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PLAY: King Henry V ACT/SCENE: 2.4 SPEAKER: Exeter CONTEXT: From him, and thus he greets your Majesty:
He wills you, in the name of God almighty,
That you divest yourself and lay apart
The borrowed glories that, by gift of heaven,
By law of nature and of nations, ’longs
To him and to his heirs—namely, the crown
And all wide-stretchèd honours that pertain
By custom and the ordinance of times
Unto the crown of France. That you may know
’Tis no sinister nor no awkward claim
Picked from the wormholes of long-vanished days
Nor from the dust of old oblivion raked,
He sends you this most memorable line. DUTCH: Opdat gij weten moogt,
Dat dit geen slinksche, wraakb’re vord’ring is,
Ontdekt in ‘t molm van lang vervlogen dagen,
Gerakeld uit vergetelheids oud stof.
MORE:
Ordinance of times=Law of centuries
‘longs=Belongs
Sinister=Unfair, wrong; deceitful
Awkward=Perverse, unbecoming

Compleat:
Awkward=Averechts
Aukward=Averechts, verkeerd
Sinister (or unlawful)=Onbetaamelyk, ongeoorloofd Topics: claim, value, deceit, honour

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
Not so, not so; his life is parallel’d
Even with the stroke and line of his great justice:
He doth with holy abstinence subdue
That in himself which he spurs on his power
To qualify in others: were he meal’d with that
Which he corrects, then were he tyrannous;
But this being so, he’s just.

DUTCH:
Doortrok ook hem de deesem,
Door hem gewraakt, dan waar’ hij tyranniek;
Maar nu is hij rechtvaardig.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Stroke=Line (as made with a pen)
Mealed=Sprinkled, tainted
Compleat:
Meal=Meel
Mealed=Tot poejer gemaakt

Topics: justice, good and bad, honour, reputation, temptation, respect

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
O madam! yonder ‘s my lord your son with a
patch of velvet on ‘s face: whether there be a
scar under ‘t or no, the velvet knows; but ’tis a
goodly patch of velvet. His left cheek is a cheek
of two pile and a half, but his right cheek is worn
bare.
LAFEW
A scar nobly got, or a noble scar, is a good livery of honour; so belike is that.

DUTCH:
Een roemvol verworven schram, of een roemvolle schram, kleedt den adel goed en zoo doet waarschijnlijk ook deze.

MORE:
Patch of velvet: velvet patches were used to cover scars or marks (cicatrice)
Pile=Measure of the depth of velvet (three pile being the thickest)
Belike=As it seems, it should seem, I suppose
Livery=Uniform
Belike=Probably
Compleat:
Her face was full of patches=Haar aangezigt was vol zwarte pleistertjes
Livery=Lievry

Topics: appearance, dignity, honour

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Beggar that I am, I am even poor in thanks; but I thank you, and sure, dear friends, my thanks are too dear a halfpenny.

DUTCH:
Bedelaar die ik Ben: ik heb zelfs gebrek aan dank. Maar ik dank jullie, en geloof me, beste vrienden, die dank is nog geen halve stuiver waard./
Schooier die ik ben, ik ben zelfs arm in dank; toch dank ik u; en zeker, beste vrienden, mijn dank is niet veel waarde, geen halve penning.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Dear= bearing a high price

Compleat:
Dear-bought experience=Een duurgekogte ondervinding

Topics: honour, ingratitude

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
I am not valiant neither,
But ever puny whipster gets my sword.
But why should honour outlive honesty?
Let it go all.

DUTCH:
Ik ben geen krijgsheld meer,
en elke snotaap is mij nu de baas.
Maar waarom overleeft eer eerlijkheid?
Laat alles gaan.

MORE:

Onions:
Whipster=Contemptible fellow (Arden: Whippersnapper)
Puny=Little, petty (meaning invented by Shakespeare)

Compleat:
Puny (a younger brother)=Een jonger broeder
A puny judge=Een jongste rechter (See Puisny. Puisne (or puisny)=a law term for younger; a name given in the house of lords to the youngest baron, and in Westminster hall to the youngest judge. De jongste Lord in ‘t hogerhuis, of de jongste Rechter in de pleitzaal van Westmunster.)
Valiant=Dapper, kloekmoedig

Topics: honesty, strength, honour, reputation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
If we are marked to die, we are enough
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God’s will, I pray thee wish not one man more.
By Jove, I am not covetous for gold
Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
It yearns me not if men my garments wear;
Such outward things dwell not in my desires.
But if it be a sin to covet honour,
I am the most offending soul alive.

DUTCH:
Bij Jupiter, ik heb geen dorst naar goud,
En vraag niet, wie er op mijn kosten teert.

MORE:

Admiration=Wonder
Prating=Prattling, chattering
Coxcomb=Fool (From fool’s cap)
Meet=Appropriate

Compleat:
Admiration=Verwondering
To prate=Praaten
Coxcomb=Een haanekam; een nar, uilskuiken
An ignorant coxcomb=Een onweetende zotskap
Mee

Topics: proverbs and idioms, sill in use, honour

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
TAMORA
Not so, my lord; the gods of Rome forfend
I should be author to dishonour you!
But on mine honour dare I undertake
For good Lord Titus’ innocence in all;
Whose fury not dissembled speaks his griefs:
Then, at my suit, look graciously on him;
Lose not so noble a friend on vain suppose,
Nor with sour looks afflict his gentle heart.
My lord, be ruled by me; be won at last;
Dissemble all your griefs and discontents:
You are but newly planted in your throne;
Lest, then, the people, and patricians too,
Upon a just survey, take Titus’ part,
And so supplant you for ingratitude,
Which Rome reputes to be a heinous sin,
Yield at entreats; and then let me alone:
I’ll find a day to massacre them all
And raze their faction and their family,
The cruel father and his traitorous sons,
To whom I sued for my dear son’s life,
And make them know what ’tis to let a queen
Kneel in the streets and beg for grace in vain.
Come, come, sweet emperor; come, Andronicus;
Take up this good old man, and cheer the

DUTCH:
Neem raad aan, mijn gemaal, geef eindlijk toe;
Ontveins nu al uw grieven en verdriet, —
Te nauwernood zijt ge op uw troon gezeteld.

MORE:
Author to=Responsible for
Undertake=Vouch
Not dissembled=Clear to see, not concealed
Speaks=Conveys, expresses
Vain suppose=Idle supposition
At entreats=To entreaties
Take up=Lift up
Compleat:
Author=Een stichter, aanvanger, vinder, veroorzaaker, aanrechter, aanlegger
To undertake for one=Voor iemand borg staan
To dissemble=Veybnzen, ontveynzen, verbloemen
Supposition=Onderstelling, waan
To entreat=Bidden, ernstig verzoeken

Topics: honour, revenge

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
LODOVICO
O, thou Othello, that wert once so good,
Fallen in the practice of a damned slave,
What shall be said to thee?
OTHELLO
Why, anything.
An honourable murderer, if you will,
For naught I did in hate, but all in honour.

DUTCH:
Zeg maar wat,
een goede moordenaar, zo u dat wilt,
want wat mij aandreef was niet haat, maar eer.

MORE:

In the practice=Through the machinations

Schmidt:
Practice=Artifice, stratagem, insidious device
Slave=Abject person, wretch

Compleat:
Practice (underhand dealing, intrigue, way of proceeding)=Praktyk, bedekten handel, list
Machination=Kwaadstooking, kwaadbrouwing, berokkening

Topics: honour, offence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
Good alone
Is good without a name. Vileness is so:
The property by what it is should go,
Not by the title. She is young, wise, fair;
In these to nature she’s immediate heir,
And these breed honour: that is honour’s scorn,
Which challenges itself as honour’s born
And is not like the sire: honours thrive,
When rather from our acts we them derive
Than our foregoers: the mere word’s a slave
Debauched on every tomb, on every grave
A lying trophy, and as oft is dumb
Where dust and damn’d oblivion is the tomb
Of honour’d bones indeed. What should be said?

DUTCH:
Goed is goed,
Ook zonder hoogen naam; en slecht is slecht;
Alleen op wat hij is, gronde elk zijn recht,
Op titels niet.

MORE:
Idiom: “Let’s write good angel on the devil’s horn, ‘Tis not the devil’s crest”
Challenges itself=Urges as a right, makes a claim for itself
Foregoers=Forebears

Topics: honour, merit, proverbs and idioms, good and bad, order/society

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Cominius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Worthy man!
FIRST SENATOR
He cannot but with measure fit the honours
Which we devise him.
COMINIUS
Our spoils he kick’d at,
And look’d upon things precious as they were
The common muck of the world: he covets less
Than misery itself would give; rewards
His deeds with doing them, and is content
To spend the time to end it.
MENENIUS
He’s right noble:
Let him be call’d for.
FIRST SENATOR
Call Coriolanus.

DUTCH:
Onzen buit verstiet hij;
Op kostb’re schatten zag hij neer, als waren
Zij drek en afval., Zijn verlangst is minder,
Dan de armoe zelf zou geven; zijner daden
Belooning is hem ‘t doen; hij is voldaan,
Is zoo zijn tijd besteed

MORE:
Proverb: Muck of the world
Proverb: Virtue is its own reward

With measure=Becomingly, with equal greatness
Misery=Penury

Topics: work, satisfaction, honour, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAMPEIUS
Put your main cause into the King’s protection.
He’s loving and most gracious. ’Twill be much
Both for your honour better and your cause,
For if the trial of the law o’ertake you,
You’ll part away disgraced.
WOLSEY
He tells you rightly.
QUEEN KATHERINE
You tell me what you wish for both: my ruin.
Is this your Christian counsel? Out upon you!
Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge
That no king can corrupt.
CAMPEIUS
Your rage mistakes us.
QUEEN KATHARINE
The more shame for ye: holy men I thought ye,
Upon my soul, two reverend cardinal virtues;
But cardinal sins and hollow hearts I fear ye:
Mend ’em, for shame, my lords. Is this your comfort?
The cordial that ye bring a wretched lady,
A woman lost among ye, laugh’d at, scorn’d?
I will not wish ye half my miseries;
I have more charity: but say, I warn’d ye;
Take heed, for heaven’s sake, take heed, lest at once
The burthen of my sorrows fall upon ye

DUTCH:
Gij beiden, wat gij wenscht, mijn ondergang.
Is dit uw raad als christen? foei! Nog is er
Een hemel, waar een rechter, door geen koning
Ooit om te koopen, troont!

MORE:
Part away=Leave
Rage mistakes=Anger causes you to misjudge
Cardinal virtues=Alllusion to the four ‘cardinal’ virtues (prudence, justice, courage and temperance)
Cardinal sins=Allusion to the seven ‘cardinal’ sins (envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, pride, sloth, and wrath)
Cordial=Tonic
Compleat:
Rage=Raazerny, woede, dulheyd
Mistake=Misvatting
Cardinal virtues=De vier hoofd-deugden, als Wysheyd, Maatigheyd, Gerechtigheyd en Dapperheyd
Cordial=Hardsterking

Topics: honour, dispute, anger, innocence, evidence

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
How high a pitch his resolution soars!
Thomas of Norfolk, what say’st thou to this?
THOMAS MOWBRAY
O, let my sovereign turn away his face
And bid his ears a little while be deaf,
Till I have told this slander of his blood,
How God and good men hate so foul a liar.
KING RICHARD II
Mowbray, impartial are our eyes and ears:
Were he my brother, nay, my kingdom’s heir,
As he is but my father’s brother’s son,
Now, by my sceptre’s awe, I make a vow,
Such neighbour nearness to our sacred blood
Should nothing privilege him, nor partialize
The unstooping firmness of my upright soul:
He is our subject, Mowbray; so art thou:
Free speech and fearless I to thee allow.

DUTCH:
Wat vlucht ten wolken neemt zijn koene geest!
Thomas van Norfolk, wat zegt gij hierop?

MORE:

Pitch=Highest point of soaring flight for a hawk or falcon
Neighbour nearness=Extremely close proximity
Partialize=Prejudice
Unstooping=Unbending (Stoop is another falcony ref. meaning to come down or pounce on the prey)
Fearless=Bold
Blood=Ancestry

Compleat:
To stoop=Buigen, bokken of bukken
A hawk that makes a stoop at a partridge=Een valk die op een Patrys valt
Fearless=Schroomeloos, onbevreesd, onvertzaagd, onbeschroomd, onverschrokken

Topics: resolution, strength, truth, relationship, honour

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
No, by mine honour, but I was bid to come for you.
ROSALIND
Where learned you that oath, fool?
TOUCHSTONE
Of a certain knight that swore by his honour they were good pancakes, and swore by his honour the mustard was naught. Now, I’ll stand to it, the pancakes were naught and the mustard was good, and yet was not the knight forsworn.
CELIA
How prove you that in the great heap of your knowledge?
ROSALIND
Ay, marry, now unmuzzle your wisdom.
TOUCHSTONE
Stand you both forth now: stroke your chins and swear by your beards that I am a knave.

DUTCH:
Hoe kunt gij dit uit den rijken schat van uw geleerdheid
bewijzen ?

MORE:
Schmidt:
To Forswear=To swear falsely, commit perjury
Unmuzzle=Free from restraint
Compleat:
To forswear one’s self=Eenen valschen eed doen, meyneedig zyn
To forswear a thing=Zweeren dat iets zo niet is

Topics: honour, promise, evidence, intellect

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Ay, Edward will use women honourably.
Would he were wasted, marrow, bones and all,
That from his loins no hopeful branch may spring,
To cross me from the golden time I look for!
And yet, between my soul’s desire and me—
The lustful Edward’s title buried—
Is Clarence, Henry, and his son young Edward,
And all the unlook’d for issue of their bodies,
To take their rooms, ere I can place myself:
A cold premeditation for my purpose!
Why, then, I do but dream on sovereignty;
Like one that stands upon a promontory,
And spies a far-off shore where he would tread,
Wishing his foot were equal with his eye,
And chides the sea that sunders him from thence,
Saying, he’ll lade it dry to have his way:
So do I wish the crown, being so far off;
And so I chide the means that keeps me from it;
And so I say, I’ll cut the causes off,
Flattering me with impossibilities.

DUTCH:
Ja, ja, zoo is ‘t, ik droom van kroon en rijk,
Als een, die op een voorgebergte staat

MORE:

That=So that
Hopeful=With potential, prospect of success
Cross=Block
Gold time=Golden age, of wearing a crown
Unlooked-for=Unwelcome
Rooms=Places, positions
Cold=Discouraging
Lade=Ladle
Chide=To scold, curse
Means that keep me from it=Obstacles
Flattering me=Deluding myself

Compleat:
Chide=Kyven, bekyven
Hopefull=Van goede hope; wiens veel belooft
To cros=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen
Chide=Kyven, bekyven

Topics: honour, ambition, purpose

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Saturninus
CONTEXT:
SATURNINUS
Titus Andronicus, for thy favours done
To us in our election this day,
I give thee thanks in part of thy deserts,
And will with deeds requite thy gentleness:
And, for an onset, Titus, to advance
Thy name and honourable family,
Lavinia will I make my empress,
Rome’s royal mistress, mistress of my heart,
And in the sacred Pantheon her espouse:
Tell me, Andronicus, doth this motion please thee?
TITUS ANDRONICUS
It doth, my worthy lord; and in this match
I hold me highly honoured of your grace:
And here in sight of Rome to Saturnine,
King and commander of our commonweal,
The wide world’s emperor, do I consecrate
My sword, my chariot and my prisoners;
Presents well worthy Rome’s imperial lord:
Receive them then, the tribute that I owe,
Mine honour’s ensigns humbled at thy feet.
SATURNINUS
Thanks, noble Titus, father of my life!
How proud I am of thee and of thy gifts
Rome shall record, and when I do forget
The least of these unspeakable deserts,
Romans, forget your fealty to me.

DUTCH:
Voor al uw gunsten, Titus Andronicus,
Ons heden bij de keizerskeus betoond,
Wijd ik naar uw verdienste u dank, en wil
Met daden uwe vriend’lijkheid beloonen;

MORE:
In part of=As part of
Deserts=Reward
Gentleness=Nobility
Onset=Start
Pantheon=Temple
Motion=Proposal
Ensign=Token, emblem
Unspeakable=Indescribable
Fealty=Loyalty, obligation
Compleat:
Desert=Verdienste, verdiende loon
Gentleness=Zachtheid, zachtzinnigheid, leenigheid, behendigheid
Onset=Een aanval, bespringing; To give the onset=Den aanval doen
Motion=Beweeging, aandryving
Ensign=Een vandel, vendel, vaan, banier
Unspeakable=Onuytspreekelyk

Topics: contract, loyalty, honour, promise

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Bagot
CONTEXT:
BAGOT
My Lord Aumerle, I know your daring tongue
Scorns to unsay what once it hath deliver’d.
In that dead time when Gloucester’s death was plotted,
I heard you say, ‘Is not my arm of length,
That reacheth from the restful English court
As far as Calais, to mine uncle’s head?’
Amongst much other talk, that very time,
I heard you say that you had rather refuse
The offer of an hundred thousand crowns
Than Bolingbroke’s return to England;
Adding withal how blest this land would be
In this your cousin’s death.

DUTCH:
Mylord Aumerle, ik weet, uw stoute tong
Versmaadt, wat ze eenmaal heeft gezegd, te looch’nen.

MORE:

Proverb: Kings have long arms

Unsay=Deny, retract
Dead=(a) deadly; (b) past
Of length=Long enough
Restful=Peaceful, quiet

Compleat:
Unsay=Ontkennen, ontzeggen
To say and unsay=Zeggen en ontkennen
Restful=In ruste, gerust

Topics: proverbs and idioms, law/legal, honour, authority

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Lucy
CONTEXT:
SOMERSET
How now, Sir William! whither were you sent?
LUCY
Whither, my lord? from bought and sold Lord Talbot;
Who, ring’d about with bold adversity,
Cries out for noble York and Somerset,
To beat assailing death from his weak legions:
And whiles the honourable captain there
Drops bloody sweat from his war-wearied limbs,
And, in advantage lingering, looks for rescue,
You, his false hopes, the trust of England’s honour,
Keep off aloof with worthless emulation.
Let not your private discord keep away
The levied succours that should lend him aid,
While he, renowned noble gentleman,
Yields up his life unto a world of odds:
Orleans the Bastard, Charles, Burgundy,
Alencon, Reignier, compass him about,
And Talbot perisheth by your default.

DUTCH:
Laat toch door uwe tweedracht hem de hulp,
Voor hem, voor zijn ontzet gelicht, niet derven,
Terwijl hij, die beroemde en eed’le held,
Bezwijkt voor een onmeetlijke overmacht!

MORE:
Proverb: To be bought and sold

Bought and sold=Betrayed
Ill-advantaged=Disadvantaged
Trust=Trustee
Keep off aloof=At a distance from a person or action, but in close connection with them
Emulation=Rivalry
Succours=Relief or assistance

Compleat:
Emulation=Naayver, volgzucht, afgunst
Disadvantaged=Benadeelt
Aloof=In de ruimte, van verre
Succours=Hulpbenden, krygshulpe

Topics: honour, betrayal, conflict

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
My honour’s at the stake; which to defeat,
I must produce my power. Here, take her hand,
Proud scornful boy, unworthy this good gift;
That dost in vile misprision shackle up
My love and her desert; that canst not dream,
We, poising us in her defective scale,
Shall weigh thee to the beam; that wilt not know,
It is in us to plant thine honour where
We please to have it grow. Check thy contempt:
Obey our will, which travails in thy good:
Believe not thy disdain, but presently
Do thine own fortunes that obedient right
Which both thy duty owes and our power claims;
Or I will throw thee from my care for ever
Into the staggers and the careless lapse
Of youth and ignorance; both my revenge and hate
Loosing upon thee, in the name of justice,
Without all terms of pity. Speak; thine answer.
BERTRAM
Pardon, my gracious lord; for I submit
My fancy to your eyes: when I consider
What great creation and what dole of honour
Flies where you bid it, I find that she, which late
Was in my nobler thoughts most base, is now
The praised of the king; who, so ennobled,
Is as ’twere born so.

DUTCH:
Mijn eer staat op het spel, en dit gevaar
Verdwijne voor mijn macht .

MORE:
Misprision=1) Contempt; 2) Mistake, wrong or false imprisonment
Desert=Something deserved, either a reward or punishment
Defective=Lighter end (of the scale)
To the beam=Outweigh (raising the lighter end to the crossbeam)
Dropsied=Swollen
Plant=(Figuratively)= To give rise, to create
Check=Control
Staggers=Bewilderment, giddy confusion (a horse disease)
Careless=Reckless
Fancy=Love
Compleat:
Misprision=Verwaarloozing, verzuyming, verachteloozing
Desert=Verdienste
Defective=Gebreklyk, onvolkomen
Dropsy or dropsie=Waterzucht
The staggers=De duyzeling van een paard
Careless=Zorgeloos, kommerloos, achteloos, onachtzaam

Topics: honour, reputation

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Mariana
CONTEXT:
WIDOW
We have lost our labour; they are gone a contrary
way: hark! you may know by their trumpets.
MARIANA
Come, let’s return again, and suffice ourselves with
the report of it. Well, Diana, take heed of this
French earl: the honour of a maid is her name; and
no legacy is so rich as honesty.
WIDOW
I have told my neighbour how you have been solicited
by a gentleman his companion.

DUTCH:
Geen nalatenschap is zo rijk als eerlijkheid./
De eer van een meisjen is haar schat, en geen erfenis is zoo rijk als haar goede naam.

MORE:
Proverb: He that will not labour must not eat
Proverb: You lose your labour
Honesty also used to mean virginity.
Suffice ourselves=Be satisfied with
Heed=Suspicious watch, caution
Compleat:
Honesty (chastity)=Kuisheid (also a plant)
Heed=Hoede, zorg, acht, toezigt

Topics: honour, honesty

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Ophelia
CONTEXT:
O, what a noble mind is here o’erthrown!
The courtier’s, soldier’s, scholar’s, eye, tongue, sword,
Th’ expectancy and rose of the fair state,
The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
Th’ observed of all observers, quite, quite down!

DUTCH:
O, wat een edele geest is hier verscheurd! /
O, wat een eedle geest ging hier te loor!

MORE:
Noble=Magnanimous, elevated, dignified, generous
Expectancy=Hope
Glass= Mirror, reflection
Compleat:
Nobly (or generously)=Edemoediglyk
Expectance. To be an expectation of something=Iets verwagten, ergens op hoopen

Topics: sorrow, madness, intellect, honour, hope

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Player King
CONTEXT:
I do believe you think what now you speak,
But what we do determine oft we break.
Purpose is but the slave to memory,
Of violent birth, but poor validity,
Which now, like fruit unripe, sticks on the tree,
But fall, unshaken, when they mellow be.

DUTCH:
Al te vaak verbreekt men zijn beloften. Beloften zijn slechts slaven van ‘t geheugen; in aanleg sterk, doch later krachteloos. /
‘t Plan is de slaaf slechts der herinnering

MORE:
Schmidt:
Validity= Strength, efficacy
Compleat:
Validity=Krachtigheid, bondigheid

Topics: honour, still in use, memory, plans/intentions, language

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Rightly to be great
Is not to stir without great argument,
But greatly to find quarrel in a straw
When honour’s at the stake.

DUTCH:
Waarlijk hoogstaan doet Niet hij, die opbruist zonder hooge reden

MORE:
Schmidt:
Straw=Emblem of weakness and insignificance
Compleat:
A straw man (an insignificant fellow)=Een stroo man, een zwak, kragteloos man

Burgersdijk notes:
Het waarlijk groot zijn Is niet, zich enkel voor iets groots te roeren. In ‘t Engelsch :
Rightly to be great Is not to stir without great argument.
Men kan twijfelen, of de ontkenning ‘not’ behoort hij ‘is’, zoodat men achter ‘not’ eene komma plaatsen moet, of wel bij het volgende ‘to stir’. In het eerste geval is het volgende ‘but’ juist gekozen, in het tweede iets minder goed. Wenscht men ondertusschen, wat mij thans verkieslijker voorkomt, de tweede opvatting, dan luide de vertaling: Echt groot zijn is, Zich niet dan voor een machtig doel te roeren, Maar enz.
Capell en Delius rekenen, dat ‘not’ zoowel bij ‘is’ als bij ‘to stir’ behoort, dus eigenlijk voor ‘not not’ staat:
“Het waarlijk groot zijn bestaat niet daarin, dat men niet dan om eene groote oorzaak in beweging
komt, maar” enz.

Topics: honour, dispute, justification

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.4.
SPEAKER: Somerset
CONTEXT:
It is too late; I cannot send them now:
This expedition was by York and Talbot
Too rashly plotted: all our general force
Might with a sally of the very town
Be buckled with: the over-daring Talbot
Hath sullied all his gloss of former honour
By this unheedful, desperate, wild adventure:
York set him on to fight and die in shame,
That, Talbot dead, great York might bear the name

DUTCH:
Talbots overmoed
Heeft heel den glans van al zijn vroegere eer
Bevlekt door dit onzinnig dolle waagstuk.
York dreef hem aan tot strijd en roemloos sterven,
Om zelf des dooden Talbots glorie te erven.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Expedition=A warlike enterprise
Sally=An issue of troops from a besieged place
Buckled with=Join in close fight, resist
Sullied=Tarnished
The very town=The garrison

Compleat:
Expedition=Een krygsverrichting
Sally=Uitvallen
Buckle=(to buckle together) Worstelen, schermutselen
Sullied=Bemorst, vuil gemaakt, bezoedeld

Topics: haste, preparation, caution, honour, ruin, risk

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Helen
CONTEXT:
HELEN
Ay, my good lord.
Gerard de Narbon was my father;
In what he did profess, well found.
KING
I knew him.
HELEN
The rather will I spare my praises towards him:
Knowing him is enough. On’s bed of death
Many receipts he gave me: chiefly one.
Which, as the dearest issue of his practice,
And of his old experience the oily darling,
He bade me store up, as a triple eye,
Safer than mine own two, more dear; I have so;
And hearing your high majesty is touch’d
With that malignant cause wherein the honour
Of my dear father’s gift stands chief in power,
I come to tender it and my appliance
With all bound humbleness.

DUTCH:
Te minder heb ik noodig hem to roemen ;
Genoeg is ‘t hem to kennen .

MORE:
Receipt=Prescription
Dearest issue=Most valuable product
Malignant cause=Disease
Honour=Virtue
Chief in power=Has most effect
Appliance=Treatment
Bound=Dutiful, appropriate
Compleat:
Receipt (receit)=Geneesmiddel
Issue=Uytkomst, uytslag; afkomst, afkomeling
Dear=Waard, lief, dierbaar, dier
Bound=Gebonden, verbonden, verpligt, dienstbaar
Humbleness=Ootmoedigheyd, nederigheyd

Topics: honour, skill

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
You rogue, here’s lime in this sack too.—There is nothing but roguery to be found in villanous man, yet a coward is worse than a cup of sack with lime in it. A villanous coward! Go thy ways, old Jack. Die when thou wilt. If manhood, good manhood, be not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a shotten herring. There lives not three good men unhanged in England, and one of them is fat and grows old, God help the while. A bad world, I say. I would I were a weaver. I could sing psalms, or anything. A plague of all cowards, I say still.

DUTCH:
In heel England leven geen drie echte mannen, die niet gehangen zijn, en een van hen is vet en wordt oud.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Manhood=Qualities becoming a man, bravery, fortitude, honour
Shotten=Having spent the roe
Weaver=Weavers were generally Protestant religious exiles from the Low Countries who would sing their psalms at work.
Compleat:
Manhood=Manlykheid, dapperheid, manbaarheid, manbaare staat, menschheid
A shotten herring=Een haring die zyn kuit geschooten heeft
He looks like a shotten herring (or pitifully)=Hy ziet er uit als een kalf dat niet voort wil.
Burgersdijk notes
Daar is nu ook kalk in deze sek.
Er werd kalk gedaan in de Spaansche wijnen om ze duurzamer te maken; bij Sh.’s tijdgenooten vindt men meermalen klachten over deze bijmenging.
Ik wenschte, dat ik een wever was.
De wevers stonden in dien tijd in den reuk van vroomheid; velen van hen waren Calvinistische vluchtelingen uit de Nederlanden, en zongen psalmen bij hun werk.

Topics: honour, courage, honesty

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
Thou hast affected the fine strains of honour,
To imitate the graces of the gods;
To tear with thunder the wide cheeks o’ the air,
And yet to charge thy sulphur with a bolt
That should but rive an oak. Why dost not speak?
Think’st thou it honourable for a noble man
Still to remember wrongs?

DUTCH:
Nog spreekt gij niet?
Acht gij ‘t een eed’len man betamend , eeuwig
Te wrokken om een krenking?

MORE:
Fine strains=Refinements, niceties
Schmidt:
Affect=Aimed at, pretended to have
Bolt=Lightning
Rive=Split

Compleat:
Affect=Naäapen
Affectation=Gemaaktheid
Rive (asunder(=Opscheuren, opsplyten, opbarsten

Topics: honour, appearance

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
PRINCE HENRY
Why, thou owest God a death.
Tis not due yet. I would be loath to pay Him before His day. What need I be so forward with Him that calls not on me? Well, ’tis no matter. Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on? How then? Can honor set to a leg? no. Or an arm? no. Or take away the grief of a wound? No. Honour hath no skill in surgery, then? No. What is honour? A word. What is in that word “honour”? What is that “honour”? Air. A trim reckoning. Who hath it? He that died o’ Wednesday. Doth he feel it? No. Doth he hear it? No. ‘Tis insensible, then? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? No. Why? Detraction will not suffer it. Therefore, I’ll none of it. Honour is a mere scutcheon. And so ends my catechism.

DUTCH:
Wat is eer? Een woord. Wat is het woord eer? Lucht. De rekening sluit! — Wie Iieeft haar? Die woensdag gestorven is. Voelt hij ze? Neen. Hoort hij ze? Neen. Is ze dus niet waar te nemen? Neen, door de dooden niet. Maar leeft ze dan nooit bij de levenden? Neen. Waarom niet? De afgunst duldt dit niet.

MORE:
Death. Debt. The word-play on “death” and “debt” occurs as early as 1400.
Onions:
Prick on=Encourage, incite
Prick off=to mark or indicate by a ‘prick’ or tick, mark or tick off
Set to a leg=Restore a leg cut off
Insensible=Not to be apprehended by the senses
Scutcheon=A shield with armorial ensigns. Scutcheon is the lowest description of heraldic ensign used for funerals.
Compleat:
Scutcheon=Schild, wapenschild
REFERENCED IN E&W LAW: AM v Local Authority & Anor [2009] EWCA Civ 205 (16 March 2009)
Burgersdijk notes:
De eer is niets dan een wapenschild. Dat bij de begrafenis van een edelman mede rond gedragen wordt, zonder dat de doode er iets aan heeft. — Falstaff noemt, wat hij gezegd heeft, een catechismus, omdat hij in vragen en antwoorden zijn geloofsbelijdenis heeft afgelegd.

Topics: honour, cited in law, skill/talent, life

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
You are too absolute;
Though therein you can never be too noble,
But when extremities speak. I have heard you say,
Honour and policy, like unsever’d friends,
I’ the war do grow together: grant that, and tell me,
In peace what each of them by the other lose,
That they combine not there.

DUTCH:
Gij zijt te hoog van taal;
Wel toont gij dus uw adeldom te meer;

MORE:
Absolute=Rigid, inflexible
When extremities speak=In a crisis, extreme situation “give ground” or concede something

Schmidt:
Unsevered=Inseparable
Policy=Stratagem, prudent or dexterous management

Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
Severed=Afgescheiden
Extremity=Uitspoorigheid; uiterste

Topics: conflict, judgment, wisdom, honour

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
This, and all else
This talking lord can lay upon my credit,
I answer is most false. The duke by law
Found his deserts: how innocent I was
From any private malice in his end,
His noble jury and foul cause can witness.
If I loved many words, lord, I should tell you
You have as little honesty as honour,
That in the way of loyalty and truth
Toward the king, my ever royal master,
Dare mate a sounder man than Surrey can be,
And all that love his follies.

DUTCH:
Hield ik van vele woorden,
Dan, graaf, zou ik u zeggen: even luttel
Bezit gij eerlijkheid als eer.

MORE:
Credit=Reputation
From=Of
Noble=Composed of nobles and noble-minded
Cause=Case, crime
Mate=Match
Compleat:
Credit=Geloof, achting, aanzien, goede naam
Noble=Edel, adelyk
Cause=Oorzaak, reden, zaak
Mate=Koppelen, gelykmaaken

Topics: honour, honesty, reputation

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
VOLUMNIA
Because that now it lies you on to speak
To the people; not by your own instruction,
Nor by the matter which your heart prompts you,
But with such words that are but rooted in
Your tongue, though but bastards and syllables
Of no allowance to your bosom’s truth.
Now, this no more dishonours you at all
Than to take in a town with gentle words,
Which else would put you to your fortune and
The hazard of much blood.
I would dissemble with my nature where
My fortunes and my friends at stake required
I should do so in honour: I am in this,
Your wife, your son, these senators, the nobles;
And you will rather show our general louts
How you can frown than spend a fawn upon ’em,
For the inheritance of their loves and safeguard
Of what that want might ruin.
MENENIUS
Noble lady!
Come, go with us; s peak fair: you may salve so,
Not what is dangerous present, but the loss
Of what is past.

DUTCH:
En toch, gij wilt aan ‘t lomp gemeen veeleer
Uw fronsblik toonen, dan ‘t met vleien winnen,
Om, door hun gunst, te redden, wat hun haat
Te gronde richten zal.

MORE:
General louts=Vulgar clowns in the community, “common clowns” (Johnson)
Bastards=Not truly coming from the heart
Of no allowance… truth=Not reflecting true feelings
Take in=Capture, occupy
Inheritance=Acquisition or merely possession
That want=Absence of that acquisition
Salve=Rescue

Compleat:
Lout=Een boersche ongeschikte vent
Inheritance=Erfenis, erfdeel
Want=Gebrek

Topics: manipulation, deceit, honour, appearance, truth

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAMPEIUS
Put your main cause into the King’s protection.
He’s loving and most gracious. ’Twill be much
Both for your honour better and your cause,
For if the trial of the law o’ertake you,
You’ll part away disgraced.
WOLSEY
He tells you rightly.
QUEEN KATHERINE
You tell me what you wish for both: my ruin.
Is this your Christian counsel? Out upon you!
Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge
That no king can corrupt.
CAMPEIUS
Your rage mistakes us.
QUEEN KATHARINE
The more shame for ye: holy men I thought ye,
Upon my soul, two reverend cardinal virtues;
But cardinal sins and hollow hearts I fear ye:
Mend ’em, for shame, my lords. Is this your comfort?
The cordial that ye bring a wretched lady,
A woman lost among ye, laugh’d at, scorn’d?
I will not wish ye half my miseries;
I have more charity: but say, I warn’d ye;
Take heed, for heaven’s sake, take heed, lest at once
The burthen of my sorrows fall upon ye

DUTCH:
Gij beiden, wat gij wenscht, mijn ondergang.
Is dit uw raad als christen? foei! Nog is er
Een hemel, waar een rechter, door geen koning
Ooit om te koopen, troont!

MORE:
Part away=Leave
Rage mistakes=Anger causes you to misjudge
Cardinal virtues=Alllusion to the four ‘cardinal’ virtues (prudence, justice, courage and temperance)
Cardinal sins=Allusion to the seven ‘cardinal’ sins (envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, pride, sloth, and wrath)
Cordial=Tonic
Compleat:
Rage=Raazerny, woede, dulheyd
Mistake=Misvatting
Cardinal virtues=De vier hoofd-deugden, als Wysheyd, Maatigheyd, Gerechtigheyd en Dapperheyd
Cordial=Hardsterking

Topics: honour, dispute, anger, innocence, evidence

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