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PLAY: King Lear ACT/SCENE: 2.2 SPEAKER: Kent CONTEXT: Pray you do not, sir. I have watched and traveled hard.
Some time I shall sleep out. The rest I’ll whistle.
A good man’s fortune may grow out at heels. DUTCH: Ons goed fortuin laat ons soms in de steek;
ik wens u goededag.
MORE: Proverb: A good man’s fortune may grow out at heels (luck may run out).
Out at heel=worn out at the heel Topics: fate/destiny, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice
And could of men distinguish, her election
Hath sealed thee for herself, for thou hast been—
As one in suffering all that suffers nothing—
A man that Fortune’s buffets and rewards
Hast ta’en with equal thanks. And blessed are those
Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled,
That they are not a pipe for Fortune’s finger
To sound what stop she please.

DUTCH:
Gezegend, zij wier inborst en verstand zó zijn verweven /
Gezegend hij, Bij wien verstand en hart zoo zijn gepaard /
En wel gelukkig Zijn zij bij wien zich bloed en geest zoo mengen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Election = preference
Blood=Disposition, temper
Judgment=Faculty of discerning the truth, discernment, good sense, understanding
Commingled= balanced

Topics: fate/destiny, reason, judgment, adversity

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Archbishop
CONTEXT:
MOWBRAY
You wish me health in very happy season,
For I am on the sudden something ill.
ARCHBISHOP
Against ill chances men are ever merry,
But heaviness foreruns the good event.
WESTMORELAND
Therefore be merry, coz, since sudden sorrow
Serves to say thus: “Some good thing comes tomorrow.”

DUTCH:
Als onheil naakt, is steeds de mensch blijmoedig;
Zwaarmoedigheid verkondigt goed geluk./
Bij slechte kansen zijn mensen altijd vrolijk, maar depressies kondigen een gunstige afloop aan

MORE:

Happy season=The appropriate time
Something=Somewhat
Heaviness=Sorrow, sadness, melancholy
Forerun=Precede

Compleat:
Season (a proper time to do a thing)=Een bekwamen tyd om iets te doen
In due season=Ter rechter tyd, recht van pas
Something (somewhat)=Iets, iet, wat
Heaviness (or sadness)=Verdriet, droefheid, leetweezen

Topics: fate/destiny, wellbeing, sorrow

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Glendower
CONTEXT:
Cousin, of many men
I do not bear these crossings. Give me leave
To tell you once again that at my birth
The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes,
The goats ran from the mountains, and the herds
Were strangely clamorous to the frighted fields.
These signs have marked me extraordinary,
And all the courses of my life do show
I am not in the roll of common men.

DUTCH:
En heel de loop mijns levens toont, dat ik
Niet op de rol sta der gewone menschen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Clamorous=vociferous, loud
Crossings=Contradictions
Onions:
Rolls=list, register (fig.)

Topics: fate/destiny, status, order/society

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Edgar
CONTEXT:
I stumbled when I saw. Full oft ’tis seen,
Our means secure us and our mere defects
Prove our commodities. O dear son Edgar,
The food of thy abusèd father’s wrath,
Might I but live to see thee in my touch,
I’d say I had eyes again!
OLD MAN
How now? Who’s there?
EDGAR
(aside) O gods! Who is ’t can say “I am at the worst”?
I am worse than e’er I was.
OLD MAN
(to GLOUCESTER)
‘Tis poor mad Tom.
EDGAR
(aside) And worse I may be yet. The worst is not
So long as we can say “This is the worst.”

DUTCH:
Het ergste is nog niet aan de orde zolang wij nog kunnen zeggen ‘Dit is het ergste’./
En ‘t kan nog erger ; ‘t is nog niet het ergste
Als wij nog zeggen kunnen „Dit is ‘t ergste .”

MORE:
Proverb: ‘The way to be safe is never to be secure’ or ‘He that is secure is not safe’
Our means secure us=Give us a false sense of security (See Macbeth 3.5: ‘Security is mortals’ chiefest enemy’)
Schmidt:
Stumble (in a moral sense)=To err
Means=That which is at a person’s disposal; resources, power, wealth, allowance
Secure=To make careless and confident
Abusèd=Deceived
Compleat:
Secure (fearless or careless)=Onbevreest, zorgeloos

Topics: fate/destiny, adversity

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
He has some reason, else he could not beg.
I’ th’ last night’s storm I such a fellow saw,
Which made me think a man a worm. My son
Came then into my mind, and yet my mind
Was then scarce friends with him. I have heard more since.
As flies to wanton boys are we to th’ gods.
They kill us for their sport.

DUTCH:
Nu weet ik meer: wij zijn
voor goden slechts wat vliegen zijn voor jongens:
zij doden voor de grap./
Hem toen niet goed gezind ; sinds hoorde ik meer
Den Goden zijn we als vliegen voor kwajongens ;
Zij doode’ ons uit de grap .

MORE:
Compare Job 25.6: ‘How 38-9 How much more man, a worme, euen the sonne of man, which is but a worme?’ (Kittredge); Psalms 22:6 ‘But I am a worm and not a man’.
Schmidt:
Compleat:
Plague=Plaag
Scarce=Hardly, scantly
Those kind of people are the plague (pest or bane) of mankind=Dat soort van menschen is de pest van het menschdom
Plague (punishment or judgment)=Straffe
A wanton child=Een speelsch kind
Scarce (or scarcely)=Naauwlyks

Topics: madness, poverty and wealth, fate/destiny

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Bertram
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
I mean, the business is not ended, as fearing to hear of it hereafter. But shall we have this dialogue between the fool and the soldier? Come, bring forth this counterfeit module, he has deceived me, like a double-meaning prophesier.
SECOND LORD
Bring him forth: has sat i’ the stocks all night, poor gallant knave.
BERTRAM
No matter: his heels have deserved it, in usurping his spurs so long. How does he carry himself?

DUTCH:
Ik bedoel, dat de zaak nog niet ten einde is, daar ik vrees, er later nog wel van te zullen hooren .

MORE:
His heels have deserved it:
The ‘heels’ reference here is probably to the practice of baffling=originally a punishment of infamy, inflicted on recreant knights, one part of which was hanging them up by the heels (Nares). This practice is also referred to in 2.4 (Falstaff: If thou dost it half so gravely, so majestically, both in word and matter, hang me up by the heels for a rabbit- sucker or a poulter’s hare.)
Another punishment was ‘hacking’: chopping off the spurs of a knight when he was to be degraded.

Module=model (OED: “a person… eminently worthy of imitation; a perfect exemplar of some excellence”)
Double-meaning prophesier=Prophecies that can suggest one thing but interpreted to mean another (such as the witches in Macbeth)
Compleat:
Module (measure in architecture)=Model
To lay one by the heels (send to prison)=Iemand gevangen zetten
Stocks (pair of)=De Stok, daar men kwaaddoenders met de beenen insluit
Double (dissembling, treacherous)=Dubbelhartig, geveinst, verraaderlyk
Double-tongued=Tweetongig

Topics: punishment, deceit, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Pistol
CONTEXT:

Fortune is Bardolph’s foe and frowns on him,
For he hath stolen a pax and hangèd must he be.
A damnèd death!
Let gallows gape for dog, let man go free,
And let not hemp his windpipe suffocate.
But Exeter hath given the doom of death
For pax of little price.
Therefore go speak—the duke will hear thy voice—
And let not Bardolph’s vital thread be cut
With edge of penny cord and vile reproach.
Speak, Captain, for his life, and I will thee requite.

DUTCH:
Fortuin is Bardolfs vijandin, ziet norsch;
Hij stal zich een monstrans en moet nu hangen.
Een vloekb’re dood!
Voor honden gaap’ de galg, de mensch zij vrij,
En hennep mag zijn gorgel niet verstikken.
Maar Exeter deed de uitspraak van den dood
Voor voddigen monstrans.

MORE:
Doom=Judgment. (Doom (or ‘dome’) was a statute or law (doombooks were codes of laws); related to the English suffix -dom, originally meaning jurisdiction. Shakespeare is credited for first using doom to mean death and destruction in Sonnet 14.)

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
A heavy doom=een zwaar vonnis

Topics: fate/destiny, offence, punishment, judgment

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cominius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Be gone;
Put not your worthy rage into your tongue;
One time will owe another.
CORIOLANUS
On fair ground
I could beat forty of them.
COMINIUS
I could myself
Take up a brace o’ the best of them; yea, the two tribunes:
But now ’tis odds beyond arithmetic;
And manhood is call’d foolery, when it stands
Against a falling fabric. Will you hence,
Before the tag return? whose rage doth rend
Like interrupted waters and o’erbear
What they are used to bear.

DUTCH:
Doch thans is hier onmeet rijke overmacht;
En mannenmoed wordt dolheid, als hij poogt
Een stortend huis te houden.

MORE:
Proverb: The stream (current, tide) stopped swells the higher
Proverb: Tag, rag and bobtail (Tag and rag)

Odds beyond arithmetic=Incalculable odds
Take up=Encounter, fight

Schmidt:
Worth=Well-founded, legitimate
Tag=Rabble (See Julius Caesar 1.2, “the tag-rag people”)
Fabric=Structure, frame or large building

Compleat:
Tag-rag and bob-tail (company of scoundrels)=Jan rap en zyn maat
Odds (advantage)=Voorrecht, voordeel
To lay odds with one=Een ongelyke weddenschap met iemand aangaan, drie tegen twee, of twee tegen één zetten.

Burgersdijk notes:
Houd stand! Gelijk staan vriend en vijand. Door de folio en door de meeste uitgevers worden deze woorden aan Cominius toegeschreven. Veel beter is het echter, ja noodig is het, ze aan Coriolanus toe te kennen en dan te lezen:
Houdt stand! enz. De persoonsaanwijzingen zijn in de folio hier verkeerd; het zeggen: Kom, vriend, ga mee! wordt niet aan Cominius, maar aan Coriolanus toegeschreven en Coriolanus’ woorden: O waren zij barbaren, enz. aan Menenius. Op Coriolanus zeggen: In ‘t open veld enz. spreke dan niet Menenius, maar Cominius, met weglating van het woordjen nog:
,Ikzelf
Een paar der besten, ja, de twee tribunen.
Doch thans is hier onmeet’lijke overmacht, enz.”
Bij het maken der aanteekeningen blijkt mij, dat dit inderdaad de beste verdeeling is.

Topics: fate/destiny, risk, anger, caution

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
My fate cries out
And makes each petty artery in this body
As hardy as the Nemean lion’s nerve.
Still am I called.—Unhand me, gentlemen.
By heaven, I’ll make a ghost of him that lets me.
I say, away!—Go on. I’ll follow thee.

DUTCH:
Bij God, ik maak een spook van wie mij hindert /
Bij God, wie ‘t mij belet, maak ‘k tot een geest.

MORE:
Let=prevent. (Anglo-Saxon verb ‘lettan’, to prevent. Dutch ‘beletten’.)

Compleat:
To let=beletten, verhinderen.
‘What doth let me why I should no do it’=Wat verhindert my (wat weerhoudt my) dat ik het niet zou doen?
Unhand me=Laat my los, laat my gaan.

Topics: fate/destiny

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Come what come may,
Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

DUTCH:
Laat komen wat komen wil, ook de ergste dag gaat voorbij./
Kome al wat komen wil; De ruwste dag verloopt, geen uur staat stil.

MORE:
Nowadays: Come what may
Even the worst day comes to an end

Topics: fate/destiny, still in use

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
Full well hath Clifford play’d the orator,
Inferring arguments of mighty force.
But, Clifford, tell me, didst thou never hear
That things ill-got had ever bad success?
And happy always was it for that son
Whose father for his hoarding went to hell?
I’ll leave my son my virtuous deeds behind;
And would my father had left me no more!
For all the rest is held at such a rate
As brings a thousand-fold more care to keep
Than in possession and jot of pleasure.
Ah, cousin York! Would thy best friends did know
How it doth grieve me that thy head is here!

DUTCH:
Schoon toonde Clifford daar zijn redekunst
En voerde gronden aan van groot gewicht.
Maar, Clifford, zeg mij, hebt gij nooit gehoord,
Dat slecht verworven goed steeds slecht gedijt?

MORE:

Proverb: Evil-gotten (ill-gotten) goods never prove well (prosper, endure)
Proverb: Happy is the child whose father goes to the devil

Full well=Very well
Inferring=Adducing
Success=Result
Happy=Fortunate
Rate=Price

Compleat:
Jot=Zier
To hord up=Opstapelen, vergaaren, byeenschraapen

Burgersdijk notes:
II.2.48. Wiens vader om zijn schrapen voer ter helle. Het spreekwoord, waarop hier gezinspeeld wordt, luidt : Happy the child, whose father went to the devil; „Gelukkig het kind, welks vader door den duivel is gehaald!” Als een vader, die op zondige wijze rijk geworden is, sterft, erft de zoon wel het goed, maar heeft voor de zonden niet meer te boeten. Koning Hendrik betwijfelt blijkbaar de juistheid van het spreekwoord.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, corruption, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Joan la Pucelle
CONTEXT:
Assign’d am I to be the English scourge.
This night the siege assuredly I’ll raise:
Expect Saint Martin’s summer, halcyon days,
Since I have entered into these wars.
Glory is like a circle in the water,
Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself
Till by broad spreading it disperse to nought.
With Henry’s death the English circle ends;
Dispersed are the glories it included.
Now am I like that proud insulting ship
Which Caesar and his fortune bare at once.

DUTCH:
Ik ben tot Englands geese! uitverkoren.
Nog deze nacht ontzet ik wis de stad;
Verwacht, nu ik den strijd aanvaard, een schoonen
Sint Maartenszomer, Halcyonendagen.

MORE:
Saint Martin’s summer=Equivalent of an ‘Indian summer’
Halcyon days=Unseasonable calm (so called because when it was calm in winter the kingfisher could build its nest)
Halcyon=Kingfisher
“Pround insulting ship” is a ref. to Plutarch, who wrote that Caesar told the captain of his ship no harm would befall him because he was carrying Caesar and therefore had Caesar’s ‘fortune’
Insulting=Triumphant

Compleat:
Halcyon (a sea-owl)=Een zekere Zee-vogel
Halcyon days=Een tijd van vrede en rust

Burgersdijk notes:
Sint Maartenszomer, Halcyonendagen. Halcyonendagen waren bij de ouden schoone, stormlooze dagen. Het schoone weder, op een storm volgend, wordt hier met een schoonen zomerschen dag in November, op Sint Maarten, vergeleken.

Ik ben nu als dat fiere schip, dat eens Tegader Caesar droeg en zijn geluk. Het verhaal, dat Caesar eens zijn bezorgden schipper toeriep: „Wees goedsmoeds, knaap, want gij hebt Cesar en zijn geluk aan boord”, vond Shakespeare in de vertaling van Plutarchus door North, een werk, dat zeker vlijtig door hem beoefend werd en dat hem aanleiding gaf tot de meeste geleerde toespelingen, waaraan dit stuk rijk is.

Topics: fate/destiny, achievement, hope/optimism, nature

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Ephesus
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
Nay, come, I pray you, sir, give me the chain.
Both wind and tide stays for this gentleman,
And I, to blame, have held him here too long.
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
Good Lord! You use this dalliance to excuse
Your breach of promise to the Porpentine.
I should have chid you for not bringing it,
But, like a shrew, you first begin to brawl.
SECOND MERCHANT
The hour steals on. I pray you, sir, dispatch.
ANGELO
You hear how he importunes me. The chain!
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
Why, give it to my wife, and fetch your money.
ANGELO
Come, come. You know I gave it you even now.
Either send the chain, or send me by some token.
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
Fie, now you run this humor out of breath.
Come, where’s the chain? I pray you, let me see it.
SECOND MERCHANT
My business cannot brook this dalliance.
Good sir, say whe’er you’ll answer me or no.
If not, I’ll leave him to the Officer.

DUTCH:
Mijn hemel! wis moet deze scherts bewimp’len,
Dat gij mij in den Egel zitten liet.
Het was aan mij u daarom hard te vallen,
Maar als een feeks zoekt gij het eerste twist.

MORE:
Proverb: Time and tide (The tide) tarries (stays for) no man
Proverb: Some complain to prevent complaint (I should have chid you for not bringing it, But like a shrew you first begin to brawl)

Chid (impf., to chide.)=To rebuke, to scold at
Run this humour out of breath=Taking the joke too far
Token=A sign or attestion of a right

Compleat:
Importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
To sail with wind and tide=Voor wind and stroom zeilen
Chide=Kyven, bekyven
Token=Teken, getuigenis
Dalliance=Gestoei, dartelheid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, time, fate/destiny, complaint, promise, business

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Thus far our fortune keeps an upward course,
And we are graced with wreaths of victory.
But, in the midst of this bright-shining day,
I spy a black, suspicious, threatening cloud,
That will encounter with our glorious sun,
Ere he attain his easeful western bed:
I mean, my lords, those powers that the queen
Hath raised in Gallia have arrived our coast
And, as we hear, march on to fight with us.
CLARENCE
A little gale will soon disperse that cloud
And blow it to the source from whence it came:
The very beams will dry those vapours up,
For every cloud engenders not a storm.

DUTCH:
Een kleine storm verstrooit welras die wolk,
En blaast haar naar de bron, vanwaar zij kwam;
Uw stralen zelf verdrogen ras die dampen;
Niet ied’re wolk verwekt een onweersbui.

MORE:

Proverb: All clouds bring not rain

Our glorious sun=Edward returns again to the image of the sun that represents the House of York.
Gallia=France
Easeful=Comfortable
Beams=Sunbeams (another reference to the sun emblem)

Topics: fate/destiny, conflict, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
Nay, forward, old man. Do not break off so,
For we may pity though not pardon thee.
EGEON
O, had the gods done so, I had not now
Worthily termed them merciless to us.
For, ere the ships could meet by twice five leagues,
We were encounterd by a mighty rock,
Which being violently borne upon,
Our helpful ship was splitted in the midst;
So that, in this unjust divorce of us,
Fortune had left to both of us alike
What to delight in, what to sorrow for.

DUTCH:
Neen, oude, breek niet af; want mededoogen
Mag ik u schenken, schoon genade niet..

MORE:
Worthily=Deservedly, justly
Helpful ship=Mast, which was helpful when the ship was “sinking-ripe”
In the midst=Down the middle

Compleat:
Worthily=Waardiglyk
Helpful=Behulpelyk
Midst=Het middenst, midden

Topics: pity, mercy, judgment, fate/destiny, life

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
His sole child, my lord, and bequeathed to my
overlooking. I have those hopes of her good that
her education promises; her dispositions she
inherits, which makes fair gifts fairer; for where
an unclean mind carries virtuous qualities, there
commendations go with pity; they are virtues and
traitors too; in her they are the better for their
simpleness; she derives her honesty and achieves her
goodness.

DUTCH:
Ik heb alle verwachting van het goede, dat hare opvoeding belooft; de natuur, die zij geërfd heeft, maakt de schoone gaven, die opvoeding schenkt, nog schooner;

MORE:
Proverb: Blood is inherited but virtue is achieved
Overlooking=Guardianship
Fated=Fateful (see also King Lear “The plagues that hang fated over men’s faults”, 3.2)
Go with pity=Accompanied by regret
Simpleness=Plainness (being unmixed), unrefined nativeness, innocence
Unclean=(in a moral sense) Impure
Derive=Inherit
Compleat:
Disposition (or Inclination)=Genegenheid, Lust
Disposition of mind=Gesteltenis van gemoed
Simple=Onbeschadigend, eenvoudig
Fated=Door ‘t noodlot beschooren

Topics: nature, learning/education, virtue, innocence, fate/destiny, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
I heard no letter from my master since
I wrote him Imogen was slain. ’Tis strange.
Nor hear I from my mistress, who did promise
To yield me often tidings. Neither know I
What is betid to Cloten, but remain
Perplexed in all. The heavens still must work.
Wherein I am false I am honest; not true, to be true.
These present wars shall find I love my country,
Even to the note o’ th’ King, or I’ll fall in them.
All other doubts, by time let them be cleared.
Fortune brings in some boats that are not steered.

DUTCH:
De tijd breng’ licht en helpe in mijnen nood;
‘t Geluk redt soms een onbestuurde boot.


Schmidt:
Tidings=News, intelligence
To betide=To happen, come to pass

Compleat:
Tidings=Tyding, boodschap
To betide=Aankomen, overkomen

Topics: fate/destiny, achievement

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Fluellen
CONTEXT:
PISTOL
Bardolph, a soldier firm and sound of heart and
of buxom valor, hath, by cruel Fate and giddy
Fortune’s furious fickle wheel, that goddess blind,
that stands upon the rolling restless stone
FLUELLEN
By your patience, Aunchient Pistol, Fortune is painted blind, with a muffler afore her eyes, to signify to you that Fortune is blind; and she is painted also with a wheel to signify to you, which is the moral of it, that she is turning and inconstant, and mutability and variation; and her foot, look you, is fixed upon a spherical stone, which rolls and rolls and rolls. In good truth, the poet makes a most excellent description of it. Fortune is an excellent moral.

DUTCH:
Fortuin wordt plind gemalen met een pand voor haar oogen om u te betuiten, dat Fortuin blind is.

MORE:
Proverb: Fortune is blind
Proverb: Fortune is fickle
Proverb: Fortune’s wheel is every turning

Fortune is an excellent moral: provides an excellent lesson
Painted with a wheel=Attribute of Fortune, as the emblem of mutability
Schmidt:
Aunchient=Fluellen’s Welsh pronunciation ofancient (ensign)

Compleat:
The wheel (or vicissitudes) of fortune=Het Rad van Avontuuren

Topics: fate/destiny, uncertainty

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
Full well hath Clifford play’d the orator,
Inferring arguments of mighty force.
But, Clifford, tell me, didst thou never hear
That things ill-got had ever bad success?
And happy always was it for that son
Whose father for his hoarding went to hell? I
‘ll leave my son my virtuous deeds behind;
And would my father had left me no more!
For all the rest is held at such a rate
As brings a thousand-fold more care to keep
Than in possession and jot of pleasure.
Ah, cousin York!
Would thy best friends did know
How it doth grieve me that thy head is here!

DUTCH:
Schoon toonde ClifTord daar zijn redekunst
En voerde gronden aan van groot gewicht.

MORE:

Proverb: Evil-gotten (ill-gotten) goods never prove well (prosper, endure)
Proverb: Happy is the child whose father goes to the devil

Full well=Very well
Inferring=Adducing
Success=Result
Happy=Fortunate
Rate=Price

Compleat:
Jot=Zier
To hord up=Opstapelen, vergaaren, byeenschraapen

Burgersdijk notes:
II.2.48. Wiens vader om zijn schrapen voer ter helle. Het spreekwoord, waarop hier gezinspeeld wordt, luidt : Happy the child, whose father went to the devil; „Gelukkig het kind, welks vader door den duivel is gehaald!” Als een vader, die op zondige wijze rijk geworden is, sterft, erft de zoon wel het goed, maar heeft voor de zonden niet meer te boeten. Koning Hendrik betwijfelt blijkbaar de juistheid van het spreekwoord.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, corruption, fate/destiny

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Sir Stephen Scroop
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
t Verheugt mij, dat mijn vorst gewapend is,
Om tijdingen van onheil te vernemen.

MORE:

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: preparation, strength, fate/destiny, failure, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Joan la Pucelle
CONTEXT:
Assign’d am I to be the English scourge.
This night the siege assuredly I’ll raise:
Expect Saint Martin’s summer, halcyon days,
Since I have entered into these wars.
Glory is like a circle in the water,
Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself
Till by broad spreading it disperse to nought.
With Henry’s death the English circle ends;
Dispersed are the glories it included.
Now am I like that proud insulting ship
Which Caesar and his fortune bare at once.

DUTCH:
Ik ben tot Englands geese! uitverkoren.
Nog deze nacht ontzet ik wis de stad;
Verwacht, nu ik den strijd aanvaard, een schoonen
Sint Maartenszomer, Halcyonendagen.

MORE:
Saint Martin’s summer=Equivalent of an ‘Indian summer’
Halcyon days=Unseasonable calm (so called because when it was calm in winter the kingfisher could build its nest)
Halcyon=Kingfisher
“Pround insulting ship” is a ref. to Plutarch, who wrote that Caesar told the captain of his ship no harm would befall him because he was carrying Caesar and therefore had Caesar’s ‘fortune’
Insulting=Triumphant

Compleat:
Halcyon (a sea-owl)=Een zekere Zee-vogel
Halcyon days=Een tijd van vrede en rust

Burgersdijk notes:
Sint Maartenszomer, Halcyonendagen. Halcyonendagen waren bij de ouden schoone, stormlooze dagen. Het schoone weder, op een storm volgend, wordt hier met een schoonen zomerschen dag in November, op Sint Maarten, vergeleken.

Ik ben nu als dat fiere schip, dat eens Tegader Caesar droeg en zijn geluk. Het verhaal, dat Caesar eens zijn bezorgden schipper toeriep: „Wees goedsmoeds, knaap, want gij hebt Cesar en zijn geluk aan boord”, vond Shakespeare in de vertaling van Plutarchus door North, een werk, dat zeker vlijtig door hem beoefend werd en dat hem aanleiding gaf tot de meeste geleerde toespelingen, waaraan dit stuk rijk is.

Topics: fate/destiny, achievement, hope/optimism, nature

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
MIRANDA
I should sin
To think but nobly of my grandmother;
Good wombs have borne bad sons.
PROSPERO
Now the condition.
This King of Naples, being an enemy
To me inveterate, hearkens my brother’s suit,
Which was that he, in lieu o’th’ premises
Of homage, and I know not how much tribute,
Should presently extirpate me and mine
Out of the dukedom and confer fair Milan,
With all the honours, on my brother. Whereon –
A treacherous army levied – one midnight
Fated to th’ purpose did Antonio open
The gates of Milan and i’th’ dead of darkness
The ministers for th’ purpose hurried thence
Me and thy crying self.

DUTCH:
t Waar’ zonde, zoo ik
Zelfs in gedachte een blaam wierp op uw moeder;
Reeds menig eed’le schoot droeg slechte zoons.

MORE:
In lieu o’th’ premises=In exchange for the stipulations (of the agreement with the King of Naples)
Schmidt:
Homage=Fealty and service professed to a superior lord
Tribute=Stated payment made in acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace, or by virtue of a treaty
Extirpate=To root out, to remove completely
Fated=Destined by fate
Ministers=Agents (assigned to the task)
Compleat:
Homage=Hulde, hulding, manschap, onderdaanigheid
Tribute=Cynsgeld, schatting; Tol, impost
He was the principal minister (or instrument) of his revenge=Hy was het voornaamste werktuig van zyne wraak
Fated=Door’t noodlot beschooren

Topics: contract, promise, fate/destiny, good and bad, envy, honour, revenge

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Amiens
CONTEXT:
I would not change it. Happy is your Grace,
That can translate the stubbornness of fortune
Into so quiet and so sweet a style.

DUTCH:
t Is u een groote zegen,
Mijn vorst, in ‘t harde vonnis van Fortuin
Een zin, zoo zacht en zoet, te kunnen lezen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Happy=Fortunate, lucky
Stubbornness=Roughness, harshness
Compleat:
Stubbornness=Hardnekkigheid, hansterrigheid

Topics: fate/destiny, adversity

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
For what, lieutenant? For well using me?
Nay, be thou sure I’ll well requite thy kindness,
For that it made my imprisonment a pleasure;
Ay, such a pleasure as incaged birds
Conceive when after many moody thoughts
At last by notes of household harmony
They quite forget their loss of liberty.
But, Warwick, after God, thou set’st me free,
And chiefly therefore I thank God and thee;
He was the author, thou the instrument.
Therefore, that I may conquer fortune’s spite
By living low, where fortune cannot hurt me,
And that the people of this blessed land
May not be punish’d with my thwarting stars,
Warwick, although my head still wear the crown,
I here resign my government to thee,
For thou art fortunate in all thy deeds.

DUTCH:
Hij was hiervan de ontwerper, gij het werktuig

MORE:

Using=Treating
Requite=Repay
Moody=Melancholy
Thwarting=Perverse, obstructive
Fortunate=Favoured by fortune

Compleat:
To use (or treat) one well or ill=Iemand wel of kwaalyk behandelen
To requite=Vergelden
To requite a man in his own way=Iemand met gelyke munt betaalen
To requite a kindness=Een vriendschap vergelden
To thwart=Dwarsdryven, draaiboomen, dwars voor de boeg komen, beletten

Topics: fate/destiny, mercy

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Methinks I am a prophet new inspired
And thus expiring do foretell of him:
His rash fierce blaze of riot cannot last,
For violent fires soon burn out themselves;
Small showers last long, but sudden storms are short;
He tires betimes that spurs too fast betimes;
With eager feeding food doth choke the feeder:
Light vanity, insatiate cormorant,
Consuming means, soon preys upon itself.

DUTCH:
Zijn dol en wulpsch geflakker kan niet duren,
Want ieder heftig vuur brandt schielijk uit

MORE:

Proverb: Nothing violent can be permanent
Proverb: Untimeous [untimely] spurring spoils the steed

Expiring=(a) Dying; (b) Expiration
Riot=Dissolute behaviour
Betimes=Early, at an early hour

Compleat:
Expiration=Eindiging, uitgang, verloop, uitblaazing van den laatsten adem
To expire=Den geest geeven, sterven
To riot=Optrekken, rinkinken, pypestellen
Betimes=Bytyds,vroeg

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, fate/destiny, haste

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
BENVOLIO
Romeo, away, be gone!
The citizens are up, and Tybalt slain.
Stand not amazed. The Prince will doom thee death
If thou art taken. Hence, be gone, away!
ROMEO
Oh, I am fortune’s fool!

DUTCH:
k Ben speelbal der Fortuin!

MORE:
Prince=Prince of Cats = figure from Reynard the Fox, also called Tybalt

Topics: fate/destiny, punishment

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: First Citizen
CONTEXT:
We are accounted poor citizens, the patricians good.
What authority surfeits on would relieve us: if they
would yield us but the superfluity, while it were
wholesome, we might guess they relieved us humanely;
but they think we are too dear: the leanness that
afflicts us, the object of our misery, is as an
inventory to particularise their abundance; our
sufferance is a gain to them. Let us revenge this with
our pikes, ere we become rakes: for the gods know I
speak this in hunger for bread, not in thirst for revenge.

DUTCH:
Laat ons dit wreken met onze pieken, eer wij dun als harken worden! Want de goden weten het, ik zeg dit uit honger
naar brood, niet uit dorst naar wraak.

MORE:
Proverb: As lean as a rake

The patricians good=Good (mercantile), meaning wealthy, well monied

Schmidt:
Guess=Think, suppose
Object=Spectacle, sight
Accounted=Thought of as
To particularise=Specify
Sufferance=Suffering, misery
Rake=A lean person (as thin as a rake)

Compleat:
As lean as a rake=Zo mager als een hout
Abundance=Overvloed

Burgersdijk notes:
De patriciërs als goede. Omdat zij arm zijn, worden de plebejers niet voor vol geteld, niet „goed” gerekend. Vergelijk: Koopman v. Venetië”, 1. 3. 16.

Topics: poverty and wealth, order/society, fate/destiny

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
To me you speak not.
If you can look into the seeds of time
And say which grain will grow and which will not,
Speak, then, to me, who neither beg nor fear
Your favors nor your hate.

DUTCH:
Als je in de zaden van de tijd kunt kijken, en zeg welk graan zal groeien en welke niet. /
Kunt gij der tijden zaad doorschouwen, spellen,
Wat korrel kiemen zal, wat korrel niet

MORE:
Seeds of time is thought to have been coined by Shakespeare; still in use, it has been adopted by many as a title including John Wyndham.

Topics: fate/destiny, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
HORATIO
If your mind dislike anything, obey it. I will forestall their repair hither and say you are not fit.
HAMLET
Not a whit. We defy augury. There’s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come. If it be not to come, it will be now. If it be not now, yet it will come—the readiness is all. Since no man of aught he leaves knows, what is ’t to leave betimes? Let be.

DUTCH:
Als uw innerlijk zich ergens tegen verzet, gehoorzaam het dan. /
Als uw gemoed met jets geen vrede heeft, geef er gehoor
aan. /
Als uw gemoed van iets afkeerig mocht zijn, luister er naar.

MORE:
Not a whit: not at all
Schmidt:
Forestall=Anticipate, to be beforehand with, to prevent
Repair hither=arrival
Augury=Art of prophesying
Compleat:
Forestall=Voor-inneemen, onderscheppen, verrassen, voor-opkoopen
Augury=Wichlery, vogelwaarzeggery

Topics: fate/destiny, free will, plans/intentions, preparation

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Let us sit and mock the good housewife Fortune from her wheel, that her gifts may henceforth be bestowed equally.
ROSALIND
I would we could do so, for her benefits are mightily misplaced, and the bountiful blind woman doth most mistake in her gifts to women.

DUTCH:
Laat ons gaan zitten, en die nijvere huisvrouw met
dat wiel, Fortuin, door spot er van af jagen, opdat
voortaan haar gaven wat onpartijdiger worden uitgedeeld

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wheel: Attribute of Fortune, as the emblem of mutability

Burgersdijk notes:
Die nijvere huisvrouw. Alsof het rad of wiel van Fortuin een spinnewiel was. Zie ook „Antonius en
Cleopatra”, IV, 15.

Topics: fate/destiny, life, status, poverty and wealth

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
Mijn oor is open, voorbereid mijn hart;
Wereldsch verlies is ‘t ergst, wat gij kunt melden.

MORE:

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: preparation, strength, fate/destiny, failure, conflict

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Trinculo
CONTEXT:
TRINCULO
(…) Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian. Legged like a man and his fins like arms! Warm, o’ my troth. I do now let loose my opinion, hold it no longer: this is no fish, but an islander that hath lately suffered by a thunderbolt.
Alas, the storm is come again! My best way is to creep under his gaberdine. There is no other shelter hereabouts. Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows. I will here shroud till the dregs of the storm be past.

DUTCH:
Ellende laat een man kennis maken met vreemde kameraden./
De nood brengt een mensch al bij vreemde slaapkameraden.

MORE:
Proverb:Misery makes strange bedfellows
Gaberdine=Cloak
Doit=A former Dutch coin, equivalent to half a farthing
Compleat:
Doit=Een duit (achtste deel van een stuiver)
He is not worth a doit or doitkin=Het is geen duit waard
Fellow ( or companion)=Medgezel
A bed-fellow=Een byslaap, bedgenoot

Topics: fate/destiny, relationship, proverbs and idioms, still in use, adversity

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
He calls us back. My pride fell with my fortunes.
I’ll ask him what he would.—Did you call, sir?
Sir, you have wrestled well and overthrown
More than your enemies.

DUTCH:
Hij roept ons; met mijn rang ontvlood mijn trots. ‘k Vraag, wat hij wenscht. — Hebt gij geroepen, heer? Schoon was uw worst’ling en gij overwon’t. Niet vijanden alleen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Pride=Self-esteem, mostly in a bad sense, haughtiness, arrogance
Compleat:
Hovaardy, grootsheid, hoogmoed, trotsheid, verwaandheid.

Topics: fate/destiny, life

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
O fortune, fortune! All men call thee fickle.
If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him
That is renowned for faith? Be fickle, fortune,
For then, I hope, thou wilt not keep him long,
But send him back.

DUTCH:
Fortuin, fortuin! een ieder noemt u wuft!
En zijt gij wuft, wat doet ge dan met hem,
Die zich getrouw betoont? Wees wuft, Fortuin

MORE:
Compleat:
Fickle=Wispeltuurig, veranderlyk, wuft, ongestadig

Topics: fate/destiny, loyalty

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Player King
CONTEXT:
Our wills and fates do so contrary run
That our devices still are overthrown.
Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own.
So think thou wilt no second husband wed,
But die thy thoughts when thy first lord is dead.

DUTCH:
Ons willen is zoo strijdig met ons lot /
Ons lot en willen zoo contrarie gaan

MORE:
Schmidt:
Devices=contrivance, conceit, stratagem
Compleat:
Device (contrivance or invention)=Uitvinding, vinding
Device (cunning trick)=Een listige streek

Topics: fate/destiny, plans/intentions

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: First Player
CONTEXT:
Out, out, thou strumpet Fortune! All you gods
In general synod take away her power,
Break all the spokes and fellies from her wheel,
And bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven,
As low as to the fiends!

DUTCH:
Weg, weg, gij slet Fortuna! /
Weg, lichtekooi, Fortuin!

MORE:
Fortune (i.e., chance, luck) was often called a strumpet, because of the indiscriminae granting of her favours, regardless of worth.
Schmidt:
Strumpet=prostitute
Fortune=the power supposed to distribute the lots of life according to her humour
Compleat:
Fortune (a heathen-ish goddess)=’t Fortuin

Topics: fate/destiny, plans/intentions

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Captain
CONTEXT:
CAPTAIN
’Tis thought the king is dead; we will not stay.
The bay-trees in our country are all wither’d
And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
The pale-faced moon looks bloody on the earth
And lean-look’d prophets whisper fearful change;
Rich men look sad and ruffians dance and leap,
The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
The other to enjoy by rage and war:
These signs forerun the death or fall of kings.
Farewell: our countrymen are gone and fled,
As well assured Richard their king is dead.
EARL OF SALISBURY
Ah, Richard, with the eyes of heavy mind
I see thy glory like a shooting star
Fall to the base earth from the firmament.
Thy sun sets weeping in the lowly west,
Witnessing storms to come, woe and unrest:
Thy friends are fled to wait upon thy foes,
And crossly to thy good all fortune goes.

DUTCH:
De rijken zijn bedrukt en schelmen dansen; —
Die duchten het verlies van geld en goed,
En dezen hopen op geweld en oorlog;

MORE:

Lean-looked=Thin-faced
Meteor=A bright phenomenon, thought to be portentous, harbinger of doom
Fixed stars=Symbol of permanence
Forerun=Precede
Assured=Convinced, persuaded
Witness=Portend
Wait upon=Serve
Crossly=Adversely

Compleat:
To assure=Verzekeren
Portend=Voorduiden, voorzeggen

Topics: ruin, nature, conflict, fate/destiny

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more.
By Sinel’s death I know I am thane of Glamis.
But how of Cawdor? The thane of Cawdor lives,
A prosperous gentleman, and to be king
Stands not within the prospect of belief,
No more than to be Cawdor. Say from whence
You owe this strange intelligence, or why
Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
With such prophetic greeting. Speak, I charge you.

DUTCH:
Spreekt, hoe gewerd u
Die wond’re wetenschap? En waarom treedt gij
Op deze barre heide ons in den weg
Met zulk een zienersgroet? Spreekt, ik bezweer u!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Intelligence=Notice, information, news
Compleat:
Intelligence=Kundschap, verstandhouding
To give intelligence=Kundschap geeven, overbrieven

Topics: fate/destiny, evidence, justification, suspicion

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Witches
CONTEXT:
Show his eyes and grieve his heart.
Come like shadows; so depart!

DUTCH:
Wenscht zijn hart zich leed, verschijnt!
Komt als schimmen, en verdwijnt!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Grieve his heart=make him sorry

Topics: fate/destiny, disappointment, truth, regret

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Sir, in my heart there was a kind of fighting
That would not let me sleep. Methought I lay
Worse than the mutines in the bilboes. Rashly—
And praised be rashness for it: let us know
Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well
When our deep plots do pall, and that should teach us.
There’s a divinity that shapes our ends,
Rough-hew them how we will,

DUTCH:
Mijnheer, er was in mij een soort van strijd, Die mij niet slapen liet /
Er was een soort van tweestrijd in mijn ziel, Die ‘s nachts mij wakker hield /
Er woedde in mijn hart een soort van strijd, die mij geen slaap liet /
Daar een godheid is die vormt ons doelen, ‘t Ruw-weg door ons gehouwene.

MORE:
Onions:
Bilboes=shackles used for mutinous sailors and to confine prisoners at sea. This punishment was described by Steevens: “The bilboes is a bar of iron with fetters annexed to it, by which mutinous or disorderly sailors were anciently linked together. The word is derived from Bilboa, a place in Spain where instruments of steel were fabricated in the utmost perfection. To understand Shakespeare’s allusion completely, it should be known that, as these fetters connect the legs of the offenders very close together, their attempts to rest must be as fruitless as those of Hamlet, in his mind there was a ‘kind of fighting that would not let him sleep’.
CITED IN HOUSE OF LORDS: The Hon. W. C. Yelverton, Major in H.M. Royal Artillery v. Maria Theresa Longworth, or Yelverton [1864] UKHL 4_Macqueen_745 (3 June 1864)

Topics: fate/destiny, plans/intentions

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Methinks I am a prophet new inspired
And thus expiring do foretell of him:
His rash fierce blaze of riot cannot last,
For violent fires soon burn out themselves;
Small showers last long, but sudden storms are short;
He tires betimes that spurs too fast betimes;
With eager feeding food doth choke the feeder:
Light vanity, insatiate cormorant,
Consuming means, soon preys upon itself.

DUTCH:
Kort duurt een stortbui, zachte regens lang;
Wie vroeg te haastig spoort, is weldra moe;
Wie al te gulzig eet, hij stikt in ‘t eten;
Dwaze ijdelheid, die onverzaadbre gier,
Verslindt haar buit en aast dán op zich zelf.

MORE:

Proverb: Nothing violent can be permanent
Proverb: Untimeous [untimely] spurring spoils the steed

Expiring=(a) Dying; (b) Expiration
Riot=Dissolute behaviour
Betimes=Early, at an early hour

Compleat:
Expiration=Eindiging, uitgang, verloop, uitblaazing van den laatsten adem
To expire=Den geest geeven, sterven
To riot=Optrekken, rinkinken, pypestellen
Betimes=Bytyds,vroeg

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, fate/destiny, haste

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
Peradventure this is not Fortune’s work neither, but Nature’s, who perceiveth our natural wits too dull to reason of such goddesses, and hath sent this natural for our whetstone, for always the dullness of the fool is the whetstone of the wits. How now, wit, whither wander you?

DUTCH:
Wie weet, misschien is ook dit niet het werk van Fortuin, maar van Natuur, die, bespeurende dat onze natuurlijke geest te bot is om over zulke godinnen te redeneeren, ons dezen botterik voor slijpsteen gezonden heeft; want steeds is de botheid van den nar de wetsteen der wijzen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Peradventure=perhaps
Compleat:
To whet a knife=een Mes wetten (of slypen)
Whet-stone=een Wetsteen, Slypsteen
Whetted=Gewet, gesleepen, scherp gemaakt.

Topics: fate/destiny, intellect, nature

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Abergavenny
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
Surely, sir,
There’s in him stuff that puts him to these ends;
For, being not propp’d by ancestry, whose grace
Chalks successors their way, nor call’d upon
For high feats done to the crown; neither allied
For eminent assistants; but, spider-like,
Out of his self-drawing web, he gives us note,
The force of his own merit makes his way
A gift that heaven gives for him, which buys
A place next to the king.
ABERGAVENNY
I cannot tell
What heaven hath given him,—let some graver eye
Pierce into that; but I can see his pride
Peep through each part of him: whence has he that,
If not from hell? the devil is a niggard,
Or has given all before, and he begins
A new hell in himself.

DUTCH:
Want, niet gestut op voorgeslacht, welks glans
Den weg voor ‘t nakroost teekent, niet geroepen
Om grootsche daden, voor de kroon volbracht,
Aan hooge helpers niet verwant, maar als
De spin in ‘t web, door haar geweven, toont
Hij ons, dat hem de kracht van zijn verdienste
Zijn weg baant

MORE:
Stuff=Characteristics, substance
Propped=Propped up, lean on
Grace=Rank, distinction
Chalk=Marks (the path of)
Compleat:
Stuff=Stof, stoffe
Prop=Een stut, steun. To prop=Ondersteunen, stutten
Grace=Gunst, bevalligheid
To chalk=Bekryten, met kryt schetsen. To chalk out=Uytmerken, afteykenen

Burgersdijk notes:
Toont hij ons. In het Engelsch: he gives us note, zooals in de meeste uitgaven, volgens de verbetering van Capell gelezen wordt; de folio heeft hiervoor den tusschenzin: O give us note, als het ware „mark what I say”, welke door Knight voor de juiste lezing gehouden wordt.

Topics: fate/destiny, order/society, wisdom, merit, pride

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept:
Those many had not dared to do that evil,
If the first that did the edict infringe
Had answer’d for his deed: now ’tis awake
Takes note of what is done; and, like a prophet,
Looks in a glass, that shows what future evils,
Either new, or by remissness new-conceived,
And so in progress to be hatch’d and born,
Are now to have no successive degrees,
But, ere they live, to end.

DUTCH:
De wet was geenszins dood, hoezeer zij sliep.
Die velen hadden ‘t kwaad niet durven doen,
Zoo daad’lijk de eerste, die de wet verbrak,
Geboet had voor zijn doen;

MORE:
CITED Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton):
“Dormiunt aliquando leges moriuntur nunquam/The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.”
CITED US LAW:
Labatv. Bennett, 365 F.2d 698,701 (5th Cir. 1966);
U.S. v. Elliott, 266 F.Supp. 318 (S.D.N.Y. 1967);
Waldron v. British Petroleum Co., Ltd., 231 F.Supp. 72 (S.D.N.Y. 1964).

Topics: cited in law, law/legal, fate/destiny

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Claudio
CONTEXT:
DUKE VINCENTIO
So then you hope of pardon from Lord Angelo?
CLAUDIO
The miserable have no other medicine
But only hope:
I’ve hope to live, and am prepared to die.

DUTCH:
Rampzaal’gen blijft geen andere artsenij
Dan hoop alleen;
Ik hoop te leven, schoon ter dood bereid.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Miserable=Unhappy, wretched
Compleat:
Miserable=Ellendig, deerlyk, jammerlyk, rampzalig
A miserable wretch=Een arm elendig schepzel

Topics: poverty and wealth, order/society, status, fate/destiny

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Dromio of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
The plainer dealer, the sooner lost. Yet he loseth it in a kind of jollity.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
For what reason?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
For two, and sound ones too.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Nay, not sound, I pray you.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Sure ones, then.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Nay, not sure, in a thing falsing.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Certain ones, then.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Name them.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
The one, to save the money that he spends in tiring; the other, that at dinner they should not drop in his porridge.

DUTCH:
Hoe onnoozeler iemand is, des te eer zorgt hij het
kwijt te raken; maar hij verliest het met een soort van
genot.

MORE:
Proverb: The properer (honester) man the worse luck

Ref also to plain dealing and double dealing
Falsing=Deceptive
Tiring=Hairdressing
Sound=Both ‘valid’ and ‘healthy’

Compleat:
Plain dealing=Oprechte handeling
To tire=Optoooijen, de kap zetten
Sound (healthful)=Gezond
Sound (whole)=Gaaf
Sound (judicious)=Verstandig, schrander, gegrond

Topics: honesty, gullibility, satisfaction, fate/destiny, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
HORATIO
If your mind dislike anything, obey it. I will forestall their repair hither and say you are not fit.
HAMLET
Not a whit. We defy augury. There’s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come. If it be not to come, it will be now. If it be not now, yet it will come—the readiness is all. Since no man of aught he leaves knows, what is ’t to leave betimes? Let be.

DUTCH:
Als uw innerlijk zich ergens tegen verzet, gehoorzaam het dan. /
Als uw gemoed met jets geen vrede heeft, geef er gehoor
aan. /
Als uw gemoed van iets afkeerig mocht zijn, luister er naar.

MORE:
Not a whit: not at all
Schmidt:
Forestall=Anticipate, to be beforehand with, to prevent
Repair hither=arrival
Augury=Art of prophesying
Compleat:
Forestall=Voor-inneemen, onderscheppen, verrassen, voor-opkoopen
Augury=Wichlery, vogelwaarzeggery

Topics: fate/destiny, free will

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Rest, rest, perturbèd spirit!—So, gentlemen,
With all my love I do commend me to you,
And what so poor a man as Hamlet is
May do, to express his love and friending to you,
God willing, shall not lack. Let us go in together,
And still your fingers on your lips, I pray.
The time is out of joint. O cursèd spite,
That ever I was born to set it right!
Nay, come, let’s go together

DUTCH:
De tijd is ziek. Vervloekt, moet ik het wezen,
Wiens taak het is dien zieke te genezen!

MORE:
Time is out of joint=Things are not as they should be
De tijd is uit zyn voegen (Burgersdijk: De tijd sprong uit den band)

Schmidt:
Time=The present state of things; circumstances

Compleat:
Times (with relation to the state of things , manners or government)=Tyden
If the times turn=Als de tijden veranderen

Topics: fate/destiny, time

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Not a whit. We defy augury. There’s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come. If it be not to come, it will be now. If it be not now, yet it will come—the readiness is all. Since no man of aught he leaves knows, what is ’t to leave betimes? Let be.

DUTCH:
Geen mus valt ter aarde, of het is voorbeschikt. /
Er is een bizondere voorzienigheid in den val van een musch /
Wij tarten voorgevoelens; daar bestaat eene bizondere voorzienigheid voor een musch die valt.

MORE:
The sparrow here is an allusion to book of Matthew
Commentators quote Matthew’s Gospel: “Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? And one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.”

Topics: fate/destiny, nature, plans/intentions

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Ross
CONTEXT:
I pray you school yourself. But for your husband,
He is noble, wise, judicious, and best knows
The fits o’ th’ season. I dare not speak much further;But cruel are the times when we are traitors
And do not know ourselves; when we hold rumor
From what we fear, yet know not what we fear,
But float upon a wild and violent sea
Each way and none. I take my leave of you.
Shall not be long but I’ll be here again.
Things at the worst will cease, or else climb upward
To what they were before.

DUTCH:
Wat in den afgrond zonk, is weg, of stijgt,
En drijft, als ‘t vroeger deed.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb, “When things are at the worst they will mend” (1582).
Onions:
Fits of the season=paroxysms, formerly regarded as a periodic disease; applied to critical times – “The violent fits o’ the time” (Cor, 3.2); “The fits o’ the season” (Macbeth, 4.2)
Schmidt:
School=To set to rights, to reprimand
Fits of the season= Any irregular and violent affection of the mind
Compleat:
To school=Bedillen, berispen
A Fit=Een vlaag, bui, overval, stoot
A Mad fits, a fit of madness=Een vlaag van dolheid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, fate/destiny,

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
How now, my lord! Why do you keep alone,
Of sorriest fancies your companions making,
Using those thoughts which should indeed have died
With them they think on? Things without all remedy
Should be without regard. What’s done is done.

DUTCH:
Aan wien zij denken? Naar het onherstelb’re
Niet omgezien! ‘t Gedane blijft gedaan

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb “Things done cannot be undone” (c1460). Earlier version, “What is done may not be undone” (1300). perhaps also the proverb “Past cure, past care” (1567)

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, fate/destiny,

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Edmund
CONTEXT:
This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains on necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical pre-dominance; drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforc’d obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine thrusting on. An admirable evasion of whore-master man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!

DUTCH:

Dit is wel de uitstekende dwaasheid der wereld

MORE:
Schmidt:
Foppery= Foolishness
Sick in fortune=Down on our luck
Heavenly compulsion=Astrological influence
Divine thrusting on= Supernatural force
Compleat:
Foppery=Zotte kuuren, grillen, snaakerij.
‘T is a mere foppery=Het is loutere dwaasheid

Topics: life, nature, fate/destiny

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Kind gentlemen, let’s go see poor Cassio dressed.—
Come, mistress, you must tell ’s another tale.—
Emilia, run you to the citadel
And tell my lord and lady what hath happed.—
Will you go on afore? Aside. This is the night
That either makes me or fordoes me quite.

DUTCH:
Dra blijkt, of deze nacht
Mij hoog verhief of diepen val mij bracht.

MORE:

Proverb: To make one tell another tale

Dressed=wounds dressed
Fordoes=Ruins

Topics: fate/destiny, risk, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
YORK
No, not to lose it all, as thou hast done:
I rather would have lost my life betimes
Than bring a burthen of dishonour home
By staying there so long till all were lost.
Show me one scar character’d on thy skin:
Men’s flesh preserved so whole do seldom win.
QUEEN MARGARET
Nay, then, this spark will prove a raging fire,
If wind and fuel be brought to feed it with:
No more, good York; sweet Somerset, be still:
Thy fortune, York, hadst thou been regent there,
Might happily have proved far worse than his.

DUTCH:
Stil, stil, die vonk sloeg wis in vlammen uit,
Zoo wind en brandstof nu het vuur kwam voeden

MORE:

Betimes=Early, at an early hour
Burthen=Burden
Charactered=Written, inscribed, marked

Compleat:
Betimes=Bytyds, vroeg
Burden=Last, pak, vracht
Character=Een merk, merkteken, letter, afbeeldsel, uitdruksel, print, stempel, uitgedruktbeeld, uitbeelding

Topics: fate/destiny, consequence, conflict

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Nym
CONTEXT:
NYM
Faith, I will live so long as I may, that’s the certain of it. And when I cannot live any longer, I will do as I may. That is my rest; that is the rendezvous of it.
BARDOLPH
It is certain, corporal, that he is married to Nell Quickly, and certainly she did you wrong, for you were troth-plight to her.
NYM
I cannot tell. Things must be as they may. Men may sleep, and they may have their throats about them at that time, and some say knives have edges. It must be as it may. Though patience be a tired mare, yet she will plod. There must be conclusions. Well, I cannot tell.

DUTCH:
Het moet gaan, zooals het wil; al is
geduld een afgejakkerde knol, voortploeteren doet het
toch.

MORE:

Rendezvous=Refuge, retreat
Troth-plight=Betrothed
Patience be a tired mare=Patience is wearing thin

Compleat:
Troth=Trouw
In troth=Ter goeder trouw

Topics: fate/destiny, patience, trust

PLAY: As you like it
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
Thus must I from the smoke into the smother,
From tyrant duke unto a tyrant brother

DUTCH:
Thans voort, uit smook naar ‘t hol, waar smoring wacht,
Uit vorstendwang in ‘s boozen broeders macht!

MORE:
Smother=suffocating smoke. (From the frying pan into the fire.)
See:
Shunning the smoke, he fell into the fire (Tilley 570)
Fumum fugiens, in ignem incidi
Fleeing from the smoke I fell into the fire

Topics: fate/destiny, relationship

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Many years of happy days befall
My gracious sovereign, my most loving liege!
THOMAS MOWBRAY
Each day still better other’s happiness;
Until the heavens, envying earth’s good hap,
Add an immortal title to your crown!
KING RICHARD II
We thank you both: yet one but flatters us,
As well appeareth by the cause you come;
Namely to appeal each other of high treason.
Cousin of Hereford, what dost thou object
Against the Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Mowbray?

DUTCH:
Hebt beiden dank; doch een is slechts een vleier;
De reden van uw hierzijn spreekt dit uit:
Gij legt elkander hoogverraad te last.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Liege=Term used to express allegiance to the king
Hap=Fortune
Appeal=Accuse

Compleat:
A liege Lord=Een Opperheer, die onder niemand staat

Topics: fate/destiny, law/legal, blame, dispute

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Launcelot
CONTEXT:
LAUNCELOT
The old proverb is very well parted between my master
Shylock and you, sir—you have “the grace of God,” sir,
and he hath “enough.”
BASSANIO
Thou speak’st it well.—Go, father, with thy son.—
Take leave of thy old master and inquire
My lodging out.—
Give him a livery
More guarded than his fellows’. See it done.
LAUNCELOT
Father, in. I cannot get a service, no. I have ne’er a
tongue in my head.
Well, if any man in Italy have a fairer table which doth offer to swear upon a book, I shall have good fortune. Go to, here’s a simple line of life. Here’s a small trifle of wives. Alas, fifteen wives is nothing! Eleven widows and nine maids is a simple coming-in for one man. And then to ’scape
drowning thrice and to be in peril of my life with the
edge of a feather-bed—here are simple ’scapes. Well, if
Fortune be a woman, she’s a good wench for this
gear.—Father, come. I’ll take my leave of the Jew in the
twinkling.

DUTCH:
Ik moet zeggen, als Fortuin een vrouw is, dan
is zij in dat opzicht een goeie meid. — Kom, vader; ik
zal in een ommezientjen klaar wezen met dat afscheidnemen
van den jood.

MORE:
Guarded=Edged with braid
Table=Hand palm
Simple=Ordinary
Coming-in=Income
This gear=This matter
Compleat:
Geer or gear=Optooisel, stof
To be in his geers=Gereed staan, vaerdig zyn

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
What fates impose, that men must needs abide;
It boots not to resist both wind and tide.

DUTCH:
De mensch verduur’ zijn noodlot, goed of kwaad;
En wind èn tij te trotsen, geeft geen baat.

MORE:

Must needs=Needs must
Boots not=No point, profit, advantage

Compleat:
It must needs be so=Het moet noodzaakelyk zo zyn
It is to no boot=Het doet geen nut, ‘t is te vergeefs

Topics: fate/destiny

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
Thy mother was a piece of virtue, and
She said thou wast my daughter; and thy father
Was Duke of Milan, and his only heir
And princess, no worse issued.
MIRANDA
O, the heavens!
What foul play had we that we came from thence?
Or blessed wast we did?
PROSPERO
Both, both, my girl.
By foul play, as thou sayst, were we heaved thence,
But blessedly holp hither.

DUTCH:
0, hemel!
Wat booze treken dreven ons van daar?
Of brachten zij ons zegen?

MORE:
Piece of virtue=Masterpiece, perfect specimen or
Worse issue=Lower (no worse issued = not of lesser birth than a pricess)
Holp=Short for holpen, helped
Compleat:
Holpen=Geholpen
Holp op=Opgeholpen
Ill holp op=In een slegte staat laaten
Issue=Afkomst, afkomeling

Topics: virtue, understanding, status, foul play, fate/destiny

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
GONZALO
I assure you, Carthage.
SEBASTIAN
His word is more than the miraculous harp. He hath raised the wall and houses too.
ANTONIO
What impossible matter will he make easy next?
SEBASTIAN
I think he will carry this island home in his pocket and give it his son for an apple.
ANTONIO
And sowing the kernels of it in the sea, bring forth more islands.
GONZALO
Ay.
ANTONIO
Why, in good time.

DUTCH:
Wat voor een onmogelijkheid zal hij den volgenden
keer uithalen.?

MORE:
Miraculous harp: In Greek mythology, Amphion used a harp to raise the walls of Thebes. Sebastian
suggests that Gonzalo rebuilt all of Carthage by conflating it with Tunis. (Arden)
Compleat:
Miraculous=Wonderbaarlyk
Kernel=Pit, kern, korrel
Burgersdijk notes:
Dan Amphion’s wonderharp. In het oorspronkelijke staat alleen: „dan de wonderharp” of „dan de wonderdoende harp”; de harp, of lier, van Amphion wordt bedoeld, op wier klanken de steenen zich samenvoegden tot den opbouw van Thebe’s muren.

Topics: achievement, ambition, purpose, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
Unreasonable creatures feed their young;
And though man’s face be fearful to their eyes,
Yet, in protection of their tender ones,
Who hath not seen them, even with those wings
Which sometime they have used with fearful flight,
Make war with him that climb’d unto their nest,
Offer their own lives in their young’s defence?
For shame, my liege, make them your precedent!
Were it not pity that this goodly boy
Should lose his birthright by his father’s fault,
And long hereafter say unto his child,
‘What my great-grandfather and grandsire got
My careless father fondly gave away’?
Ah, what a shame were this! Look on the boy;
And let his manly face, which promiseth
Successful fortune, steel thy melting heart
To hold thine own and leave thine own with him.

DUTCH:
Waar’ ‘t niet een jammer, dat die wakk’re knaap
Zijn erfdeel door zijns vaders schuld zou derven,
En tot zijn zoon in later tijd moest zeggen: —
„Wat groot- en oudgrootvader eens verwierven,
Dat gaf mijn zwakke vader zorgloos weg!”

MORE:

Unreasonable=Without the power of reason (unreasonable creatures=animals)
Fearful=(1)Frightening; (2) Terrified
Sometime=On occasion
Fondly=Foolishly
Steel=To harden

Compleat:
To steel (or harden)=Hardmaaken, verharden
Fond=Zot, dwaas, ongerymt

Topics: reason, courage, value, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Edmund
CONTEXT:
What you have charged me with, that have I done,
And more, much more; the time will bring it out.
‘Tis past, and so am I. But what art thou
That hast this fortune on me? If thou’rt noble,
I do forgive thee.
EDGAR
Let’s exchange charity.
I am no less in blood than thou art, Edmond.
If more, the more th’hast wronged me.
My name is Edgar, and thy father’s son.
The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
Make instruments to plague us.
The dark and vicious place where thee he got
Cost him his eyes.

DUTCH:
Al wat gij mij verweet, ik heb ‘t gedaan,
En meer, veel meer; de tijd zal ‘t openbaren;
‘t Is al voorbij, ik ook. Maar wie zijt gij,
Die mij versloegt ? Zijt gij van adel, dan
Vergeef ik u.

MORE:
Schmidt;
Charity=That disposition of heart which inclines men to think favourably of their fellow-men, and to do them good.

Topics: blame, offence, mercy, civility, fate/destiny, status

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
She that is Queen of Tunis; she that dwells
Ten leagues beyond man’s life; she that from Naples
Can have no note, unless the sun were post—
The man i’ th’ moon’s too slow—till newborn chins
Be rough and razorable; she that from whom
We all were sea-swallowed, though some cast again,
And by that destiny to perform an act
Whereof what’s past is prologue, what to come
In yours and my discharge.

DUTCH:
Zij, door wier echt de zee ons allen inzwolg,
Schoon ze enk’len weergaf, die zij daardoor wenkt
Een stuk te doen, waarvan ‘t gebeurde een voorspel,
Wat volgt ons beider rol is.

MORE:
CITED IN EU LAW: SARGSYAN v. AZERBAIJAN – 40167/06 – Grand Chamber Judgment [2015] ECHR 588 (16 June 2015)/(2017) 64 EHRR 4, [2015] ECHR 588, 64 EHRR 4
Cast=Thrown ashore
By that destiny=Thus destined
Discharge=Fulfilment, performance, execution (of an obligation, duty, function) (“what to come… discharge”=What is to come is down to you and me)
Compleat:
To earthen=Begraven, met aarde overdekken
To cast up=Opwerpen, braaken
“Past is prologue” even inspired the title of a Star Trek episode!

Topics: life, still in use, fate/destiny, cited in law

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Suffolk
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL
My Lord of York, try what your fortune is.
The uncivil kerns of Ireland are in arms
And temper clay with blood of Englishmen:
To Ireland will you lead a band of men,
Collected choicely, from each county some,
And try your hap against the Irishmen?
YORK
I will, my lord, so please his majesty.
SUFFOLK
Why, our authority is his consent,
And what we do establish he confirms:
Then, noble York, take thou this task in hand.

DUTCH:
Nu, ons gezag is ook des konings jawoord,
En wat wij hier bepalen vindt hij goed;
Dus, eed’le York, belast u met die taak.

MORE:

Kern=Irish footsoldier
In arms=Armed
Temper=To moisten; to mix
Hap=Luck
Collected choicely=Selected carefully
Confirms=Assents to

Compleat:
Kern=Een ligtgewapend Iersch Soldaat
Hap=Het luk, geval, toeval
Choicely=Keurlyk
To confirm=Bevestigen, bekrachtigen, verzekeeren, versterken

Topics: authority, duty, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Lewis
CONTEXT:
QUEEN MARGARET
From such a cause as fills mine eyes with tears
And stops my tongue, while heart is drown’d in cares.
KING LEWIS XI
Whate’er it be, be thou still like thyself,
And sit thee by our side:
KING LEWIS XI
Yield not thy neck
To fortune’s yoke, but let thy dauntless mind
Still ride in triumph over all mischance.
Be plain, Queen Margaret, and tell thy grief;
It shall be eased, if France can yield relief.

DUTCH:
Buig den nek toch niet
Voor ‘t juk van ‘t noodlot; zegevierend drave
Uw kloeke geest, den nood vertrappend, voort;

MORE:

Cares=Grief, sorrow
Still=Always
Yoke=Emblem of slavery
Dauntless=Fearless
Mischance=Misfortune
Tell=Tell about

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
Yoke=Een juk; (yoke of bondage) Het juk der dienstbaarheid
To stoop onder the yoke=Onder ‘t juk buigen
Dauntless=Onverschrokken, onbevreest
Mischance=Een misval, mislukking, ongeval, ongeluk

Topics: grief, sorrow, fate/destiny

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
You are three men of sin, whom Destiny,
That hath to instrument this lower world
And what is in ’t, the never-surfeited sea
Hath caused to belch up you—and on this island
Where man doth not inhabit, you ’mongst men
Being most unfit to live. I have made you mad,
And even with suchlike valor men hang and drown
Their proper selves.
You fools, I and my fellows
Are ministers of fate. The elements
Of whom your swords are tempered may as well
Wound the loud winds or with bemocked-at stabs
Kill the still-closing waters as diminish
One dowl that’s in my plume. My fellow ministers
Are like invulnerable.

DUTCH:
Gij dwazen! mijne makkers
En ik zijn ‘s noodlots dienaars

MORE:
Surfeit=To feed to excess, to cloy (used only in the partic. –ed: “the never –ed sea,”)
Ministers=Agents, servants
Dowl(e)=Fibre of down in a feather (“diminish one d. that’s in my plume”)
Still-closing=Always coalescing again

Topics: fate/destiny, power, corruption

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Good Monsieur Lavatch, give my Lord Lafeu this
letter: I have ere now, sir, been better known to
you, when I have held familiarity with fresher
clothes; but I am now, sir, muddied in fortune’s
mood, and smell somewhat strong of her strong
displeasure.
CLOWN
Truly, fortune’s displeasure is but sluttish, if it
smell so strongly as thou speakest of: I will
henceforth eat no fish of fortune’s buttering.
Prithee, allow the wind.
PAROLLES
Nay, you need not to stop your nose, sir; I spake
but by a metaphor.
CLOWN
Indeed, sir, if your metaphor stink, I will stop my
nose; or against any man’s metaphor. Prithee, get thee further.
PAROLLES
Pray you, sir, deliver me this paper.
CLOWN
Foh! prithee, stand away: a paper from fortune’s
close-stool to give to a nobleman! Look, here he
comes himself.

DUTCH:
Neen, gij behoeft uw neus niet dicht te houden, heer ;
ik bediende mij daar van beeldspraak .

MORE:
Sluttish=Unclean, nasty
Allow the wind=Stand downwind
Stop=Block, hold your nose
Close-stool=Chamber pot
Compleat:
Sluttish=Sloeriachtig, morsig, kladdig
Close-stool=Kakstoel

Topics: fate/destiny

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