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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Macbeth ACT/SCENE: 3.2 SPEAKER: Macbeth CONTEXT: Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck,
Till thou applaud the deed. Come, seeling night,
Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day
And with thy bloody and invisible hand
Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond
Which keeps me pale. Light thickens, and the crow
Makes wing to th’ rooky wood. DUTCH: MORE: Schmidt:
Applaud= To praise, approve
to Seel=to blind (originally a term of falconry)
Bond= Bond of life
Compleat:
To seel a hawk=Eenen valk een kap voor de oogen doen Topics: innocence, offence

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
His sole child, my lord, and bequeathed to my
overlooking. I have those hopes of her good that
her education promises; her dispositions she
inherits, which makes fair gifts fairer; for where
an unclean mind carries virtuous qualities, there
commendations go with pity; they are virtues and
traitors too; in her they are the better for their
simpleness; she derives her honesty and achieves her
goodness.

DUTCH:
Ik heb alle verwachting van het goede, dat hare opvoeding belooft; de natuur, die zij geërfd heeft, maakt de schoone gaven, die opvoeding schenkt, nog schooner;

MORE:
Proverb: Blood is inherited but virtue is achieved
Overlooking=Guardianship
Fated=Fateful (see also King Lear “The plagues that hang fated over men’s faults”, 3.2)
Go with pity=Accompanied by regret
Simpleness=Plainness (being unmixed), unrefined nativeness, innocence
Unclean=(in a moral sense) Impure
Derive=Inherit
Compleat:
Disposition (or Inclination)=Genegenheid, Lust
Disposition of mind=Gesteltenis van gemoed
Simple=Onbeschadigend, eenvoudig
Fated=Door ‘t noodlot beschooren

Topics: nature, learning/education, virtue, innocence, fate/destiny, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAMPEIUS
Put your main cause into the King’s protection.
He’s loving and most gracious. ’Twill be much
Both for your honour better and your cause,
For if the trial of the law o’ertake you,
You’ll part away disgraced.
WOLSEY
He tells you rightly.
QUEEN KATHERINE
You tell me what you wish for both: my ruin.
Is this your Christian counsel? Out upon you!
Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge
That no king can corrupt.
CAMPEIUS
Your rage mistakes us.
QUEEN KATHARINE
The more shame for ye: holy men I thought ye,
Upon my soul, two reverend cardinal virtues;
But cardinal sins and hollow hearts I fear ye:
Mend ’em, for shame, my lords. Is this your comfort?
The cordial that ye bring a wretched lady,
A woman lost among ye, laugh’d at, scorn’d?
I will not wish ye half my miseries;
I have more charity: but say, I warn’d ye;
Take heed, for heaven’s sake, take heed, lest at once
The burthen of my sorrows fall upon ye

DUTCH:
Gij beiden, wat gij wenscht, mijn ondergang.
Is dit uw raad als christen? foei! Nog is er
Een hemel, waar een rechter, door geen koning
Ooit om te koopen, troont!

MORE:
Part away=Leave
Rage mistakes=Anger causes you to misjudge
Cardinal virtues=Alllusion to the four ‘cardinal’ virtues (prudence, justice, courage and temperance)
Cardinal sins=Allusion to the seven ‘cardinal’ sins (envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, pride, sloth, and wrath)
Cordial=Tonic
Compleat:
Rage=Raazerny, woede, dulheyd
Mistake=Misvatting
Cardinal virtues=De vier hoofd-deugden, als Wysheyd, Maatigheyd, Gerechtigheyd en Dapperheyd
Cordial=Hardsterking

Topics: honour, dispute, anger, innocence, evidence

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Lucio
CONTEXT:
The duke is very strangely gone from hence;
Bore many gentlemen, myself being one,
In hand and hope of action: but we do learn
By those that know the very nerves of state,
His givings-out were of an infinite distance
From his true-meant design. Upon his place,
And with full line of his authority,
Governs Lord Angelo; a man whose blood
Is very snow-broth; one who never feels
The wanton stings and motions of the sense,
But doth rebate and blunt his natural edge
With profits of the mind, study and fast.

DUTCH:
Dat wat hij voorgaf hemelsbreed verschilt
Van wat hij inderdaad bedoelt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Givings-out=Utterances, assertions
True-meant design=Intention
Sting=Impulse, incitement.
Rebate=Abate
Profit of the mind=Proficiency, improvement

Topics: perception, justification, innocence, integrity, intellect, learning/education

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
I do profess
You speak not like yourself; who ever yet
Have stood to charity, and display’d the effects
Of disposition gentle, and of wisdom
O’ertopping woman’s power. Madam, you do me wrong:
I have no spleen against you; nor injustice
For you or any: how far I have proceeded,
Or how far further shall, is warranted
By a commission from the consistory,
Yea, the whole consistory of Rome. You charge me
That I have blown this coal: I do deny it:
The king is present: if it be known to him
That I gainsay my deed, how may he wound,
And worthily, my falsehood! yea, as much
As you have done my truth. If he know
That I am free of your report, he knows
I am not of your wrong. Therefore in him
It lies to cure me: and the cure is, to
Remove these thoughts from you: the which before
His highness shall speak in, I do beseech
You, gracious madam, to unthink your speaking
And to say so no more.

DUTCH:
Hooge vrouwe,
Ik smeek u, dat gij, eer zijne hoogheid spreekt
Wat gij gezegd hebt, ongedacht wilt maken,
En nimmermeer zoo spreekt.

MORE:
Ever yet=Always until now
O’ertop=Exceed, surpass
Spleen=Ill will, malice
Gainsay=Contradict, deny
Consistory=Council chamber
Blown this coal=Fanned the fire
Free of your report=Innocent of your accusations
Unthink=Take back, retract
Compleat:
To overtop=Te boven gaan, overschryden
Spleen=Een wrok
To have a spleen against one=Eenen wrok tegen iemand hebben
To gainsay=Tegenspreeken, Wederspreeken.
To gainsay truth=De waarheid wederspreeken of bestryden
Consistory=De Kerkenraad, Pauzelyke raad, Kardinaals vergadering

Topics: truth, punishment, innocence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
I humbly thank your highness;
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnow’d, where my chaff
And corn shall fly asunder: for, I kno§w,
There’s none stands under more calumnious tongues
Than I myself, poor man.
KING HENRY VIII
Stand up, good Canterbury:
Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
In us, thy friend: give me thy hand, stand up:
Prithee, let’s walk. Now, by my holidam.
What manner of man are you? My lord, I look’d
You would have given me your petition, that
I should have ta’en some pains to bring together
Yourself and your accusers; and to have heard you,
Without endurance, further.

DUTCH:
Mylord, ik dacht,
Dat gij mij zoudt verzoeken, een’ge moeite
Te nemen, uw beschuldigers terstond
Te ontbieden en u, zonder uitstel, verder
Te hooren.

MORE:
Winnow=Process of sorting wheat from chaff, i.e. in the wind (cleared)
Stands under=Suffers
Calumnious=Slanderous
Holidame=Holy dame (also Holydame, halidom)
Looked=Expected
Petition=Request
Endurance=Hardship
Compleat:
To winnow=Wannen, ziften
Calumnious=Faamroovend, lasterlyk
Petition=Verzoek, smeekschrift
To endure=Verdraagen, harden, duuren

Topics: innocence, evidence, claim, dispute

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
I humbly thank your highness;
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnow’d, where my chaff
And corn shall fly asunder: for, I kno§w,
There’s none stands under more calumnious tongues
Than I myself, poor man.
KING HENRY VIII
Stand up, good Canterbury:
Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
In us, thy friend: give me thy hand, stand up:
Prithee, let’s walk. Now, by my holidam.
What manner of man are you? My lord, I look’d
You would have given me your petition, that
I should have ta’en some pains to bring together
Yourself and your accusers; and to have heard you,
Without endurance, further.

DUTCH:
En gaarne aanvaard ik, wat de tijd mij biedt,
Dat door een wan mijn kaf en koren zuiver
Gescheiden worden.

MORE:
Winnow=Process of sorting wheat from chaff, i.e. in the wind (cleared)
Stands under=Suffers
Calumnious=Slanderous
Holidame=Holy dame (also Holydame, halidom)
Looked=Expected
Petition=Request
Endurance=Hardship
Compleat:
To winnow=Wannen, ziften
Calumnious=Faamroovend, lasterlyk
Petition=Verzoek, smeekschrift
To endure=Verdraagen, harden, duuren

Topics: innocence, evidence, claim, dispute

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Methought I heard a voice cry, ‘Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep: the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care,
The death of each day’s life, sore labor’s bath,
Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course,
Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

DUTCH:
Den slaap, die ‘t warnet van de zorg ontrafelt

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW: To help to define “murder”. Wright et al v United States, 108 F. 805 (5th Cir. 1901). The same court also turned to Shakespeare to help to define “Conspire”.

Topics: cited in law, offence, innocence, conscience

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good:
the goodness that is cheap in beauty makes beauty
brief in goodness; but grace, being the soul of
your complexion, shall keep the body of it ever fair.

DUTCH:
De hand, die u schoon deed zijn, heeft u ook goed
doen zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Grace=Virtue
Soul=Denoting the chief part and quintessence of a thing
(Compleat)
Grace=Genade, gunst, bevalligheyd, fraajigheyd, aardige zwier
Soul=Ziel, leven geevende kragt, leevensgeesten

Topics: good and bad, virtue, honesty, innocence

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
DUKE
How shalt thou hope for mercy, rendering none?
SHYLOCK
What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
You have among you many a purchased slave,
Which—like your asses and your dogs and mules—
You use in abject and in slavish parts
Because you bought them. Shall I say to you,
“Let them be free! Marry them to your heirs!
Why sweat they under burdens? Let their beds
Be made as soft as yours and let their palates
Be seasoned with such viands”? You will answer,
“The slaves are ours.” So do I answer you.
The pound of flesh which I demand of him
Is dearly bought. ‘Tis mine and I will have it.
If you deny me, fie upon your law—
There is no force in the decrees of Venice.

DUTCH:
Doge.
Hoopt ge op gena, gij die er geen bewijst?
Shylock.
Wat vonnis zou ik duchten ? ‘k Doe geen onrecht.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
By 1993, “pound of flesh” had been used 120 times in courts without reference to Shakespeare. (See William Domnarski, Shakespeare in the Law)
Gates v. United States 33 Fed. Cl. 9 , 13 (1995);
Leasing Service Corporation v. Justice, 673 F.2d 70, 71 (2d Cir. 198l)(Kaufman,J.);
Eldridge v. Burns, 76 Cal. App.3d 396, 432, 142 Cal. Rptr. 845,868 (1978);
Jones v. Jones, 189 Mise. 186, 70 N.Y.S.2d lll, 112 (N.Y. C1v. Ct.1947).

Fie=Exclamation of contempt or dislike
Force=validity
Viands=Dressed meat, food
Compleat:
Fie (or fy)=Foei
Fy upon it! Fy for shame!=Foei ‘t is een schande!

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CAMPEIUS
Put your main cause into the King’s protection.
He’s loving and most gracious. ’Twill be much
Both for your honour better and your cause,
For if the trial of the law o’ertake you,
You’ll part away disgraced.
WOLSEY
He tells you rightly.
QUEEN KATHERINE
You tell me what you wish for both: my ruin.
Is this your Christian counsel? Out upon you!
Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge
That no king can corrupt.
CAMPEIUS
Your rage mistakes us.
QUEEN KATHARINE
The more shame for ye: holy men I thought ye,
Upon my soul, two reverend cardinal virtues;
But cardinal sins and hollow hearts I fear ye:
Mend ’em, for shame, my lords. Is this your comfort?
The cordial that ye bring a wretched lady,
A woman lost among ye, laugh’d at, scorn’d?
I will not wish ye half my miseries;
I have more charity: but say, I warn’d ye;
Take heed, for heaven’s sake, take heed, lest at once
The burthen of my sorrows fall upon ye

DUTCH:
Gij beiden, wat gij wenscht, mijn ondergang.
Is dit uw raad als christen? foei! Nog is er
Een hemel, waar een rechter, door geen koning
Ooit om te koopen, troont!

MORE:
Part away=Leave
Rage mistakes=Anger causes you to misjudge
Cardinal virtues=Alllusion to the four ‘cardinal’ virtues (prudence, justice, courage and temperance)
Cardinal sins=Allusion to the seven ‘cardinal’ sins (envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, pride, sloth, and wrath)
Cordial=Tonic
Compleat:
Rage=Raazerny, woede, dulheyd
Mistake=Misvatting
Cardinal virtues=De vier hoofd-deugden, als Wysheyd, Maatigheyd, Gerechtigheyd en Dapperheyd
Cordial=Hardsterking

Topics: honour, dispute, anger, innocence, evidence

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