIRST GENTLEMAN
Thou art always figuring diseases in me; but thou
art full of error; I am sound.
LUCIO
Nay, not as one would say, healthy; but so sound as
things that are hollow: thy bones are hollow;
impiety has made a feast of thee.

DUTCH:
Nu, dat wil daarom nog niet zeggen gezond; maar
zoo wel, als iets zijn kan, dat voos en hol is; uw beenderen
zijn hol; goddeloosheid heeft op u geteerd en u
uitgemergeld.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Impiety=Sin, wickedness
Compleat:
Impiety=Ongodvruchtigheid, godloosheid
An impious man=Een ongodsdienstig, onvroom man

Topics: insult, good and bad, excess

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Gratiano
CONTEXT:
GRATIANO
Let me play the fool.
With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.
And let my liver rather heat with wine
Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
Why should a man whose blood is warm within
Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster,
Sleep when he wakes, and creep into the jaundice
By being peevish?

DUTCH:

’k Wacht dartlend, lachend, rimplige’ ouderdom /
Laat mij maar rimpels krijgen van ‘t lachen en de vrolijkheid /
Laat de oude rimpels komen met gelach

MORE:
Jaundice was thought to be caused by excess choler ( one of the four humors)
Compleat:
Sooth=Zéker, voorwaar
Jaundice=De Geelzucht
Peevish=Kribbig, gémelyk, korsel, ligt geraakt.
Early 16c corsel (now ‘korselig’) (J. de Vries (1971), Nederlands Etymologisch Woordenboek, Leiden)

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
IAGO
(…) You are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice, even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion. Sue to him again, and he’s yours.
CASSIO
I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so good a commander with so slight, so drunken, and so indiscreet an officer. Drunk? And speak parrot? And squabble? Swagger? Swear? And discourse fustian with one’s own shadow? O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil!

DUTCH:
Dronken zijn! Wezenloos oreren!
Herrie schoppen! Twisten! Vloeken! Onzin staan uit te
kramen tegen je schaduw! O jij onzichtbare wijngeest, als
jij geen naam hebt waaronder je bekend staat, laten wij je
dan duivel noemen!

MORE:

Cast=Dismissed
Mood=Anger
In policy=Public demonstration
Speak parrot=Nonsense
Fustian=Bombastic, high-sounding nonsense
Sue=Petition, entreat

Compleat:
To cast off=Afwerpen, verwerpen, achterlaaten
To cast his adversary at the bar=Zyn party in rechte verwinnen
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben
Fustian (or bombast)-Gezwets, snorkery
Fustian language=Grootspreeking, opsnyery

Topics: punishment, judgment, excess, anger

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Chief Justice
CONTEXT:
CHIEF JUSTICE
Well, the truth is, Sir John, you live in great infamy.
FALSTAFF
He that buckles him in my belt cannot live in less.
CHIEF JUSTICE
Your means are very slender, and your waste is great.
FALSTAFF
I would it were otherwise. I would my means were greater and my waist slender.

DUTCH:
Uw middelen zijn zeer klein en uw vertering zeer groot.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Infamy=Disgrace
Slender=Small, inconsiderable, insufficient

Compleat:
Infamy=Eerloosheid, Schandvlek
Slender (small, sorry, pitiful)=Klein, gering, armoedig
To have but a slender estate=Een gering kapitaal hebben

Topics: appearance, money, excess

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