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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Richard II ACT/SCENE: 2.1 SPEAKER: John of Gaunt CONTEXT: Now He that made me knows I see thee ill;
Ill in myself to see, and in thee seeing ill.
Thy death-bed is no lesser than thy land
Wherein thou liest in reputation sick;
And thou, too careless patient as thou art,
Commit’st thy anointed body to the cure
Of those physicians that first wounded thee:
A thousand flatterers sit within thy crown,
Whose compass is no bigger than thy head;
And yet, incaged in so small a verge,
The waste is no whit lesser than thy land.
O, had thy grandsire with a prophet’s eye
Seen how his son’s son should destroy his sons,
From forth thy reach he would have laid thy shame,
Deposing thee before thou wert possess’d,
Which art possess’d now to depose thyself. DUTCH: Een duizend vleiers zitten in uw kroon,
Haar omtrek is niet grooter dan uw hoofd,
En toch, gesperd in zulk een enge ruimte,
Verbrassen zij niet minder dan uw land.
MORE:
Proverb: Better in health than in good conditions

Punning on ‘Ill’=Sick (a); wrongly, blamefully (b)
Lesser=Less
Physicians=The flatterers, who harm with their flattery rather than heal
Grandsire=Edward III
Deposing=Removing from the throne
Possessed=In possession of; posssessed by (an evil spirit)
Whit=Point, jot (used negatively)(not in the least, not at all) Topics: proverbs and idioms, wellbeing, flattery

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
I prithee now, my son,
Go to them, with this bonnet in thy hand;
And thus far having stretch’d it—here be with them—
Thy knee bussing the stones—for in such business
Action is eloquence, and the eyes of the ignorant
More learned than the ears—waving thy head,
Which often, thus, correcting thy stout heart,
Now humble as the ripest mulberry
That will not hold the handling: or say to them,
Thou art their soldier, and being bred in broils
Hast not the soft way which, thou dost confess,
Were fit for thee to use as they to claim,
In asking their good loves, but thou wilt frame
Thyself, forsooth, hereafter theirs, so far
As thou hast power and person.

DUTCH:
Want gebaren
Zijn reed’naars bij onnooz’len, daar hun oog
Min stomp is dan hun oor

MORE:
Schmidt:
Bonnet=Take off a bonnet (sign of respect, courtesy)
To buss=To kiss
Broil=War, combat, battle
Hold=Bear, stand up to

Compleat:
To buss=Zoenen, kussen
Broil=Oproer, beroerte, gewoel

Topics: language, appearance, flattery, manipulation, promise

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage, blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drenched our steeples, drowned the cocks!
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers of oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head; and thou all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’th’world,
Crack nature’s moulds, all germens spill at once
That makes ingrateful man.
FOOL
O nuncle, court holy water in a dry house is better than this rain-water out o’door. Good nuncle, in, ask thy daughters
blessing. Here’s a night pities neither wise men nor fools.

DUTCH:
Blaas, winden, scheur uw wangen stuk! Raas! Tier!
U, cataracten en orkaanvloed, spuit
de torens weg en overspoel hun hanen!

MORE:
Court holy water=Flattery at court
Schmidt:
Cocks = weathervanes
Thought-executing fires=Lightning that is more rapid than, or precedes, thought
Burgersdijk notes:
Wijwatersprenging. Het geven van mooie woorden, vleien; dit wordt door den Nar aan den koning als middel aanbevolen, om uit den nood te geraken. In ‘t Engelsch staat court holy-water; de Franschen spreken evenzoo van ‘eau bénite du cour’.

Topics: nature, poverty and wealth, order/society, flattery

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
The woman’s part in me—for there’s no motion
That tends to vice in man but I affirm
It is the woman’s part: be it lying, note it,
The woman’s; flattering, hers; deceiving, hers;
Lust and rank thoughts, hers, hers; revenges, hers;
Ambitions, covetings, change of prides, disdain,
Nice longing, slanders, mutability,
All faults that may be named, nay, that hell knows,
Why, hers, in part or all, but rather all.
For even to vice
They are not constant, but are changing still
One vice but of a minute old for one
Not half so old as that. I’ll write against them,
Detest them, curse them. Yet ’tis greater skill
In a true hate to pray they have their will;
The very devils cannot plague them better.

DUTCH:
O, vond ik slechts
Wat vrouwlijk is in mij! want ied’re neiging
Tot ondeugd in den man, voorwaar, zij is
Zijn vrouwlijk erfdeel; liegen, ja, het is zoo,
Komt van de vrouw; van haar ‘t gevlei, ‘t bedriegen;
Onkuische lust, van haar; van haar, de wraakzucht;
Van haar de zucht naar grootheid, hoovaardij,
Inbeelding, dwaze lusten, lasterzucht,
Laatdunkendheid en wuftheid, alle kwaad,
Wat maar een naam heeft, wat de hel maar kent,
Van haar, gedeelt’lijk of geheel; of ja, geheel;


May be named=That man can name (See Richard III, 1.2 “tongue may name”)
Motion=Impulse
Nice=Fastidious

Compleat:
Motion (instigation)=Aanporring, aandryving
To plague=Plaagen, quellen

Topics: honesty, truth, flattery, deceit, revenge

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
THIRD CONSPIRATOR
The people will remain uncertain whilst
’Twixt you there’s difference; but the fall of either
Makes the survivor heir of all.
AUFIDIUS
I know it;
And my pretext to strike at him admits
A good construction. I raised him, and I pawn’d
Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten’d,
He water’d his new plants with dews of flattery,
Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,
He bow’d his nature, never known before
But to be rough, unswayable and free.

DUTCH:
Doch, pas verheven,
Bedauwde hij met vleierij zijn planten,
En trok mijn vrienden van mij af; hij plooide
Daartoe zijn aard, dien niemand vroeger anders
Dan ruw, onbuigzaam, eigenwillig kende.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Construction=Interpretation
A good construction=Well-founded
Pawn=Pledge
To bow=To crush, to strain

Compleat:
To bow=Buigen, neigen, bukken
Construction=Uitlegging; woordenschikking

Topics: flattery, achievement, reputation

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
BENVOLIO
Why, what is Tybalt?
MERCUTIO
More than Prince of Cats. Oh, he’s the courageous captain of compliments. He fights as you sing prick-song, keeps time, distance, and proportion. He rests his minim rests—one, two, and the third in your bosom. The very butcher of a silk button, a duelist, a duelist, a gentleman of the very first house of the first and second cause. Ah, the immortal passado, the punto reverso, the hai!

DUTCH:
Meer dan de vorst van het kattengeslacht, dat kan ik u
verzekeren; hij is de moedige aanvoerder van alle fijne manieren.

MORE:
Prince of Cats = figure from Reynard the Fox, also called Tybalt
To compliment (or complement) = to observe formal ceremonies or courtesy. Hence captain of compliments = one who observes protocol.
Butcher of a silk button=precise, never misses the mark.

Topics: custom, civility, flattery, clarity/precision

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
If I had a suit to Master Shallow, I would humor his men with the imputation of being near their master; if to his men, I would curry with Master Shallow that no man could better command his servants. It is certain that either wise bearing or ignorant carriage is caught, as men take diseases, one of another. Therefore let men take heed of their company. I will devise matter enough out of this Shallow to keep Prince Harry in continual laughter the wearing out of six fashions, which is four terms, or two actions, and a’ shall laugh without intervallums.

DUTCH:
Het is zeker , dat zoowel een wijs gedrag als een onnoozele wijs van doen aanstekelijk zijn, zooals de menschen kwalen krijgen, de een van den ander; daarom moet de mensch toezien, met wie hij omgaat.

MORE:

Curry=Curry favour, flatter
Carriage=Behaviour
Six fashions=Four terms (one year for the legal profession) or two actions
Intervallum=Interval, interruption

Compleat:
To curry favour+Smeerschoenen, flikflooijen
To curry with one=Zyn hof by iemand maaken
Carriage=Gedrag, aanstelling, ommegang

Topics: wisdom, emotion and mood, friendship, flattery

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Kent
CONTEXT:
That such a slave as this should wear a sword,
Who wears no honesty. Such smiling rogues as these,
Like rats, oft bite the holy cords a-twain,
Which are too intrince t’unloose; smooth every passion
That in the natures of their lords rebel,
Being oil to fire, snow to the colder moods,
Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaks
With every gall and vary of their masters,
Knowing naught, like dogs, but following.

DUTCH:
Dat zulk een deugniet, zonder hart in ‘t lijf,
Een zwaard aan ‘t lijf draagt. Zulk een vleilach-tuig
Doorknaagt, als ratten, vaak de heil’ge banden,
Die onontknoopbaar zijn; vleit ied’ren hartstocht,
Die in de borst van hun gebieders woelt;
Werpt olie op hun vuur, ijs op hun koelheid;
Knikt ja, schudt neen, en draait als weerhaan rond,
Met ied’re vlaag en wiss’ling van hun meesters;
Loopt hun als honden na, het kent niets anders.

MORE:
Proverb: A mouse in time may bite in two a cable (Like rats, oft bite….)
Holy cords=Matrimonial bond
A-twain=In two
Intrince=Entangled, intertwined (Verb to intrince=To untangle)
Onions:
Smooth=Flatter, humour
Halcyon=Kingfisher. (Kingfishers when hung by the beck or tail could serve as a weathervane).
Compleat:
Halcyon (sea fowl)=Een zekere Zeevogel
Burgerdijk notes:
En draait als weerhaan rond. In’t Engelsch: and turn their halcyon beaks; naar het volksgeloof keerde een ijsvogel, aan een draad opgehangen, zijn bek altijd naar den kant, waar de wind van daan kwam.

Topics: insult, proverbs and idioms, flattery, honesty

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
They flattered me like a dog and told me I had white hairs in my beard ere the black ones were there. To say “Ay” and “No” to everything that I said “Ay” and “No” to was no good divinity. When the rain came to wet me once, and the wind to make me chatter, when the thunder would not peace at my bidding—there I found ’em, there I smelt ’em out. Go to, they are not men o’ their words. They told me I was everything. ‘Tis a lie, I am not ague-proof.

DUTCH:
Zij zeiden mij, dat ik alles en nog wat was ;
gelogen is ‘t – ik kan niet eens tegen de koorts op./
Loop heen, hun woorden betekenden
niets, ze zeiden dat ik alles voor hen was. Dat is een leugen.
Ik ben niet onvatbaar voor koorts.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Ague-proof=Able to resist the causes which produce agues (also: Immune to severe chill)
Divinity=Theology
Compleat:
Ague=Koorts die met koude komt, een verpoozende koorts

Topics: flattery, deceit, truth, promise, betrayal

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Third Servingman
CONTEXT:
FIRST SERVINGMAN
Directitude! what’s that?
THIRD SERVINGMAN
But when they shall see, sir, his crest up again,
and the man in blood, they will out of their
burrows, like conies after rain, and revel all with him.

DUTCH:
Maar als ze, man, zijn helmbos weer rechtop zien, en
den man in volle kracht, dan komen ze wel weer uit
haar holen, evenals konijnen na regen, en allen dansen
met hem mede.

MORE:
Huper: to raise, or set up his crest: to become proud, loftie, stately.
“Man in blood=Thirsting for battle

Compleat:
Coney=Konijn
Crestfallen=Die de kuif laat hangen, die de moed opgeeft, neerslagtig

Topics: flattery, respect, authority

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Luciana
CONTEXT:
What simple thief brags of his own attaint?
‘Tis double wrong to truant with your bed
And let her read it in thy looks at board.
Shame hath a bastard fame, well managèd;
Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word.
Alas, poor women, make us but believe,
Being compact of credit, that you love us.
Though others have the arm, show us the sleeve;
We in your motion turn, and you may move us.
Then, gentle brother, get you in again.
Comfort my sister, cheer her, call her wife.
‘Tis holy sport to be a little vain
When the sweet breath of flattery conquers strife.

DUTCH:
Een weinig huich’lens is een vroom bedrog,
Als zoete vleitaal twist bedwingen kan.

MORE:
Attaint=Stain, crime
Vain=Deceitful
Compact of credit=Made of credulity, entirely believable

Topics: flattery, offence, appearance, gullibility

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
LE BEAU
What color, madam? How shall I answer you?
ROSALIND
As wit and fortune will.
TOUCHSTONE
Or as the Destinies decrees.
CELIA
Well said. That was laid on with a trowel.
TOUCHSTONE
Nay, if I keep not my rank—
ROSALIND
Thou losest thy old smell.

DUTCH:
Goed gezegd! dat werd daar nog wat aangevet!

MORE:
To lay it on with a trowel = to exaggerate, often with flattery.
audirankness
Rankness: the state of being overgrown and stinking, used of weeds.

Topics: flattery, invented or popularised, still in use

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Sir, I hope
My words disbench’d you not.
CORIOLANUS
No, sir: yet oft,
When blows have made me stay, I fled from words.
You soothed not, therefore hurt not: but your people,
I love them as they weigh.

DUTCH:
Hield ik voor slagen stand, en vlood voor woorden.
Gij vleit niet, dus gij krenkt niet. Doch, uw burgers
Bemin ik naar zij waard zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Soothed not=Did not flatter
As they weigh=According to their weight or value

Compleat:
To sooth up=Vleijen, flikflooien

Topics: resolution, remedy, value, flattery

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
You were ever good at sudden commendations,
Bishop of Winchester. But know, I come not
To hear such flattery now, and in my presence;
They are too thin and bare to hide offences.
To me you cannot reach, you play the spaniel,
And think with wagging of your tongue to win me;
But, whatsoe’er thou takest me for, I’m sure
Thou hast a cruel nature and a bloody.
[To Cranmer]Good man, sit down. Now let me see the proudest
He, that dares most, but wag his finger at thee:
By all that’s holy, he had better starve
Than but once think this place becomes thee not.

DUTCH:
Gij speelt den schoothond
En waant door tonggekwispel mij te winnen;
Doch, waar gij mij voor houden moogt, dit weet ik:
Dat gij in ‘t harte wreed zijt en bloeddorstig.

MORE:
Proverb: As flattering (fawning) as a spaniel
Sudden=Spontaneous
Commendation=Praise, flattery
Starve=Die
Place=Position
Compleat:
Sudden=Schielyk, gezwind
Commendation=Pryzing, aanpryzing, aanbeveling
Starve=Sterven
Place=Plaats

Topics: flattery, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
You were ever good at sudden commendations,
Bishop of Winchester. But know, I come not
To hear such flattery now, and in my presence;
They are too thin and bare to hide offences.
To me you cannot reach, you play the spaniel,
And think with wagging of your tongue to win me;
But, whatsoe’er thou takest me for, I’m sure
Thou hast a cruel nature and a bloody.
[To Cranmer]Good man, sit down. Now let me see the proudest
He, that dares most, but wag his finger at thee:
By all that’s holy, he had better starve
Than but once think this place becomes thee not.

DUTCH:
Steeds waart gij vaardig in het plots’ling loven.

MORE:
Proverb: As flattering (fawning) as a spaniel
Sudden=Spontaneous
Commendation=Praise, flattery
Starve=Die
Place=Position
Compleat:
Sudden=Schielyk, gezwind
Commendation=Pryzing, aanpryzing, aanbeveling
Starve=Sterven
Place=Plaats

Topics: flattery, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Martius
CONTEXT:
He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? The one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
Where he should find you lions, finds you hares;
Where foxes, geese: you are no surer, no,
Than is the coal of fire upon the ice,
Or hailstone in the sun. Your virtue is
To make him worthy whose offence subdues him
And curse that justice did it.
Who deserves greatness
Deserves your hate; and your affections are
A sick man’s appetite, who desires most that
Which would increase his evil. He that depends
Upon your favours swims with fins of lead
And hews down oaks with rushes. Hang ye! Trust Ye?
With every minute you do change a mind,
And call him noble that was now your hate,
Him vile that was your garland. What’s the matter,
That in these several places of the city
You cry against the noble senate, who,
Under the gods, keep you in awe, which else
Would feed on one another? What’s their seeking?

DUTCH:
Een vriend’lijk woord tot u waar’ laag gevlei,
Geen afschuw waard

MORE:
Schmidt:
Virtue=Merit, what you excel in
Make worthy=Exalt, glorify
Proud=Full of self-esteem, haughty
Offence subdues=Ruined, disabled, tamed, crushed by their crime
Sure=Reliable, stable

Compleat:
Subdue=Onderbrengen
Virtue (efficacy, power, propriety)=Kracht, vermogen, hoedanigheid, eigenschap
Proud=Hovaardig, hoogmoedig, verwaand

Topics: flattery, trust, justice, merit, value

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