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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: As You Like It ACT/SCENE: 2.7 SPEAKER: Jaques CONTEXT: JAQUES
…And in his brain,
Which is as dry as the remainder biscuit
After a voyage, he hath strange places crammed
With observation, the which he vents
In mangled forms. Oh, that I were a fool!
I am ambitious for a motley coat.
DUKE SENIOR
Thou shalt have one.
JAQUES
It is my only suit
Provided that you weed your better judgements
Of all opinion that grows rank in them
That I am wise DUTCH: Een noob’le nar! — Hij was weleer een hoov’ling,
En zegt, dat, zijn de vrouwen jong en schoon,
Zij ook de gaaf bezitten van ‘t te weten.
Zijn brein, zoo droog als restjens scheepsbeschuit,
Heeft hij gepropt met vreemde spreuken, vol
Opmerkingsgeest; en geeft die wijsheid lucht,
Verminkt, bij stukjens
MORE: Elizabethans believed that the three main organsi were the heart, liver and brain. The brain had to be cool and moist to sleep; someone with a ‘cool and moist’ humour would be able to sleep, unlike a choleric person of hot and dry humour. A dry brain was believed to take longer to be impressed with information.
Provided . . . wise as long as you
disabuse yourselves of the prejudice
that I am a wise man.rank gross (homonym with grows),
often including foul smell Topics: insult, intellect, reason, fashion/trends

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
When he was naked, he was, for all the world, like a forked radish with a head fantastically carved upon it with a knife. He was so forlorn that his dimensions to any thick sight were invincible. He was the very genius of famine, yet lecherous as a monkey, and the whores called him “mandrake.” He came ever in the rearward of the fashion, and sung those tunes to the overscutched houswives that he heard the carmen whistle, and swore they were his fancies or his good-nights. And now is this Vice’s dagger become a squire, and talks as familiarly of John o’ Gaunt as if he had been sworn brother to him, and I’ll be sworn he ne’er saw him but once in the tilt-yard, and then he burst his head for crowding among the Marshal’s men.

DUTCH:
Hij kwam altijd een paar modes achteraan en zong aan de afgeranselde vrouwmenschen de deuntjens voor, die hij van karrelieden had hooren fluiten, en zwoer dan dat het zijn eigen minneliederen of nachtgroeten waren.

MORE:

Overscutched or overscotched=Scutch or scotch is a cut with lash, rod or whip.
Rearward=The last troop, rearguard
Ever in the rearward of the fashion=Always behind the times, out of fashion
Carmen=Carters
Mandrake=The plant Atropa mandragora, the root of which was thought to resemble the human figure, and to cause madness and even death, when torn from the ground
Fancies=Fastasias, improvised music
Good-nights=Serenades
Genius=Embodiment
Thick sight=Short-sightedness

Compleat:
The rear of an army=De agterhoede van een leger
Mandrake=Alrin, Mandragora

Topics: fashion/trends, leadership

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lady Percy
CONTEXT:
(…) Who then persuaded you to stay at home?
There were two honours lost, yours and your son’s.
For yours, the God of heaven brighten it.
For his, it stuck upon him as the sun
In the grey vault of heaven, and by his light
Did all the chivalry of England move
To do brave acts. He was indeed the glass
Wherein the noble youth did dress themselves.
He had no legs that practiced not his gait;
And speaking thick, which nature made his blemish,
Became the accents of the valiant;
For those that could speak low and tardily
Would turn their own perfection to abuse
To seem like him. So that in speech, in gait,
In diet, in affections of delight,
In military rules, humours of blood,
He was the mark and glass, copy and book,
That fashioned others.

DUTCH:
Ja, hij was de spiegel,
Waar heel de jeugdige adel zich voor tooide.

MORE:
Speaking thick=Speaking fast
Accent=Speech pattern
Glass=Mirror
Affectations of delight=Recreations
Humours of blood=Temperament

Compleat:
Humours of the body=De humeuren van het lichaam
Affectation=Een al te nauwkeurige naaaping, gemaaktheid, waanwysheid; gemaakt

Topics: fashion/trends, honour, leadership

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Mylord, I was born about three of the clock in the afternoon, with a white head and something a round belly. For my voice, I have lost it with halloing and singing of anthems. To approve my youth further, I will not. The truth is, I am only old in judgement and understanding. And he that will caper with me for a thousand marks, let him lend me the money, and have at him. For the box of the ear that the Prince gave you, he gave it like a rude prince, and you took it like a sensible lord. I have checked him for it, and the young lion repents.
Marry, not in ashes and sackcloth, but in new silk and old sack.

DUTCH:
Verder mijn jeugd bewijzen wil ik niet; de waarheid is, dat ik alleen oud ben in verstand en doorzicht, en wie met mij om een duizend mark luchtsprongen wil maken, moge mij het geld leenen en dan toezien.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Sack=The generic name of Spanish and Canary wines
Caper=A leap, a spring, in dancing or mirth
Sack-cloth=Coarse cloth worn in mourning and mortification:
Checked=Rebuked

Compleat:
Sack=Sek, een soort van sterke wyn
Caper=Een Kaper, als mede een Sprong
Check=Berispen, beteugelen, intoomen, verwyten
Sack-cloth=Zak-doek. Sack-cloth and ashes=Zak en assche

Topics: fashion/trends, age/experience, understanding, wisdom

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Then let them anatomise Regan; see what breeds about her
heart. Is there any cause in nature that makes these hardhearts?
[To Edgar] You, sir, I entertain for one of my hundred,
only I do not like the fashion of your garments. You will say
they are Persian; but let them be changed.

DUTCH:
Is er een natuurlijke oorzaak die harten zo hard maakt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Anatomize = dissect
Compleat:
Anatomize=Opsnyding, ontleeden

Topics: life, nature, mercy, appearance, fashion/trends

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
His good remembrance, sir,
Lies richer in your thoughts than on his tomb;
So in approof lives not his epitaph
As in your royal speech.
KING
Would I were with him! He would always say—
Methinks I hear him now: his plausive words
He scatterd not in ears, but grafted them,
To grow there and to bear ;—” Let me not live,”
Thus his good melancholy oft began,
On the catastrophe and heel of pastime.
When it was out,—” Let me not live,” quoth he,
“After my flame lacks oil, to be the snuff
Of younger spirits, whose apprehensive senses
All but new things disdain; whose judgments are
Mere fathers of their garments; whose constancies
Expire before their fashions. This he wish’d;
I after him do after him wish too,
Since I nor wax nor honey can bring home,
I quickly were dissolved from my hive,
To give some labourers room.

DUTCH:
O, dat ik bij hem waar! Hij zeide steeds:
Mij is ‘t, als hoor ik hem; hij strooide niet
Zijn gulden taal in ‘t oor, maar entte er die,
Zoodat ze er vruchten droeg,

MORE:
Approof=Testimony
Plausive=Pleasing, specious, plausible
Catastrophe, Heel=Both meaning end
Scattered not but grafted=Not thrown carelessly but carefully planted
Snuff=The burning wick of a candle, as darkening the flame or remaining after it.
Apprehensive=Imaginative
Compleat:
Plausible=Op een schoonschynende wyze
To snuff out a candle=Een kaars uitsnuiten
Apprehensive (sensible of)=Een ding gewaar worden

Topics: fashion/trends, language, reason, understanding, memory, legacy

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Sands
CONTEXT:
CHAMBERLAIN
Is ’t possible the spells of France should juggle
Men into such strange mysteries?
SANDS
New customs,
Though they be never so ridiculous—
Nay, let ’em be unmanly—yet are followed.
CHAMBERLAIN
As far as I see, all the good our English
Have got by the late voyage is but merely
A fit or two o’ the face; but they are shrewd ones;
For when they hold ’em, you would swear directly
Their very noses had been counsellors
To Pepin or Clotharius, they keep state so.

DUTCH:
Nieuwe modes,
Al zijn zij nog zoo dwaas, nog zoo belachlijk ,
Ja zelfs onmann’lijk, worden toch gevolgd.

MORE:
Juggle=Mislead
Mysteries=Conduct
Let them be=Even if they are, be they
Fit=Grimace
Shrewd=Artful, mischievous
Compleat:
Juggle=Guychelen
Shrewd=Loos, doortrapt, sneedig, vinnig, fel

Burgersdijk notes:
Tot zulke malle fratsen. Holinshed vermeldt op het jaar 1519, dat vele voorname jonge Engelschen, die zich geruimen tijd in Parijs hadden opgehouden, bij hunne terugkomst geheel Franschen geworden waren, in manieren en ondeugden, wat Engelsch was uitlachten, en niets goedvonden wat niet naar den Franschen smaak was. Sh. heeft dit hier uitgewerkt, doch had het oog op de dwaze manieren van zijn tijd, evenals in koning Jan en in den koopman van Venetië.

Topics: fashion/trends

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
Not yours, in good sooth! Heart, you swear like a comfit-maker’s wife! “Not you, in good sooth,” and “as true as I live,” and “as God shall mend me,” and “as sure as day”—
And givest such sarcenet surety for thy oaths
As if thou never walk’st further than Finsbury.Swear me, Kate, like a lady as thou art,
A good mouth-filling oath, and leave “in sooth,”
And such protest of pepper-gingerbread,
To velvet-guards and Sunday citizens.

DUTCH:
En geeft zoo taffen eedwaarborg, als waart gij
Nooit verder weg geweest dan Finsbury
Zweer als een edelvrouw, zooals gij zijt,
Een vollen eed, die klinkt,—en laat “In ernst”
En zulke peperkoekbetuigingen
Aan fulpgalons en zondagsburgers over.

MORE:
Onions:
Velvet-guards=Guards with velvet-trimmed clothes (trimmings of velvet being a city fashion at the time)
Mouth-filling=Robust
Protest=Oath, protestation
Burgersdijk notes:
En geeft zoo taffen eedwaarborg, als waart gij Nooit verder weg geweest dan Finsbury. Heetspoor kan die makke betuigingen niet lijden, zooals welgestelde burgervrouwtjens, die, het gewaad met fluweel omboord, hare zondagswandeling naar Finsbury richtten, gaarne gebruiken. Zijne vrouw moest ze aan de vrouwen van zijdehandelaars, — vandaar taffen eedwaarborg, — en peperkoekverkopers overlaten. Finsbury lag toen nog buiten de poorten van Londen en was een gewoon doel van de op Zondag wandelende burgers.

Topics: language, civility, order/society, fashion/trends

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
Good sentences, and well pronounced.
NERISSA
They would be better if well followed.
PORTIA
If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do,
chapels had been churches and poor men’s cottages
princes’ palaces. It is a good divine that follows his
own instructions. I can easier teach twenty what were
good to be done than be one of the twenty to follow mine
own teaching. The brain may devise laws for the blood,
but a hot temper leaps o’er a cold decree. Such a hare
is madness the youth—to skip o’er the meshes of good
counsel the cripple. But this reasoning is not in the
fashion to choose me a husband. O me, the word “choose!”
I may neither choose whom I would nor refuse whom I
dislike—so is the will of a living daughter curbed by
the will of a dead father. Is it not hard, Nerissa, that
I cannot choose one nor refuse none?

DUTCH:
Het brein kan wel wetten voor het gestel uitdenken, maar een vurig bloed springt over een koel voorschrift heen / De hersenen kunnen wel wetten uitdenken voor het bloed; maar een vurige natuur springt over een koel gebod

MORE:
Meshes=net.
“…reasoning is not in the fashion”=This line of reasoning
Compleat:
Fashion=wyze, manier

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Use a more spacious ceremony to the
noble lords; you have restrained yourself within the
list of too cold an adieu: be more expressive to
them: for they wear themselves in the cap of the
time, there do muster true gait, eat, speak, and
move under the influence of the most received star;
and though the devil lead the measure, such are to
be followed: after them, and take a more dilated
farewell.
BERTRAM
And I will do so.
PAROLLES
Worthy fellows; and like to prove most sinewy
sword-men.

DUTCH:
COUNTESS
Nu voorwaar, dat is een rijk antwoord, dat voor alle vragen passend is.
CLOWN
Het is als een scheerdersstoel, die voor alle achterstevens passend is, voor de spitse, voor de platte, voor de ronde, kortom voor alle achterstevens.

MORE:
Spacious=Expansive
Ceremony=Courtesy
Dilated=Extended
Wear the cap of time=Are fashionable
Received=Fashionable
Compleat:
Spacious=Ruym, wyd
Ceremony=Plegtigheyd
Dilate=Verwyden, uitweyden

Topics: fashion/trends, independence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Sands
CONTEXT:
CHAMBERLAIN
How now!
What news, Sir Thomas Lovell?
LOVELL
Faith, my lord,
I hear of none, but the new proclamation
That’s clapp’d upon the court-gate.
CHAMBERLAIN
What is’t for?
LOVELL
The reformation of our travell’d gallants,
That fill the court with quarrels, talk, and tailors.
CHAMBERLAIN
I’m glad ’tis there: now I would pray our monsieurs
To think an English courtier may be wise,
And never see the Louvre.
LOVELL
They must either,
For so run the conditions, leave those remnants
Of fool and feather that they got in France,
With all their honourable point of ignorance
Pertaining thereunto, as fights and fireworks,
Abusing better men than they can be,
Out of a foreign wisdom, renouncing clean
The faith they have in tennis, and tall stockings,
Short blister’d breeches, and those types of travel,
And understand again like honest men;
Or pack to their old playfellows: there, I take it,
They may, ‘cum privilegio,’ wear away
The lag end of their lewdness and be laugh’d at.
SANDS
‘Tis time to give ’em physic, their diseases
Are grown so catching.

DUTCH:
De kuur was noodig, want hun kwalen bleken
Besmett’lijk.

MORE:
Louvre=Louvre Palace
Fool and feather=Foolishness and foppery (fashion)
Clean=Entirely
Lag end=Remains
Compleat:
Foolery=Malligheid; fooleries=Zotte kuuren, potsen
Feather=Pluym
Clean=Geheelendal; ganschelyk
Lag=De laatste

Topics: fashion/trends, independence

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
Hear patiently my purpose. I’ll disrobe me
Of these Italian weeds and suit myself
As does a Briton peasant. So I’ll fight
Against the part I come with; so I’ll die
For thee, O Imogen, even for whom my life
Is every breath a death. And thus, unknown,
Pitied nor hated, to the face of peril
Myself I’ll dedicate. Let me make men know
More valour in me than my habits show.
Gods, put the strength o’ th’ Leonati in me.
To shame the guise o’ th’ world, I will begin
The fashion: less without and more within.

DUTCH:
Men zie meer heldenmoed
Van mij, dan mijn gewaad vermoeden doet.
Schenkt, goden, mij de kracht der Leonaten!
O, schaam u, wereld! thans wil ik beginnen,
Deez’ dracht: van buiten arm en rijk van binnen.


Proverb: Appearances are deceitful

Schmidt:
Weeds=Garment
Purpose=Something spoken of or to be done, matter, question, subject

Compleat:
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad

Topics: appearance, deceit, fashion/trends

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