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PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Flavius
CONTEXT:
FLAVIUS
Heavens, have I said, the bounty of this lord!
How many prodigal bits have slaves and peasants
This night englutted! Who is not Timon’s?
What heart, head, sword, force, means, but is
Lord Timon’s?
Great Timon, noble, worthy, royal Timon!
Ah, when the means are gone that buy this praise,
The breath is gone whereof this praise is made:
Feast-won, fast-lost; one cloud of winter showers,
These flies are couched.

DUTCH:
Ach, rijkdom kocht dien lof; vervloog die, fluks
Vervliegt de lof, die louter adem is;
Wat feesten schonken, neemt het vasten weer;
Eén wintervlaag, en schuil gaan deze vliegen.


MORE:
Prodigal=Wasteful
Bits=Scraps
Englutted=Swallowed
Couched=Concealed, disappear
Compleat:
Prodigal=Quistig, verquistend, quistachtig
To englut=Verkroppen

Topics: money, poverty and wealth, caution, gullibility, manipulation

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Apemantus
CONTEXT:
APEMANTUS
What a coil’s here!
Serving of becks and jutting-out of bums!
I doubt whether their legs be worth the sums
That are given for ’em. Friendship’s full of dregs:
Methinks, false hearts should never have sound legs,
Thus honest fools lay out their wealth on curtseys.
TIMON
Now, Apemantus, if thou wert not sullen, I would be
good to thee.
APEMANTUS
No, I’ll nothing: for if I should be bribed too,
there would be none left to rail upon thee, and then
thou wouldst sin the faster. Thou givest so long,
Timon, I fear me thou wilt give away thyself in
paper shortly: what need these feasts, pomps and
vain-glories?

DUTCH:
Die vriendschap is vol droesem; ik zou meenen,
Bij ‘t valsche hart behoorden lamme beenen.
‘t Gekniebuig kost een braven nar zijn geld.

MORE:
Coil=Commotion
Serving of becks=Bowing and scraping
Dregs=Impurities
Rail upon=Criticise
Give thyself away=Overextend yourself
Paper=Promissory notes
Vain-glories=Spectacles, celebrations
Compleat:
Coil=Geraas, getier
Beck=Een wenk, knik
Dregs=Droesssem, grondsop
To rail=Schelden
Vain glory=Ydele glorie

Topics: flattery, deceitvanity, gullibility, friendship

PLAY: Twelfth Night
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Maria
CONTEXT:
FABIAN
And his opposite, the youth, bears in his visage no
great presage of cruelty.
SIR TOBY BELCH
Look where the youngest wren of nine comes.
MARIA
If you desire the spleen, and will laugh yourself into
stitches, follow me. Yond gull Malvolio is turned
heathen, a very renegado. For there is no Christian that
means to be saved by believing rightly can ever believe
such impossible passages of grossness. He’s in yellow
stockings.
SIR TOBY BELCH
And cross-gartered?
MARIA
Most villanously, like a pedant that keeps a school i’
the church. I have dogged him, like his murderer. He
does obey every point of the letter that I dropped to
betray him. He does smile his face into more lines than
is in the new map with the augmentation of the Indies.
You have not seen such a thing as ’tis. I can hardly
forbear hurling things at him. I know my lady will
strike him. If she do, he’ll smile and take ’t for a
great favor.

DUTCH:
Hij volgt elk punt van den brief, dien ik neergeworpen
heb om hem te foppen: hij lacht meer lijnen in
zijn gezicht dan er op de nieuwe wereldkaart, waar de
Indiën op staan, te vinden zijn

MORE:

Gull=A person easily deceived, a dupe, a fool
The spleen=An uncontrollable fit (here of laughter)
Grossness=Exaggeration
Pedant=Teacher
More lines=Rhumb lines used to navigate that criss-cross the map
Augmentation=Probably with the addition of the East Indies
Compleat:
Gull=Bedrieger
To gull=Bedriegen, verschalken. You look as if you had a mind to gull me=Hete schynt of gy voorneemens waart om my te foppen
Grossness=Grofheid, plompheid
Een pedant=Een kindermeester, schoolmeester
Augmentation=Vermeerdering, toeneeming

Burgersdijk notes:
Hij lacht meer lijnen in zijn gezicht enz. Hoogstwaarschijnlijk een toespeling op de nieuwe wereldkaart, die bij de vertaling van Linschoten’s reizen in 1598 verschenen was en waarop voor het eerst de eilanden van den Oost-Indischen Archipel geteekend waren. De kaart is overal met lijnen doorsneden om de streken van het kompas aan te geven.

Topics: gullibility, appearance

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
EDGAR
The foul fiend bites my back.
FOOL
He’s mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a horse’s health, a boy’s love, or a whore’s oath.

DUTCH:
Hij is gek die vertrouwt op de makheid van een wolf, de gezondheid van een paard, de liefde van een jongen of de eed van een hoer./
Alleen een gek vertrouwt op de tamheid van een wolf, de ge-
zondheid van een paard, de liefde van een jongen of de eed van een hoer.

MORE:

Topics: gullibility, madness, betrayal, trust, deceit

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
First note that he is near you in descent,
And should you fall, he as the next will mount.
Meseemeth then it is no policy,
Respecting what a rancorous mind he bears
And his advantage following your decease,
That he should come about your royal person
Or be admitted to your highness’ council.
By flattery hath he won the commons’ hearts,
And when he please to make commotion,
‘Tis to be fear’d they all will follow him.
Now ’tis the spring, and weeds are shallow-rooted;
Suffer them now, and they’ll o’ergrow the garden
And choke the herbs for want of husbandry.
The reverent care I bear unto my lord
Made me collect these dangers in the duke.
If it be fond, call it a woman’s fear;
Which fear if better reasons can supplant,
I will subscribe and say I wrong’d the duke.
My Lord of Suffolk, Buckingham, and York,
Reprove my allegation, if you can;
Or else conclude my words effectual.

DUTCH:
t Is voorjaar nog en ‘t onkruid vlak van wortels;
Verschoont gij ‘t nu, het overgroeit den hof
En bij verzuim verstikt het al ‘t gezaaide.

MORE:

Meseemeth=It seems to me
No policy=Not wise
Respecting=Considering
Commotion=Rebellion
Husbandry=Care, cultivation, tillage
Collect=Conclude, gather
Fond=Foolish
Subscribe=Admit, confess to being in the wrong
Reprove=Disprove, confute

Compleat:
It seems to me=Heet schynt my toe
Respect=Achting, inzigt
Commotion=Beweeging, beroerte, oproer, oploop
Husbandry=Landbouw
Fond (foolish)=Dwaas
Subscribe (submit or consent)=Iet toestaan, zich ergens aan onderwerpen
To reprove=Bestraffen, berispen

Topics: respect, reputation, trust, gullibility, wisdom

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Regan
CONTEXT:
O sir, to wilful men,
The injuries that they themselves procure
Must be their schoolmasters. Shut up your doors.
He is attended with a desperate train.
And what they may incense him to, being apt
To have his ear abused, wisdom bids fear.

DUTCH:
Wie eigenzinnig is; Heeft in het leed, dat hij zichzelf bereidt; Een goede leerschool./
Dwarskoppen moeten
hun lesje leren van het leed dat zij
zichzelf toebrengen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wilful=Obstinate, stubborn, refractory
Train=Retinue
To have his ear abused=Susceptible to misleading tales
Compleat:
Wilfull (obstinate)=Halstarrig

Topics: life, age/experience, gullibility, manipulation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Small curs are not regarded when they grin;
But great men tremble when the lion roars;
And Humphrey is no little man in England.
First note that he is near you in descent,
And should you fall, he as the next will mount.
Meseemeth then it is no policy,
Respecting what a rancorous mind he bears
And his advantage following your decease,
That he should come about your royal person
Or be admitted to your highness’ council.
By flattery hath he won the commons’ hearts,
And when he please to make commotion,
‘Tis to be fear’d they all will follow him.

DUTCH:
Wie let er op, als kleine hondjens keffen?
Doch brult de leeuw, dan sidd’ren groote mannen;

MORE:

Small curs=Small dogs
Meseemeth=It seems to me
No policy=Not wise
Respecting=Considering
Commotion=Rebellion

Compleat:
Cur (curr)=Hond
It seems to me=Heet schynt my toe
Respect=Achting, inzigt
Commotion=Beweeging, beroerte, oproer, oploop

Topics: respect, reputation, trust, gullibility, wisdom

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
Yes, my lord, and of very valiant approof.
LAFEW
You have it from his own deliverance.
BERTRAM
And by other warranted testimony.
LAFEW
Then my dial goes not true: I took this lark for a bunting.
BERTRAM
I do assure you, my lord, he is very great in knowledge, and accordingly valiant.
LAFEW
I have then sinned against his experience and transgressed against his valour; and my state that way is dangerous, since I cannot yet find in my heart to repent. Here he comes ; I pray you, make us friends ; I will pursue the amity.

DUTCH:
Dan gaat mijn uurwerk niet goed. Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors.

MORE:
Proverb: To take a bunting for a lark
“The bunting is, in feather, size, and form, so like the skylark, as to require nice attention to discover the one from the other; it also ascends and sinks in the air nearly in the same manner; but it has little or no song, which gives estimation to the skylark.” (Johnson).
Approof=Proven (valour)
Deliverance=Account
Accordingly=Correspondingly
Dangerous=At risk (of damnation)
Amity=Friendship

Burgersdijk notes:
Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors. De bedoelde gors, in het Engelsch bunting, is de grauwe gors, ook wel gierstvogel genoemd. Terwijl de leeuwrik zich hoog in de lucht verheft en aangenaam zingt, zet de gors zich op steenen palen, struiken of lage boomen en laat daar vaak zijn schor, bijna knarsend geluid hooren, dat nauwelijks een zang te noemen is. Het zeggen van Lafeu doet zien, hoe goed Sh. de vogels kende, want de gors en Ieeuwrik gelijken in kleur van gevederte veel op elkaar, en de gorzen, die in den herfst en den winter in troepen bijeen leven, worden, omdat zij dan zeer vet zijn, in Engeland en elders vaak gevangen en, onder den naam van leeuwriken, voor de tafel verkocht.

Topics: gullibility, appearance, offence, error, regret, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Sicinius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Get you hence instantly, and tell those friends,
They have chose a consul that will from them take
Their liberties; make them of no more voice
Than dogs that are as often beat for barking
As therefore kept to do so.
SICINIUS
Let them assemble,
And on a safer judgment all revoke
Your ignorant election; enforce his pride,
And his old hate unto you; besides, forget not
With what contempt he wore the humble weed,
How in his suit he scorn’d you; but your loves,
Thinking upon his services, took from you
The apprehension of his present portance,
Which most gibingly, ungravely, he did fashion
After the inveterate hate he bears you.
BRUTUS
Lay
A fault on us, your tribunes; that we laboured,
No impediment between, but that you must
Cast your election on him.
SICINIUS
Say, you chose him
More after our commandment than as guided
By your own true affections, and that your minds,
Preoccupied with what you rather must do
Than what you should, made you against the grain
To voice him consul: lay the fault on us.

DUTCH:
Gaat, spoedt u tot die vrienden; maakt hun duid’lijk,
Dat zij een consul kozen, die hun rechten
Hun nemen zal, hun zooveel stem zal laten
Als honden, die men ranselt om hun blaffen
En toch voor ‘t blaffen houdt.

MORE:
Proverb: Goes against the grain

Took from you the apprehension …portance=Blinded you to his behaviour
Ungravely=Without appropriate gravity or seriousness
Fashion after=Frame to conform with
Gibingly=Mockingly
Portance=Carriage, demeanour
Weeds=Clothing
Inveterate=Long-standing

Compleat:
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad
Inveterate=Verouderd, ingeworteld
The inveterate hatred=Een ingeworteld haat

Topics: appearance, deceit, blame, gullibility, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Lucullus
CONTEXT:
LUCULLUS
I have observed thee always for a towardly prompt
spirit—give thee thy due—and one that knows what
belongs to reason; and canst use the time well, if
the time use thee well: good parts in thee.
Get you gone, sirrah.
Draw nearer, honest Flaminius. Thy lord’s a
bountiful gentleman: but thou art wise; and thou
knowest well enough, although thou comest to me,
that this is no time to lend money, especially upon
bare friendship, without security. Here’s three
solidares for thee: good boy, wink at me, and say
thou sawest me not. Fare thee well.
FLAMINIUS
Is’t possible the world should so much differ,
And we alive that lived? Fly, damned baseness,
To him that worships thee!
LUCULLUS
Ha! now I see thou art a fool, and fit for thy master.

DUTCH:
Uw meester is een milddadig edelman; maar
gij zijt verstandig, en weet zoo goed als ik, al komt gij
nu tot mij, dat het tegenwoordig geen tijd is om geld
uit te leenen, en dat wel op loutere vriendschap, zonder
eenige zekerheid.

MORE:
Towardly=Malleable, friendly
Prompt=Timely, efficient
Spirit=Character
Parts=Qualities
Solidare=Coin of little value
Differ=Change
Fit=Appropriate
Compleat:
Towardly=(gentle, good-natured): Goedaardig, gedwee, zagtzinnig; (docile): Leerzaam
Prompt=Vaardig, gereed, snel, gezwind
Parts=Deelen, hoedaanigheden, begaafdheden
Fit=Bequaam, dienstig, betaaamelyk, raadzaam

Burgersdijk notes:
Drie staters. Drie goudstukken; het Engelsch heeft hier solidares, een woord, dat anders nergens voorkomt, maar van het Latijnsche woord solidus, een gouden munt, schijnt gemaakt te zijn.

Topics: money, honesty, security, gullibility

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Apemantus
CONTEXT:
APEMANTUS
What a coil’s here!
Serving of becks and jutting-out of bums!
I doubt whether their legs be worth the sums
That are given for ’em. Friendship’s full of dregs:
Methinks, false hearts should never have sound legs,
Thus honest fools lay out their wealth on court’sies.
TIMON
Now, Apemantus, if thou wert not sullen, I would be
good to thee.
APEMANTUS
No, I’ll nothing: for if I should be bribed too,
there would be none left to rail upon thee, and then
thou wouldst sin the faster. Thou givest so long,
Timon, I fear me thou wilt give away thyself in
paper shortly: what need these feasts, pomps and
vain-glories?

DUTCH:
Gij gaaft reeds
zoo lang, Timon. Ik ben bang, dat gij u nog geheel in
schuldbekentenissen zult weggeven. Wat hebt gij aan die
feesten, optochten en al dien ijdelen pronk ?

MORE:
Coil=Commotion
Serving of becks=Bowing and scraping
Dregs=Impurities
Rail upon=Criticise
Give thyself away=Overextend yourself
Paper=Promissory notes
Vain-glories=Spectacles, celebrations
Compleat:
Coil=Geraas, getier
Beck=Een wenk, knik
Dregs=Droesssem, grondsop
To rail=Schelden
Vain glory=Ydele glorie

Topics: flattery, deceitvanity, gullibility, friendship

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Luciana
CONTEXT:
What simple thief brags of his own attaint?
‘Tis double wrong to truant with your bed
And let her read it in thy looks at board.
Shame hath a bastard fame, well managèd;
Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word.
Alas, poor women, make us but believe,
Being compact of credit, that you love us.
Though others have the arm, show us the sleeve;
We in your motion turn, and you may move us.
Then, gentle brother, get you in again.
Comfort my sister, cheer her, call her wife.
‘Tis holy sport to be a little vain
When the sweet breath of flattery conquers strife.

DUTCH:
Een weinig huich’lens is een vroom bedrog,
Als zoete vleitaal twist bedwingen kan.

MORE:
Attaint=Stain, crime
Vain=Deceitful
Compact of credit=Made of credulity, entirely believable

Topics: flattery, offence, appearance, gullibility

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Good Lord, how like the empress’ sons they are!
And you, the empress! but we worldly men
Have miserable, mad, mistaking eyes.
O sweet Revenge, now do I come to thee;
And, if one arm’s embracement will content thee,
I will embrace thee in it by and by.
TAMORA
This closing with him fits his lunacy
Whate’er I forge to feed his brain-sick fits,
Do you uphold and maintain in your speeches,
For now he firmly takes me for Revenge;
And, being credulous in this mad thought,
I’ll make him send for Lucius his son;
And, whilst I at a banquet hold him sure,
I’ll find some cunning practise out of hand,
To scatter and disperse the giddy Goths,
Or, at the least, make them his enemies.
See, here he comes, and I must ply my theme.

DUTCH:
Zoo met hem om te gaan past bij zijn waanzin.
Wat ik nu uitdenk voor zijn dolle vlagen,
Steunt gij dat, zet het voort door wat gij zegt;
Want hij gelooft nu vast, dat ik de Wraak ben;

MORE:
Worldly=Mortal, of this world
Closing=Agreeing
Fits=Is appropriate to
Humours=Moods, whims
Sure=Safe
Practice=Scheme
Out of hand=Off the cuff, spontaneously
Ply my theme=Keep up my performance
Compleat:
Worldly=Waereldsch
To close=Overeenstemmen; besluiten
To fit=Passen, pas maaken
Humour (dispositon of the mind)=Humeur, of gemoeds gesteldheid
Sure=Zeker, vast, wis, veilig, getrouw
Practice (underhand dealing, intrigue, way of proceeding)=Praktyk, bedekten handel, list
Out of hand=Op staande voet, terstond
To ply=Wakker op iets aanvallen
He plies me too hard=Hy valt my al te hard hy wil al te veel werks van my hebben

Topics: revenge, deceit, betrayal, gullibility

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Scrivener
CONTEXT:
SCRIVENER
This is the indictment of the good Lord Hastings,
Which in a set hand fairly is engrossed,
That it may be today read o’er in Paul’s.
And mark how well the sequel hangs together:
Eleven hours I have spent to write it over,
For yesternight by Catesby was it sent me;
The precedent was full as long a-doing,
And yet within these five hours Hastings lived,
Untainted, unexamined, free, at liberty.
Here’s a good world the while. Who is so gross
That cannot see this palpable device?
Yet who so bold but says he sees it not?
Bad is the world, and all will come to naught
When such ill dealing must be seen in thought.

DUTCH:
Wie is zoo stomp,
Dat hij then tastb’ren toeleg niet doorziet,
En wie zoo stout, te zeggen, wat hij ziet?

MORE:
Fairly engrossed=Clearly written
Sequel=Chronology of events
Precedent=Original draft
Untainted=Not accused
Gross=Stupid
Palpable device=Obvious strategy
Seen in thought=Not spoken of
Compleat:
To engross=Te boek stellen, in’t net stellen
Precedent=Voorgaande, voorbeeld
Untainted=Gaaf, onbedurven, onbesmet
Gross=Grof, plomp, onbebouwen
Palpable=Tastelyk, tastbaar
Device=List; uytvindsel, gedichtsel

Topics: clarity/precision, communication, intellect, gullibility

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