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PLAY: Measure for Measure ACT/SCENE: 1.1 SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio CONTEXT: My haste may not admit it;
Nor need you, on mine honour, have to do
With any scruple; your scope is as mine own
So to enforce or qualify the laws
As to your soul seems good. Give me your hand:
I’ll privily away. I love the people,
But do not like to stage me to their eyes: DUTCH: Ook moge, bij mijn eer, u geen bedenking
Doen aarz’len; uwe macht is als de mijne;
Verscherp, verzacht de wetten, – ‘t staat u vrij, –
MORE: Schmidt:
Scruple=Doubt
Scope=Power
Compleat:
Free scope=de ruimte
I give your anger scope=Ik geef uw kwaadheid de vrye loop Topics: authority, justice, law/legal, independence, status

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
Why, that is nothing. For I tell you, father,
I am as peremptory as she proud-minded;
And where two raging fires meet together,
They do consume the thing that feeds their fury.
Though little fire grows great with little wind,
Yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all.
So I to her and so she yields to me,
For I am rough and woo not like a babe.
BAPTISTA
Well mayst thou woo, and happy be thy speed.
But be thou armed for some unhappy words.
PETRUCHIO
Ay, to the proof, as mountains are for winds,
That shakes not, though they blow perpetually.

DUTCH:
O, dat is niets; want ik verklaar u, vader,
‘k Ben even kort van stof als zij hooghartig;
En als een heftig vuur een ander vindt,
Dan wordt, wat hunne woede voedt, verteerd.

MORE:

Proverb: The wind puts out small lights but enrages great fires
Proverb: A little wind kindles, much puts out the fire

Peremptory=Positive, absolute
Speed=Success
To the proof=Properly armed
Compleat:
Peremptory=Volstrekt, uitvoerig, volkomen, uiteindig
Speed=Voortgang

Topics: independence, conflict, proverbs and idioms, conflict, anger

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
You must know,
Till the injurious Romans did extort
This tribute from us, we were free. Caesar’s ambition,
Which swelled so much that it did almost stretch
The sides o’ th’ world, against all colour here
Did put the yoke upon ’s, which to shake off
Becomes a warlike people, whom we reckon
Ourselves to be.

DUTCH:
t Zij u bewust,
Wij waren , tot ons Rome met geweld
Tot cijns verplichtte, vrij; eerst Caesars eerzucht, —
Die zoo zich opblies, dat de wereld schier
Te klein haar werd


Against all colour=Against any opposition, whatever the reason
Schmidt:
Injurious=Detractory, hurting reputation, insulting
Tribute=Stated payment made in acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace, or by virtue of a treaty
Colour=Specious pretence, palliation, appearance of right

Compleat:
Injurious=Verongelykend, beledigend, smaadelyk, lasterlyk
Tribute=Tol, impost
Colour=Vaandel
Under colour of peace=Onder den schyn van vreede
Under colour of friendship=Onder den dekmantel van vriendschap

Topics: independence, free will, ambition, rights, equality

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Katherine
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
Now, by my mother’s son, and that’s myself,
It shall be moon, or star, or what I list,
Or e’er I journey to your father’s house.
Go on, and fetch our horses back again.—
Evermore crossed and crossed, nothing but crossed!
HORTENSIO
Say as he says, or we shall never go.
KATHERINE
Forward, I pray, since we have come so far,
And be it moon, or sun, or what you please.
An if you please to call it a rush candle,
Henceforth I vow it shall be so for me.
PETRUCHIO
I say it is the moon.
KATHERINE
I know it is the moon.
PETRUCHIO
Nay, then you lie. It is the blessèd sun.
KATHERINE
Then God be blessed, it is the blessèd sun.
But sun it is not, when you say it is not,
And the moon changes even as your mind.
What you will have it named, even that it is,
And so it shall be so for Katherine.

DUTCH:
O voorwaarts toch; wij zijn nu eens zoo ver;
En zij het maan of zon of wat go wilt;
Al wildet gij het ook een nachtlicht noemen,
Ik zweer, voortaan zal ‘t ook voor mij zoo zijn.

MORE:
Proverb: As changeful (inconstant) as the moon

List=Please
Crossed=Challenged
Rush candle=Cheap candle made of a rush dipped in tallow
Compleat:
To list=Genegen zijn, lust hebben
To cross=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, free will, independence, language

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
Away ! th’ art a knave.
CLOWN
You should have said, sir, before a knave th’ art a knave; that ‘s, before me th ‘rt a knave: this had been truth, sir.
PAROLLES
Go to, thou art a witty fool; I have found thee.
CLOWN
Did you find me in yourself, sir, or were you
taught to find me ?

DUTCH:
Loop, loop, gij zijt een schelmsche nar; ik heb u in
mijn zak

MORE:
In yourself=By your own efforts
Knave= Rascal, villain
Found thee=Seen through you
Compleat:
Witty=Verstandig, vernuftig, schrander
Knave=Guyt, boef

Topics: truth, identity, independence

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Let him do his spite.
My services which I have done the signiory
Shall out-tongue his complaints. ‘Tis yet to know—
Which, when I know that boasting is an honour,
I shall promulgate. I fetch my life and being
From men of royal siege, and my demerits
May speak unbonneted to as proud a fortune
As this that I have reached. For know, Iago,
But that I love the gentle Desdemona,
I would not my unhousèd free condition
Put into circumscription and confine
For the sea’s worth. But look, what lights come yond?
IAGO
Those are the raisèd father and his friends.
You were best go in.
OTHELLO
Not I, I must be found.
My parts, my title, and my perfect soul
Shall manifest me rightly. Is it they?
IAGO
By Janus, I think no.
You were best go in.
Not I, I must be found.
My parts, my title, and my perfect soul
Shall manifest me rightly. Is it they?
IAGO
By Janus, I think no.
OTHELLO
The servants of the Duke and my lieutenant?
The goodness of the night upon you, friends!
What is the news?
CASSIO
The Duke does greet you, general,
And he requires your haste-post-haste appearance,
Even on the instant.

DUTCH:
Veel Senatoren, in der haast ontboden,
Zijn bij den doge. Onmidd’lijk riep men u,
En toen gij niet te huis te vinden waart,
Zond de Senaat drie boden door de stad
Om u te zoeken.

MORE:
Yet to know=Still not public knowledge
Promulgate=Make public
Siege=Seat; social status
Demerits=Deserts, merits
Unhousèd=Unconfined
Put into circumscription=Restrain, confine
Unbonneted=Bare-headed (without humility or embarrassment; on equal terms)
Janus=Ancient Roman god of beginnings, endings, and doorways, who is represented as having two faces
Compleat:
To promulgate=Verkondigen
Demerit=Verdienste [doch in quaaden zin]Circumscription=Omschryving
To circumscribe=Omschryven, bepaalen, beperken

Topics: work, merit, claim, status, independence

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
HORTENSIO
Petruchio, patience. I am Grumio’s pledge.
Why, this’ a heavy chance ’twixt him and you,
Your ancient, trusty, pleasant servant Grumio.
And tell me now, sweet friend, what happy gale
Blows you to Padua here from old Verona?
PETRUCHIO
Such wind as scatters young men through the world
To seek their fortunes farther than at home,
Where small experience grows. But in a few,
Signior Hortensio, thus it stands with me:
Antonio, my father, is deceased,
And I have thrust myself into this maze,
Happily to wive and thrive as best I may.
Crowns in my purse I have and goods at home,
And so am come abroad to see the world.

DUTCH:
Antonio, mijn vader, overleed,
En ik dwaal nu deez’ doolhof in en zoek
Er mijn fortuin.

MORE:
Heavy=Sad
Chance=Occurrence, occasion
Ancient=Long-standing
In a few=To be brief
Happily=Perhaps, with a bit of luck
Compleat:
Heavy=(sad) Droevig, verdrietig
To chance=Voorvallen, gebeuren
Anciently=Van ouds, oulings
Haply=Misschien

Topics: money, age/experience, learning/education, legacy, independence

PLAY: Twelfth Night
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Orsino
CONTEXT:
ORSINO
Dear lad, believe it.
For they shall yet belie thy happy years
That say thou art a man. Diana’s lip
Is not more smooth and rubious. Thy small pipe
Is as the maiden’s organ, shrill and sound,
And all is semblative a woman’s part.
I know thy constellation is right apt
For this affair.
Some four or five attend him.
All, if you will, for I myself am best
When least in company. Prosper well in this,
And thou shalt live as freely as thy lord,
To call his fortunes thine.

DUTCH:
Hoe min gewoel hoe liever; ‘t allerbest
Is de eenzaamheid. — Heb voorspoed op uw tocht,
En noem dan, vrij gelijk uw vorst, al ‘t zijne
Het uwe.

MORE:
Proverb: Never less alone than when alone
Proverb: He is never alone who is accompanied by noble thoughts

Belie=Misrepresent
Pipe=Voice
Semblative=Like
Constellation=Character, talent
Freely=Independently
Compleat:
Belie (bely)=Beliegen
Constellation=Gesternte, ‘t zamensterring, Hemelteken
Freely=Vryelyk

Topics: proverbs and idioms, imagination, independence, appearance, nature

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Shallow
CONTEXT:
By cock and pie, sir, you shall not away tonight. What, Davy, I say!
FALSTAFF
You must excuse me, Master Robert Shallow.
SHALLOW
I will not excuse you. You shall not be excused. Excuses shall not be admitted. There is no excuse shall serve. You shall not be excused. Why, Davy!

DUTCH:
Ik wil u niet ontschuldigen; gij zult niet ontschuldigd
worden; ontschuldigingen worden niet aangenomen; geen
ontschuldiging helpt u; gij zult niet ontschuldigd worden.
Kom toch, David!

MORE:

Schmidt:
Cock and pie=Mild oaath meaning God and the book
Cock=Corruption or rather disguise of the name of God

Topics: still in use, identity, understanding, independence

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 2.9
SPEAKER: Arragon
CONTEXT:
ARRAGON
And so have I addressed me. Fortune now
To my heart’s hope! Gold, silver, and base lead.
“Who chooseth me must give and hazard all he hath.”
You shall look fairer ere I give or hazard.
What says the golden chest? Ha, let me see.
“Who chooseth me shall gain what many men desire.”
“What many men desire”—that “many” may be meant
By the fool multitude that choose by show,
Not learning more than the fond eye doth teach;
Which pries not to th’ interior, but like the martlet
Builds in the weather on the outward wall,
Even in the force and road of casualty.
I will not choose what many men desire
Because I will not jump with common spirits
And rank me with the barbarous multitudes.
Why then, to thee, thou silver treasure house.
Tell me once more what title thou dost bear.
“Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves.”
And well said too—for who shall go about
To cozen fortune and be honorable
Without the stamp of merit? Let none presume
To wear an undeserved dignity.
Oh, that estates, degrees and offices
Were not derived corruptly, and that clear honor
Were purchased by the merit of the wearer!
How many then should cover that stand bare!
How many be commanded that command!
How much low peasantry would then be gleaned
From the true seed of honor! And how much honor
Picked from the chaff and ruin of the times
To be new varnished! Well, but to my choice.
“Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves.”
I will assume desert.—Give me a key for this,
And instantly unlock my fortunes here.

DUTCH:
Ik wil mij niet naar lage geesten schikken,
Niet voegen bij den grooten dommen hoop.

MORE:
CITED IN EWCA LAW:
Cruddas v Calvert & Ors [2013] EWCA Civ 748 (21 June 2013)
DeRonde v. Regents of the Univ. of California, 102 Cal. App. 3d 221 (1980): “We close with a quotation from Shakespeare, who so eloquently reminds us that competition on the basis of merit alone is the lifeblood of a democratic society: ‘For who shall go about….’.”

Fool multitude=Foolish commoners
Fond=Doting, simple.
Fond eye=What meets the eye
Jump with=Agree with
Barbarous=Ignorant, unlettered
Cozen=Cheat
Undeservèd=Unmerited
Dignity=Elevated rank, high office
Compleat:
Multitude=Menigte, veelheid, het gemeene volk, het gepeupel
Jump (to agree)=Het ééns worden, overenstemmen.
Their opinions jump much with ours=Hunne gevoelens komen veel met de onzen overeen
Wits jump always together=De groote verstanden beulen altijd saamenCozen=Bedriegen
Merit=Verdienste.
What ever may be said of him wil fall short of his merit=Alles wat men van hem zeggen kan, is minder dan zyne verdienste.
Dignity (Merit, importance)=Waardigheid, Staat-ampt, verdiensten.
Dignity (Greatness, Nobleness)=Grootheid, Adelykheid.

Burgersdijk notes:
Als de zwaluw. De huiszwaluw, in het Engelsch martlet (Hirundo urbica), maakt haar nest aan de buitenzijde van gebouwen; meestal vindt men er verscheidene dicht bijeen, zooals Sh. uitvoeriger in Macbeth I. 6.4. beschrijft. Sh. wist, welke soort hij koos; de boerenzwaluw (Hirundo rustics) nestelt
binnenshuis, b.v. in stallen, of, in onbewoonde streken, in rotsholten enz.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
What, upon compulsion? Zounds, an I were at the strappado or all the racks in the world, I would not tell you on compulsion. Give you a reason on compulsion? If reasons were as plentiful as blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I.

DUTCH:
Al waren er gronden zoo overvloedig als bramen, van mij zou niemand een grond door dwang vernemen, van mij niet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Compulsion=forced applied, constraint
Strappado=A species of torture, usually a military punishment, in which a person was drawn up by his arms tied behind his back, and then suddenly let down with a jerk. The result was usually to dislocate the shoulder blade.
Compleat:
Compulsion=Dwang, drang
Burgersdijk notes:
Aan de wipgalg. In ‘t Engelsch: at the strappado. Bij deze pijniging trok men het slachtoffer met een koord, dat over een katrol liep, omhoog, liet het tot halfweg vallen en hield het dan op met een ruk, zoo, dat de schouders ontwricht waren.

Topics: reason, justification, free will, independence, authority, punishment

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ferdinand
CONTEXT:
MIRANDA
No wonder, sir,
But certainly a maid.
FERDINAND
My language! Heavens,
I am the best of them that speak this speech,
Were I but where ’tis spoken.
PROSPERO
How? The best?
What wert thou if the King of Naples heard thee?
FERDINAND
A single thing, as I am now, that wonders
To hear thee speak of Naples. He does hear me,
And that he does I weep. Myself am Naples,
Who with mine eyes, never since at ebb, beheld
The king my father wrecked.

DUTCH:
Mijne taal, o hemel! —
Van wie haar spreken ben ik de eerste, ware ik
Slechts daar, waar zij gesproken wordt.

MORE:
Best=Highest in rank
At ebb=Tears have never since stopped
A single thing=(1) Standing alone, without support; (2) One and the same

Topics: language, understanding, status, order/society, independence

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Let him do his spite.
My services which I have done the signiory
Shall out-tongue his complaints. ‘Tis yet to know—
Which, when I know that boasting is an honour,
I shall promulgate. I fetch my life and being
From men of royal siege, and my demerits
May speak unbonneted to as proud a fortune
As this that I have reached. For know, Iago,
But that I love the gentle Desdemona,
I would not my unhousèd free condition
Put into circumscription and confine
For the sea’s worth. But look, what lights come yond?
IAGO
Those are the raisèd father and his friends.
You were best go in.
OTHELLO
Not I, I must be found.
My parts, my title, and my perfect soul
Shall manifest me rightly. Is it they?
IAGO
By Janus, I think no.
You were best go in.
Not I, I must be found.
My parts, my title, and my perfect soul
Shall manifest me rightly. Is it they?
IAGO
By Janus, I think no.
OTHELLO
The servants of the Duke and my lieutenant?
The goodness of the night upon you, friends!
What is the news?
CASSIO
The Duke does greet you, general,
And he requires your haste-post-haste appearance,
Even on the instant.

DUTCH:
Hij krenke wat hij kan;
Mijn diensten, aan den Raad bewezen, spreken
Veel luider dan zijn klachten

MORE:
Yet to know=Still not public knowledge
Promulgate=Make public
Siege=Seat; social status
Demerits=Deserts, merits
Unhousèd=Unconfined
Put into circumscription=Restrain, confine
Unbonneted=Bare-headed (without humility or embarrassment; on equal terms)
Janus=Ancient Roman god of beginnings, endings, and doorways, who is represented as having two faces
Compleat:
To promulgate=Verkondigen
Demerit=Verdienste [doch in quaaden zin]Circumscription=Omschryving
To circumscribe=Omschryven, bepaalen, beperken

Topics: work, merit, claim, status, independence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Helen
CONTEXT:
HELEN
Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky
Gives us free scope, only doth backward pull
Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull.
What power is it which mounts my love so high,
That makes me see, and cannot feed mine eye?
The mightiest space in fortune nature brings
To join like likes and kiss like native things.
Impossible be strange attempts to those
That weigh their pains in sense and do suppose
What hath been cannot be: who ever strove
To show her merit, that did miss her love?
The king’s disease—my project may deceive me,
But my intents are fix’d and will not leave me.

DUTCH:
Vaak vinden we in onszelf de hulp en baat,
Die wij den hemel vragen. ‘t Noodlot laat
Den weg ons vrij, en spert dien enkel dan,
Wanneer wij loom en traag zijn, zonder plan.

MORE:
Proverb: Like will to like (“To join like likes”)
Fated=Fateful (see also King Lear “The plagues that hang fated over men’s faults”, 3.2)
Mightiest space in fortune=Greatest difference in social rank
Weigh their pains=Count the cost
In sense=In advance
Miss=Fail to gain
Compleat:
Fated=Door ‘t noodlot beschooren

Topics: independence, fate/destiny , remedy, satisfaction, achievement, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
I would I had that corporal soundness now,
As when thy father and myself in friendship
First tried our soldiership! He did look far
Into the service of the time and was
Discipled of the bravest: he lasted long;
But on us both did haggish age steal on
And wore us out of act. It much repairs me
To talk of your good father. In his youth
He had the wit which I can well observe
To-day in our young lords; but they may jest
Till their own scorn return to them unnoted
Ere they can hide their levity in honour;
So like a courtier, contempt nor bitterness
Were in his pride or sharpness; if they were,
His equal had awaked them; and his honour.
Clock to itself, knew the true minute when
Exception bid him speak, and at this time
His tongue obeyed his hand: who were below him
He us’d as creatures of another place.
And bowed his eminent top to their low ranks.
Making them proud of his humility.
In their poor praise he humbled. Such a man
Might be a copy to these younger times,
Which, followed well, would demonstrate them now
But goers backward.

DUTCH:
Een man als hij kon onzen jong’ren tijd
Een voorbeeld zijn, dat, nagevolgd, zou toonen,
Hoe deze tijd teruggaat.

MORE:
Copy= Example
Equal=Equal ranking
Exception=Disapproval
Courtier=Paradigm of true courtesy
Used=Treated
Scorn=Derision
Unnoted=Ignored
Goers-backward=Regressives
Compleat:
Equal=Wedergade
Courtier=Hoveling
He made exception=Hy had er iets tegen te zeggen
To take exception=Zich over iets belgen

Topics: civility, life, age/experience, independence, order/society, respect, fashion/trends, understanding

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
Your enemies, with nodding of their plumes,
Fan you into despair! Have the power still
To banish your defenders; till at length
Your ignorance, which finds not till it feels,
Making not reservation of yourselves,
Still your own foes, deliver you as most
Abated captives to some nation
That won you without blows! Despising,
For you, the city, thus I turn my back:
There is a world elsewhere.

DUTCH:
Ook elders is een wereld!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Plume=Feathers which serve to adorn, particularly a tuft of feathers worn as an ornament
Making not reservation (in some versions “making but reservations”)
Abated=Humbled, discouraged
Ignorance=Stupidity

Compleat:
Plume=Pluim, veder
He had a white plume of feathers upon his hat=Hy had witte pluimen op zyn hoed
To abate one’s pride=Iemands hoogmoed fnuiken

Topics: life, free will, independence, failure

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
KATHERINE
Then God be blessed, it is the blessèd sun.
But sun it is not, when you say it is not,
And the moon changes even as your mind.
What you will have it named, even that it is,
And so it shall be so for Katherine.
HORTENSIO
Petruchio, go thy ways; the field is won.
PETRUCHIO
Well, forward, forward! Thus the bowl should run,
And not unluckily against the bias.
But, soft! Company is coming here.

DUTCH:
Vooruit dan, voort; zoo rolt de bal wel goed
En poedelt niet meer zijwaarts aan ‘t beschot. –
Maar kijk, wie komt ons daar gezelschap houden?

MORE:
Proverb: As changeful (inconstant) as the moon

List=Please
Crossed=Challenged
Rush candle=Cheap candle made of a rush dipped in tallow
Compleat:
To list=Genegen zijn, lust hebben
To cross=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, free will, independence, language

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
My Lord Cardinal,
I do excuse you; yea, upon mine honour,
I free you from ’t. You are not to be taught
That you have many enemies that know not
Why they are so but, like to village curs,
Bark when their fellows do. By some of these
The Queen is put in anger. You’re excused.
But will you be more justified? You ever
Have wished the sleeping of this business, never desired
It to be stirred, but oft have hindered, oft,
The passages made toward it. On my honour
I speak my good Lord Cardinal to this point
And thus far clear him. Now, what moved me to ’t,
I will be bold with time and your attention:
Then mark the inducement. (…)

DUTCH:
Doch wenscht gij meer rechtvaardiging? steeds hebt gij
Gewenscht, dat deze zaak bleef slapen, nooit
Dat zij werd opgerakeld; vaak belettet
Gij ‘t doen der eerste stappen

MORE:
Proverb: Like dogs, if one barks they all bark
Not to be taught=Already know
Excused=Exonerated
Justified=Vindicated
Sleeping=Put (this matter) to bed
Compleat:
Excused=Ontschuldigd, verschoond
Justified=Gerechtvaardigd, verdeedigd, gebillykt

Topics: proverbs and idioms, justification, independence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
My Lord Cardinal,
I do excuse you; yea, upon mine honour,
I free you from ’t. You are not to be taught
That you have many enemies that know not
Why they are so but, like to village curs,
Bark when their fellows do. By some of these
The Queen is put in anger. You’re excused.
But will you be more justified? You ever
Have wished the sleeping of this business, never desired
It to be stirred, but oft have hindered, oft,
The passages made toward it. On my honour
I speak my good Lord Cardinal to this point
And thus far clear him. Now, what moved me to ’t,
I will be bold with time and your attention:
Then mark the inducement. (…)

DUTCH:
Dat gij veel haters hebt, die zelf niet weten,
Waarom zij ‘t zijn , maar die, als honden, blaffen
Zoodra geblaft wordt; zulke lieden dreven
De koningin tot toorn

MORE:
Proverb: Like dogs, if one barks they all bark
Not to be taught=Already know
Excused=Exonerated
Justified=Vindicated
Sleeping=Put (this matter) to bed
Compleat:
Excused=Ontschuldigd, verschoond
Justified=Gerechtvaardigd, verdeedigd, gebillykt

Topics: proverbs and idioms, justification, independence

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
You must forget to be a woman; change
Command into obedience, fear and niceness—
The handmaids of all women, or, more truly,
Woman it pretty self—into a waggish courage,
Ready in gibes, quick-answered, saucy, and
As quarrellous as the weasel. Nay, you must
Forget that rarest treasure of your cheek,
Exposing it—but O, the harder heart!
Alack, no remedy—to the greedy touch
Of common-kissing Titan, and forget
Your laboursome and dainty trims, wherein
You made great Juno angry.

DUTCH:
Vergeet, dat gij een vrouw zijt; ruil ‘t gebieden.
Voor dienstbaarheid, de schuchterheid en kieschheid, —
Der vrouwen gezellinnen, ja veeleer,
Haar lieflijk wezen zelf, — voor dart’len moed;
Wees spotziek, onbeschaamd, vlug met de tong,
En twistziek als een wezel;


Niceness=Delicacy, daintiness, coyness
Quarrellous as the weasel. Weasels were kept for killing vermin. Cf. Henry IV Part 1: “A weasel hath not such a deal of spleen as you are toss’d with.”
Laboursome=Elaborate, requiring much pains and industry (also laboursome petition, Hamlet)
Common-kissing=Kissing anybody and anything
Trims=Ornamental dress

Compleat:
To gibe=Boerten, gekscheeren
Quarrelsome=Krakeelachtig, twistig, twistgierig, kyfachtig
Laboursom=Lastig, verdrdietig, verveelend
Niceness=Viezigheid, keurigheid

Burgersdijk notes:
Den fellen straler van omhoog. In het oorspronkelijke wordt gesproken van the greedg touch of common-kissing Titan. De zonnegod wordt meermalen Titan genoemd.

Topics: appearance, intellect, independence, language, reply

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Troilus
CONTEXT:
TROILUS
I take today a wife, and my election
Is led on in the conduct of my will;
My will enkindled by mine eyes and ears,
Two traded pilots ‘twixt the dangerous shores
Of will and judgement: how may I avoid,
Although my will distaste what it elected,
The wife I chose? there can be no evasion
To blench from this and to stand firm by honour:
We turn not back the silks upon the merchant,
When we have soiled them, nor the remainder viands
We do not throw in unrespective sieve,
Because we now are full. It was thought meet
Paris should do some vengeance on the Greeks:
Your breath of full consent bellied his sails;
The seas and winds, old wranglers, took a truce
And did him service: he touched the ports desired,
And for an old aunt whom the Greeks held captive,
He brought a Grecian queen, whose youth and freshness
Wrinkles Apollo’s, and makes stale the morning.

DUTCH:
Uws bijvals adem blies zijn zeilen vol;
De wind en golven, oude twisters, voerden,
Een wijl verzoend, hem naar ‘t gewenschte strand

MORE:
I take today=What if I were today to take
Election=Choice
Conduct=Guidance
Traded=Experienced
Blench=Flinch, back away from
Turn upon=Return to
Viands=Meat; food, victuals
Unrespective=Undiscriminating
Bellied=Swelled
Wrangler=Adversary
Compleat:
To eleect=Kiezen, verkiezen
Conduct=Bestieren, geleyden
Traded=Gehandeld
Viands=Spyzen van vleesch
Wrangler=Krakeelder

Topics: independence, free will, value

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