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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors ACT/SCENE: 5.1 SPEAKER: Aegeon CONTEXT: O, grief hath changed me since you saw me last,
And careful hours with time’s deformèd hand
Have written strange defeatures in my face.
But tell me yet, dost thou not know my voice? DUTCH: Door zorgvolle uren heeft de maag’re hand
Des Tijds mij vreemde trekken ingegrift
MORE: Schmidt:
Defeatures=Disfigurements
Careful=Full of cares, subject to anxiety, sorrow, or want Topics: time, age/experience, sorrow, appearance, grief

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
These indeed “seem,”
For they are actions that a man might play.
But I have that within which passeth show,
These but the trappings and the suits of woe.

DUTCH:
Ik draag iets meer-dan-toonbaar in mijn hart /
Maar meer dan ‘t zichtb’re zit mij diep in ‘t hart.

MORE:
Trappings=ornamental appendages (from horse furniture).
Actions that a man might play = It has all the hallmarks of acting
For they are actions that a man might play:
Want al dat doen kan best vertooning zijn/Want dit zijn dingen die een mens kan spelen

Topics: appearance, sorrow, grief

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Bushy
CONTEXT:
Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadows
Which shows like grief itself but is not so;
For sorrow’s eyes, glazed with blinding tears,
Divides one thing entire to many objects,
Like perspectives, which rightly gazed upon
Show nothing but confusion, eyed awry
Distinguish form. So your sweet majesty,
Looking awry upon your lord’s departure,
Find shapes of grief, more than himself, to wail;
Which, look’d on as it is, is nought but shadows
Of what it is not. Then, thrice-gracious queen,
More than your lord’s departure weep not: more’s not seen;
Or if it be, ’tis with false sorrow’s eye,
Which for things true weeps things imaginary.

DUTCH:
Het wezen van elk leed heeft twintig schimmen,
Die wel als leed er uitzien, maar ‘t niet zijn.

MORE:

Perspectives=(a) Multifaceted crystal balls, often mounted; (b) A type of painting which, when viewed obliquely, reveals another (more complex or deeper) meaning

Schmidt:
Shadow=Any thing unsubstantial or unreal, a reflected image, having the appearance of reality
Rightly=From directly in front (hence perspective painting)
Eyes awry distinguish form=Viewed from an angle to reveal the meaning

Compleat:
Perspective=Een verschiet, doorzigt
A piece of perspective=Een afbeelding in ‘t verschiet
A perspective glass=Een verrekyker
Awry=Scheef, krom, verdraaid

Topics: grief, sorrow, imagination, perception

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
What, man! Ne’er pull your hat upon your brows.
Give sorrow words. The grief that does not speak
Whispers the o’erfraught heart and bids it break.

DUTCH:
Geef verdriet woorden: Het verdriet dat niet spreekt fluistert in het overbelaste hart, en vraagt het te breken./
Geef jammer woorden; ingehouden smart, breekt door zijn fluisteren het overladen hart./
Geef Uw jammer woorden! Ingehouden smart Breekt door zijn fluist’ren ‘t overladen hart.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb: “Grief pent up will break the heart” (1589)
CITED IN US LAW:
Baxter v. State, 503 S.W.2d 226,228 (Tenn. 1973): The court observes that “Shakespeare was right, as students of emotion know, when he advised, ‘give sorrows words. The grief that does not speak whispers the o’erfraught heart and bids it break'”.

Topics: grief, cited in law, emotion and mood, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Henry Bolingbroke
CONTEXT:
JOHN OF GAUNT
O, to what purpose dost thou hoard thy words,
That thou return’st no greeting to thy friends?
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
I have too few to take my leave of you,
When the tongue’s office should be prodigal
To breathe the abundant dolour of the heart.
JOHN OF GAUNT
Thy grief is but thy absence for a time.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Joy absent, grief is present for that time.
JOHN OF GAUNT
What is six winters? they are quickly gone.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
To men in joy; but grief makes one hour ten.

DUTCH:
Voor vreugde; smart vertienvoudt ieder uur.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Prodigal=Lavish, profuse
Dolour=Grief

Compleat:
Prodigal=Quistig, verquistend
Dolor=Droefheid, smerte

Topics: grief, language, sorrow, time

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Gonzalo
CONTEXT:
SEBASTIAN
He receives comfort like cold porridge.
ANTONIO
The visitor will not give him o’er so.
SEBASTIAN
Look he’s winding up the watch of his wit. By and by it will strike.
GONZALO
(to ALONSO) Sir—
SEBASTIAN
One. Tell.
GONZALO
When every grief is entertained that’s offered,
comes to th’entertainer –
SEBASTIAN
A dollar.
GONZALO
Dolour comes to him, indeed. You have spoken truer than you purposed.

DUTCH:
Zie, hij windt het uurwerk van zijn vernuft op, zoo
aanstonds zal het slaan.

MORE:
A visitor is ‘One who visits from charitable motives or with a view of doing good’ (OED)
Dollar=’The English name for the German thaler, a large silver coin’ (OED).
Dolour=Sorrow, grief (wordplay on ‘dollar’)
Tell=Count
Entertain=To conceive, to harbour, to feel, to keep (When everyone who feels grief embraces every grief that comes their way)
Compleat:
Entertain (receive or believe) a principle, an opinion, etc.=Een stelling, een gevoelen aanneemen, koesteren’ gelooven of voorstaan
Dolor=Droefheid, smerte
Dolorous=Pynlyk, droevig
To visit (to go about to see whether things be as they should)=Bezoeken, nazien, onderzoeken
To visit (to affect, to try)=Bezoeken, beproeven

Topics: grief, sorrow, adversity, intellect

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
Sweet Duke of York, our prop to lean upon,
Now thou art gone, we have no staff, no stay.
O Clifford, boisterous Clifford! Thou hast slain
The flower of Europe for his chivalry;
And treacherously hast thou vanquish’d him,
For hand to hand he would have vanquish’d thee.
Now my soul’s palace is become a prison:
Ah, would she break from hence, that this my body
Might in the ground be closed up in rest!
For never henceforth shall I joy again,
Never, O never shall I see more joy

DUTCH:
Geliefde York, gij staf, waarop wij leunden!
Nu gij bezweekt, ontviel ons steun en stut!

MORE:

Prop=Support
Stay=Support
Boisterous=Wild, intractable, rudely violent, noisy and tumultuous
Soul’s palace=Body

Compleat:
Prop=Ondersteuning
Stay=Steun, stut; ondersteuning
Boisterous=Ontstuimig; oploopend

Topics: grief, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Lewis
CONTEXT:
QUEEN MARGARET
From such a cause as fills mine eyes with tears
And stops my tongue, while heart is drown’d in cares.
KING LEWIS XI
Whate’er it be, be thou still like thyself,
And sit thee by our side:
KING LEWIS XI
Yield not thy neck
To fortune’s yoke, but let thy dauntless mind
Still ride in triumph over all mischance.
Be plain, Queen Margaret, and tell thy grief;
It shall be eased, if France can yield relief.

DUTCH:
Buig den nek toch niet
Voor ‘t juk van ‘t noodlot; zegevierend drave
Uw kloeke geest, den nood vertrappend, voort;

MORE:

Cares=Grief, sorrow
Still=Always
Yoke=Emblem of slavery
Dauntless=Fearless
Mischance=Misfortune
Tell=Tell about

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
Yoke=Een juk; (yoke of bondage) Het juk der dienstbaarheid
To stoop onder the yoke=Onder ‘t juk buigen
Dauntless=Onverschrokken, onbevreest
Mischance=Een misval, mislukking, ongeval, ongeluk

Topics: grief, sorrow, fate/destiny

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