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PLAY: Macbeth ACT/SCENE: 2.2 SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth CONTEXT: I hear a knocking
At the south entry. Retire we to our chamber.
A little water clears us of this deed.
How easy is it, then! Your constancy
Hath left you unattended. DUTCH: Een weinig waters spoelt die daad ons af MORE: CITED IN US LAW:
State v. Shanahan, 404 A.2d 975 (Me. 1979)(Wemick, J.)
Schmidt:
Constancy=Firmness of mind (purpose, resolve)
Compleat:
Constancy=Standvastigheid, volharding, bestendigheid Topics: guilt, cited in law, conscience, offence, evidence, purpose

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
CLARENCE
Ah keeper, keeper, I have done those things,
That now give evidence against my soul,
For Edward’s sake, and see how he requites me.—
O God, if my deep prayers cannot appease thee,
But thou wilt be avenged on my misdeeds,
Yet execute thy wrath in me alone!
O, spare my guiltless wife and my poor children!—
Keeper, I prithee sit by me awhile.
My soul is heavy, and I fain would sleep.

DUTCH:
O stokbewaarder! O, ik deed die dingen,
Die tegen mijne ziel alsnu getuigen,
Om Edwards wil; en zie, hoe hij ‘t mij loont!

MORE:
Keeper=Jailer
Requite=Repay
Heavy=Sad
Fain=Am eager to
Compleat:
Keeper=Een bewaarder
Requite=Vergelden
Heavy=Zwaar, zwaarmoedig, bedrukt, bedroefd
Fain=Gaern

Topics: conscience, offence, guilt, regret

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
If his occulted guilt
Do not itself unkennel in one speech,
It is a damnèd ghost that we have seen,
And my imaginations are as foul
As Vulcan’s stithy. Give him heedful note.
For I mine eyes will rivet to his face,
And after we will both our judgments join
In censure of his seeming.

DUTCH:
Let op hem; ik doe het ook; ik houd mijn blik gevestigd op zijn gezicht, en later geven wij ons beider oordeel over zijn gedrag /
Geef zorgvol acht; Ik zal mijn oog vastklinken op zijn aanzicht En later zullen uwe en mijne meening Raad houden saam, hoe hij zich hield. /
Sla goed hem ga; Wat ik mijn blik aan zijn gelaat zal naaglen; En daarna komen wij tot oordeel saâm Om hem te schaten naar den schijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Occulted=committed in secret
Unkennel=to reveal, bring out into the open
Stithy=smithy
Compleat:
Uyt het hok of hol jaagen
Stithy=een Aambeeld als ook een zekere quaal …

Topics: deceit, suspicion, guilt, discovery

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Gravedigger
CONTEXT:
GRAVEDIGGER
How can that be, unless she drowned herself in her own defense?
OTHER
Why, ’tis found so.
GRAVEDIGGER
Give me leave. Here lies the water. Good. Here stands the man. Good. If the man go to this water and drown himself, it is, will he nill he, he goes. Mark you that. But if the water come to him and drown him, he drowns not himself. Argal, he that is not guilty of his own death shortens not his own life.
OTHER
But is this law?
GRAVEDIGGER
Ay, marry, is ’t. Crowner’s quest law.

DUTCH:
Des daarom, wie niet schuldig is aan zijn eigen good, verkort zijn eigen leven niet. /
Ergel, hij die niet schuldig is aan eigen dood, verkort ook
zijn leven niet.

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
CITED IN HONG KONG LAW:
China Light & Power Co. Ltd. and Another v Warner B.G. Banks, Esq Her Majesty’s Coroner of Hong Kong (CACV 55/1994)
“The purposes of ‘Crowner’s quest law’, as the clown calls it in Shakespeare‘s ‘Hamlet’, Act 5, Scene I, are consistently misunderstood by the public and the media”

Topics: law/legal, cited in law, death, guilt

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Confess yourself to heaven.
Repent what’s past. Avoid what is to come.
And do not spread the compost on the weeds
To make them ranker.

DUTCH:
Biecht jezelf de hemel in; berouw wat is gebeurd; vermijd wat staat te komen. /
Biecht uw zonden op, berouw wat is geschied, ontwijk wat komt.

MORE:
Schmidt:=
Rank=Too luxuriant, exuberant, grown to immoderate height
Compleat:
Rank (or fruitful)=Vruchtbaar
Rank (that shoots too many leaves or branches)=Weelig, dat te veel takken of bladen schiet
To grow rank=Al te weelit groeien

Topics: offence, still in use, guilt

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
Now, if these men have defeated the law and outrun native punishment, though they can outstrip men, they have no wings to fly from God. War is His beadle, war is His vengeance, so that here men are punished for before-breach of the king’s laws in now the king’s quarrel. Where they feared the death, they have borne life away; and where they would be safe, they perish. Then, if they die unprovided, no more is the king guilty of their damnation than he was before guilty of those impieties for the which they are now visited. Every subject’s duty is the king’s, but every subject’s soul is his own. Therefore should every soldier in the wars do as every sick man in his bed: wash every mote out of his conscience.

DUTCH:
De dienst van iederen onderdaan is des konings, maar de ziel van iederen onderdaan is zijn eigene. Daarom moest ieder soldaat in den oorlog doen, wat ieder kranke in zijn bed doet: zijn geweten rein wasschen van ieder stofjen.

MORE:

Out-run=Escaped
Native punishment=Punishment in their own country
Unprovided=Not properly prepared
Before-breach=A breach committed in former times
Beadle=Official responsible for punishment, whipping

Compleat:
Unprovided=Onvoorien, onverzorgd.
To take one unprovided=Iemand verrassen
Beadle=Een gerechtsdienaar, boode, deurwaarder.
A beadle of beggars=Een verjaager van bedelaars, luizevanger

Topics: guilt, debt/obligation, punishment, justice, offence

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
It was my deer; and he that wounded her
Hath hurt me more than had he killed me dead:
For now I stand as one upon a rock
Environed with a wilderness of sea,
Who marks the waxing tide grow wave by wave,
Expecting ever when some envious surge
Will in his brinish bowels swallow him.
This way to death my wretched sons are gone;
Here stands my other son, a banished man,
And here my brother, weeping at my woes.
But that which gives my soul the greatest spurn,
Is dear Lavinia, dearer than my soul.
Had I but seen thy picture in this plight,
It would have madded me: what shall I do
Now I behold thy lively body so?
Thou hast no hands, to wipe away thy tears:
Nor tongue, to tell me who hath martyred thee:
Thy husband he is dead: and for his death
Thy brothers are condemned, and dead by this.
Look, Marcus! ah, son Lucius, look on her!
When I did name her brothers, then fresh tears
Stood on her cheeks, as doth the honey-dew
Upon a gathered lily almost withered.

DUTCH:
Nu sta ik hier, als iemand op een klip,
Omgordeld door een woestenij van zee,
Die het getij met golf op golf ziet stijgen,
En immer wacht, dat fluks de felle branding
Hem zal verzwelgen in haar zilten schoot.

MORE:
Environed=Surrounded
Mark=Perceives
Envious=Malignant
Spurn=Hurt, suffering
Lively=Living
Compleat:
Environed=Omringd, omcingeld
To mark=Merken, tekenen, opletten
Envious=Nydig, afgunstig, wangunstig
To spurn=Agteruit schoppen, schoppen. To spurn away=Wegschoppen

Topics: punishment, suspicion, guilt, regret

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Oliver
CONTEXT:
OLIVER
‘Twas I, but ’tis not I. I do not shame
To tell you what I was, since my conversion
So sweetly tastes, being the thing I am.
ROSALIND
But for the bloody napkin?
OLIVER
By and by.
When from the first to last betwixt us two
Tears our recountments had most kindly bathed—
As how I came into that desert place—
In brief, he led me to the gentle duke,
Who gave me fresh array and entertainment,
Committing me unto my brother’s love,
Who led me instantly unto his cave,
There stripped himself, and here upon his arm
The lioness had torn some flesh away,
Which all this while had bled. And now he fainted,
And cried in fainting upon Rosalind.
Brief, I recovered him, bound up his wound,
And after some small space, being strong at heart,
He sent me hither, stranger as I am,
To tell this story, that you might excuse
His broken promise, and to give this napkin
Dyed in his blood unto the shepherd youth
That he in sport doth call his Rosalind.

DUTCH:
Ik was ‘t, doch ben ‘t niet meer. Ik schaam mij niet,
Te zeggen wat ik was, daar mijn bekeering
Zoo zoet mij is, nu ik een ander ben.

MORE:
Do not shame=Am not ashamed
By and by=In a moment
Recountments=Accounts, narratives
Entertainment=Hospitality
Recovered=Revived
In sport=In jest
Compleat:
Shame=Beschaamen, beschaamd maaken, schande aandoen
By and by=Zo aanstonds, op ‘t oogenblik
To recount=Verhaalen
Entertainment=Huysvesting, onderhoud
To recover=Weder bekomen, weer krygen, weer opkomen
To make sport=Lachen, speelen

Topics: guilt, promise, mercy

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Richard, Duke of Gloucester
CONTEXT:
RICHARD
My lord, there needs no such apology.
I do beseech your Grace pardon me,
Who, earnest in the service of my God,
Deferred the visitation of my friends.
But, leaving this, what is your Grace’s pleasure?
BUCKINGHAM
Even that, I hope, which pleaseth God above
And all good men of this ungoverned isle.
RICHARD
I do suspect I have done some offence
That seems disgracious in the city’s eye,
And that you come to reprehend my ignorance.
BUCKINGHAM
You have, my lord. Would it might please your Grace,
On our entreaties, to amend your fault.

DUTCH:
Ik heb vermoeden, dat ik iets beging,
Wat in der burg’ren oogen onrecht is,
En dat gij mijn onachtzaamheid komt laken.

MORE:
Even=Only
Disgracious=Displeasing
Reprehend=Blame
Ignorance=Lack of understanding
Entreaties=Requests
Compleat:
Ungracious=Van genade ontbloot, godloos, onzalig, verwaaten, heilloos
Reprehend=Berispen, bestraffen
Entreaty=Ernstig verzoek
Ignorance=Onweetendheyd, onkunde, onbewustheyd

Topics: civility, offence, guilt

PLAY: The Merry Wives of Windsor
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Shallow
CONTEXT:
SHALLOW
He hath wronged me, Master Page.
PAGE
Sir, he doth in some sort confess it.
SHALLOW
If it be confessed, it is not redressed: is not that
so, Master Page? He hath wronged me; indeed he
hath, at a word, he hath, believe me: Robert
Shallow, esquire, saith, he is wronged.

DUTCH:
Bekend is nog niet geboet; is het zoo niet, mijnheer
Page? Hij heeft mij beleedigd; inderdaad, dat heeft
hij; — in een woord, dat heeft hij; — geloof mij; —
Robert Zielig, esquire, zegt, dat hij beleedigd is.

MORE:
Proverb: Confession of a fault is half amends

In some sort=To some extent
At a word=In short
Compleat:
In a word=In ‘t kort, in weynig woorden

Topics: guilt, abuse, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee:
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.

DUTCH:
Is dit een dolk die ik voor me zie, Het handvat naar mijn hand?/
Is dat een dolk, wat ik daar voor mij zie,
Het hecht mij toegekeerd?

MORE:

Topics: still in use, conscience, guilt

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Oliver
CONTEXT:
OLIVER
By and by.
When from the first to last betwixt us two
Tears our recountments had most kindly bathed—
As how I came into that desert place—
In brief, he led me to the gentle duke,
Who gave me fresh array and entertainment,
Committing me unto my brother’s love,
Who led me instantly unto his cave,
There stripped himself, and here upon his arm
The lioness had torn some flesh away,
Which all this while had bled. And now he fainted,
And cried in fainting upon Rosalind.
Brief, I recovered him, bound up his wound,
And after some small space, being strong at heart,
He sent me hither, stranger as I am,
To tell this story, that you might excuse
His broken promise, and to give this napkin
Dyed in his blood unto the shepherd youth
That he in sport doth call his Rosalind.
CELIA
Why, how now, Ganymede, sweet Ganymede?
OLIVER
Many will swoon when they do look on blood.

DUTCH:
Ja, velen vallen flauw, wanneer zij bloed zien.

MORE:
Do not shame=Am not ashamed
By and by=In a moment
Recountments=Accounts, narratives
Entertainment=Hospitality
Recovered=Revived
In sport=In jest
Compleat:
Shame=Beschaamen, beschaamd maaken, schande aandoen
By and by=Zo aanstonds, op ‘t oogenblik
To recount=Verhaalen
Entertainment=Huysvesting, onderhoud
To recover=Weder bekomen, weer krygen, weer opkomen
To make sport=Lachen, speelen

Topics: guilt, promise, mercy

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Peace, tender sapling; thou art made of tears,
And tears will quickly melt thy life away.
What dost thou strike at, Marcus, with thy knife?
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
At that that I have killed, my lord; a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Out on thee, murderer! thou kill’st my heart;
Mine eyes are cloyed with view of tyranny:
A deed of death done on the innocent
Becomes not Titus’ brother: get thee gone:
I see thou art not for my company.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Alas, my lord, I have but killed a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
But how, if that fly had a father and mother?
How would he hang his slender gilded wings,
And buzz lamenting doings in the air!
Poor harmless fly, That, with his pretty buzzing melody, Came here to make us merry! and thou hast killed him.

DUTCH:
Foei, schaam u, moord’naar! mij doodt gij het hart.
Mijn oogen zijn verzaad van ‘t zien van gruw’len

MORE:
Cloyed=Satiated
View=Perception
Becomes not=Is not becoming for
But=Only
Compleat:
To cloy=Verkroppen, overlaaden
To view=Beschouwen, bezien
Become=Betaamen
But=Maar, of, dan, behalven, maar alleen

Topics: life, regret, nature, error, guilt

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King Richard III
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD
Give me another horse! Bind up my wounds!
Have mercy, Jesu!—Soft, I did but dream.
O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!
The lights burn blue. It is now dead midnight.
Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh.
What do I fear? Myself? There’s none else by.
Richard loves Richard; that is, I and I.
Is there a murderer here? No. Yes, I am.
Then fly! What, from myself? Great reason why:
Lest I revenge. What, myself upon myself?
Alack, I love myself. Wherefore? For any good
That I myself have done unto myself?
O, no! Alas, I rather hate myself
For hateful deeds committed by myself.
I am a villain. Yet I lie. I am not.
Fool, of thyself speak well. Fool, do not flatter.
My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Perjury, perjury, in the highest degree;
Murder, stern murder, in the direst degree;
All several sins, all used in each degree,
Throng to the bar, crying all, “Guilty! guilty!”
I shall despair. There is no creature loves me,
And if I die no soul will pity me.
And wherefore should they, since that I myself
Find in myself no pity to myself?
Methought the souls of all that I had murdered
Came to my tent, and every one did threat
Tomorrow’s vengeance on the head of Richard.

DUTCH:
O, mijn geweten heeft veel duizend tongen,
En ied’re tong vertelt een ander stuk,
En ieder stuk veroordeelt mij als schurk.

MORE:
Fly=Flee
Several=Separate
Burn blue=Indicating spirits
Compleat:
Flee=Vlieden, vlugten
Several=Verscheyden

Topics: conscience, imagination, punishment, guilt, pity

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
He, he, ’tis he.
Oh, that’s well said—the chair!
Some good man bear him carefully from hence.
I’ll fetch the general’s surgeon.—
For you, mistress,
Save you your labour.—He that lies slain here, Cassio,
Was my dear friend. What malice was between you?
CASSIO
None in the world, nor do I know the man.
IAGO
What, look you pale?—Oh, bear him out o’ the air.—
Do you perceive the gastness of her eye?—Stay you, good
gentlemen.—Look you pale, mistress?—
Nay, if you stare, we shall hear more anon.—
Behold her well. I pray you, look upon her.
Do you see, gentlemen? Nay, guiltiness
Will speak, though tongues were out of use.

DUTCH:
Gij ziet het, heeren? ja, ‘t geweten spreekt,
Al is de tong geboeid.

MORE:
Gastness=Ghastness, ghastliness, haggard look (fear, terror)
Though tongues out of use=Even without the power of speech
Bear him out o’ the air=Take him inside (fresh air being considered bad for wounds)
Compleat:
Guiltiness=Schuldigheid; misdaadigheid

Topics: guilt, language, appearance

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
MACBETH
Oh, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!
Thou know’st that Banquo, and his Fleance, lives.
LADY MACBETH
But in them nature’s copy’s not eterne.
MACBETH
There’s comfort yet; they are assailable.
Then be thou jocund. Ere the bat hath flown
His cloistered flight, ere to black Hecate’s summons
The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
hath rung night’s yawning peal, there shall be done
A deed of dreadful note.

DUTCH:
O vrouw, vol schorpioenen is mijn hart

MORE:
“Mis”quoted as “A guilty mind is full of scorpions”
Schmidt:
Assailable=Liable to an attack
Jocund=Gay, lively, brisk
Of note= Any distinction or eminence. With an adjective denoting the particular kind of distinction: i.e. a deed of dreadful note

Topics: guilt, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: First Witch
CONTEXT:
Sleep shall neither night nor day
Hang upon his penthouse lid.
He shall live a man forbid.
Weary sev’nnights nine times nine
Shall he dwindle, peak and pine.

DUTCH:
De slaap zal nacht noch dag aan het deksel van zijn penthouse hangen/
En geen slaap zijn oogen sluit; Dag noch nacht, te geener uur

MORE:
Schmidt:
Penthouse lid=Eyelid
A man forbid=A man cursed
Sevennight (or sennight)=Week
Dwindle, peak and pine=Shrink, grow lean and wear away, languish
Compleat:
Penthouse=Luyfel
Sevennight (Sennyt)=Week
Dwindle away=Verdwynen, te niet loopen
Peaking=Ziekelyk, quynende
To pine=Quynen, hartzeer ztten, een teering zetten
Pine away=Uytteeren, de teering zetten

Topics: guilt, conscience, regret

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Gertrude
CONTEXT:
To my sick soul (as sin’s true nature is)
Each toy seems prologue to some great amiss.
So full of artless jealousy is guilt,
It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.

DUTCH:
Zoo vol natuurlijke argwaan is de schuld, Onthulling vreezend, zij zichtzelf onthult. /
De reedlooze argwaan is bij schuld zoo groot, Dat met haar doodsangst schuld zich zelve doodt. /
Onze zonden slaan ons met vrees, en vrees beweegt de schuld tot zelfonthulling voor zij wordt onthuld.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Each toy= The slightest thing
Prologue= To preface
Jealousy=Suspicion
Compleat:
Jealousy (Jealoesie)(or suspicion)=Agterdogtig
Full of jealousies=Zeer agterdenkend

Topics: guilt, conscience, suspicion

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: First Murderer
CONTEXT:
FIRST MURDERER
Remember our reward when the deed’s done.
SECOND MURDERER
Zounds, he dies! I had forgot the reward.
FIRST MURDERER
Where’s thy conscience now?
SECOND MURDERER
O, in the duke of Gloucester’s purse.
FIRST MURDERER
So when he opens his purse to give us our reward, thy conscience flies out.
SECOND MURDERER
‘Tis no matter. Let it go. There’s few or none will entertain it.
FIRST MURDERER
What if it come to thee again?
SECOND MURDERER
I’ll not meddle with it. It makes a man a coward: a man cannot steal but it accuseth him; a man cannot swear but it checks him; a man cannot lie with his neighbour’s wife but it detects him. ‘Tis a blushing, shamefaced spirit that mutinies in a man’s bosom. It fills a man full of obstacles. It made me once restore a purse of gold that by chance I found. It beggars any man that keeps it. It is turned out of towns and cities for a dangerous thing, and every man that means to live well endeavours to trust to himself and live without it.

DUTCH:
Als hij zijn beurs opent om ons to beloonen, vliegt
uw geweten er Hit .

MORE:
Restrain=Legal use: keep back, withhold. Among examples in the New Eng. Dict, is: “The rents, issues, and profites thereof [they] have wrongfully restreyned, perceyved, and taken to their owne use.”

Entertain=Host
Meddle=Bother
Checks=Restrains
Live well=Virtuously, honestly
Compleat:
Entertain=Onthaalen, huysvesten, plaats vergunnen
Meddle=Bemoeijen, moeijen
Check=Berispen, beteugelen, intoomen, verwyten

Topics: courage, conscience, guilt, money

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
The prince of Cumberland! That is a step
On which I must fall down, or else o’erleap,
For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires;
Let not light see my black and deep desires.
The eye wink at the hand, yet let that be
Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.

DUTCH:
Taant, sterren! dat uw gloed
Den zwarten wensch niet zie van mijn gemoed!

MORE:

Topics: deceit, conspiracy, plans/intentions, guilt, betrayal, foul play

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind;
The thief doth fear each bush an officer.
KING HENRY VI
The bird that hath been limed in a bush,
With trembling wings misdoubteth every bush;
And I, the hapless male to one sweet bird,
Have now the fatal object in my eye
Where my poor young was limed, was caught and kill’d.

DUTCH:
Argwaan waart in het schuldig hart steeds om;
De dief vermoedt in elke ruigte een rakker.

MORE:

Proverb: Birds once snared (limed) fear all bushes
Proverb: The escaped mouse ever feels the taste of the bait

Birdlime=Sticky substance put on trees to catch small birds
To lime=To smear with birdlime, seek to catch
Misdoubt=To suspect, be apprehensive about; have dounts as to
Hapless=Unfortunate

Compleat:
Bird-lime=Vogellym
Misdoubt=’t Onrecht twyffelen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, suspicion, guilt

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Richard, Duke of Gloucester
CONTEXT:
LORD MAYOR
Now fair befall you! He deserved his death,
And your good Graces both have well proceeded
To warn false traitors from the like attempts.
I never looked for better at his hands
After he once fell in with Mrs Shore.
RICHARD
Yet had we not determined he should die
Until your Lordship came to see his end
(Which now the loving haste of these our friends,
Something against our meaning, have prevented),
Because, my lord, I would have had you heard
The traitor speak, and timorously confess
The manner and the purpose of his treasons,
That you might well have signified the same
Unto the citizens, who haply may
Misconstrue us in him, and wail his death.
LORD MAYOR
But, my good lord, your Graces’ words shall serve
As well as I had seen and heard him speak;
And do not doubt, right noble princes both,
But I’ll acquaint our duteous citizens
With all your just proceedings in this case.
RICHARD
And to that end we wished your Lordship here
T’ avoid the censures of the carping world.
BUCKINGHAM
Which since you come too late of our intent,
Yet witness what you hear we did intend.
And so, my good Lord Mayor, we bid farewell.

DUTCH:
Juist hierom wenschten wij uw lordschap hier,
Om elk verwijt te ontgaan der booze wereld.

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Fair befall=Good fortune to you
The like=Similar
Looked for=Expected
Meaning=Intention
Timorously=Timidly
Haply=Perhaps
Misconster us in him=Misconstrue what we did to him
Case=Business, affair
Carping=Critical, complaining
In all post=In all haste
Compleat:
Befall=Gebeuren, overkomen
I never saw the like=Ik heb diergelyk nooit gezien
Not looked for=Onverwacht, onverhoeds
Meaning=Opzet
Timorous=Vreesachtig, bevreesd, vervaard
Haply=Misschien
Misconstrue=Misduyden, verkeerd uytleggen
To carp=Plukken, pluyzen, bedillen, muggeziften

Topics: fate/destiny, adversity, guilt, betrayal

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
’Tis one thing to be tempted, Escalus,
Another thing to fall. I not deny,
The jury, passing on the prisoner’s life,
May in the sworn twelve have a thief or two
Guiltier than him they try. But justice takes the opportunities it has; who knows what laws thieves pass against other thieves?

DUTCH:
k Loochen niet,
Dat onder de gezwoor’nen voor een halszaak
Het twaalftal licht éen dief, zelfs twee, kan tellen,
Wier schuld die des gedaagden overtreft;

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Topics: law/legal, justice, guilt, honesty, judgment

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Launcelot
CONTEXT:
LAUNCELOT
Yes, truly, for look you, the sins of the father are to
be laid upon the children. Therefore I promise ye I
fear you. I was always plain with you, and so now I
speak my agitation of the matter. Therefore be o’ good
cheer, for truly I think you are damned. There is but
one hope in it that can do you any good, and that is but
a kind of bastard hope neither.

DUTCH:
Ja, waarlijk! want ziet ge, de zonden des vaders worden
bezocht aan de kinderen; daarom, ik verzeker u, hen ik bang voor u.

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CITED IN US LAW:
Fogleman v. Mercy Hospital, Inc., 283 F.3d 561 (2002);
Tison v. Arizona, 481 U.S. 137, 183-84 (1987). In discussing the need for sentencing to “respond to the reasonable goals of punishment”, Justice White added in a footnote “Thy fathers’ sins, O Roman, thou, though guiltless, shall expiate”.
United States v. Auerbach, 745 F.2d 1157, 1160 (1984);
Miller v. CIR, T. C. Memo 1989-461 (1989): “With deference to Shakespeare, the fraud of the father is not the fraud of the son”;
Misenheimer v. Misenheimer, 312 N.C. 692, 698 (1985);
Adams v. Franco, 168 Misc.2d 399, 403 (N.Y., 1996).

Agitation=emotion, disturbance
Neither=Following a negative by way of enforcing it (i.e. for all that, yet)
Bastard (hope)=spurious, adulterate
Compleat:
Agitation=Schudding, beweeging, beroering
Bastard=Valsch. A bastard generosity=Een valsche édelmoedigheid

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Doctor
CONTEXT:
MACBETH
Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
DOCTOR
Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
MACBETH
Throw physic to the dogs; I’ll none of it.

DUTCH:
Hier moet de kranke Zichzelf tot arts zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Minister to=Administer (medicines), to prescribe, to order
CITED IN LAW: In a direct quotation or “borrowed eloquence” in White v Chief Constable of the South Yorkshire Police [1999] 1 All ER 1, considering the concepts of foreseeability and psychiatric injury, Lord Hoffmann noted, as the Doctor of Physic tells Macbeth: “therein the patient must minister to himself” (Macbeth Act 5, Scene 3).

Topics: madness, memory, guilt, conscience, remedy

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Flavius
CONTEXT:
FLAVIUS
Go, go, good countrymen, and for this fault,
Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears
Into the channel till the lowest stream
Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
See whether their basest metal be not moved.
They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
Go you down that way towards the Capitol.
This way will I. Disrobe the images
If you do find them decked with ceremonies.
MURELLUS
May we do so?
You know it is the feast of Lupercal.
FLAVIUS
It is no matter. Let no images
Be hung with Caesar’s trophies. I’ll about
And drive away the vulgar from the streets.
So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
These growing feathers plucked from Caesar’s wing
Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,
Who else would soar above the view of men
And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

DUTCH:
Ruk Caesar’s vleugels deze veeren uit ;
Dit houdt zijn vlucht wat lager bij den grond.

MORE:
Sort=Rank
Kiss=Touch
Most exalted=Highest river level
Metal=Punning on mettle: spirit, disposition
Disrobe=Undress
Ceremonies=Caesar’s supporters would put diadems on statues
Trophies=Symbols of the ruler
Lupercal=A fertility festival
Vulgar=Common people
Pitch=Height, highest point of flight. Plucking feathers would prevent Caesar from rising above ordinary Roman citizens.
Compleat:
Sort=Soort
Exalted=Verhoogd, verheven
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
To disrobe=Den tabberd uitschudden; zich ontkleeden
Ceremony=Plegtigheyd
Trophy=Een zeegeteken, trofee
Vulgar=(common) Gemeen
Pitch=Pik

Burgersdijk notes:
Laat met Caesar’s zegeteek’nen enz. Plutarchus vermeldt, dat er beelden van Caesar werden opgericht met diademen op het hoofd, en dat de volkstribunen, Flavius en Marullus, die omverhaalden.
Ruk Caesar’s vleugels deze veed’ren uit. Namelijk de gunst van het gepeupel – the vulgar – een paar regels vroeger genoemd. In ‘t Engelsch wordt gesproken van ‘These growing feathers’, „dit wassend gevederte”; in de vertaling is het woord “wassend” weggevallen.

Topics: guilt, ingratitude, order/society, status, leadership

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Henry Bolingbroke
CONTEXT:
EXTON
Great king, within this coffin I present
Thy buried fear: herein all breathless lies
The mightiest of thy greatest enemies,
Richard of Bordeaux, by me hither brought.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Exton, I thank thee not; for thou hast wrought
A deed of slander with thy fatal hand
Upon my head and all this famous land.
EXTON
From your own mouth, my lord, did I this deed.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
They love not poison that do poison need,
Nor do I thee: though I did wish him dead,
I hate the murderer, love him murdered.
The guilt of conscience take thou for thy labour,
But neither my good word nor princely favour:
With Cain go wander through shades of night,
And never show thy head by day nor light.

DUTCH:
Exton, ik dank u niet; voorwaar, ik gruw
Van zulk een daad, waardoor uw booze hand
Vloek brengt op mij en heel dit roemrijk land.

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Deed of slander=Reproach, disgrace, scandal

Compleat:
Slander=Laster, lasterkladde

Topics: regret, conscience, guilt

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
What stronger breastplate than a heart untainted!
Thrice is he armed that hath his quarrel just,
And he but naked, though lock’d up in steel
Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted.

DUTCH:
Welk harnas is er als een vlekk’loos hart?
Driewerf gepantserd is wie ‘t recht verdedigt,
En hij is naakt, hoe ‘t staal hem ook omsluit’,
Wien ongerechtigheid het hart verpest.

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Proverb: Innocence bears its defence with it

Quarrel just=Has a just cause
Locked up in steel=Wearing armour

Compleat:
Quarrel=Krakeel; twist
Just (righteous)=Een rechtvaardige

Topics: proverbs and idioms, dispute, guilt

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
We are oft to blame in this,
‘Tis too much proved, that with devotion’s visage
And pious action we do sugar o’er
The devil himself

DUTCH:
Vaak zijn wij te laken dat wij met devoot gelaat en vroom gebaar de duivel zelf verbloemen./
Soms, doen wij berispelijk, – Te vaak ‘t vertoond werd, dat met vroom gelaat En heilge handling we oversuikeren Den duivel zelf.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Sugar (over)= To sweeten (in a metaphorical sense), to embellish, to colour
Compleat:
To sugar=Zoet maken.
Sugared words=Gesuikerede woorden

Topics: appearance, deceit, guilt

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Flavius
CONTEXT:
FLAVIUS
Go, go, good countrymen, and for this fault,
Assemble all the poor men of your sort,
Draw them to Tiber banks, and weep your tears
Into the channel till the lowest stream
Do kiss the most exalted shores of all.
See whether their basest metal be not moved.
They vanish tongue-tied in their guiltiness.
Go you down that way towards the Capitol.
This way will I. Disrobe the images
If you do find them decked with ceremonies.
MURELLUS
May we do so?
You know it is the feast of Lupercal.
FLAVIUS
It is no matter. Let no images
Be hung with Caesar’s trophies. I’ll about
And drive away the vulgar from the streets.
So do you too, where you perceive them thick.
These growing feathers plucked from Caesar’s wing
Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,
Who else would soar above the view of men
And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

DUTCH:
Voert ze aan des Tibers oevers, en vergiet
Uw tranen in zijn bedding, tot de stroom
Van ‘t laagste deel de hoogste boorden kust.

MORE:
Sort=Rank
Kiss=Touch
Most exalted=Highest river level
Metal=Punning on mettle: spirit, disposition
Disrobe=Undress
Ceremonies=Caesar’s supporters would decorate statues in his honour
Trophies=Symbols of the ruler
Lupercal=A fertility festival
Vulgar=Common people
Pitch=Height, highest point of flight. Plucking feathers would prevent Caesar from rising above ordinary Roman citizens.
Compleat:
Exalted=Verhoogd, verheven
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
To disrobe=Den tabberd uitschudden; zich ontkleeden
Ceremony=Plegtigheyd
Trophy=Een zeegeteken, trofee
Vulgar=(common) Gemeen
Pitch=Pik

Burgersdijk notes:
Laat met Caesar’s zegeteek’nen enz. Plutarchus vermeldt, dat er beelden van Caesar werden opgericht met diademen op het hoofd, en dat de volkstribunen, Flavius en Marullus, die omverhaalden.
Ruk Caesar’s vleugels deze veed’ren uit. Namelijk de gunst van het gepeupel – the vulgar – een paar regels vroeger genoemd. In ‘t Engelsch wordt gesproken van ‘These growing feathers’, „dit wassend gevederte”; in de vertaling is het woord “wassend” weggevallen.

Topics: guilt, ingratitude, order/society, status, leadership

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Out, damned spot! Out, I say!—One, two. Why, then, ’tis time to do ’t. Hell is murky!—Fie, my lord, fie! A soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account?—Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him.

DUTCH:
Wat behoeven wij te duchten, dat iemand het te weten
komt, als niemand onze macht ter verantwoording kan
roepen

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, guilt, suspicion, consequence, punishment

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
I do beseech your Grace,
Let me the knowledge of my fault bear with me.
If with myself I hold intelligence
Or have acquaintance with mine own desires,
If that I do not dream or be not frantic—
As I do trust I am not—then, dear uncle,
Never so much as in a thought unborn
Did I offend your Highness.
DUKE FREDERICK
Thus do all traitors.
If their purgation did consist in words,
They are as innocent as grace itself.
Let it suffice thee that I trust thee not.
ROSALIND
Yet your mistrust cannot make me a traitor.
Tell me whereon the likelihood depends.

DUTCH:
Kan mijn verraad uit uwen argwaan blijken?
Zeg mij ten minste, op welken schijn die rust.

MORE:
Purgation=Clearing from imputation of guilt, exculpation. Used in theology (Purgatory and declaration of innocence oath) and as a legal term of proving of innocence
Frantic=Mad
Likelihood=Probability
Compleat:
Purgation (the clearing one’s self of a crime)=Zuivering van een misdaad
Frantick=Zinneloos, hersenloos, ylhoofdig
Likelihood=Waarschynelykheid

Topics: hope/optimism, madness, offence, guilt, suspicion

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