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PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
A Daniel come to judgment, yea, a Daniel!—
O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!

DUTCH:
Een Daniël, die rechtspreekt! ja, een Daniël! —
O wijze, jonge rechter, hoe ‘k u eer!


MORE:
Origin of the phrase ‘A Daniel come to judgment’. Believed to refer to Daniel (5:14 King James Version): “I have even heard of thee, that the spirit of the gods is in thee, and that light and understanding and excellent wisdom is found in thee.”
CITED IN US LAW:
People v. De Jesus. 42 N.Y.2d 519, 523 (1977).

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice
And could of men distinguish, her election
Hath sealed thee for herself, for thou hast been—
As one in suffering all that suffers nothing—
A man that Fortune’s buffets and rewards
Hast ta’en with equal thanks. And blessed are those
Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled,
That they are not a pipe for Fortune’s finger
To sound what stop she please.

DUTCH:
Gezegend, zij wier inborst en verstand zó zijn verweven /
Gezegend hij, Bij wien verstand en hart zoo zijn gepaard /
En wel gelukkig Zijn zij bij wien zich bloed en geest zoo mengen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Election = preference
Blood=Disposition, temper
Judgment=Faculty of discerning the truth, discernment, good sense, understanding
Commingled= balanced

Topics: fate/destiny, reason, judgment, adversity

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ADRIANA
Come, come, no longer will I be a fool,
To put the finger in the eye and weep
Whilst man and master laugh my woes to scorn.
Come, sir, to dinner.—Dromio, keep the gate. —
Husband, I’ll dine above with you today,
And shrive you of a thousand idle pranks.
Sirrah, if any ask you for your master,
Say he dines forth, and let no creature enter.—
Come, sister.—Dromio, play the porter well.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Am I in earth, in heaven, or in hell?
Sleeping or waking, mad or well-advised?
Known unto these, and to myself disguised!
I’ll say as they say, and persever so,
And in this mist at all adventures go.

DUTCH:
Wat is het, hemel, hel of aarde, hier?
Slaap, waak ik? Ben ik wijs of buiten west?
Ik ken mijzelven niet en zij mij best.

MORE:
Proverb: To put finger in the eye (force tears, generate sympathy)

Mist=Confusion
Well-advised=In my right mind
Persever=Persevere
To shrive=To hear confession and absolve (between condemnation and execution of punishment – origin of short shrift (korte metten))
At all adventures=Whatever the risk, consequences

Compleat:
To shrive=Biechten
At all adventures=Laat komen wat wil, ‘t gaa hoe ‘t gaa

Topics: imagination, evidence, judgment, reason, risk, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
GREEN
Besides, our nearness to the king in love
Is near the hate of those love not the king.
BAGOT
And that’s the wavering commons: for their love
Lies in their purses, and whoso empties them
By so much fills their hearts with deadly hate.
BUSHY
Wherein the king stands generally condemn’d.
BAGOT
If judgement lie in them, then so do we,
Because we ever have been near the king.

DUTCH:
De wank’lende gemeenten! hare liefde
Ligt in haar buidels, en wie deze leêgt,
Vult wis haar hart met doodelijken haat.

MORE:

Wavering=Fickle
Commons=The common people, commoners

Compleat:
Wavering=Waggeling; wapperende, twyffelachtig, ongestadig
The common (vulgar) people=Het gemeene Volk

Topics: love, money, respect, judgment

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
Be you content, fair maid;
It is the law, not I condemn your brother:
Were he my kinsman, brother, or my son,
It should be thus with him: he must die tomorrow.

DUTCH:
Schoone maagd, berust;
Het recht, niet ik, veroordeelt uwen broeder;

MORE:
Content=Contentedness, satisfaction
Compleat:
Content=Voldoening, genoegen
To give content, take content=Voldoening geeven, genoegen neemen
Contented with little=Met weinig te vreede

Topics: law/legal, satisfaction, punishment, judgment

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.6
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
All of her that is out of door, most rich!
If she be furnished with a mind so rare,
She is alone th’ Arabian bird, and I
Have lost the wager. Boldness be my friend.
Arm me, audacity, from head to foot,
Or like the Parthian I shall flying fight—
Rather, directly fly.
IMOGEN (reading):
He is one of the noblest note, to whose
kindnesses I am most infinitely tied. Reflect upon
him accordingly as you value your trust. – Leonatus

DUTCH:
O, driestheid, wees mijn vriend,
En wapen, stoutheid, mij van top tot teen!
Of als de Parth, moet ik al vluchtend vechten,
Neen, vluchten en niets meer.


Proverb: As rare as the Phoenix

Arabian bird=Phoenix (never is there more than one Phoenix in the world at one time)
Out of door=External, outward appearance
Value your trust=Value the charge entrusted to you. (Some editors have this as ‘truest’, making this the close of the letter.)
Reflect upon=Consider him

Compleat:
Boldness=Stoutheyd, koenheyd, vrymoedigheyd, onvertsaagheyd
Audacity=Stoutheyd
It would be well for every one to reflect upon himself=’t Zou wel zyn dat een yder zich zelven aanmerkte; ‘t was goed dat elk op zich zelven lette
To lay a wager=Wedden, een wedspel aan gaan
Wager of law=Aanbieding van te beedigen, dat men zynen eyscher niets schuldig is

Burgersdijk notes:
Uw getrouwsten Leonatus. Hier is de gissing van Mason gevolgd, die, éene letter e bijvoegende, leest your truest Leonatus. Imogeen loopt den brief haastig door en deelt dan aan Jachimo, die inmiddels bij zichzelf gesproken heeft, beleefd het slot, dat op hem betrekking heeft, mede. Wil men de lezing der folio-uitgave behouden: as you value your trust, dan moet men dit, veel minder eenvoudig, als eene soort van bezwering opvatten: „zoo waar gij uwe bezworen trouw in eere houdt” en aannemen, dat Imogeen uit het midden van den brief eenige woorden hardop leest, dan de lezing ten einde brengt en alleen de onderteekening weder uitspreekt.

Topics: appearance, intellect, value, trust, judgment, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Pistol
CONTEXT:

Fortune is Bardolph’s foe and frowns on him,
For he hath stolen a pax and hangèd must he be.
A damnèd death!
Let gallows gape for dog, let man go free,
And let not hemp his windpipe suffocate.
But Exeter hath given the doom of death
For pax of little price.
Therefore go speak—the duke will hear thy voice—
And let not Bardolph’s vital thread be cut
With edge of penny cord and vile reproach.
Speak, Captain, for his life, and I will thee requite.

DUTCH:
Fortuin is Bardolfs vijandin, ziet norsch;
Hij stal zich een monstrans en moet nu hangen.
Een vloekb’re dood!
Voor honden gaap’ de galg, de mensch zij vrij,
En hennep mag zijn gorgel niet verstikken.
Maar Exeter deed de uitspraak van den dood
Voor voddigen monstrans.

MORE:
Doom=Judgment. (Doom (or ‘dome’) was a statute or law (doombooks were codes of laws); related to the English suffix -dom, originally meaning jurisdiction. Shakespeare is credited for first using doom to mean death and destruction in Sonnet 14.)

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
A heavy doom=een zwaar vonnis

Topics: fate/destiny, offence, punishment, judgment

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
PLANTAGENET
[Aside] Plantagenet, I see, must hold his tongue,
Lest it be said ‘Speak, sirrah, when you should;
Must your bold verdict enter talk with lords?’
Else would I have a fling at Winchester.
KING HENRY VI
Uncles of Gloucester and of Winchester,
The special watchmen of our English weal,
I would prevail, if prayers might prevail,
To join your hearts in love and amity.
O, what a scandal is it to our crown,
That two such noble peers as ye should jar!
Believe me, lords, my tender years can tell
Civil dissension is a viperous worm
That gnaws the boels of the commonwealth.

DUTCH:
Geloof mij, lords, mijn teed’re jeugd bevroedt reeds,
Dat burgertwist een giftige adder is ,
Die de ingewanden van den staat doorknaagt.

MORE:
Bold=Daring, insolent
Verdict=Judgment, opinion
Enter=Engage in, interrupt
Weal=Commonwealth
Jar=Quarrel

Compleat:
Jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
The common-weal=’t Welvaaren van ‘t algemeen
A common-wealths man=Een republyks gezinde

Burgersdijk notes:
Mijn teed’re jeugd bevroedt reeds. Eigenlijk was Hendrik VI slechts vijf jaar oud, toen het parlement
bijeenkwam om de twisten tusschen Gloster en Winchester te beslechten.

Topics: dispute, consequence, resolution, judgment

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS
Content thee, prince, I will restore to thee
The people’s hearts, and wean them from themselves.
BASSIANUS
Andronicus, I do not flatter thee,
But honour thee, and will do till I die:
My faction if thou strengthen with thy friends,
I will most thankful be; and thanks to men
Of noble minds is honourable meed.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
People of Rome, and people’s tribunes here,
I ask your voices and your suffrages:
Will you bestow them friendly on Andronicus?
TRIBUNES
To gratify the good Andronicus,
And gratulate his safe return to Rome,
The people will accept whom he admits.

DUTCH:
Wees kalm, mijn prins; de harten van Het volk
Geef ik u weer, die van zichzelf vervreemdend.

MORE:
Content thee=Don’t worry
Meed=Reward
Voices=Support
Suffrages=Votes
Gratulate=Please, gratify
Admit=Acknowledge
Compleat:
To content=Voldoen, te vreede stellen, genoegen geeven
Voice=Stem
Suffrage=Een stem, keurstem
Gratulate=Geluk wenschen, verwelkomen
To admit=Toelaaten, tot zich neenmen, toestaan, inschikken, toegang verleenen

Topics: flattery, respect, leadership, judgment

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
BELARIUS
I cannot tell. Long is it since I saw him,
But time hath nothing blurred those lines of favour
Which then he wore. The snatches in his voice
And burst of speaking were as his. I am absolute
’Twas very Cloten.
ARVIRAGUS
In this place we left them.
I wish my brother make good time with him,
You say he is so fell
BELARIUS
Being scarce made up,
I mean to man, he had not apprehension
Of roaring terrors; for defect of judgment
Is oft the cause of fear.
GUIDERIUS
This Cloten was a fool, an empty purse;
There was no money in ’t. Not Hercules
Could have knocked out his brains, for he had none.
Yet I not doing this, the fool had borne
My head as I do his.

DUTCH:
Nauw’lijks opgegroeid,
Ik meen, tot man, ontbrak hem elk begrip
Van iets gevaarlijks ; en gebrek aan oordeel
Wekt vaak vermetelheid. Daar is uw broeder.


Scarce made up=Not fully developed, still and immature youth; or not ‘all there’
Lines of favour=Lines on the countenance
Snatches=Catches, seizures followed by a ‘burst of speaking’. (Irish ‘ganch’ meaning stammer)
Absolute=Positive, have no doubt
Roaring=Loud-tongued

Compleat:
Snatch=Een ruk, hap, beet
A snatch and away=Een mond vol en weg ‘er mee
To do a thing by girds and snatches=Ies met horten en stooten doen; met menigvuldige tusschenpoosingen verrigten
Absolute=Volslagen, volstrekt, volkomen, onafhangklyk, onverbonden
To roar=Uitbrullen

Burgersdijk notes:
Gebrek aan oordeel wekt vaak vermetelheid. Het oorspronkelijke is hier blijkbaar bedorven, de folio heeft: for defect of judgment is oft the cause of fear; Shakespeare moet ongeveer het tegendeel gezegd hebben, want de doldriestheid van Cloten wordt uit zijn gebrek aan oordeel verklaard.
Hanmer las daarom: is oft the arre of fear, en dienovereenkomstig is hier vertaald. Doch ook Theobald’s verbetering is zeer opmerkelijk: for the effect of judgment is oft the cause of fear; „want des oordeels werking is oorzaak vaak van vrees” ; de zin van beide verbeteringen is nagenoeg gelijk; de tegenstelling tusschen gevolg of werking en oorzaak pleit er misschien voor, dat Theobald de uitdrukking des dichters getroffen heeft.

Topics: language, memory, judgment, intellect

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
Nay, forward, old man. Do not break off so,
For we may pity though not pardon thee.
EGEON
O, had the gods done so, I had not now
Worthily termed them merciless to us.
For, ere the ships could meet by twice five leagues,
We were encounterd by a mighty rock,
Which being violently borne upon,
Our helpful ship was splitted in the midst;
So that, in this unjust divorce of us,
Fortune had left to both of us alike
What to delight in, what to sorrow for.

DUTCH:
Neen, oude, breek niet af; want mededoogen
Mag ik u schenken, schoon genade niet..

MORE:
Worthily=Deservedly, justly
Helpful ship=Mast, which was helpful when the ship was “sinking-ripe”
In the midst=Down the middle

Compleat:
Worthily=Waardiglyk
Helpful=Behulpelyk
Midst=Het middenst, midden

Topics: pity, mercy, judgment, fate/destiny, life

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,
Bear ’t that th’ opposèd may beware of thee.
Give every man thy ear but few thy voice.
Take each man’s censure but reserve thy judgment.

DUTCH:
Geef elk uw oor, maar enk’len slechts uw oordeel /
Leen iedereen het oor, uw stem slechts enklen

MORE:
Oft-quoted list of maxims in Polonius’ ‘fatherly advice’ monologue to Laertes. Many of these nuggets have acquired proverb status today, although they weren’t invented by Shakespeare (here, for example, Hear much but speak little, 1532,).

Topics: proverbs and idioms, perception, judgment

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHARINE
I will, when you are humble; nay, before,
Or God will punish me. I do believe,
Induced by potent circumstances, that
You are mine enemy, and make my challenge
You shall not be my judge: for it is you
Have blown this coal betwixt my lord and me;
Which God’s dew quench! Therefore I say again,
I utterly abhor, yea, from my soul
Refuse you for my judge; whom, yet once more,
I hold my most malicious foe, and think not
At all a friend to truth.

DUTCH:
Vast geloof ik,
En wel op meen’gen hechten grond, dat gij
Mijn vijand zijt, en stel den eisch, dat niet
Mijn vijand hier mij rechte.

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton): “Nemo debet esse judex in suâ propriâ causâ (12 Rep. 113). No one ought to be a judge in his own cause.”.
CITED IN US LAW:
The Florida Bar v. Silverman, 196 So.2d 442, 444 (Fla. 1967)(Ervin, J;)(dissent).
Blown this coal=Fanned the fire
Potent=Srong, powerful
Circumstances=Adjuncts of a fact which are evidence one way or another (Onions) (cf. Othello 3.3:
If imputation and strong circumstances
Which lead directly to the door of truth
Will give you satisfaction, you may have ’t.)
Compleat:
Potent=Magtig
Circumstance=Omstandigheyd
Circumstanced=Met omstandigheden belegd, onder omstandigheden begreepen

Topics: cited in law, law/legal, judgment

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Suffolk
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
Stay, good my lords,
I have a little yet to say. Look there, my lords;
By virtue of that ring, I take my cause
Out of the grips of cruel men and give it
To a most noble judge, the King my master.
CHAMBERLAIN
This is the King’s ring.
SURREY
’Tis no counterfeit.
SUFFOLK
’Tis the right ring, by heaven! I told you all,
When we first put this dangerous stone a-rolling,
’Twould fall upon ourselves.
NORFOLK
Do you think, my lords,
The king will suffer but the little finger
Of this man to be vex’d?

DUTCH:
t Is de echte ring, bij God! Ik zeide ‘t wel,
Toen wij den boozen steen aan ‘t rollen brachten,
Dat hij op ons zou vallen.

MORE:
Proverb: The stone you throw will fall on your own head
Suffer=Permit, tolerate
But=Even
Vexed=Harmed
Compleat:
Suffer=Toelaaten, gedoogen
But=Maar alleen
To vex=Quellen, plaagen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, consequence, judgment

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
So please your Majesty, I would I could
Quit all offences with as clear excuse
As well as I am doubtless I can purge
Myself of many I am charged withal.
Yet such extenuation let me beg
As, in reproof of many tales devised,
Which oft the ear of greatness needs must hear,
By smiling pickthanks and base newsmongers,
I may for some things true, wherein my youth
Hath faulty wandered and irregular,
Find pardon on my true submission.

DUTCH:
Veroorloof, uwe hoogheid! ‘k Wenschte, dat ik
Van iedre smet mij zoo bevrijden kon,
Als ik mij buiten twijfel rein kan wasschen
Van meen’ge zonde, mij te last gelegd;

MORE:
I am doubtless=I doubt not
Quit=acquit, clear oneself
Purge=clear
Charged withal=Accused of now
Extenuation= Considerations, allowance
Devised= Invented, made up
Smiling pickthanks=Flatterers who think flattery will earn the King’s gratitude
True submission= Confession
Newsmongers=Gossips
Compleat:
Purge=Zuyveren, reynigen

Topics: nlame, innocence, reputation, mercy, judgment

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
Kneel not to me.
The power that I have on you is to spare you;
The malice towards you to forgive you. Live
And deal with others better.
CYMBELINE
Nobly doomed.
We’ll learn our freeness of a son-in-law:
Pardon’s the word to all.

DUTCH:
Kniel niet voor mij;
De macht, die ‘k op u heb, is u te sparen,
En heel mijn wrok, u te vergeven. Leef,
Behandel and’ren beter.


Proverb: To be able to harm and not to do it is noble
Doomed=Judged

Schmidt:
Malice=Malignity, disposition to injure others
Freeness=Generosity

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
To doom=Veroordelen, verwyzen, doemen
Doomed=Veroordeeld, verweezen.

Topics: good and bad, offence, judgment, mercy, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
I show it most of all when I show justice;
For then I pity those I do not know,
Which a dismiss’d offence would after gall;
And do him right that, answering one foul wrong,
Lives not to act another. Be satisfied;
Your brother dies to-morrow; be content.
ISABELLA
So you must be the first that gives this sentence,
And he, that suffer’s. O, it is excellent
To have a giant’s strength; but it is tyrannous
To use it like a giant.

DUTCH:
Het is fantastisch om reuzenkracht te hebben, maar tiranniek het als een reus te gebruiken.

MORE:
CITED IN E&W LAW:
In a direct quotation or ‘borrowed eloquence’, one of the most vivid instances of quotation is Lord Justice Waite’s observation in Thomas v Thomas [1995] 2 FLR 668 on judicial power, noting that: “it is excellent to have a giant’s strength but tyrannous to use it like a giant”).
CITED IN US LAW:
Gardiner v. A.H. Robins Company, lnc., 747 F.2d 1180, 1194, n. 21 (8th Cir. 1984);
Davis v. Ohio Barge Line, Ine., 697 F.2d 549, 558 (3d Cir. 1982)(“Federal judges are the final arbiters of whether a case comes within our gigantic power and authority. But at all times we should heed the admonition of the Bard of Stratford-Avon: … );
People v. Fatone, 165 Cal. App.3d 1164, 1180, 211 Cal. Rptr. 288, 297 (1985);
Lewis v. Bill Robertson & Sons, Inc., 162 Cal. App. 3d 650,656, 208 Cal. Rptr. 699, 703 (1984).
Burgersdijk notes:
Reuzenkracht bezitten. In ‘t Engelsch: To have a giant ‘s strength. Hier werd door Sh. waarschijnlijk aan de Titanen gedacht, die den hemel bestormden, – zie Vroolijke Vrouwtjes van Windsor, II.1.81, – veeleer dan aan de reuzen uit ridderromans.

Topics: justice, cited in law, judgment, punishment, authority

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
SICINIUS
It is a mind
That shall remain a poison where it is,
Not poison any further.
CORIOLANUS
Shall remain!
Hear you this Triton of the minnows? mark you
His absolute ‘shall’?
COMINIUS
’Twas from the canon.

DUTCH:
„Blijven moet!” —
Hoort gij dien katvisch-Triton? merkt gij daar
‘t Gebiedend,,moet”?

MORE:
Proverb: A Triton among the minnows

Schmidt:
Canon=Rule, law
Absolute=Positive, certain, decided, not doubtful

Compleat:
Canonical=Regelmaatig
Triton=De trompetter van Neptunus; (weather-cock)=Een weerhaan, windwyzer

Burgersdijk notes:
Dien kat visch-Triton. Triton is een mindere zeegod, die dus alleen over de kleine vischjes gebied voert.

Topics: language, intellect, authority, judgment, law/legal

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
O God, O God! that e’er this tongue of mine,
That laid the sentence of dread banishment
On yon proud man, should take it off again
With words of sooth! O that I were as great
As is my grief, or lesser than my name!
Or that I could forget what I have been,
Or not remember what I must be now!
Swell’st thou, proud heart? I’ll give thee scope to beat,
Since foes have scope to beat both thee and me.

DUTCH:
O, ware ik zoo groot
Als nu mijn smart, of kleiner dan mijn naam;
Of dat ik kon vergeten, wat ik was,
Of niet begrijpen, wat ik nu moet zijn!

MORE:

Words of sooth=Words of appeasement, comfort (‘sooth’ is sweet as well as true as in the verb ‘to soothe’)
Scope=(a) latitude’ (b) purpose, capabillity

Compleat:
Sooth=Zeker, voorwaar
To sooth up=Vleijen, flikflooijen
To sooth up (lull)=Aanmoedigen
Scope=Oogmerk, ,doelwit
To have free scope (latitude)=De ruimte hebben (vrye loop)

Topics: judgment, punishment, memory, integrity, value

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
’Tis one thing to be tempted, Escalus,
Another thing to fall. I not deny,
The jury, passing on the prisoner’s life,
May in the sworn twelve have a thief or two
Guiltier than him they try. But justice takes the opportunities it has; who knows what laws thieves pass against other thieves?

DUTCH:
k Loochen niet,
Dat onder de gezwoor’nen voor een halszaak
Het twaalftal licht éen dief, zelfs twee, kan tellen,
Wier schuld die des gedaagden overtreft;

MORE:

Topics: law/legal, justice, guilt, honesty, judgment

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
No, sir, it does not please me.
I had thought I had had men of some understanding
And wisdom of my council; but I find none.
Was it discretion, lords, to let this man,
This good man,—few of you deserve that title,—
This honest man, wait like a lousy footboy
At chamber—door? and one as great as you are?
Why, what a shame was this! Did my commission
Bid you so far forget yourselves? I gave you
Power as he was a counsellor to try him,
Not as a groom: there’s some of you, I see,
More out of malice than integrity,
Would try him to the utmost, had you mean;
Which you shall never have while I live.

DUTCH:
k Gaf u de macht
Hem te verhooren als een lid des raads,
Niet als een stalknecht. ‘k Zie nu, menig uwer
Zou, meer uit boosheid dan rechtvaardigheid,
Ten scherpste hem verhooren, zoo gij mocht;
Maar nimmer zal dit zijn zoolang ik leef.

MORE:
Understanding=Intellect, judgement
Discretion=Wisdom
Lousy=Inferior (or lice-ridden)
Groom=Servant
Try to the utmost=Give the most severe sentence
Mean=The means
Compleat:
Understanding=Verstand
Discretion=Verstand
Valour can do little without discretion=Dapperheyd zonder een goed beleyd heeft weynig om ‘t lyf.
Lousy=Luyzig, luysvoedig
Groom=Stalknecht
Utmost=Uyterste
Mean=Middelen, een middel

Topics: intellect, honesty, authority, judgment

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
Prithee, fair youth,
Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds
By this rude place we live in. Well encountered!
’Tis almost night; you shall have better cheer
Ere you depart, and thanks to stay and eat it.—
Boys, bid him welcome

DUTCH:
Acht ons geen lomperds; schat ons zacht gemoed
Niet naar de woeste woning


Churl=Peasant, rude and ill-bred fellow
To measure=To judge

Compleat:
Churl=Een plompe boer; een vrek
Churlish=Woest, boersch, onbeschoft
To measure a thing by one’s own profit=Een zaak schatten naar het voordeel dat men ‘er van trekt
To measure other peoples corn by one’s own bushel=Een ander by zich zelven afmeeten

Topics: civility, order/society, appearance, value, judgment, poverty and wealth

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 2.9
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
ARRAGON
What’s here? The portrait of a blinking idiot
Presenting me a schedule! I will read it.—
How much unlike art thou to Portia!
How much unlike my hopes and my deservings!
“Who chooseth me shall have as much as he deserves”!
Did I deserve no more than a fool’s head?
Is that my prize? Are my deserts no better?
PORTIA
To offend and judge are distinct offices
And of opposèd natures.

DUTCH:
t Misdoen en ‘t vonnis slaan zijn steeds gescheiden;
Het een strijdt tegen ‘t ander.

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
Unlike my hopes and deservings=Not what I hoped for or deserve
Schedule=scroll
Fool’s head=Ass-head, fool
Distinct=Separate, different positions/functions
Compleat:
Buffle-head=Buffelskop, een plomperd, dom-oor
Desert=Verdienste, verdiende loon
Distinct=Onderscheyden, afzonderlyk, duydelyk
Opposed=Wéderstaand, tégenstrydig, Tegenstaaning

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
To me she speaks; she moves me for her theme.
What, was I married to her in my dream?
Or sleep I now and think I hear all this?
What error drives our eyes and ears amiss?
Until I know this sure uncertainty
I’ll entertain the offered fallacy.
LUCIANA
Dromio, go bid the servants spread for dinner.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
O, for my beads! I cross me for a sinner.
This is the fairy land. O spite of spites!
We talk with goblins, ouphs, and sprites:
If we obey them not, this will ensue:
They’ll suck our breath, or pinch us black and blue.

DUTCH:
Het is tot mij, dat zij die reed’nen houdt!
Wat! ben ik in den droom met haar getrouwd?
Of slaap ik nu en meen ik, dat ik hoor?
Wat vreemde waan verdwaast mijn oog en oor?
Maar kom, tot mij dit raadsel wordt verklaard,
Zij de opgedrongen dwaling thans aanvaard

MORE:
Proverb: To beat (pinch) one black and blue. Pinching was a traditional punishment associated with fairies

Onions:
Move=to urge, incite, instigate, make a proposal to, appeal or apply to (a person)
Error=Mistake, deception, false opinion
Ouph=Elf, goblin
Uncertainty=A mystery, the unknown
Entertain=Accept (the delusion)

Compleat:
Error=Fout, misslag, dwaaling, dooling
To lie under a great errour=In een groote dwaaling steeken
Beadsman=een Bidder, Gety=leezer, Gebed-opzegger

Topics: imagination, evidence, judgment, punishment, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
We cannot weigh our brother with ourself:
Great men may jest with saints; ’tis wit in them,
But in the less foul profanation.

DUTCH:
Niet met zichzelf mag men zijn naaste meten

MORE:
Schmidt:
Weigh=To ascertain the weight of, to examine by the balance
That by which a thing is counterbalanced, preceded by against or with
Profanation=The act of violating holy things, irreverence
Compleat:
Profanation=Ontheiliging, schending
Weigh=Weegen, overweegen
To weigh all things by pleasures and sorrows=Van alles oordeelen door het vermaak of de droefheid
His authority weighs more than his arguments=Zyn gezach weegt zwaarder als de argumenten

Topics: judgment, equality, status, order/society, law/legal

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
Well, time is the old justice that examines all such offenders, and let time try. Adieu.

DUTCH:
Nu, de Tijd is de oude rechter, die al zulke euveldaders
oordeelt; de Tijd moge uitspraak doen.

MORE:
Proverb: Time tries all things

Topics: judgment, time, offence, justice, law/legal

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Why, then you should discover a brace of
unmeriting, proud, violent, testy magistrates, alias
fools, as any in Rome.
SICINIUS
Menenius, you are known well enough, too.
MENENIUS
I am known to be a humorous patrician, and one that
loves a cup of hot wine with not a drop of allaying
Tiber in’t; said to be something imperfect in
favouring the first complaint; hasty and tinder-like
upon too trivial motion; one that converses more
with the buttock of the night than with the forehead
of the morning: what I think I utter, and spend my
malice in my breath.

DUTCH:
Wat ik denk, dat uit ik, en ik geef mijn boosheid in mijn adem lucht.

MORE:
Humorous=Capricious, whimsical
Converses more=Is more conversant with
Too trivial motion=Too trifling a provocation
Spend my malice in my breath=Vent my anger in words

Schmidt:
Weal=(1) Welfare, prosperity, happiness; (2) Commonwealth, body politic
Wealsmen=Legislators
Testy=Easily angry, fretful, peevish
Motion=Incitement

Compleat:
The common-weal=’t Welvaaren van ‘t algemeen
A common-wealths man=Een republyks gezinde
Testy=Korzel, kribbig, gramsteurig, gemelyk

Topics: judgment, anger, law/legal

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
DUKE
How shalt thou hope for mercy, rendering none?
SHYLOCK
What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
You have among you many a purchased slave,
Which—like your asses and your dogs and mules—
You use in abject and in slavish parts
Because you bought them. Shall I say to you,
“Let them be free! Marry them to your heirs!
Why sweat they under burdens? Let their beds
Be made as soft as yours and let their palates
Be seasoned with such viands”? You will answer,
“The slaves are ours.” So do I answer you.
The pound of flesh which I demand of him
Is dearly bought. ‘Tis mine and I will have it.
If you deny me, fie upon your law—
There is no force in the decrees of Venice.

DUTCH:
Doge.
Hoopt ge op gena, gij die er geen bewijst?
Shylock.
Wat vonnis zou ik duchten ? ‘k Doe geen onrecht.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
By 1993, “pound of flesh” had been used 120 times in courts without reference to Shakespeare. (See William Domnarski, Shakespeare in the Law)
Gates v. United States 33 Fed. Cl. 9 , 13 (1995);
Leasing Service Corporation v. Justice, 673 F.2d 70, 71 (2d Cir. 198l)(Kaufman,J.);
Eldridge v. Burns, 76 Cal. App.3d 396, 432, 142 Cal. Rptr. 845,868 (1978);
Jones v. Jones, 189 Mise. 186, 70 N.Y.S.2d lll, 112 (N.Y. C1v. Ct.1947).

Fie=Exclamation of contempt or dislike
Force=validity
Viands=Dressed meat, food
Compleat:
Fie (or fy)=Foei
Fy upon it! Fy for shame!=Foei ‘t is een schande!

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
You know neither me, yourselves nor any thing. You are ambitious for poor knaves’ caps and legs: you wear out a good wholesome forenoon in hearing a cause between an orange wife and a fosset-seller; and then rejourn the controversy of three pence to a second day of audience. When you are hearing a matter between party and party, if you chance to be pinched with the colic, you make faces like mummers; set up the bloody flag against all patience; and, in roaring for a chamber-pot, dismiss the controversy bleeding the more entangled by your hearing: all the peace you make in their cause is calling both the parties knaves. You are a pair of strange ones.
BRUTUS
Come, come, you are well understood to be a
perfecter giber for the table than a necessary
bencher in the Capitol.

DUTCH:
Kom, kom, het is overbekend, dat gij veeleer een onverbeterlijk grappenmaker aan tafel zijt, dan een onontbeerlijk bijzitter op het Kapitool.

MORE:
Proverb: Know thyself

Ambitious for caps and legs=Wanting people to bow and doff caps
Bencher=member of a court or council
Set up the bloody flag=Declare war on (patience)

Schmidt:
Fosset, forset, faucet=Kind of tap for drawing liquor from a barrel; only in “faucet-seller”
Giber=entertainer, (aftr-dinner) jester
Mummer=Someone wearing a mask
The more entangled=To make (the dispute) more confused and intricate

Compleat:
To gibe=Boerten, gekscheeren
Bencher=Een byzitter, Raad, een Rechtsgeleerde van den eersten rang in ‘t Genootschap
Mummer=Een vermomde
Faucet (or peg)=Zwikje, pennetje tot een vat

Topics: language, intellect, reputation, judgment, dispute

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Alas, poor Clarence! Is it for a wife
That thou art malcontent? I will provide thee.
CLARENCE
In choosing for yourself, you show’d your judgment,
Which being shallow, you give me leave
To play the broker in mine own behalf;
And to that end I shortly mind to leave you.
KING EDWARD IV
Leave me, or tarry, Edward will be king,
And not be tied unto his brother’s will.

DUTCH:
Uw eigen keus getuigde van uw oordeel;
Daar dit niet diep gaat, zij het mij vergund,
Dat ik als maak’laar van mijzelven optreed;
En daartoe ga ik eerstdaags u verlaten.

MORE:

Malcontent=Disaffected
Shallow=Silly, superficial
Mind=Intend
Tied unto=Bound by

Compleat:
Malecontent=Misnoegd, ‘t onvrede
Shallow=Ondiep
Shallowness, shallow wit=Kleinheid van begrip, dommelykheid
To mind=Betrachten
Minded=Gezind, genegen
To tie unto=Aan vast binden

Topics: judgment, independence, free will

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