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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1 ACT/SCENE: 2.2 SPEAKER: Falstaff CONTEXT: An ’twere not as good a deed as drink to turn true man and to leave these rogues, I am the veriest varlet that ever chewed with a tooth. Eight yards of uneven ground is threescore and ten miles afoot with me, and the stony-hearted villains know it well enough. A plague upon it when thieves cannot be true one to another! DUTCH: Tien ellen oneffen grond te voet zijn voor mij zes dozijn mijlen en meer, en die booswichten met steenen harten weten dat maar al te goed. Naar den duivel er mee, als dieven onder elkaar niet eerlijk kunnen zijn. MORE: Phrase ‘stony-hearted’ first recorded in 1569 in Underdown’s translation of the Æthiopian History of Heliodorus: “There is no man so stoany harted, but he shal be made to yeelde with our flatteringe allurmente”.
Schmidt:
Veriest=most veritable
Varlet=A a servant to a knight; A term of reproach; knave, rascal
Compleat:
Stony heart=Een steene hart, verhard hart
Varlet=Een schobbejak. Varlet (valet)=knegt Topics: invented or popularised, virtue, good and bad

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Chief Justice
CONTEXT:
CHIEF JUSTICE
Well, I am loath to gall a new-healed wound. Your day’s
service at Shrewsbury hath a little gilded over your night’s
exploit on Gad’s Hill . You may thank th’ unquiet time for
your quiet o’erposting that action.
FALSTAFF
My lord.
CHIEF JUSTICE
But since all is well, keep it so. Wake not a sleeping wolf.

DUTCH:
Wij willen het er bij laten, maar laat gij liet er ook bij! maak geen slapenden wolf wakker!

MORE:

Proverb: It is evil (ill, not good) waking of a sleeping dog

Schmidt:
Gall=To hurt by friction, to excoriate
O’erpost=Get over quickly (get away with)

Compleat:
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten
Unquiet=Ongerust, onrustig

Topics: good and bad, caution

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Sir, for a quart d’ecu he will sell the fee-simple
of his salvation, the inheritance of it; and cut the
entail from all remainders, and a perpetual
succession for it perpetually.
FIRST SOLDIER
What’s his brother, the other Captain Dumain?
SECOND LORD
Why does he ask him of me?
FIRST SOLDIER
What’s he?
PAROLLES
E’en a crow o’ the same nest; not altogether so
great as the first in goodness, but greater a great
deal in evil: he excels his brother for a coward,
yet his brother is reputed one of the best that is:
in a retreat he outruns any lackey; marry, in coming
on he has the cramp.

DUTCH:
Geheel en al een kraai uit hetzelfde nest; niet volkomen
zoo groot als de andere in het goede, maar een good
deel slechter in bet booze.

MORE:
Proverb: A bird (egg) of the same nest
To stand seised in fee simple=A feudal term that meant to have both possession and title of property, a form of freehold ownership. (Absolute and perpetual ownership.) Shakespeare sometimes used the phrase to mean absoluteness.
Entail=Succession
Remainders=Possible future heirs (residual property rights)
Lackey=Footman (who would run in front of the master’s coach)
Come on=Advance
Compleat:
Seised=Beslagen, aangetast, gevat
Fee-simple=Een onbepaald leen ons en onze erfgenaamen voor altoos toehehoorende
Entail=By erfenisse vast gemaakt
Lackey (lacquey)=Een voetjongen, volgdienaar, lakkey

Topics: good and bad, law/legal

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
Good alone
Is good without a name. Vileness is so:
The property by what it is should go,
Not by the title. She is young, wise, fair;
In these to nature she’s immediate heir,
And these breed honour: that is honour’s scorn,
Which challenges itself as honour’s born
And is not like the sire: honours thrive,
When rather from our acts we them derive
Than our foregoers: the mere word’s a slave
Debauched on every tomb, on every grave
A lying trophy, and as oft is dumb
Where dust and damn’d oblivion is the tomb
Of honour’d bones indeed. What should be said?

DUTCH:
Goed is goed,
Ook zonder hoogen naam; en slecht is slecht;
Alleen op wat hij is, gronde elk zijn recht,
Op titels niet.

MORE:
Idiom: “Let’s write good angel on the devil’s horn, ‘Tis not the devil’s crest”
Challenges itself=Urges as a right, makes a claim for itself
Foregoers=Forebears

Topics: honour, merit, proverbs and idioms, good and bad, order/society

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
MIRANDA
I should sin
To think but nobly of my grandmother;
Good wombs have borne bad sons.
PROSPERO
Now the condition.
This King of Naples, being an enemy
To me inveterate, hearkens my brother’s suit,
Which was that he, in lieu o’th’ premises
Of homage, and I know not how much tribute,
Should presently extirpate me and mine
Out of the dukedom and confer fair Milan,
With all the honours, on my brother. Whereon –
A treacherous army levied – one midnight
Fated to th’ purpose did Antonio open
The gates of Milan and i’th’ dead of darkness
The ministers for th’ purpose hurried thence
Me and thy crying self.

DUTCH:
t Waar’ zonde, zoo ik
Zelfs in gedachte een blaam wierp op uw moeder;
Reeds menig eed’le schoot droeg slechte zoons.

MORE:
In lieu o’th’ premises=In exchange for the stipulations (of the agreement with the King of Naples)
Schmidt:
Homage=Fealty and service professed to a superior lord
Tribute=Stated payment made in acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace, or by virtue of a treaty
Extirpate=To root out, to remove completely
Fated=Destined by fate
Ministers=Agents (assigned to the task)
Compleat:
Homage=Hulde, hulding, manschap, onderdaanigheid
Tribute=Cynsgeld, schatting; Tol, impost
He was the principal minister (or instrument) of his revenge=Hy was het voornaamste werktuig van zyne wraak
Fated=Door’t noodlot beschooren

Topics: contract, promise, fate/destiny, good and bad, envy, honour, revenge

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
My brave spirit!
Who was so firm, so constant, that this coil
Would not infect his reason?
ARIEL
Not a soul
But felt a fever of the mad and played
Some tricks of desperation. All but mariners
Plunged in the foaming brine and quit the vessel,
Then all afire with me. The king’s son, Ferdinand,
With hair up-staring – then like reeds, not hair –
Was the first man that leaped; cried “Hell is empty
And all the devils are here.”

DUTCH:
Vóór de and’ren
Sprong Ferdinand, des konings zoon, wien ‘t haar, —
Het scheen eer riet, — te berge stond; hij riep:
„De hel is ledig, alle duivels hier !”

MORE:
Schmidt:
Coil=Confusion, turmoil
Up-staring=Standing on end
Compleat:
Coil=Geraas, getier

Topics: courage, madness, nature, good and bad

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Gentleman
CONTEXT:
Her speech is nothing,
Yet the unshaped use of it doth move
The hearers to collection. They aim at it,
And botch the words up fit to their own thoughts,
Which, as her winks and nods and gestures yield them,
Indeed would make one think there might be thought,
Though nothing sure, yet much unhappily.
HORATIO
‘Twere good she were spoken with, for she may strew
Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.

DUTCH:
Maar toch, haar warreltaal wekt bij de hoorders
Vermoedens ; en als die met hun gedachten
De woorden, die zij met cen wenk of knik
En vreemd gebaar verzelt, gaan samenkopp’len,

MORE:
Spurns enviously=Kicks spitefully
Collection=Inference
To botch up=Piece together unskilfully
Botcher=One who mends and patches old clothes
Compleat:
Botcher=Een lapper, knoeijer, boetelaar, broddelaar

Topics: language, perception, understanding, good and bad

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
I am a woodland fellow, sir, that always loved a
great fire; and the master I speak of ever keeps a
good fire. But, sure, he is the prince of the
world; let his nobility remain in’s court. I am for
the house with the narrow gate, which I take to be
too little for pomp to enter: some that humble
themselves may; but the many will be too chill and
tender, and they’ll be for the flowery way that
leads to the broad gate and the great fire.

DUTCH:
Ik ben voor het huis met de enge poort, die ik
voor te klein houd, dan dat pracht en praal er binnen
kunnen gaan; enkelen misschien, die zich vernederen,
komen er door, maar de meesten zullen te kouwelijk en
te gevoelig zijn, en zij zullen voor den bloemrijken weg
zijn, die naar de breede poort en het groote vuur leidt .

MORE:
Chill=Sensitive to cold, faint-hearted
Tender=Fond of comfort, self-interested
Compleat:
Chill=Koud, killig, huyverig
Tender=Teder, week, murw

Topics: good and bad, temptation

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
I never did repent for doing good,
Nor shall not now; for in companions
That do converse and waste the time together
Whose souls do bear an equal yoke of love,
There must be needs a like proportion
Of lineaments, of manners, and of spirit,
Which makes me think that this Antonio,
Being the bosom lover of my lord,
Must needs be like my lord. If it be so,
How little is the cost I have bestowed
In purchasing the semblance of my soul
From out the state of hellish cruelty!
This comes too near the praising of myself.
Therefore no more of it. Hear other things.
Lorenzo, I commit into your hands
The husbandry and manage of my house
Until my lord’s return.
For mine own part,
I have toward heaven breathed a secret vow
To live in prayer and contemplation,
Only attended by Nerissa here
Until her husband and my lord’s return.
There is a monastery two miles off,
And there will we abide. I do desire you
Not to deny this imposition,
The which my love and some necessity
Now lays upon you.

DUTCH:
Nooit heeft mij nog een goede daad berouwd,
En deez’ zal ‘t ook niet doen; want trouwe makkers,
Die samen immer leven en verkeeren,
Wier zielen saam een juk van vriendschap dragen,
Gelijk verdeeld, die moeten wel gelijk zijn
In wezenstrekken, geest en wijs van doen;

MORE:
Waste=Spend
Lineaments=Features
Semblance=Similarity
Husbandry=Care, cultivation, tillage
Manage=Management
Deny=Refuse
Imposition=Charge
Compleat:
Waste=Doorbrengen
Lineament=Een trek
Semblance=Gelykenis, schyn
Husbandry=Huysbezorging
Manage=Bewind, bestiering
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
This supernatural soliciting
Cannot be ill, cannot be good. If ill,
Why hath it given me earnest of success,
Commencing in a truth? I am thane of Cawdor.
If good, why do I yield to that suggestion
Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
Against the use of nature? Present fears
Are less than horrible imaginings.

DUTCH:
En is zij goed, wat blaast zij mij iets in,
Zoo gruwlijk, dat mijn haar te berge rijst

MORE:
Unfix my hair = make my hair stand on end (hair standing on end is also attributed to Shakespeare (Hamlet))
CITED IN US LAW:
In Re Public Service Company of New Hampshire, 884 F.2d 11, 13 (1st Cir.1989);
In Re Martin, 817 F.2d 175, 183 (1st Cir.1987);
Scuncio Motors, Inc. v. Subaru of New England, Inc., 5.55 F.Supp. 1121, 1136 (D.R.I. 1982).

Topics: cited in law, temptation, manipulation, good and bad

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Hastings
CONTEXT:
MOWBRAY
There is a thing within my bosom tells me
That no conditions of our peace can stand.
HASTINGS
Fear you not that. If we can make our peace
Upon such large terms and so absolute
As our conditions shall consist upon,
Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.
MOWBRAY
Yea, but our valuation shall be such
That every slight and false-derivèd cause,
Yea, every idle, nice, and wanton reason,
Shall to the King taste of this action,
That, were our royal faiths martyrs in love,
We shall be winnowed with so rough a wind
That even our corn shall seem as light as chaff,
And good from bad find no partition.

DUTCH:
Vrees dit geenszins! Gelukt het ons, den vrede
Zoo hecht te vesten op zoo breeden grondslag,
Als die, waar onze vord’ring zich aan houdt,
Dan is de vrede onwrikbaar als een rots.

MORE:

Schmidt:
False-derivèd cause=Not based on truth
Wanton=Capricious, frivolous
Winnowed=Sifted, tried. Winnowed opinions: probably truisms

Compleat:
To winnow corn=Koorn wannen

Topics: contract, hope/optimism, good and bad

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Young Clifford
CONTEXT:
Meet I an infant of the house of York,
Into as many gobbets will I cut it
As wild Medea young Absyrtus did:
In cruelty will I seek out my fame.

DUTCH:
Mijn wreedheid zij het, die mij roem verwerve.

MORE:

CITED IN E&W LAW: Siddiqui v The Chancellor, Masters & Scholars of the University of Oxford [2018] EWHC 184 (QB) (07 February 2018)

Gobbet=Small pieces of flesh
In Greek mythology, Medea cut her brother Absyrtus into small pieces which she scattered to slow her father down

Topics: cited in law, ambition, good and bad

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
From thee, even from thy virtue!
What’s this, what’s this? Is this her fault or mine?
The tempter or the tempted, who sins most?
Ha!
Not she: nor doth she tempt: but it is I
That, lying by the violet in the sun,
Do as the carrion does, not as the flower,
Corrupt with virtuous season. Can it be
That modesty may more betray our sense
Than woman’s lightness? Having waste ground enough,
Shall we desire to raze the sanctuary
And pitch our evils there? O, fie, fie, fie!
What dost thou, or what art thou, Angelo?

DUTCH:
Wat is ‘t? is ‘t hare schuld of is ‘t de mijne?
Wie is de grootste zondaar, die verzocht wordt,
Of die verzoekt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Virtuous=Powerful, efficacious by inherent qualities, beneficial
Virtuous season=With the benign influence of summer weather and sunshine
Betray=Seduce
Compleat:
Betray=Verraaden, beklappen
Virtuous=Deugdelyk, deugdzaam, vroom
Burgersdijk notes:
Men heeft het woord evil hier en in Koning Hendrik Vill, II.1.61 ook wel verklaard met ,heimelijk gemak” en zou dan hier kunnen vertalen: Om juist daar Ons drekhuis op to slaan. O, foei, foei, foei!

Topics: temptation, virtue, offence, good and bad, corruption

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Salisbury
CONTEXT:
It is great sin to swear unto a sin,
But greater sin to keep a sinful oath.
Who can be bound by any solemn vow
To do a murderous deed, to rob a man,
To force a spotless virgin’s chastity,
To reave the orphan of his patrimony,
To wring the widow from her custom’d right,
And have no other reason for this wrong
But that he was bound by a solemn oath?
QUEEN MARGARET
A subtle traitor needs no sophister.

DUTCH:
t Is groote zonde, op zonde een eed te doen,
Doch grooter zonde , een zondige’ eed te houden.

MORE:

Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
Proverb: It is a great sin to swear unto a sin But greater sin to keep a sinful oath

Reave=Rob
Customed right=Rightful portion of her husband’s estate
Sophister=Clever or cunning arguer
Field=Battlefield

Compleat:
Bereave=Rooven
Accustomed=Gewoon, gewend, tot iets geschikt
Sophister (a cunning or sharp man)=Een listing schrander man
Sophistry=Een schalke wyze van redeneeren, woordvittery, haairkloovery, verschalking

Topics: law/legal, proverbs and idioms, good and bad

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
Kneel not to me.
The power that I have on you is to spare you;
The malice towards you to forgive you. Live
And deal with others better.
CYMBELINE
Nobly doomed.
We’ll learn our freeness of a son-in-law:
Pardon’s the word to all.

DUTCH:
Kniel niet voor mij;
De macht, die ‘k op u heb, is u te sparen,
En heel mijn wrok, u te vergeven. Leef,
Behandel and’ren beter.


Proverb: To be able to harm and not to do it is noble
Doomed=Judged

Schmidt:
Malice=Malignity, disposition to injure others
Freeness=Generosity

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
To doom=Veroordelen, verwyzen, doemen
Doomed=Veroordeeld, verweezen.

Topics: good and bad, offence, judgment, mercy, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
To beguile the time,
Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
But be the serpent under’t. He that’s coming
Must be provided for; and you shall put
This night’s great business into my dispatch,
Which shall to all our nights and days to come
Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.

DUTCH:
[S]chijn schuldloos als de bloem,
Maar wees de slang er onder

MORE:
Beguile the time=to deceive them; appear as expected, blend in
Schmidt:
Time=Men, the world
Dispatch=The finishing or winding up of a business
Compleat:
To dispatch=Afvaerdigen, afdoen, verrichten, beschikken, aflaaden, afmaaken, aan een kant helpen, ‘t leeven beneemen
The matter is dispatcht=De zaak is beschikt

Topics: deceit, appearance, good and bad

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
’Tis good; though music oft hath such a charm
To make bad good, and good provoke to harm.
I pray, you, tell me, hath any body inquired
for me here to-day? much upon this time have
I promised here to meet.

DUTCH:
Goed; doch muziek begoochelt soms ‘t gemoed
En maakt het goede boos, het booze goed.

MORE:

Topics: good and bad, skill/talent

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Canterbury
CONTEXT:
The courses of his youth promised it not.
The breath no sooner left his father’s body
But that his wildness, mortified in him,
Seemed to die too. Yea, at that very moment
Consideration like an angel came
And whipped th’ offending Adam out of him,
Leaving his body as a paradise
T’ envelop and contain celestial spirits.
Never was such a sudden scholar made,
Never came reformation in a flood
With such a heady currance scouring faults,
Nor never Hydra-headed willfulness
So soon did lose his seat, and all at once,
As in this king

DUTCH:
Zoo plots’ling werd geen kweek’ling ooit gevormd;
Zoo, als een vloed, kwam nooit bekeering op

MORE:

Proverb: The old Adam
Proverb: As many heads as Hydra

Mortified=Struck down
The offending Adam=Innate depravity
Currance=Current
Hydra=Moster with proliferating heads
Seat=Throne

Compleat:
Hydra=Een monstreuze en fabel=achtige draak
To mortify=Dooden, tuchtigen, onderbrengen, quellen, den voet dwars zetten

Topics: learning/education, regret, good and bad

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight.
Let’s see for means. O mischief, thou art swift
To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!

DUTCH:
Euveldaad! Hoe snel neemt gij de ziel van radelozen in!/
Euveldaad! hoe snel
Neemt gij de ziel van radeloozen in!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Mischief=evil done on purpose, harm, injury
Desperate=despaired of, irremediable, not to be saved
Compleat:
Mischief=onheil, dwaad, ongeluk, ramp, verderf, heilloosheid
Desperate (who is in despair)=Wanhopig
To be in a desperate condition=In een vertwyfelden staat zyn

Topics: good and bad, temptation

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
Presume not that I am the thing I was,
For God doth know—so shall the world perceive—
That I have turned away my former self.
So will I those that kept me company.
When thou dost hear I am as I have been,
Approach me, and thou shalt be as thou wast,
The tutor and the feeder of my riots.
Till then I banish thee, on pain of death,
As I have done the rest of my misleaders.
Not to come near our person by ten mile.
For competence of life I will allow you,
That lack of means enforce you not to evils.
And, as we hear you do reform yourselves,
We will, according to your strengths and qualities,
Give you advancement.
Be it your charge, my lord,
To see performed the tenor of my word.—
Set on.

DUTCH:
En waan niet, dat ik ben, wat ik eens was!
De hemel weet, en zien zal ‘t nu de wereld,
Dat ik den rug keerde aan mijn vroeger ik,
En ‘t hun zal doen, die eertijds met mij waren.

MORE:
Feeder=Inciter
Competence=Pension, sufficient means of subsistence

Topics: flaw/fault, regret, good and bad, poverty and wealth

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Escalus
CONTEXT:
Well, heaven forgive him! and forgive us all!
Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall:
Some run from brakes of vice, and answer none:
And some condemned for a fault alone.

DUTCH:
Sommigen rijzen door ondeugd, anderen komen door deugd ten val/
De een stijgt door schuld, door deugd moet de ander vallen

MORE:
Also versions with ‘brakes of ice’.
Schmidt:
Meaning of brakes is disputed; from the context it should be understood in the sense of “engines of torture”. Brakes was used to mean a collection.

Topics: good and bad, corruption, virtue, error, punishment, fate/destiny

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
That monster, custom, who all sense doth eat,
Of habits devil, is angel yet in this:
That to the use of actions fair and good
He likewise gives a frock or livery
That aptly is put on.

DUTCH:
Dat monster, sleur, dat alle zinnen doodt, Die duivel van ons doen, is engel hierin/
Gewoonte, dat monster, dat alle redelijkheid verslindt. /
Dat monster, sleur, de vraat van elk besef, Aller gewoonten duivel, is hierin Een engel.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Custom=Habit, regular practice
Eat=To devour, to consume, to waste, to destroy

Topics: good and bad, conscience, custom

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good:
the goodness that is cheap in beauty makes beauty
brief in goodness; but grace, being the soul of
your complexion, shall keep the body of it ever fair.

DUTCH:
De hand, die u schoon deed zijn, heeft u ook goed
doen zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Grace=Virtue
Soul=Denoting the chief part and quintessence of a thing
(Compleat)
Grace=Genade, gunst, bevalligheyd, fraajigheyd, aardige zwier
Soul=Ziel, leven geevende kragt, leevensgeesten

Topics: good and bad, virtue, honesty, innocence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: First Lord
CONTEXT:
FIRST LORD
How mightily sometimes we make us comforts of our
losses!
SECOND LORD
And how mightily some other times we drown our gain
in tears! The great dignity that his valour hath
here acquired for him shall at home be encountered
with a shame as ample.
FIRST LORD
The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and
ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our
faults whipped them not; and our crimes would
despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues.

DUTCH:
Het weefsel van ons leven bestaat uit gemengd garen,
goed en slecht dooreen; onze deugden zouden trotsch
zijn, indien zij niet door onze ondeugden gestriemd werden; en onze slechtheid zou wanhopig zijn, als ze niet door onze deugden vertroost werd.

MORE:
Cherish=Comfort, encourage, console
Despair=Cause (us to) despair
Whipped (Metaphorically)= to lash with sarcasm, to have a lash at, to put to the blush
Compleat:
To put to the blush=Iemand eene kleur aanjaagen, beschaamd maaken
Cherish=Koesteren, opkweeken, streelen, aankweeken

Topics: life, virtue, good and bad

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
Fare you well, my lord; and
believe this of me, there can be no kernel in this
light nut; the soul of this man is his clothes.
Trust him not in matter of heavy consequence;
I have kept of them tame, and know their natures.
Farewell, monsieur: I have spoken better
of you than you have or will to deserve at my
hand; but we must do good against evil.

DUTCH:
Vaarwel, mijn heer, en geloof mij, in deze vooze noot kan geen pit schuilen; de ziel van dezen mensch zit in zijn kleederen.

MORE:
Light nut=Lightweight
Consequence=Influence, importance
Compleat:
Consequence=Belang

Topics: status, merit, respect, good and bad, appearance

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
Gloucester, ’tis true that we are in great danger.
The greater therefore should our courage be.
—Good morrow, brother Bedford. God almighty,
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distill it out.
For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers,
Which is both healthful and good husbandry.
Besides, they are our outward consciences
And preachers to us all, admonishing
That we should dress us fairly for our end.
Thus may we gather honey from the weed
And make a moral of the devil himself.

DUTCH:
In booze dingen schuilt een kern van goed,
Zoo slechts de mensch bedachtzaam dien er uitperst;/
Er is een geest van goedheid in slechte dingen als de mensen die er maar uit wisten te distilleren.

MORE:

Proverb: He that has an ill neighbour has oftentimes an ill morning
Proverb: There is nothing so bad in which there is not something of good (1623)
Proverb: Every cloud has a silver lining

Observingly=With close observation, attentively
Distil=To obtain or extract the essence of, also to obtain (the quintessence) by extraction or distillation (lit. and fig.)

Topics: good and bad, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,
Doing more murder in this loathsome world,
Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
I sell thee poison. Thou hast sold me none.
Farewell. Buy food, and get thyself in flesh.—
Come, cordial and not poison, go with me
To Juliet’s grave, for there must I use thee

DUTCH:
Hier is uw goud, een erger zielsvergif
Een boozer moorddrank in deez’ booze wereld,
Dan ‘t brouwsel, dat gij niet verkoopen moogt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Compound=composition, mixture
Compleat:
No reference to compound as a noun.
To compound with one’s creditors=Met zyn Schuld-eischers overeenkomen, accordeeren

Topics: poverty and wealth, money, good and bad

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Stephano
CONTEXT:
Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy! This is a devil, and no monster. I will leave him. I have no long spoon.

DUTCH:
Dit is geen monster, maar een duivel!
Ik wil wegloopen; ik heb geen langen lepel.

MORE:
Proverb: He must have a long spoon that will eat with the devil/He who sups with the devil should take a long spoon (See Comedy of Errors, 4.3)
In the Morality plays the Devil and the Vice would take food from opposite sides of the same dish with a spoon of great length. (Arden)
Burgersdijk notes:
Ik wil wegloopen; ik heb geen langen lepel. Zinspeling op het oud-Engelsche spreekwoord: „Wie met den duivel wil eten, moet een langen lepel hebben.”

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, good and bad

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
O, fie, fie, fie!
Thy sin’s not accidental, but a trade.
Mercy to thee would prove itself a bawd:
’Tis best thou diest quickly.

DUTCH:
O foei, foei, foei!
Geen toeval was uw zonde, ze is uw ambacht.
Genade wierd, u sparend, koppelaarster;
‘t Best is uw snelle dood.

MORE:
Sin=Offence, transgression
Bawd=Procurer

Topics: punishment, offence, custom, integrity, good and bad, mercy

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Gentleman
CONTEXT:
Her speech is nothing,
Yet the unshaped use of it doth move
The hearers to collection. They aim at it,
And botch the words up fit to their own thoughts,
Which, as her winks and nods and gestures yield them,
Indeed would make one think there might be thought,
Though nothing sure, yet much unhappily.
HORATIO
‘Twere good she were spoken with, for she may strew
Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.

DUTCH:
t Waar’ goed haar eens to spreken ; licht’lijk strooit
Zij argwaan in een geest, die boosheid broedt .

MORE:
Spurns enviously=Kicks spitefully
Collection=Inference
To botch up=Piece together unskilfully
Botcher=One who mends and patches old clothes
Compleat:
Botcher=Een lapper, knoeijer, boetelaar, broddelaar

Topics: language, perception, understanding, good and bad

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Ah, what’s more dangerous than this fond affiance!
Seems he a dove? His feathers are but borrowed,
For he’s disposed as the hateful raven:
Is he a lamb? His skin is surely lent him,
For he’s inclined as is the ravenous wolf.
Who cannot steal a shape that means deceit?
Take heed, my lord; the welfare of us all
Hangs on the cutting short that fraudful man.

DUTCH:
Is hij een lam? zijn vacht in hem geleend;
Als van een fellen wolf is zijn gemoed.
Wie steelt geen mom, als hij bedriegen wil?
Vrees op uw hoede, heer; ons aller welzijn
Hangt aan ‘t voorkómen van dien valschen man.

MORE:

Proverb: A wolf in sheep’s clothing (‘His skin is surely lent him’)

Raven=Symbolic of a bad omen
Fond=Foolish
Affiance=Confidence
Steal a shape=Create a false impression or appearance
Hateful=Deserving hate
Hangs on=Depends on

Compleat:
Fond (foolish)=Dwaas
Affiance=Vertrouwen, hoop
Hatefull=Haatelyk
These things seem to hang one upon the other=Deeze zaaken schynen van malkander af te hangen

Topics: deceit, appearance, good and bad, trust, betrayal, caution

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