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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: As You Like It ACT/SCENE: 3.4 SPEAKER: Celia CONTEXT: ROSALIND
You have heard him swear downright he was.
CELIA
“Was” is not “is.” Besides, the oath of a lover is no stronger than the word of a tapster. They are both the confirmer of false reckonings. He attends here in the forest on the duke your father. DUTCH: Was is geen is; bovendien, de eed van een minnaar is niet meer waard dan de eed van een tapper; zij zijn beide de bekrachtiging van valsche rekeningen MORE: Schmidt:
Downright=Directly, without stopping short, without further ceremony, plainly
False=Not right, wrong, erroneous
Compleat:
Downright (plain and clear)=Eenvoudig and clear
Downright (plain or open)=Duidelyk of openhartig
A downright contradiction=Een rechtstrydede zaak Topics: language, clarity/precision, truth, honesty

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Tanta est erga te mentis integritas, regina serenissima
QUEEN KATHARINE
O, good my lord, no Latin!
I am not such a truant since my coming
As not to know the language I have lived in.
A strange tongue makes my cause more strange, suspicious.
Pray speak in English. Here are some will thank you,
If you speak truth, for their poor mistress’ sake.
Believe me, she has had much wrong. Lord Cardinal,
The willing’st sin I ever yet committed
May be absolved in English

DUTCH:
Een vreemde tong maakt mijne zaak licht vreemder,
Licht meer verdacht.

MORE:
Truant=Poor student
Coming=Arrival (in England)
Strange tongue=Foreign language
Strange=Odd, alien
Willing=Most eagerly (committed)
Compleat:
Truant=Een Lanterfant
To play the truant=Lanterfanten; in plaats van na school te gaan, speelen loopen (Amsterdam zegt ‘Stutteloopen’)
Willing=Willende, gewillig
Willingly=Gewilliglyk

Topics: language, order/society

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
I prithee now, my son,
Go to them, with this bonnet in thy hand;
And thus far having stretch’d it—here be with them—
Thy knee bussing the stones—for in such business
Action is eloquence, and the eyes of the ignorant
More learned than the ears—waving thy head,
Which often, thus, correcting thy stout heart,
Now humble as the ripest mulberry
That will not hold the handling: or say to them,
Thou art their soldier, and being bred in broils
Hast not the soft way which, thou dost confess,
Were fit for thee to use as they to claim,
In asking their good loves, but thou wilt frame
Thyself, forsooth, hereafter theirs, so far
As thou hast power and person.

DUTCH:
Want gebaren
Zijn reed’naars bij onnooz’len, daar hun oog
Min stomp is dan hun oor

MORE:
Schmidt:
Bonnet=Take off a bonnet (sign of respect, courtesy)
To buss=To kiss
Broil=War, combat, battle
Hold=Bear, stand up to

Compleat:
To buss=Zoenen, kussen
Broil=Oproer, beroerte, gewoel

Topics: language, appearance, flattery, manipulation, promise

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Thomas Mowbray
CONTEXT:
The language I have learn’d these forty years,
My native English, now I must forego:
And now my tongue’s use is to me no more
Than an unstringed viol or a harp,
Or like a cunning instrument cased up,
Or, being open, put into his hands
That knows no touch to tune the harmony:
Within my mouth you have engaol’d my tongue,
Doubly portcullis’d with my teeth and lips;
And dull unfeeling barren ignorance
Is made my gaoler to attend on me.
I am too old to fawn upon a nurse,
Too far in years to be a pupil now:
What is thy sentence then but speechless death,
Which robs my tongue from breathing native breath?

DUTCH:
En maakt tot stokbewaarder, ter bewaking,
Onwetendheid, die dof is, stomp, gevoelloos.
Ik ben reeds te oud tot staam’len met een voedster,
Te veel op jaren om ter school te gaan;

MORE:

A semi-literal allusion to a proverb of the time, ‘Good that the teeth guard the tongue’ (1578) and the virtue of silence. Ben Jonson recommended a ‘wise tongue’ that should not be ‘licentious and wandering’. (See also the Lucio in Measure for Measure: “’tis a secret must be locked within the
teeth and the lips”.)

Cunning=Skilful
Sentence=Verdict (punning on language)
Breathing native breath=Speaking native English (and breathing English air)

Compleat:
Cunning=Behendig

Topics: language, understanding, identity, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
My queen, my mistress!
O lady, weep no more, lest I give cause
To be suspected of more tenderness
Than doth become a man. I will remain
The loyal’st husband that did e’er plight troth.
My residence in Rome at one Philario’s,
Who to my father was a friend, to me
Known but by letter; thither write, my queen,
And with mine eyes I’ll drink the words you send,
Though ink be made of gall.

DUTCH:
k Neem mijn verblijf in Rome, bij Philario,
Een vriend mijns vaders, dien ikzelf alleen
Uit brieven ken; geliefde, schrijf mij daar;
Mijn oogen zullen uwe woorden drinken,
Al wordt ook inkt uit gal bereid.


Gall=Bile; any thing bitter and disagreeable; bitterness of mind, rancour
Gall=An ingredient in ink (iron gall ink)

Compleat:
Gall=Gal
To gall (or vex)=Tergen, verbitteren
Bitter as gall=Zo bitter als gal

Topics: sorrow, appearance, loyalty, language

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
Plead you to me, fair dame? I know you not.
In Ephesus I am but two hours old,
As strange unto your town as to your talk,
Who, every word by all my wit being scanned,
Want wit in all one word to understand.

DUTCH:
Geldt mij dit, schoone vrouw? Ik ken u niet.
Twee uren pas ben ik in Ephesus ,
En vreemder dan de stad is mij uw taal;
Want, hoe ik napluis, wat ik heb gehoord,
‘k Versta van alles, wat gij zegt, geen woord.

MORE:
But two hours old=I have only been here for two hours
Scanned=Considered (with every ounce of my intellect)

Compleat:
To scan=Onderzoeken, uitpluizen
To be a stranger to=Geen kennis van hebben

Topics: language, civility, understanding

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Cade
CONTEXT:
SAY
Nothing but this; ’tis ‘bona terra, mala gens.’
CADE
Away with him, away with him! He speaks Latin.
SAY
Hear me but speak, and bear me where you will.
Kent, in the Commentaries Caesar writ,
Is term’d the civil’st place of this isle:
Sweet is the country, because full of riches;
The people liberal, valiant, active, wealthy;
Which makes me hope you are not void of pity.
I sold not Maine, I lost not Normandy,
Yet, to recover them, would lose my life.
Justice with favour have I always done;
Prayers and tears have moved me, gifts could never.
When have I aught exacted at your hands,
But to maintain the king, the realm and you?
Large gifts have I bestow’d on learned clerks,
Because my book preferr’d me to the king,
And seeing ignorance is the curse of God,
Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven,
Unless you be possess’d with devilish spirits,
You cannot but forbear to murder me:
This tongue hath parley’d unto foreign kings
For your behoof

DUTCH:
Weg met hem! weg met hem! hij spreekt Latijn.

MORE:
See also “He can speak French; and therefore he is a traitor” (4.2)

Civil’st=Most civilized
Clerks=Scholars
Liberal=Refined
Favour=Lenience
Aught=Anything
Exacted=Taken in the form of taxes
My book=My learning, education
Preferred me=Recommended me to, put me in favour with
Parley=Talks, negotiations for an agreement
Behoof=Advantage, benefit

Compleat:
Civilized=Welgemanierd, beschaafd, heusch
Clerk=Klerk, schryver
A liberal education=Een goede of ruime opvoeding
Favourable (jkind)=Vriendelyk
Aught=Iets
To exact=Afvorderen, afeisschen
To prefer one=Iemand bevorderen, zyn fortuin maaken
To parley=Gesprek houden, te spraake staane, te woorde staan van overgaave spreeken
Behoof=Nut, geryf, gemak

Burgersdijk notes:
Bona terra, mala gens. Het land goed, maar het volk kwaad.
De leefste streek. In Arthur Golding’s vertaling der Commentaren van Julius Czesar (1565) kon Shakespeare lezen: Of all the inhabitants of this isle the Kentishnien are the civilest. Sh. spreekt hier ook van the civil’st place.

Topics: money, value, learning/education, language

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Cade
CONTEXT:
I feel remorse in myself with his words; but I’ll bridle it:
he shall die, an it be but for pleading so well for his life.
Away with him! He has a familiar under his tongue;
he speaks not o’ God’s name. Go, take him away,
I say, and strike off his head presently;
and then break into his son-in-law’s house,
Sir James Cromer, and strike off his head,
and bring them both upon two poles hither.

DUTCH:
Weg met hem! hij heeft een dienstbaren duivel onder zijn tong, hij spreekt niet in den naam van God

MORE:

Bridle=Rein in, constrain
Familiar=Demon or spirit
An be it but for=If only for

Compleat:
To bridle=Intoomen, breidelen, beteugelen
Familiar=Een gemeenzaame geet, queldrommel

Topics: language, deceit, truth, punishment, regret

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
MIRANDA
Be of comfort.
My father’s of a better nature, sir,
Than he appears by speech. This is unwonted
Which now came from him.
PROSPERO
Thou shalt be free
As mountain winds. But then exactly do
All points of my command.
ARIEL
To th’ syllable.

DUTCH:
Houd goeden moed!
Mijn vader, heer, is zachter van natuur,
Dan nu zijn taal verraadt; wat hij daar zeide,
Is ongewoon in hem.

MORE:
Proverb: As free as the air (wind). Shakespeare refers to this again in AYL (“I must have liberty
Withal, as large a charter as the wind”, 2.7) and Coriolanus (“Be free as is the wind.”, 1.9).
Unwonted=Uncommon, unusual
Compleat:
Ebb=De eb, ebbe; afvlooijen
The lowest ebb of its authority=Genoegzaam haar gezach veloren
My soul hs never ebbed from its constant principles=Myn ziel is nooit van haare grondbeginzels afgeweeken

Topics: language, civility, proverbs and idioms, still in use, free will

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Brabantio
CONTEXT:
So let the Turk of Cyprus us beguile,
We lose it not so long as we can smile;
He bears the sentence well that nothing bears
But the free comfort which from thence he hears;
But he bears both the sentence and the sorrow
That to pay grief must of poor patience borrow.
These sentences, to sugar or to gall,
Being strong on both sides, are equivocal.
But words are words; I never yet did hear
That the bruised heart was pierced through the ear.
Beseech you now, to the affairs of the state.

DUTCH:
Doch woord blijft woord, en dat het spreuken horen, een krank hart heelde, kwam mij nooit ter oren./
Die uitspraken, geschikt voor zuur en zoet,
doen het aan beide zijden even goed:
het zijn maar woorden; ik heb nooit gehoord
van ’t wonde hart dat baat vond bij een woord.

MORE:

Sentence that nothing bears=Indifferent platitude
Gall=Bitterness, to embitter
Pierced=lanced (and cured)(See LLL, 5.2: Honest plain words best pierce the ear of grief)

Compleat:
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten; to gall (or vex)=Tergen, verbitteren
To pierce=Doordringen, doorbooren

Topics: language, deceit, appearance, emotion and mood, wisdom, understanding

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Cry “holla” to thy tongue, I prithee. It curvets unseasonably. He was furnished like a hunter.
ROSALIND
Oh, ominous! He comes to kill my heart.
CELIA
I would sing my song without a burden. Thou bring’st me out of tune.
ROSALIND
Do you not know I am a woman? When I think, I must speak. Sweet, say on.

DUTCH:
Roep toch Hola !” tot uw tong, want die maakt ontijdig
kromme sprongen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Curvet=frolic
Unseasonably=At an improper time
Compleat:
Curvet (a certain motion, or gait of a horse)=Corbet, Eenluchtige sprong van een paerd, eerst met de voorste en dan met de agterlyke pooten in de lucht
Curvet=Springen (in the above sense)
Unseasonably=Ontydiglyk, t’ontyde

Topics: language, wisdom

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
BELARIUS
I cannot tell. Long is it since I saw him,
But time hath nothing blurred those lines of favour
Which then he wore. The snatches in his voice
And burst of speaking were as his. I am absolute
’Twas very Cloten.
ARVIRAGUS
In this place we left them.
I wish my brother make good time with him,
You say he is so fell
BELARIUS
Being scarce made up,
I mean to man, he had not apprehension
Of roaring terrors; for defect of judgment
Is oft the cause of fear.
GUIDERIUS
This Cloten was a fool, an empty purse;
There was no money in ’t. Not Hercules
Could have knocked out his brains, for he had none.
Yet I not doing this, the fool had borne
My head as I do his.

DUTCH:
Nauw’lijks opgegroeid,
Ik meen, tot man, ontbrak hem elk begrip
Van iets gevaarlijks ; en gebrek aan oordeel
Wekt vaak vermetelheid. Daar is uw broeder.


Scarce made up=Not fully developed, still and immature youth; or not ‘all there’
Lines of favour=Lines on the countenance
Snatches=Catches, seizures followed by a ‘burst of speaking’. (Irish ‘ganch’ meaning stammer)
Absolute=Positive, have no doubt
Roaring=Loud-tongued

Compleat:
Snatch=Een ruk, hap, beet
A snatch and away=Een mond vol en weg ‘er mee
To do a thing by girds and snatches=Ies met horten en stooten doen; met menigvuldige tusschenpoosingen verrigten
Absolute=Volslagen, volstrekt, volkomen, onafhangklyk, onverbonden
To roar=Uitbrullen

Burgersdijk notes:
Gebrek aan oordeel wekt vaak vermetelheid. Het oorspronkelijke is hier blijkbaar bedorven, de folio heeft: for defect of judgment is oft the cause of fear; Shakespeare moet ongeveer het tegendeel gezegd hebben, want de doldriestheid van Cloten wordt uit zijn gebrek aan oordeel verklaard.
Hanmer las daarom: is oft the arre of fear, en dienovereenkomstig is hier vertaald. Doch ook Theobald’s verbetering is zeer opmerkelijk: for the effect of judgment is oft the cause of fear; „want des oordeels werking is oorzaak vaak van vrees” ; de zin van beide verbeteringen is nagenoeg gelijk; de tegenstelling tusschen gevolg of werking en oorzaak pleit er misschien voor, dat Theobald de uitdrukking des dichters getroffen heeft.

Topics: language, memory, judgment, intellect

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Doctor
CONTEXT:
Foul whisp’rings are abroad. Unnatural deeds
Do breed unnatural troubles. Infected minds
To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets.
More needs she the divine than the physician.

DUTCH:
Men fluistert gruw’len. Onnatuurlijk doen
Baart onnatuurlijk wee.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Foul=Disgraceful, derogatory, detractive
Whisperings = rumours
Unnatural = supernatural (sleepwalkers were considered to be cursed; sleepwalking a sign of demonic possession)

Topics: madness, guilt, conspiracy, language

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1 Prologue
SPEAKER: Rumour
CONTEXT:
But what mean I
To speak so true at first? My office is
To noise abroad that Harry Monmouth fell
Under the wrath of noble Hotspur’s sword,
And that the King before the Douglas’ rage
Stooped his anointed head as low as death.
This have I rumoured through the peasant towns
Between that royal field of Shrewsbury
And this worm-eaten hold of ragged stone,
Where Hotspur’s father, old Northumberland,
Lies crafty-sick. The posts come tiring on,
And not a man of them brings other news
Than they have learnt of me. From Rumour’s tongues
They bring smooth comforts false, worse than true wrongs.

DUTCH:
Waar Heetspoors vader, graaf Northumberland,
Sluw krank ligt. Moede boden komen aan,
Doch geen brengt ander nieuws dan ik hem leerde,
Elk zoeten schijntroost, komende uit mijn mond,
Veel erger dan een waar bericht, dat wondt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
To noise abroad=Verb meaning to report or spread rumour
Peasant=Condescending description of village inhabitants as ignorant
Crafty-sick=Feigning illness
Post=Courier, messenger

Compleat:
To noise abroad=Uitbrommen, uittrompetten
Peasant=Landman, boer
Crafty=Loos, listig, schalk, doortrapt, leep

Topics: betrayal, deceit, appearance, perception, language

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
He that a fool doth very wisely hit
Doth very foolishly, although he smart,
Not to seem senseless of the bob. If not,
The wise man’s folly is anatomized
Even by the squand’ring glances of the fool.
Invest me in my motley. Give me leave
To speak my mind, and I will through and through
Cleanse the foul body of th’ infected world,
If they will patiently receive my medicine.

DUTCH:
Geef mij verlof,
Vrij uit te spreken, en ik zal de wereld,
Hoe voos, bedorven en onrein, doorzuiv’ren,
Als zij mijn midd’len maar geduldig neemt.

MORE:
Proverb:
Who is nettled at a jest seems to be in ernest
Schmidt:
Wisely=skilfully, successfully
Bob=A rap, a dry wipe
Senseless of the bob=Not to have felt the jibe
Squandering=Random
Motley=multicoloured jester outfit
Compleat:
Motley=Een grove gemengelde
Bob=Begekking, boert
To bob=Begekken, bedriegen, loeren, foppen

Topics: language, authority, wisdom

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
Farewell. I’ll grow a talker for this gear.
GRATIANO
Thanks, i’ faith, for silence is only commendable
In a neat’s tongue dried and a maid not vendible.
ANTONIO
Is that any thing now?
BASSANIO
Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than
any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of
wheat hid in two bushels of chaff —you shall seek all day
ere you find them, and when you have them they are not
worth the search.

DUTCH:

Gratiano praat oneindig veel, dat niets is

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Crowley Marine Services, Inc. v. National labour Relations Board, 344 U.S. App. D.C. 165; 234 F.3d 1295 (2000): Used by the judge to introduce her dissenting opinion, stating:
“His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff; you shall
seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search. …
The court’s per curiam opinion knocks down the modest, but real, requirement that a union requesting information from an employer explain, at the time of its request, the relevance, or at least potential relevance, of information not ordinarily pertinent to its role as bargaining representative…’
Kneale v. Kneale, 67 So. 2d 233, 234 (Fla., 1953).

You speak an infinite deal of nothing: still in use today.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
Believe me, on mine honour,
My words express my purpose.
ISABELLA
Ha! little honour to be much believed,
And most pernicious purpose! Seeming, seeming!
I will proclaim thee, Angelo; look for’t:
Sign me a present pardon for my brother,
Or with an outstretch’d throat I’ll tell the world aloud
What man thou art.

DUTCH:
Neen, geloof mij,
Neen, op mijn eer, ik zeg, wat ik bedoel .

MORE:
Onions:
Pernicious=Wicked, villainous
Compleat:
Pernicious=Schadelyk, verderflyk
A pernicious counsel=Een schadelyke, snoode raad
A pernicious maxim or doctrine=Een schadelyke stokregel, verderflyke leer.

Topics: language, honour, plans/intentions, purpose, deceit, manipulation, gullibility

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Boy
CONTEXT:
For indeed three such antics do not amount to a man: for Bardolph, he is white-livered and red-faced, by the means whereof he faces it out but fights not; for Pistol, he hath a killing tongue and a quiet sword, by the means whereof he breaks words and keeps whole weapons; for Nym, he hath heard that men of few words are the best men, and therefore he scorns to say his prayers, lest he should be thought a coward, but his few bad words are matched with as few good deeds, for he never broke any man’s head but his own, and that was against a post when he was drunk. They will steal anything and call it purchase.

DUTCH:
Pistool, die heeft een moorddadige tong en
een vreedzaam zwaard; en daarom breekt hij woorden
den nek, maar houdt zijn wapens heel

MORE:

Antic=Buffoon, practising odd gesticulations
White-livered=Cowardly (White livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare)
Face it out=To get through one’s business by effrontery
Scorn=To disdain, to refuse or lay aside with contempt
Words=Also in the sense of promises

Compleat:
To scorn=Verachten, verfooijen
White-livered=Een die er altijd bleek uitziet; een bleek-neus, kwaadaardig, nydig
To face out=Iemand iets in ‘t gezigt staande houden

Topics: reputation, honour, language, promise

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Gentleman
CONTEXT:
Her speech is nothing,
Yet the unshaped use of it doth move
The hearers to collection. They aim at it,
And botch the words up fit to their own thoughts,
Which, as her winks and nods and gestures yield them,
Indeed would make one think there might be thought,
Though nothing sure, yet much unhappily.
HORATIO
‘Twere good she were spoken with, for she may strew
Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.

DUTCH:
Maar toch, haar warreltaal wekt bij de hoorders
Vermoedens ; en als die met hun gedachten
De woorden, die zij met cen wenk of knik
En vreemd gebaar verzelt, gaan samenkopp’len,

MORE:
Spurns enviously=Kicks spitefully
Collection=Inference
To botch up=Piece together unskilfully
Botcher=One who mends and patches old clothes
Compleat:
Botcher=Een lapper, knoeijer, boetelaar, broddelaar

Topics: language, perception, understanding, good and bad

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
There is sure another flood toward, and these couples are coming to the ark. Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all tongues are called fools.
TOUCHSTONE
Salutation and greeting to you all.
JAQUES
Good my lord, bid him welcome. This is the motley-minded gentleman that I have so often met in the forest. He hath been a courtier, he swears.

DUTCH:
Daar komt een paar zeer vreemde beesten aan, die in alle talen den naam van narren dragen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Toward=In preparation and expectation, near at hand
Compleat:
Toward=Na toe
Motley=Een grove gemengelde

Topics: appearance, reputation, language, intellect

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
HORATIO
Is ’t not possible to understand in another tongue? You will do ’t, sir, really.
HAMLET
What imports the nomination of this gentleman?
OSRIC
Of Laertes?
HORATIO
His purse is empty already. All ’s golden words are spent.

DUTCH:
Zijn beurs is al leeg; hij heeft al zijn gouden woorden uitgegeven /
Zijn beurs is reeds leêg; hij gaf al zijn gouden woorden al uit. /
Zijn beurs is al leeg; al zijn gouden woorden zijn uitgegeven.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Import= Convey, express, mean, signify, show
Nomination=Mention of, reference to
Tongue=Meaning or expression

Topics: language, understanding

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Duchess of York
CONTEXT:
DUCHESS OF YORK
Nay, do not say, ‘stand up;’
Say, ‘pardon’ first, and afterwards ‘stand up.’
And if I were thy nurse, thy tongue to teach,
‘Pardon’ should be the first word of thy speech.
I never long’d to hear a word till now;
Say ‘pardon,’ king; let pity teach thee how:
The word is short, but not so short as sweet;
No word like ‘pardon’ for kings’ mouths so meet.
DUKE OF YORK
Speak it in French, king; say, ‘pardonnez-moi.’
DUCHESS OF YORK
Dost thou teach pardon pardon to destroy?
Ah, my sour husband, my hard-hearted lord,
That set’st the word itself against the word!
Speak ‘pardon’ as ’tis current in our land;
The chopping French we do not understand.
Thine eye begins to speak; set thy tongue there;
Or in thy piteous heart plant thou thine ear;
That hearing how our plaints and prayers do pierce,
Pity may move thee ‘pardon’ to rehearse.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Good aunt, stand up.
DUCHESS OF YORK
I do not sue to stand;
Pardon is all the suit I have in hand.

DUTCH:
Ik vraag niet op te staan;
Neen, enkel om vergeving houd ik aan.

MORE:

Proverb: Short and sweet

Meet=Fitting, appropriate
Chopping=Changing the meaning of words
Plaints=Complaints
Sue=Beg
Suit=A request made to a prince, a court-solicitation
Nurse=Nanny

Compleat:
To chop=Ruilen, ruitebuiten
To chop at a thing=Iets aangrypen, vasthouden
Plaint=Klagte, aanklagte
Sue=Voor ‘t recht roepen, in rechte vervolgen
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, language

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
MIRANDA
Abhorrèd slave,
Which any print of goodness wilt not take,
Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee,
Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour
One thing or other. When thou didst not, savage,
Know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like
A thing most brutish, I endowed thy purposes
With words that made them known. But thy vile race,
Though thou didst learn, had that in ’t which good natures
Could not abide to be with. Therefore wast thou
Deservedly confined into this rock,
Who hadst deserved more than a prison.
CALIBAN
You taught me language, and my profit on ’t
Is I know how to curse. The red plague rid you
For learning me your language!

DUTCH:
Deernis had ik;
En schonk u met veel zorg de spraak, ik leerde
U ieder uur iets nieuws; toen gij, een wilde,
Uzelven niet begreept, en klanken uitstiet
Gelijk het stomste vee, gaf ik u woorden,
Zoodat ge u uiten kondt;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Print=Imprint
Take=To receive as a thing in any way given or communicated
Gabble=Caliban is speaking in another language (incomprehensible to Miranda)
Purpose=That which a person or thing means to say or express, sense, meaning, purport: “I endowed thy –s with words,”
Rid=Destroy
Compleat:
Imprint=Inddrukken, inprenten
To imprint a thing in one’s mind=Iemand iets in het geheugen prenten
Gabble=Gekakel, gesnater
To gabble=Snappen, kakelen, koeteren
To gabble French=Fransch koeteren

Topics: language, learning/education, understanding, status, pity, order/society

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
I have a whole school of tongues in this belly of mine, and not a tongue of them all speaks any other word but my name. An I had but a belly of any indifferency, I were simply the most active fellow in Europe. My womb, my womb, my womb undoes me. Here comes our general.

DUTCH:
Ik heb een gansche school van tongen in dezen mijnen
buik, en geen van al die tongen spreekt een ander woord dan mijn naam.

MORE:

Indifferency=Average, moderate measure
Womb=Belly

Compleat:
Indifference=Onverschilligheid; middelmaatigheid

Topics: language, identity, skill/talent

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Lord Bardolph
CONTEXT:
Pardon, sir; I have heard the word—“phrase” call you it? By this day, I know not the phrase, but I will maintain the word with my sword to be a soldierlike word, and a word of exceeding good command, by heaven. “Accommodated,” that is when a man is, as they say, accommodated, or when a man is being whereby he may be thought to be accommodated, which is an excellent thing.

DUTCH:
Neem niet kwalijk, heer; ik heb het woord van hooren zeggen. Phrase noemt gij het? Bij den hemel, de phrase ken ik niet; maar het woord wil ik met mijn zwaard volhouden, dat het een goed soldatenwoord is, en een uitmuntend goed woord om te commandeeren…

MORE:
Burgersdijk notes:
Blz. 333. III. 2. 72. Geaccommodeerd. Een modewoord uit Sh.’s tijd, zooals die in groote steden soms opkomen en dan telkens en telkens gebruikt worden; Bardolf kent het woord dus van hooren zeggen; op het land raken zulke uitdrukkingen slechts langzaam bekend of in gebruik; van hier Zieligs verbazing. Ben Jonson bespot het woord ook in zijn “Every man in his humour.”

Topics: language, understanding

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
And for I know thou ‘rt full of love and honesty
And weigh’st thy words before thou giv’st them breath,
Therefore these stops of thine fright me the more.
For such things in a false disloyal knave
Are tricks of custom, but in a man that’s just
They are close dilations, working from the heart,
That passion cannot rule

DUTCH:
Ja, en daar ik weet dat jij
de vriendschap hooghoudt en goudeerlijk bent,
en nadenkt vóór je spreekt, schrik ik temeer,
als jij ineens niets zegt.

MORE:

The two most favoured interpretations of close dilations are: (1) involuntary delays; and (2) half-hidden expressions

Schmidt:
Stops=Sudden pauses
Tricks of custom=Customary artifice, stratagem, device
Just=Honest, upright, to be relied on

Compleat:
Just (righteous)=Een rechtvaardige

Topics: honesty, loyalty, language, caution

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
I know thou’rt valiant; and, to the possibility of
thy soldiership, will subscribe for thee. Farewell.
PAROLLES
I love not many words.
SECOND LORD
No more than a fish loves water. Is not this a
strange fellow, my lord, that so confidently seems
to undertake this business, which he knows is not to
be done; damns himself to do and dares better be
damned than to do’t?
FIRST LORD
You do not know him, my lord, as we do: certain it
is that he will steal himself into a man’s favour and
for a week escape a great deal of discoveries; but
when you find him out, you have him ever after.

DUTCH:
Niet meer dan de visch van het water . – Is dat niet
een kostelijke kerel, graaf, die schijnbaar zoo vol vertrouwen deze zaak op zich neemt, schoon hij weet, dat
zij onuitvoerbaar is, zich verdoemt om haar te volbrengen
en tech eer verdoemd zou willen zijn dan haar uitvoeren?

MORE:
Proverb: To love it no more than (as well as) a fish loves water
Subscribe=Surety, guarantee
Steal himself=Creep furtively, insinuate himself
Compleat:
Subscribe=Onderschryven
Steal=Doorsluypen

Topics: language, work, trust

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Nurse
CONTEXT:
I pray you, sir, what saucy merchant was this that was so full of his ropery?
ROMEO
A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

DUTCH:
Nu, ook vaarwel. — Heer, zeg mij toch, wat is dat
voor een raren snuiter, met al die vrijmoedighedens?

MORE:
Schmidt:
saucy=impudent, insolent
merchant=fellow
ropery=roguery (Schmidt) =trickery, knavery (Onions)
Stand to=side with, assist, support, maintain, guard, be firm in the cause of
Compleat:
Roguery=Schelmery, fieltery
To stand to one’s word=By zyn woord staan, zijn woord gestand doen

Topics: language, civility

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Joan la Pucelle
CONTEXT:
JOAN LA PUCELLE
A plaguing mischief light on Charles and thee!
And may ye both be suddenly surprised
By bloody hands, in sleeping on your beds!
YORK
Fell banning hag, enchantress, hold thy tongue!
JOAN LA PUCELLE
I prithee, give me leave to curse awhile.
YORK
Curse, miscreant, when thou comest to the stake.

DUTCH:
Treffe u en Karel beide’ een folt’rend onheil,
En moge een hand des bloeds u beiden plotsling
Bij ‘t slapen in uw bedden overvallen!

MORE:
Fell=Cruel, vicious, intense, savage.
Banning=Cursing
Plaguing=Tormenting, afflicting
Mischief=Calamity, misfortune

Compleat:
Fell=(cruel) Wreed
To ban=Vervloeken, in den ban doen (also ‘bann’)
Plaguing=Plaagende
Mischief=Onheil, kwaad, ongeluk, ramp, verderf, heilloosheid

Topics: language, civility, insult

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
My Lord of York, I promise you, the king
Prettily, methought, did play the orator.
YORK
And so he did; but yet I like it not,
In that he wears the badge of Somerset.
WARWICK
Tush, that was but his fancy, blame him not;
I dare presume, sweet prince, he thought no harm.
YORK
An if I wist he did,—but let it rest;
Other affairs must now be managed.

DUTCH:
Mylord van York, de koning, moet ik zeggen,
Heeft daar zijn rol van reed’naar goed gespeeld.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Badge=Device, emblem, or mark on a piece of cloth or of silver used to identify a knight or distinguish his followers
Tush=Interjection expressive of contempt
Dare=Would venture to
Wist=Knew

Compleat:
Badge=Merk, teken
Tush=Een woordje van verachting
To dare=Durven, de stoutheid hebben, ‘t hart hebben
If I may dare to say so=Als ik zo durf spreeken
Wist=Geweeten
Had I wist=Had ik geweeten

Topics: language, leadership

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
I will speak daggers to her but use none.
My tongue and soul in this be hypocrites.
How in my words somever she be shent,
To give them seals never, my soul, consent!

DUTCH:
k Zal dolken spreken, maar ‘k gebruik er geen. /
Wreed wil ik zijn, maar aan mijn inborst tro
uw; met dolken spreken, maar ze niet gebruiken.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Shent=put to the blush, blamed, reproached, reviled
Somever=soever
Compleat:
Shent=Beschuldigd, bekeeven

Topics: language

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
If, by the Tribunes’ leave, and yours, good people,
I may be heard, I would crave a word or two,
The which shall turn you to no further harm
Than so much loss of time.
SICINIUS
Speak briefly then,
For we are peremptory to dispatch
This viperous traitor. To eject him hence
Were but one danger, and to keep him here
Our certain death. Therefore it is decreed
He dies tonight.

DUTCH:
.
Zoo gij, tribunen, en
Gij, goede burgers, mij gehoor verleent,
Vraag ik: vergunt me een woord of twee; zij kosten
U verder niets dan wat verloren tijd.

MORE:
Viperous (venomous, malignant) was a common source of metaphor in Elizabethan writing.
Peremptory=Resolved, determined

Compleat:
Peremptory=Volstrekt, uitvoering, volkomen, uiteindig

Topics: anger, punishment, language, patience

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
His company must do his minions grace,
Whilst I at home starve for a merry look.
Hath homely age th’ alluring beauty took
From my poor cheek? Then he hath wasted it.
Are my discourses dull? Barren my wit?
If voluble and sharp discourse be marred,
Unkindness blunts it more than marble hard.
Do their gay vestments his affections bait?
That’s not my fault; he’s master of my state.
What ruins are in me that can be found
By him not ruined? Then is he the ground
Of my defeatures. My decayèd fair
A sunny look of his would soon repair.
But, too unruly deer, he breaks the pale
And feeds from home. Poor I am but his stale.

DUTCH:
Ontnam reeds rimp’lige ouderdom mijn wang
Haar boeiend schoon? Wie heeft het mij geroofd,
Dan hij? Is geest en scherts in mij verdoofd?
Neemt iets aan vlug en lucht gekout den moed,
‘t Is barschheid, ruw en hard als steen, die ‘t doet.
Lokt and’rer fraai gewaad hem van mijn zij,
‘t Is mijn schuld niet, want hij koopt mij kleedij.
Wat is in mij vervallen en is ‘t niet
Door hem? Ja, zoo hij mij vervallen ziet,
Hij ziet zijn eigen werk; één zonnestraal
Van hem, mijn schoon herleeft in morgenpraal.

MORE:
Proverb: As hard as a stone (flint, rock)

Voluble=Fluent, articulate
Sharp=Subtle, witty
Voluble and sharp discourse=Articulate and witty conversation
To blunt=Dull the edge of, repress, impair, i.e. blunt the natural edge
Ground of=Reason for
Defeatures=Disfigurements
Stale= Laughing-stock, dupe; decoy or bait set up as a lure
Pale=Enclosure

Compleat:
A voluble tongue=Een vloeijende tong, een gladde tong, een tong die wel gehangen is
Court minion=Een gunsteling van den Vorst; Troetelkind
To pale in=Met paalen afperken, afpaalen. Paled in=Rondom met paalen bezet, afgepaald
To make on a stale (property or stalking-horse) to one’s design=Iemand gebruiken om ons oogmerk te bereiken

Topics: language, intellect, respect, marriage, relationship, loyalty

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
If’t be summer news,
Smile to’t before; if winterly, thou need’st
But keep that countenance still. My husband’s hand!
That drug-damn’d Italy hath out-craftied him,
And he’s at some hard point. Speak, man: thy tongue
May take off some extremity, which to read
Would be even mortal to me.

DUTCH:
Wat houdt ge mij, met ingehouden smart,
Dien brief voor? Brengt hij zomerzonneschijn,
Zoo glimlach; is het ijzig winternieuws,
Dan past die schrik.

At some hard point=In a difficult situation
Take off some extremity=Soften the blow
Out-craftied=Outwitted with cunning (See als crafty-sick (feigning sickness), Henry IV Part 2)

Schmidt:
Drug-damned=Detested for its drugs or poisons

Compleat:
Extremity=Uitspoorigheid; elende, jammerstaat
Crafty=Loos, listig, schalk, doortrapt, leep

Topics: life/experience, appearance, language

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Saye
CONTEXT:
SAYE
Nothing but this; ’tis ‘bona terra, mala gens.’
CADE
Away with him, away with him! He speaks Latin.
SAYE
Hear me but speak, and bear me where you will.
Kent, in the Commentaries Caesar writ,
Is term’d the civil’st place of this isle:
Sweet is the country, because full of riches;
The people liberal, valiant, active, wealthy;
Which makes me hope you are not void of pity.
I sold not Maine, I lost not Normandy,
Yet, to recover them, would lose my life.
Justice with favour have I always done;
Prayers and tears have moved me, gifts could never.
When have I aught exacted at your hands,
But to maintain the king, the realm and you?
Large gifts have I bestow’d on learned clerks,
Because my book preferr’d me to the king,
And seeing ignorance is the curse of God,
Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven,
Unless you be possess’d with devilish spirits,
You cannot but forbear to murder me:
This tongue hath parley’d unto foreign kings
For your behoof

DUTCH:
Veel giften schonk ik aan geleerde mannen,
Omdat mijn weten bij den koning gold,
En wijl onwetendheid Gods vloek, maar kennis
De vleugel is, die ons ten hemel voert.

MORE:
See also “He can speak French; and therefore he is a traitor” (4.2)

Civil’st=Most civilized
Clerks=Scholars
Liberal=Refined
Favour=Lenience
Aught=Anything
Exacted=Taken in the form of taxes
My book=My learning, education
Preferred me=Recommended me to, put me in favour with
Parley=Talks, negotiations for an agreement
Behoof=Advantage, benefit

Compleat:
Civilized=Welgemanierd, beschaafd, heusch
Clerk=Klerk, schryver
A liberal education=Een goede of ruime opvoeding
Favourable (jkind)=Vriendelyk
Aught=Iets
To exact=Afvorderen, afeisschen
To prefer one=Iemand bevorderen, zyn fortuin maaken
To parley=Gesprek houden, te spraake staane, te woorde staan van overgaave spreeken
Behoof=Nut, geryf, gemak

Burgersdijk notes:
Bona terra, mala gens. Het land goed, maar het volk kwaad.
De leefste streek. In Arthur Golding’s vertaling der Commentaren van Julius Czesar (1565) kon Shakespeare lezen: Of all the inhabitants of this isle the Kentishnien are the civilest. Sh. spreekt hier ook van the civil’st place.

Topics: money, value, learning/education, language

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
So may the outward shows be least themselves.
The world is still deceived with ornament.
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil? In religion,
What damned error, but some sober brow
Will bless it and approve it with a text,
Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?
There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.
How many cowards whose hearts are all as false
As stairs of sand wear yet upon their chins
The beards of Hercules and frowning Mars,
Who, inward searched, have livers white as milk,
And these assume but valour’s excrement
To render them redoubted…

DUTCH:
In ’t recht, wat zaak is ooit zoo voos en valsch,
Die niet, door schrandre en gladde tong verfraaid,
Den schijn van ’t kwaad bemantelt?

MORE:
: CITED IN IRISH LAW:
Kirwan & Ors -v- The Mental Health Commission [2012] IEHC 217 (28 May 2012)
CITED IN US LAW:
McCauley v. State, 405 So.2d 1350, 1351 (Fla., 1981) (cited in opinion: “In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt but, being seasoned with a gracious voice, Obscures the show of evil?”);
United States v. Powell, 55 M.J. 633, 642 (2001): “The standard of review in this area of the law is difficult to apply because a judge is attempting to peer into an attorney’s heart by relying on his or her words. In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt / But, being seasoned with a gracious voice,
Obscures the show of evil.”;
Day v. Rosenthal, 170 Cal. App. 3d 1125, 1180 (1985).

To season=To temper, qualify
Gracious voice=Attractive, graceful, elegant
To season=To fit for any use by time or habit; to mature; to grow fit for any purpose (Samuel Johnson)
Compleat:
Seasoned=Toebereid, bekwaam gemaakt, getemperd.
Children should be season’d betimes to virtue=Men behoorde de kinderen by tyds aan de deugd te gewennen.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
It is a custom
More honoured in the breach than the observance.
This heavy-headed revel east and west
Makes us traduced and taxed of other nations.

DUTCH:
Het is een gebruik, meer eervol voor die het schendt, dan voor die het volgt /
Is ‘t een zede, Meer eerbiedwaard, als men haar schendt, dan volgt. /
Is het een zede Eervoller om te laten dan te volgen.

MORE:
Misquoted in that the meaning has moved nowadays to regretting the falling out of use of a custom or tradition, i.e. a custom more often ignored and observed; whereas Hamlet meant the opposite: if his uncle’s drinking and making promises is a tradition, it is one they can well do without.
CITED IN US LAW
The above point is made by Judge Posner, who wrote that a reader frequently thinks that this means custom that is not observed, which is what the expression viewed in isolation seems plainly to mean. “But if you go back to the passage in Hamlet from which the expression comes (Act I, Sc. iv, lines 8-20), you will see that the custom referred to is that of getting drunk on festive occasions. The point is general: context, in the broadest sense, is the key to understanding language”. (Alliance to End Repression v United States Department of Justice, 742 F 2d 1007, 1013 (7th Cir. 1983)(Posner, J);
U.S. v. Smith, 812 F.2d 161, 167 (4th Cir. 1987);
Calley v. Callaway, 382 F.Supp. 650, 666 (M.D.Ga. 1974);
Arthur v. Nyquist, 415 F.Supp. 904, 959 (W.D.N.Y. 1976);
State v. Griffin, 347 So.2d 692, 694 (Fla. Ct. App. 1977).

Topics: language, still in use, cited in law, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France,
Whose tongue more poisons than the adder’s tooth!
How ill-beseeming is it in thy sex
To triumph, like an Amazonian trull,
Upon their woes whom fortune captivates!
But that thy face is, visor-like, unchanging,
Made impudent with use of evil deeds,
I would assay, proud queen, to make thee blush.
To tell thee whence thou camest, of whom derived,
Were shame enough to shame thee, wert thou not
shameless.
Thy father bears the type of King of Naples,
Of both the Sicils and Jerusalem,
Yet not so wealthy as an English yeoman.
Hath that poor monarch taught thee to insult?
It needs not, nor it boots thee not, proud queen,
Unless the adage must be verified,
That beggars mounted run their horse to death.

DUTCH:
Maar, fiere koningin, het baat u niets,
Dan dat het spreekwoord waar blijkt: „Als een beed’laar
Te paard ooit komt, hij jaagt zijn rijdier dood.”

MORE:

Proverb: Set a beggar on horseback and he will ride a gallop (run his horse out of breath): newfound power will go to their heads

Ill-beseeming=Unbecoming, unattractive
Trull=A drab, lewd woman
Captivate=Subdue
Visor=(Vizor, Vizard): Mask
Impudent=Shameless
Assay=Try
Type=Title
Yeoman=Landowner
Needs not=Is unnecessary
Boots not=Is futile
Adage=Proverb

Compleat:
To beseem=Betaamen, voegen, passen
Trull=Een smots, snol
Captivate=Overmeesteren, gevangen neemen
Vizard=Een momaanzigt, mombakkus, masker
Impudent=Onbeschaamd
to assay=Beproeven, toetsen, onderstaan, keuren
Yeoman=Een welgegoed landman, een ryke boer, een Landjonker
It is to no boot=Het doet geen nut, het is te vergeefs
Adage=Spreekwoord

Topics: proverbs and idioms, appearance, civility, language, dignity

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Regan
CONTEXT:
ALBANY
That were the most if he should husband you.
REGAN
Jesters do oft prove prophets.
GONERIL
Holla, holla!
That eye that told you so looked but asquint.

DUTCH:
Een dwaas blijkt dikwijls een profeet. /
Spotters zijn vaak profeten.

MORE:
Proverb: Many a true word spoken in jest
Schmidt:
Jester=One who cracks jokes, a scoffer
Compleat:
To husband=To supply with a husband, to marry

Topics: language, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Cardinal
CONTEXT:
So, there goes our protector in a rage.
‘Tis known to you he is mine enemy,
Nay, more, an enemy unto you all,
And no great friend, I fear me, to the king.
Consider, lords, he is the next of blood,
And heir apparent to the English crown:
Had Henry got an empire by his marriage,
And all the wealthy kingdoms of the west,
There’s reason he should be displeased at it.
Look to it, lords! Let not his smoothing words
Bewitch your hearts; be wise and circumspect.
What though the common people favour him,
Calling him ‘Humphrey, the good Duke of Gloucester,’
Clapping their hands, and crying with loud voice,
‘Jesu maintain your royal excellence!’
With ‘God preserve the good Duke Humphrey!’
I fear me, lords, for all this flattering gloss,
He will be found a dangerous protector.

DUTCH:
Lords, zorgt er voor, dat niet zijn gladde taal
Uw hart beheks’, weest wijs en op uw hoede!

MORE:

Smoothing=Flattering
Flattering gloss=Sheen
What though=Never mind, so what if

Compleat:
Gloss=Uitlegging
To set a gloss upon a thing=Iets een schoonen opschik geeven
To smooth one up (coaks)=Iemand streelen

Topics: language, deceit, truth, caution, wisdom

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Thomas Mowbray
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
(…) Thou art a traitor and a miscreant,
Too good to be so and too bad to live,
Since the more fair and crystal is the sky,
The uglier seem the clouds that in it fly.
Once more, the more to aggravate the note,
With a foul traitor’s name stuff I thy throat;
And wish, so please my sovereign, ere I move,
What my tongue speaks my right drawn sword may prove.
THOMAS MOWBRAY
Let not my cold words here accuse my zeal:
Tis not the trial of a woman’s war,
The bitter clamour of two eager tongues,
Can arbitrate this cause betwixt us twain;
The blood is hot that must be cool’d for this:
Yet can I not of such tame patience boast
As to be hush’d and nought at all to say:
First, the fair reverence of your highness curbs me
From giving reins and spurs to my free speech;
Which else would post until it had return’d
These terms of treason doubled down his throat.
Setting aside his high blood’s royalty,
And let him be no kinsman to my liege,
60I do defy him, and I spit at him;
Call him a slanderous coward and a villain:
Which to maintain I would allow him odds,
And meet him, were I tied to run afoot
Even to the frozen ridges of the Alps,
Or any other ground inhabitable,
Where ever Englishman durst set his foot.
Mean time let this defend my loyalty,
By all my hopes, most falsely doth he lie.

DUTCH:
Laat niet mijn koude taal mijn moed doen laken.
Niet de schermuts’ling van een vrouwentwist,
De bitt’re smaad van twee verwoede tongen,
Kan deze zaak beslechten tusschen ons;

MORE:

Miscreant=Villain, scoundrel
Good=Noble in rank
Crystal=Bright, transparent
Aggravate the note=Add weight, exacerbate, increase the reproach
Accuse=Belie, impugn
Zeal=Intense and eager interest or endeavour, ardour
Woman’s war=Ref to ‘women are words, men deeds’
Eager=Sharp, acidic
Curbs, reins, spurs=Equestrian metaphors
Post=Gallop

Compleat:
The crystalline heaven=De kristalyne Hemel
Aggravate=Verzwaaren
Zeal=Yver
Eager=Scherp, zuur, wrang

Topics: blame, dispute, language

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
And Cassio high in oath, which till tonight
I ne’er might say before. When I came back—
For this was brief— I found them close together
At blow and thrust, even as again they were
When you yourself did part them.
More of this matter cannot I report.
But men are men, the best sometimes forget.
Though Cassio did some little wrong to him,
As men in rage strike those that wish them best,
Yet surely Cassio, I believe, received
From him that fled some strange indignity
Which patience could not pass.
OTHELLO
I know, Iago,
Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter,
Making it light to Cassio. Cassio, I love thee,
But never more be officer of mine.

DUTCH:
Al heeft hem Cassio
dan wel wat kwaad gedaan, zoals een man
in drift hem goedgezinde lieden slaat,
denk ik dat hij door de gevluchte vent
zo werd getergd dat zijn geduld dat niet
op zijn beloop kon laten.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Lindros v. Governing Board of the Torrance Unified School District, 9 Cal.3d 524, 540, 510 P.2d 361, 371, 108 Cal. Rptr. 185, 195 (1973)(Torriner, J.)(en banc).

Proverb: To mince the matter (Tell sparingly or by halves)

Still in common use e.g Don’t mince matters, don’t mince your words= Speak frankly,say what you mean

Schmidt:
Forget=Forget themselves
Indignity=Contemptuous injury, insult
Patience=Self-control
Pass=Overlook

Compleat:
Indignity=Smaad
Pass, pass by=Passeren, voorbygaan, overslaan
Mince=Kleyn kappen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, cited in law, language, honour

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Boy
CONTEXT:
For indeed three such antics do not amount to a man: for Bardolph, he is white-livered
and red-faced, by the means whereof he faces it out but fights not; for Pistol, he hath a killing tongue and a quiet sword, by the means whereof he breaks words and keeps whole weapons; for Nym, he hath heard that men of few words are the best men, and therefore he scorns to say his prayers, lest he should be thought a coward, but his few bad words are matched with as few good deeds, for he never broke any man’s head but his own, and that was against a post when he was drunk.

DUTCH:
Nym, die heeft wel eens gehoord, dat menschen van weinig woorden de besten zijn, en daarom verdraait hij het, ooit te bidden, opdat men hem niet voor een lafaard zou houden, maar naast zijn weinige en slechte woorden staan even weinige goede daden.

MORE:

Antic=Buffoon, practising odd gesticulations
White-livered=Cowardly (White livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare)
Face it out=To get through one’s business by effrontery
Scorn=To disdain, to refuse or lay aside with contempt
Words=Also in the sense of promises

Compleat:
To scorn=Verachten, verfooijen
White-livered=Een die er altijd bleek uitziet; een bleek-neus, kwaadaardig, nydig
To face out=Iemand iets in ‘t gezigt staande houden

Topics: reputation, honour, language, promise

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
So may it be indeed.
Methinks thy voice is altered, and thou speak’st
In better phrase and matter than thou didst.
EDGAR
Y’are much deceived. In nothing am I changed
But in my garments.
GLOUCESTER
Methinks y’are better spoken.
EDGAR
Come on, sir, here’s the place. Stand still. How fearful
And dizzy ’tis to cast one’s eyes so low.
The crows and choughs that wing the midway air
Show scarce so gross as beetles. Half-way down
Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade!

DUTCH:
Mij komt
Uw stem ook anders voor; uw spreken, en
Ook wat gij zegt, is beter dan voorheen.

MORE:
Onions:
Choughs=Jackdaws, or possibly the Cornishi chough or red-legged crow.
Burgersdijk notes:
Zeevenkel zaam ‘lend. Zeevenkel, sampire of samphire, Crithmum maritimum, een plant tot de schermdragende gewassen behoorende, blauwachtig green van kleur, met gevinde vleezige blaadjens, groeit aan zeekusten, op plaatsen, die door de zee niet bereikt worden; van daar hier: halfweg de hoogte der rots. Die de plant inzamelden, moesten dikwijls van den top der klippen aan een touw verscheidene vademen diep worden neergelaten. De bladen worden als salade of, in azijn ingelegd, als toespijs gebruikt. In Sh’s tijd werd zij veel ingezameld en in de straten te koop geveild. Tegenwoordig is de voor het verbruik verlangde hoeveelheid wel op gemakkelijker toegankelijke plaatsen te bekomen.

Topics: language, appearance

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ferdinand
CONTEXT:
MIRANDA
No wonder, sir,
But certainly a maid.
FERDINAND
My language! Heavens,
I am the best of them that speak this speech,
Were I but where ’tis spoken.
PROSPERO
How? The best?
What wert thou if the King of Naples heard thee?
FERDINAND
A single thing, as I am now, that wonders
To hear thee speak of Naples. He does hear me,
And that he does I weep. Myself am Naples,
Who with mine eyes, never since at ebb, beheld
The king my father wrecked.

DUTCH:
Mijne taal, o hemel! —
Van wie haar spreken ben ik de eerste, ware ik
Slechts daar, waar zij gesproken wordt.

MORE:
Best=Highest in rank
At ebb=Tears have never since stopped
A single thing=(1) Standing alone, without support; (2) One and the same

Topics: language, understanding, status, order/society, independence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Mistress Quickly
CONTEXT:
So I told him, my lord; and I said I heard your grace say so: and, my lord, he speaks most vilely of you, like a foul-mouthed man as he is; and said he would cudgel you.

DUTCH:
My lord, he speaks most vilely of you, like a foul-mouthed man as he is

MORE:
Defined as using obscene, abusive, opporobrious language. First used by Shakespeare, though there are previous recordings of foul-spoken and foul-tongued.
Schmidt:
Vilely (O. Edd. vildly or vildely; vilely only in Henry IV)=Meanly, basely, shamefully
Foul-mouthed=Speaking ill of others, given to calumny and detraction
Compleat:
Vilely=Op een verachtelyke wyze
Foul-mouthed=Vuil van mond, die een vuilen bek heeft in ‘t spreeken.

Topics: language, insult, reputation

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Claudius
CONTEXT:
My words fly up, my thoughts remain below.
Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

DUTCH:
Mijn woord stijgt op, mijn ziel blijft lager dwalen;
Het zielloos woord zal nooit den hemel halen. /
Mijn woord wiekt op en mijn gedachten zijgen: Ledige woorden nooit ten hemel stijgen. /
Mijn woord heeft vleugels, maar ontbeert de zin, en ’t holle woord wiekt nooit de hemel in.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Inappropriately cited (See William Domnarski Shakespeare in the Law) in People v. Langston, 131 Cal. App.3d 7 (1982)(Brown, J.)

Topics: language, cited in law, honesty, caution

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Why, cousin! Why, Rosalind! Cupid have mercy, not a word?
ROSALIND
Not one to throw at a dog.
CELIA
No, thy words are too precious to be cast away upon curs.
Throw some of them at me. Come, lame me with reasons.

DUTCH:
Geen enkel; woorden zouden paarlen voor de honden
zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cast away=to throw away, waste or lavish
Lame=Disable me with reasons
Compleat:
To cast away care=Werp de zorg weg
Lame=Verlammen, lam maaken

Topics: language, value, reason

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
Kneel not to me.
The power that I have on you is to spare you;
The malice towards you to forgive you. Live
And deal with others better.
CYMBELINE
Nobly doomed.
We’ll learn our freeness of a son-in-law:
Pardon’s the word to all.

DUTCH:
Mijn schoonzoon doet mij zien, wat edel is;
Vergiffenis voor alien!


Proverb: To be able to harm and not to do it is noble
Doomed=Judged

Schmidt:
Malice=Malignity, disposition to injure others
Freeness=Generosity

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
To doom=Veroordelen, verwyzen, doemen
Doomed=Veroordeeld, verweezen.

Topics: life/experience, appearance, language, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Tanta est erga te mentis integritas, regina serenissima
QUEEN KATHARINE
O, good my lord, no Latin!
I am not such a truant since my coming
As not to know the language I have lived in.
A strange tongue makes my cause more strange, suspicious.
Pray speak in English. Here are some will thank you,
If you speak truth, for their poor mistress’ sake.
Believe me, she has had much wrong. Lord Cardinal,
The willing’st sin I ever yet committed
May be absolved in English

DUTCH:
O geen Latijn, mijn waarde lord!
‘k Was, na mijn komst hier, niet zoo traag, dat ik
De taal niet ken, waarin ik heb geleefd.

MORE:
Truant=Poor student
Coming=Arrival (in England)
Strange tongue=Foreign language
Strange=Odd, alien
Willing=Most eagerly (committed)
Compleat:
Truant=Een Lanterfant
To play the truant=Lanterfanten; in plaats van na school te gaan, speelen loopen (Amsterdam zegt ‘Stutteloopen’)
Willing=Willende, gewillig
Willingly=Gewilliglyk

Topics: language, order/society

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
Oh, that’s a brave man. He writes brave verses, speaks brave words, swears brave oaths, and breaks them bravely, quite traverse, athwart the heart of his lover, as a puny tilter that spurs his horse but on one side breaks his staff like a noble goose; but all’s brave that youth mounts and folly guides.

DUTCH:
Ja, dat is een prachtig man; hij schrijft prachtige verzen, spreekt prachtige woorden, zweert prachtige eeden en breekt ze prachtig, dwars door, vlak voor het hart van zijn liefste, juist als een sukkelig tournooiruiter, die zijn paard maar aan de eene zijde spoort en als een adellijk uilskuiken zijn lans breekt. Maar alles is prachtig, als jeugd in den zadel zit en dwaasheid den teugel houdt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Brave=Fine, splendid, beautiful: O that’s a b. man! he writes b. verses etc.

Topics: language, courage, appearance

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
When as a lion’s whelp shall, to himself unknown,
without seeking find, and be embraced by a piece of
tender air; and when from a stately cedar shall be
lopped branches, which, being dead many years,
shall after revive, be jointed to the old stock and
freshly grow; then shall Posthumus end his miseries,
Britain be fortunate and flourish in peace and plenty.’
‘Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen
Tongue and brain not; either both or nothing;
Or senseless speaking or a speaking such
As sense cannot untie. Be what it is,
The action of my life is like it, which
I’ll keep, if but for sympathy.

DUTCH:
t Is nog een droom, of wel het zinn’loos kallen
Van hersenlooze onnooz’len; dit of niets;
Of zinnelooze taal, of taal waarvan
‘t Verstand den zin niet vat


Such stuff as madmen tongue=The nonsensical, irrational talk of madmen
Or=Either (as in Dutch ‘óf dit, of dat’)
Jointed=Grafted
Sympathy=Any conformity, correspondence, resemblance.

Compleat:
Sympathy (natural agreement of things)=Natuurlyke overeenstemming of trek der dingen

Topics: madness, nature, language, reason

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Player King
CONTEXT:
I do believe you think what now you speak,
But what we do determine oft we break.
Purpose is but the slave to memory,
Of violent birth, but poor validity,
Which now, like fruit unripe, sticks on the tree,
But fall, unshaken, when they mellow be.

DUTCH:
Al te vaak verbreekt men zijn beloften. Beloften zijn slechts slaven van ‘t geheugen; in aanleg sterk, doch later krachteloos. /
‘t Plan is de slaaf slechts der herinnering

MORE:
Schmidt:
Validity= Strength, efficacy
Compleat:
Validity=Krachtigheid, bondigheid

Topics: honour, still in use, memory, plans/intentions, language

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
It cannot be, my lord.
Rumour doth double, like the voice and echo,
The numbers of the feared. Please it your Grace
To go to bed. Upon my soul, my lord,
The powers that you already have sent forth
Shall bring this prize in very easily.
To comfort you the more, I have received
A certain instance that Glendower is dead.
Your Majesty hath been this fortnight ill,
And these unseasoned hours perforce must add
Unto your sickness.

DUTCH:
Dit kan niet zijn, mijn vorst.
‘t Gerucht verdubbelt, als de stem der echo,
Het tal van wie men ducht

MORE:

Like the voice and echo=As an echo doubles the voice
Unseasoned=Unrasonable, irregular hours
Instance=Proof

Compleat:
Unseasoned=Ontoebereid
Unseasonable=Ontydig
Instance=Een voorval, voorbeeld, exempel; aandringing, aanhouding; blyk

Topics: language, truth

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
SICINIUS
It is a mind
That shall remain a poison where it is,
Not poison any further.
CORIOLANUS
Shall remain!
Hear you this Triton of the minnows? mark you
His absolute ‘shall’?
COMINIUS
’Twas from the canon.

DUTCH:
„Blijven moet!” —
Hoort gij dien katvisch-Triton? merkt gij daar
‘t Gebiedend,,moet”?

MORE:
Proverb: A Triton among the minnows

Schmidt:
Canon=Rule, law
Absolute=Positive, certain, decided, not doubtful

Compleat:
Canonical=Regelmaatig
Triton=De trompetter van Neptunus; (weather-cock)=Een weerhaan, windwyzer

Burgersdijk notes:
Dien kat visch-Triton. Triton is een mindere zeegod, die dus alleen over de kleine vischjes gebied voert.

Topics: language, intellect, authority, judgment, law/legal

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
My liege, and madam, to expostulate
What majesty should be, what duty is,
What day is day, night night, and time is time,
Were nothing but to waste night, day, and time;
Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit,
And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes,
I will be brief. Your noble son is mad. . . .

DUTCH:
Beknoptheid is het kenmerk van verstand./
Wijl de ziel van wijsheid kortheid is /
Sinds bondigheid de ziel is van ‘t vernuft

MORE:

If you are quoting this, be aware of the irony that Polonius is a sly and devious blowhard with no self-awareness who says this in the middle of a grand speech!

Proverb: Brevity is the soul of wit

Wit=acumen, keen intelligence.
Soul=quintessence

Compleat:
“Een man van goed verstand”

CITED IN EU LAW: Telefonica SA and Telefonica de Espana v Commission (Advocate General’s Opinion) [2013] EUECJ C-295/12
Opinion of Advocate General Wathelet delivered on 26 September 2013.: ‘It is true that ‘brevity is the soul of wit’ (Shakespeare in Hamlet, 1602), but unlimited jurisdiction requires more than wit’.
CITED IN US LAW:
Louisville and Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District v. Simpson, 730 S.W.2d 939, 942 (Ky. 1987)(“Shakespeare described …. This may be true in many situations, hut the majority opinion in this case is not one of them.”);
State v. Eichstedt, 20 Conn. App. 395, 401, 567 A.2d 1237 (1989)(“there must be sufficient
amplification to make an intelligent argument. The briefs fail in this regard.”);
Indiana Alcoholic Beverage Commission v. W-W Associates, Inc., 152 Ind. App. 622,284 N.E.2d
534,536 (1972)(“and while we find no humor in entering judgment against ABC before
its time limit had lapsed within which to answer, we can be brief.”)

Topics: cited in law, proverbs and idioms, still in use, language, madness

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Consider this: he has been bred i’ the wars
Since he could draw a sword, and is ill school’d
In bolted language; meal and bran together
He throws without distinction. Give me leave,
I’ll go to him, and undertake to bring him
Where he shall answer, by a lawful form,
In peace, to his utmost peril.
FIRST SENATOR
Noble tribunes,
It is the humane way: the other course
Will prove too bloody, and the end of it
Unknown to the beginning.

DUTCH:
Bedenkt nog dit: sinds hij een zwaard kon trekken,
Wies hij in de’ oorlog op en leerde nooit
Zijn woorden ziften; meel en zeem’len werpt hij
Er uit, zooals het valt.

MORE:
Bolted language=Refined phraseology. “To bolt” meaning to sift is often used figuratively.
Answer=Answer a charge, meet accusation, give an account under peaceful forms of law
To his utmost peril=Whatever the danger it involves
End… beginning. See The Tempest 2.1 “The latter end of his commonwealth forgets the beginning.”

Compleat:
Utmost=Uiterste
Peril=Gevaar, perykel, nood
To bolt out=Uitschieten, uitpuilen
To bolt meal=Meel builen

Topics: language, learning/education, skill/talent

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
POSTHUMUS
If you can make ’t apparent
That you have tasted her in bed, my hand
And ring is yours. If not, the foul opinion
You had of her pure honour gains or loses
Your sword or mine, or masterless leave both
To who shall find them.
IACHIMO
Sir, my circumstances,
Being so near the truth as I will make them,
Must first induce you to believe; whose strength
I will confirm with oath, which I doubt not
You’ll give me leave to spare when you shall find
You need it not.

DUTCH:
t Bericht, dat ik omstandig geven zal,
En dat den stempel van zijn waarheid draagt,
Zal tot geloof u dwingen


Question=Hold debate
Circumstances=Details, particulars, incidental proofs

Compleat:
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omstandigheden verhaalen

Topics: truth, honesty, manipulation, language

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue. But if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town crier spoke my lines. 

DUTCH:
Zeg die regels zoals ik ze je voorgezegd heb: luchtig, langs je neus weg. /
Spreek de zinnen, als ‘t u blieft, zooals ik ze u voorzei, luchtigjes van de tong /
Zeg de toespraak, ik bid u, gelijk ik het voordeed, trippelend op de tong.

MORE:
Shakespeare had also used “trippingly” in a Midsummer Night’s Dream (Oberon 5.1), but this is the first time that it referred to speech.
Nowadays: “tripping off the tongue”, or words that “trip off the tongue”.
Compleat:
To mince it=Met een gemaakten tred gaan, prat daar heene treeden
Mincing gate (sic)=Een trippelende gang

Topics: language, still in use

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
SECOND LORD
He can come no other way but by this hedge-corner.
When you sally upon him, speak what terrible
language you will: though you understand it not
yourselves, no matter; for we must not seem to
understand him, unless some one among us whom we
must produce for an interpreter.
FIRST SOLDIER
Good captain, let me be the interpreter.
SECOND LORD
Art not acquainted with him? knows he not thy voice?
FIRST SOLDIER
No, sir, I warrant you.
SECOND LORD
But what linsey-woolsey hast thou to speak to us again?

DUTCH:
Spreek, als gjj hem overvalt, een vreeselijke taal, hoe
ook; al verstaat gij die zelf niet, het doet er niet toe;
want wij moeten doen alsof wij hem niet verstaan, op
een van ons na, dien wij voor een tolk moeten uitgeven.

MORE:
Sally upon=Ambush
Linsey-woolsey=Nonsense, mish-mash (originally a fabric mixdure of linen and wool)
Compleat:
Linsey woolsey=Tierenteyn, stof van half garen en half wol, boezel stof, miscellaan
Sally=Een uytval
To saly forth=Uytvallen, eenen uytval doen

Topics: language, misunderstanding, conflict

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
Speak you so gently? Pardon me, I pray you.
I thought that all things had been savage here,
And therefore put I on the countenance
Of stern commandment. But whate’er you are
That in this desert inaccessible,
Under the shade of melancholy boughs,
Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time,

DUTCH:
Spreekt gij zoo vriend’lijk, o vergeef mij dan!
Mij dacht, dat alles woest hier wezen zou;
En daarom nam ik toon en houding aan
Van ‘t barsch bevel.

MORE:
Onions:
Gentle =Used in polite address or as a complimentary epoithet; tame
Schmidt:
Put on a countenance=Give the apopearance
Compleat:
Gentle (mild or moderate)=Zagtmoedig, maatig
Genteel (or gallant)=Hoffelyk, wellevend; Genteel (that has a genteel carriage)=Bevallig

Topics: language, order/society

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor. Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance that you o’erstep not the modesty of nature.

DUTCH:
Regel je gebaar naar je woord, je woord naar je gebaar /
Laat het gebaar passen bij het woord, het woord bij het gebaar

MORE:
Schmidt:
Tame=Metaphorically, either in a good sense, == free from passion, mild, gentle, meek; or in a bad sense, == heartless, spiritless, insensible, dull
Compleat:
Tame (to humble or conquer)=Vernederen, overwinnen.
Tamely (with submission)=Met onderwerping

Topics: language, civility, caution, still in use

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
Not yours, in good sooth! Heart, you swear like a comfit-maker’s wife! “Not you, in good sooth,” and “as true as I live,” and “as God shall mend me,” and “as sure as day”—
And givest such sarcenet surety for thy oaths
As if thou never walk’st further than Finsbury.Swear me, Kate, like a lady as thou art,
A good mouth-filling oath, and leave “in sooth,”
And such protest of pepper-gingerbread,
To velvet-guards and Sunday citizens.

DUTCH:
En geeft zoo taffen eedwaarborg, als waart gij
Nooit verder weg geweest dan Finsbury
Zweer als een edelvrouw, zooals gij zijt,
Een vollen eed, die klinkt,—en laat “In ernst”
En zulke peperkoekbetuigingen
Aan fulpgalons en zondagsburgers over.

MORE:
Onions:
Velvet-guards=Guards with velvet-trimmed clothes (trimmings of velvet being a city fashion at the time)
Mouth-filling=Robust
Protest=Oath, protestation
Burgersdijk notes:
En geeft zoo taffen eedwaarborg, als waart gij Nooit verder weg geweest dan Finsbury. Heetspoor kan die makke betuigingen niet lijden, zooals welgestelde burgervrouwtjens, die, het gewaad met fluweel omboord, hare zondagswandeling naar Finsbury richtten, gaarne gebruiken. Zijne vrouw moest ze aan de vrouwen van zijdehandelaars, — vandaar taffen eedwaarborg, — en peperkoekverkopers overlaten. Finsbury lag toen nog buiten de poorten van Londen en was een gewoon doel van de op Zondag wandelende burgers.

Topics: language, civility, order/society, fashion/trends

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.8
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Accursèd be that tongue that tells me so,
For it hath cowed my better part of man!
And be these juggling fiends no more believed,
That palter with us in a double sense,
That keep the word of promise to our ear,
And break it to our hope. I’ll not fight with thee.

DUTCH:
En nooit
Leene iemand aan die guichelduivels ‘t oor,
Die ons door dubbelzinnigheid bedriegen,
‘t Beloofde houden aan ons oor, maar ‘t breken
Aan onze hoop.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Palter=To shift, to dodge, to shuffle, to equivocate
Compleat:
To palter=Weyfelen, leuteren, haperen, achteruyt kruypen, aerzelen, bedektelyk handelen
CITED IN US LAW:
Prather v. Dayton Power & Light Company, 918 F.2d 1255, 1262 (6th Cir. 1990)(dissent);
Hydro-Dyne, Inc. v. Ecodyne Corporation, 812 F.2d 1407 (6th Cir. 1987)(dissent);
Shango v. Jurich, 521 F.Supp. 1196, 1202 (N.D.Ill. 1981);
Stringer v. Thompson, 537 F.Supp. 133, 136 (N.D.Ill. 1982);
State v. Neely, 112 N.M. 702, 819 P.2d 249 (1991);
U.S. v. Pollard, 959 F.2d 1011, 1039 (D.C.Cir. 1992)(Williams, J.)(dissenting). “Though I do not wish to be too critical of the government, and though the analogy is inexact on some points, the case does remind me of Macbeth’s curse against the witches whose promises-and their sophistical interpretation of them – led him to doom:”.

Topics: cited in law, promise, language, hope

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
Mark you this, Bassanio,
The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
An evil soul producing holy witness
Is like a villain with a smiling cheek,
A goodly apple rotten at the heart.
Oh, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
SHYLOCK
Three thousand ducats—’tis a good round sum.
Three months from twelve, then. Let me see. The rate—
ANTONIO
Well, Shylock, shall we be beholding to you?

DUTCH:
Merk dit op, Bassanio;
De duivel zelf beroept zich op de schrift.
Een boos gemoed, dat heil’ge woorden spreekt,
Is als een fielt met liefelijken lach;
Een schijnschoone appel, maar in ‘t hart verrot;
O, glanzend schoon is ‘t uiterlijk der valschheid!

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW – some examples:
In re Amy B, 1997 Conn. Super LEXIS at 28;
Harris v. Superior Court, 3 Cal. App. 4th 661, 666 (Cal. 1992);
Shattuck Denn Mining Corporation v. National labour Relations Board, 362 F.2d 466, 469 (9th Cir. 1966);
Middleton Development Corp v Gust, 44 Mich. App.71, 79, 205, NW 2d.39,43 (1972);
Delmarva Power and Light Company of Maryland v. Eberhard, 247 Md. 273, 230 A.2d 644 (Md. Ct. App, 1966);
United States ex rel. Green v. Peters, WL 8258, 17, n. 11 (1994), where the court clarified that “its figure of speech does not of course suggest that the Attorney General has literally joined the forces of darkness”. (!)

Proverb: Sodom apples outwardly fair, ashes at the
Beholding=Beholden, indebted

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
CELIA
My father’s love is enough to honour him. Enough. Speak no more of him; you’ll be whipped for taxation one of these days.
TOUCHSTONE
The more pity that fools may not speak wisely what wise men do foolishly.
CELIA
By my troth, thou sayest true. For, since the little wit that fools have was silenced, the little foolery that wise men have makes a great show. Here comes Monsieur Le Beau.

DUTCH:
Des te erger, als dwazen niet meer in hun wijsheid mogen zeggen, wat wijze lui in hun dwaasheid doen.

MORE:
Silenced’ is probably a topical reference, either to new restraints imposed on theatrical companies or to the burning of satirical books in 1599.
Whipping was a cruel punishment. In the days of Henry VIII an Act decreed that vagrants were to be carried to some market town, or other place, and there tied to the end of a cart, naked, and beaten with whips throughout such market-town, or other place, till the body should be bloody by reason of such whipping. The punishment was mitigated in Elizabeth’s reign, to the extent that vagrants need only to be “stripped naked from the middle upwards and whipped till the body should be bloody”.
Schmidt:
Whipped=Censure, satire, invective “You’ll be whipped for taxation one of these days”.
Foolery=Jesting, buffoonery

Topics: pity, wisdom, language, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Mercutio
CONTEXT:
The pox of such antic, lisping, affecting fantasticoes, these new tuners of accents! “By Jesu, a very good blade! A very tall man! A very good whore!” Why, is not this a lamentable thing, grandsire, that we should be thus afflicted with these strange flies, these fashion-mongers, these “pardon me’s,” who stand so much on the new form, that they cannot sit at ease on the old bench? Oh, their bones, their bones!

DUTCH:
Och, naar de maan met al die bespottelijke, lispelende,
gemaakte windbuilen, die nieuwe bauwers van brabbelwoorden!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Affecting=Using affectations
Fantasticoes (sometimes fantasmines)=Fantastic, coxcomical persons (fopppish, conceited)
Blade=Fencer; used as an emblem of youth
Fashion-monger=one who affects gentility (fashion-monging)
Tune=tune of the time (see Hamlet 5.2)
A pardon-me=One who is always excusing himself
Compleat:
Blade=Een Jonker, wittebroods kind
A fine blade=Een fraai Jongeling
To blade it=Den Jonker speelen
Pardon me=Vergeef het my
To pardon=Vergeeven, quytschelden
A pardon-monger=Die Aflaaten verkoopt

Topics: civility, appearance, custom, language

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Edgar
CONTEXT:
The weight of this sad time we must obey.
Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say.
The oldest hath borne most. We that are young
Shall never see so much, nor live so long.

DUTCH:
Wij hebben ons bij rampspoed neer te leggen.
Zeg wat je voelt, niet wat wij moeten zeggen./
Ons dwingt van dezen tijd het droef gewicht;
Wij spreken ons gevoel, niet onzen plicht.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Weight=Burden, load
Obey=Comply with, submit to
Compleat:
Weight (importance, consequence)=Gewigt, belang
Obey=Gehoorzaamen
REFERENCED IN E&W LAW: Chambers v Director of Public Prosecutions [2012] EWHC 2157 (Admin) (27 July 2012)
Given the submissions by Mr Cooper, we should perhaps add that for those who have the inclination to use “Twitter” for the purpose, Shakespeare can be quoted unbowdlerised, and with Edgar, at the end of King Lear, they are free to speak not what they ought to say, but what they feel.

Topics: truth, honesty, age/experience, language, wisdom, caution

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
Let him be but testimonied in his own
bringings-forth, and he shall appear to the
envious a scholar, a statesman and a soldier.
Therefore you speak unskilfully: or if your
knowledge be more it is much darkened in your malice.

DUTCH:
Daarom, gij spreekt zonder eenig inzicht; of, als gij er meer kennis van hebt, dan is die door uwe boosaardigheid zeer verduisterd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Testimonied=Attested, witnessed, proved by testimony
Compleat:
Testimony=Getuigen. To bear testimony against one=Tegen iemand getuigen
In testimony whereof=Ten bewyze daar van

Topics: skill/talent, learning/education, evidence, language

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: Lord Talbot
CONTEXT:
The sword of Orleans hath not made me smart;
These words of yours draw life-blood from my heart:
On that advantage, bought with such a shame,
To save a paltry life and slay bright fame,
Before young Talbot from old Talbot fly,
The coward horse that bears me fail and die!
And like me to the peasant boys of France,
To be shame’s scorn and subject of mischance!
Surely, by all the glory you have won,
An if I fly, I am not Talbot’s son:
Then talk no more of flight, it is no boot;
If son to Talbot, die at Talbot’s foot.

DUTCH:
Van ‘t zwaard van Orleans voelde ik geen smart,
Van deze uw woorden bloedt en krimpt mij ‘t hart.

MORE:
Smart=Hurt
Mischance=Misfortune
No boot=Of no use, pointless

Compleat:
Smart=Pijn, smart of smerte
Mischance=Misval, mislukking, ongeval, ongeluk
No boot=Geen nut, te vergeefs

Topics: language, leadership, value, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE:
SPEAKER: Mortimer
CONTEXT:
WORCESTER
In faith, my lord, you are too wilful-blame,
And, since your coming hither, have done enough
To put him quite beside his patience.
You must needs learn, lord, to amend this fault.
Though sometimes it show greatness, courage, blood—
And that’s the dearest grace it renders you—
Yet oftentimes it doth present harsh rage,
Defect of manners, want of government,
Pride, haughtiness, opinion, and disdain,
The least of which, haunting a nobleman,
Loseth men’s hearts and leaves behind a stain
Upon the beauty of all parts besides,
Beguiling them of commendation.
HOTSPUR
Well, I am schooled. Good manners be your speed!
Here come our wives, and let us take our leave.
MORTIMER
This is the deadly spite that angers me:
My wife can speak no English, I no Welsh.

DUTCH:
Dit is voor mij een dood’lijk grievend leed:
Mijn vrouw verstaat geen Engelsch, ik geen Welsch.

MORE:
Wilful-blame=Blameable on purpose, on principle; indulging faults, though conscious that they are faults. (Arden: blameworthy in the obstinacy or rashness of your behaviour. (…) Others explain as “
wilfully blameworthy” or “wilfully to blame,” comparing “wilful-negligent” in Winter’s Tale, i. ii. 255,)
Haunting=Affecting
Blood=Mettle, spirit
Want of government=Lack of self-control
Opinion= Conceit
Boiling them of commendation=Making them lose respect
I am schooled=I have learned my lesson
Compleat:
Commendation=Pryzing, aanpryzing, aanbeveling
Opinion=Waan
A man of government=Een gemaatigt Man
He hath not the government of his tongue=Hy kan zyn tong niet beteugelen

Topics: learning/education, civility, order/society, respect, language, blame

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Cade
CONTEXT:
Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm
in erecting a grammar school; and whereas,
before, our forefathers had no other books but the
score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be
used, and, contrary to the King his crown and dignity,
thou hast built a paper mill. It will be proved
to thy face that thou hast men about thee that usually
talk of a noun and a verb and such abominable
words as no Christian ear can endure to hear. Thou hast
appointed justices of peace, to call poor men before them
about matters they were not able to answer.
Moreover, thou hast put them in prison ; and because
they could not read, thou hast hanged them; when,
indeed, only for that cause they have been most
worthy to live. Thou dost ride in a foot-cloth, dost
thou not?

DUTCH:
Het zal u in uw gezicht bewezen worden, dat gij mannen om u heen hebt, die plegen te praten van naamwoorden en van werkwoorden en meer zulke afschuwelijke woorden, die geen christenoor kan uitstaan

MORE:

The score and the tally=The score was a notch made on the tally (stick) to keep accounts
These presence=These presents (these documents)
To answer=To account for

Compleat:
Score=Rekening, kerfstok
Scored up=Op rekening, op de kerfstok gezet
Tally=Kerfstok
To tally=Op de kerfstok zetten
By these presents=Door deezen tegenwoordigen [brief]To answer for=Verantwoorden, voor iets staan, borg blyven

Topics: learning/education, order/society, language

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
PRINCE HENRY
What sayest thou to a hare, or the melancholy of Moorditch?
FALSTAFF
Thou hast the most unsavoury similes, and art indeed the most comparative, rascaliest, sweet young Prince. But, Hal, I prithee trouble me no more with vanity. I would to God thou and I knew where a commodity of good names were to be bought. An old lord of the council rated me the other day in the street about you, sir, but I marked him not, and yet he talked very wisely, but I regarded him not, and yet he talked wisely, and in the street, too.

DUTCH:
Gij hebt de onsmakelijkste vergelijkingen ter wereld,
en zijt inderdaad de vergelijkendste, spitsboefachtigste,
aardigste jonge prins.

MORE:
Eating rabbit was believed to cause depression
Onions:
Moorditch=stagnant ditch outside city walls draining the swampy ground of Moorfields
Schmidt:
Unsavoury (metaphorically)=Displeasing
Comparative=Quick at comparisons
Rate (Berate)=Chide
Mark=To take notice of, to pay attention to, to heed, to observe
Compleat:
Unsavoury=Onsmaakelyk, smaakeloos
Burgersdijk:
Gij hebt vloekwaardige aanhalingen.
Een aanhaling, als Prins Hendrik juist uit de spreuken van Salomo deed, werd door de strenge protestanten zondig gerekend en was ook door een statuut van K. Jacobus I verboden. Daarom is dan ook het citaat in folio- uitgave van 1623 verminkt, zoodat daar Falstaffs antwoord zinledig wordt.

Topics: language, reputation, vanity

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
Thou sayest well, and it holds well too, for the fortune of us that are the moon’s men doth ebb and flow like the sea, being governed, as the sea is, by the moon. As for proof now: a purse of gold most resolutely snatched on Monday night and most dissolutely spent on Tuesday morning, got with swearing “Lay by” and spent with crying “Bring in”; now in as low an ebb as the foot of the ladder, and by and by in as high a flow as the ridge of the gallows

DUTCH:

Zeer goed gezegd, en zeer juist bovendien; want het geluk van ons, die dienaars zijn der maan, heeft zijn eb en vloed als de zee, en wordt, evenals de zee, door de maan bestuurd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Holds=to be fit, to be consistent: “thou sayest well, and it –s well too
Ridge=The top of a long and narrow elevation
Compleat:
Hold (bear up)=Ondersteunen

Topics: language, understanding, money, reason

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
And Cassio high in oath, which till tonight
I ne’er might say before. When I came back—
For this was brief— I found them close together
At blow and thrust, even as again they were
When you yourself did part them.
More of this matter cannot I report.
But men are men, the best sometimes forget.
Though Cassio did some little wrong to him,
As men in rage strike those that wish them best,
Yet surely Cassio, I believe, received
From him that fled some strange indignity
Which patience could not pass.
OTHELLO
I know, Iago,
Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter,
Making it light to Cassio. Cassio, I love thee,
But never more be officer of mine.

DUTCH:
Jago, ik weet
dat je als zijn vriend dit bagatelliseert
en Cassio’s misstap wilt vergoelijken.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Lindros v. Governing Board of the Torrance Unified School District, 9 Cal.3d 524, 540, 510 P.2d 361, 371, 108 Cal. Rptr. 185, 195 (1973)(Torriner, J.)(en banc).

Proverb: To mince the matter (Tell sparingly or by halves)

Still in common use e.g Don’t mince matters, don’t mince your words= Speak frankly,say what you mean

Schmidt:
Forget=Forget themselves
Indignity=Contemptuous injury, insult
Patience=Self-control
Pass=Overlook
Compleat:
Indignity=Smaad
Pass, pass by=Passeren, voorbygaan, overslaan
Mince=Kleyn kappen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, cited in law, language, honour

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Guiderius
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
Thou art a robber,
A lawbreaker, a villain. Yield thee, thief.
GUIDERIUS, [as Polydor]To who? To thee? What art thou? Have not I
An arm as big as thine? A heart as big?
Thy words, I grant, are bigger, for I wear not
My dagger in my mouth. Say what thou art,
Why I should yield to thee.
CLOTEN
Thou villain base,
Know’st me not by my clothes?

DUTCH:
Is niet mijn arm
Zoo sterk als de uwe, niet mijn hart zoo sterk?
In woorden kunt gij sterker zijn; ik draag
Mijn dolk niet in mijn mond.


Proverb: The tailor makes the man

“My dagger is my mouth” ref. Solimon and Perseda, “I fight not with my tongue; this (pointing to sword) is my oratrix”
Base= Of low station, of mean account, i.e. base metal

Compleat:
A base fellow=Een slechte vent, oolyke boef
Base=Ondergeschikt

Topics: language, learning/education, order/society, status, appearance, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
You must borrow me Gargantua’s mouth first: ’tis a word too great for any mouth of this age’s size. To say ay and no to these particulars is more than to answer in a catechism.

DUTCH:
Dan moet gij eerst Gargantua’s mond voor mij huren;
want dat woord is veel te groot voor een mond van het
hedendaagsche formaat.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Gargantua=Rabelais’ giant (giant with an enormous appetite}.
Particular=A single point, single thing; minute detail of things singly enumerated
Compleat:
Particular=Byzonder, zonderling, byzonderheid
I don’t remember every particular of it=Ik heb juist alle de byzonderheden daarvan niet onthouden

Burgersdijk notes:
Gargantua’s mond. De reus Gargantua, uit Rabelais’ beroemden satyrischen roman, die eens (Livre I, Ch, 38) saladeplanten, zoo groot als pruim- of noteboomen, waartussvhen zes pelgrims lagen te rusten, verzamelde, en toevallig de pelgrims ook meenam, de salade in een reuzenschotel klaar maakte en de arme drommels achtereenvolgens in den mond kreeg, zonder het te merken; zij moesten met hunne pelgrimsstokken rondspringen om niet tusschen zijne kiezen te geraken en niet met het drinken ingezwolgen te worden; gelukkig werden zij door hem, weder zonder dat hij er eenig vermoeden van had, met zijn tandenstoker uit hun benauwden toestand bevrijd.

Topics: language, reply

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
What shall I need to draw my sword? the paper
Hath cut her throat already. No, ’tis slander,
Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue
Outvenoms all the worms of Nile, whose breath
Rides on the posting winds and doth belie
All corners of the world: kings, queens and states,
Maids, matrons, nay, the secrets of the grave
This viperous slander enters. What cheer, madam?

DUTCH:
Wat is hier zwaard van noode ? Reeds de brief
Heeft haar de keel doorpriemd. — Neen, neen, ‘t is laster;
Diens vlijm is scherper dan het zwaard; zijn tand
Is giftiger dan ‘t giftigst Nijlgebroed.

Slander is sharper than the sword (see Winter’s Tale, 2.3, and Measure for Measure, 3.2)
Worms=Serpents
Outvenom=Is more venomous than
Posting=Swift, fleet
Belie=Misrepresent

Compleat:
Slander=Laster, lasterkladde
In post-haste=Met groote spoed, te post
Belie (Bely)=Beliegen; lasteren
His actions bely his words=Zyn bedryf logenstraft zyne woorden; hy spreekt zich zelf tegen door zyn gedrag

Topics: language, law/legal, abuse, truth

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
To conclude, I am so good a proficient in one quarter of an hour that I can drink with any tinker in his own language during my life. I tell thee, Ned, thou hast lost much honor that thou wert not with me in this action; but, sweet Ned—to sweeten which name of Ned, I give thee this pennyworth of sugar, clapped even now into my hand by an underskinker, one that never spake other English in his life than “Eight shillings and sixpence,” and “You are welcome,”

DUTCH:
Kortom, ik heb het in een kwartier uur zoo ver gebracht, dat ik mijn leven lang met elken ketellapper in zijn eigen taal drinken kan. Ik zeg u, Edu, veel eer is u ontgaan, dat gij niet met mij bij deze heldendaad geweest zijt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
A proficient=one who has made progress
Tinker=Mender of old brass; Proverbial tipplers and would-be politicians.
Under-skinker=An under-drawer, one that serves liquors
Action=Engagement
Compleat:
Proficient=Vorderende, toeneemende
He is a great proficient in his learning=Hy neemt zeer wel aan zyn leeren.
To skink (to fill drink)=Schenken, inschenken
Skinker=Schenker
Burgersdijk:
Dit stuiverszaksken suiker. In de wijnhuizen kregen de gasten bij den wijn een zakjen suiker. Men mag er uit vermoeden, dat of de wijn of die hem dronk vaak niet al te best van smaak was.

Topics: language, learning/education, order/society

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Gentleman
CONTEXT:
Her speech is nothing,
Yet the unshaped use of it doth move
The hearers to collection. They aim at it,
And botch the words up fit to their own thoughts,
Which, as her winks and nods and gestures yield them,
Indeed would make one think there might be thought,
Though nothing sure, yet much unhappily.
HORATIO
‘Twere good she were spoken with, for she may strew
Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.

DUTCH:
t Waar’ goed haar eens to spreken ; licht’lijk strooit
Zij argwaan in een geest, die boosheid broedt .

MORE:
Spurns enviously=Kicks spitefully
Collection=Inference
To botch up=Piece together unskilfully
Botcher=One who mends and patches old clothes
Compleat:
Botcher=Een lapper, knoeijer, boetelaar, broddelaar

Topics: language, perception, understanding, good and bad

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Bedford
CONTEXT:
BURGUNDY
Is it even so? Nay, then, I see our wars
Will turn unto a peaceful comic sport,
When ladies crave to be encounter’d with.
You may not, my lord, despise her gentle suit.
TALBOT
Ne’er trust me then; for when a world of men
Could not prevail with all their oratory,
Yet hath a woman’s kindness over-ruled:
And therefore tell her I return great thanks,
And in submission will attend on her.
Will not your honours bear me company?
BEDFORD
No, truly; it is more than manners will:
And I have heard it said, unbidden guests
Are often welcomest when they are gone.
TALBOT
Well then, alone, since there’s no remedy,
I mean to prove this lady’s courtesy.
Come hither, captain.

DUTCH:
Gewis niet, dit ware onbeleefd en laakbaar;
‘k Heb wel gehoord, dat ongenoode gasten
‘t Meest welkom zijn, wanneer zij weder gaan.

MORE:
Proverb: An unbidden guest is welcome when gone

Gentle suit=Polite, well-mannered petition
Manners will=Etiquette permits
Mean=Intend

Compleat:
Gentle=Aardig, edelmoedig
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding
Manners=Zeden, manieren, manierlykheid
Mean=Meenen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, civility, language

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1 Prologue
SPEAKER: Rumour
CONTEXT:
Open your ears, for which of you will stop
The vent of hearing when loud Rumour speaks?
I, from the orient to the drooping west,
Making the wind my post-horse, still unfold
The acts commenced on this ball of earth.
Upon my tongues continual slanders ride,
The which in every language I pronounce,
Stuffing the ears of men with false reports.
I speak of peace while covert enmity
Under the smile of safety wounds the world.

DUTCH:
Voortdurend zweeft er laster op mijn topgen,
En dien verkondig ik in elke taal ,
Der menschen oor met valsche tijding vullend.
Van vrede spreek ik, als verholen haat,
Schijngoedig lachend, diep de wereld wondt;

MORE:

Stop=Block
Vent of hearing=Ears
Post-horse=A horse kept at a post-house or the inn for messengers or travellers; emblem of swiftness
Drooping=West, where the sun sets
Unfold=Reveal

Compleat:
Unfold=Ontvouwen, open leggen
Drooping=Neerslagtig, moedeloosheid; quynenende

Topics: betrayal, deceit, appearance, perception, language

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Thomas Mowbray
CONTEXT:
The language I have learn’d these forty years,
My native English, now I must forego:
And now my tongue’s use is to me no more
Than an unstringed viol or a harp,
Or like a cunning instrument cased up,
Or, being open, put into his hands
That knows no touch to tune the harmony:
Within my mouth you have engaol’d my tongue,
Doubly portcullis’d with my teeth and lips;
And dull unfeeling barren ignorance
Is made my gaoler to attend on me.
I am too old to fawn upon a nurse,
Too far in years to be a pupil now:
What is thy sentence then but speechless death,
Which robs my tongue from breathing native breath?

DUTCH:
Wat is uw vonnis, dan een stomme dood,
Nu ‘t mij mijn levensademklank verbood?

MORE:

A semi-literal allusion to a proverb of the time, ‘Good that the teeth guard the tongue’ (1578) and the virtue of silence. Ben Jonson recommended a ‘wise tongue’ that should not be ‘licentious and wandering’. (See also the Lucio in Measure for Measure: “’tis a secret must be locked within the
teeth and the lips”.)

Cunning=Skilful
Sentence=Verdict (punning on language)
Breathing native breath=Speaking native English (and breathing English air)

Compleat:
Cunning=Behendig

Topics: language, understanding, identity, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
Was there ever man had such luck? When I kissed the jack, upon an upcast to be hit away? I had a hundred pound on ’t. And then a whoreson jackanapes must take me up for swearing, as if I borrowed mine oaths of him and might not spend them at my pleasure.
FIRST LORD
What got he by that? You have broke his pate with your bowl.
SECOND LORD
If his wit had been like him that broke it, it would have run all out.
CLOTEN
When a gentleman is disposed to swear, it is not for any standers-by to curtail his oaths, ha?
SECOND LORD
No, my lord, (aside) nor crop the ears of them.

DUTCH:
Als een man van rang verkiest te vloeken, behoeft
niemand het hart te hebben zijn vloeken te kortstaarten;
hè?


Proverb: May we not do with our own what we list?

Pate=The head; used in contempt or in ridicule
Curtail=Curtal, having a docked tail (followed by ‘crop the ears’)
Upcast=A throw at the game of bowls
Take up=Rebuke

Kissed the jack … away=The jack being the small ball in bowls, the closest to the jack at the end of the game wins. If the bowl ends up close to it, it is ‘kissing the jack’ (a great advantage). Cloten’s bowl is then hit away by the ‘upcast’ (throw of an opponent).

Compleat:
Jack (in bowling)=Honk, in de klosbaan
To take one up sharply (check, reprimand)=Iemand scherpelyk berispen
Pate=De kop, het hoofd
He threatened to break his pate=Hy dreigde hem den kop in te slaan
Burgersdijk notes:
Had ooit een mensch zulk een geluk?
Cloten spreekt van het geluk, dat zijn tegenspeler gehad heeft.

Topics: language, civility, patience, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Touchstone
CONTEXT:
When a man’s verses cannot be understood nor a man’s good wit seconded with the forward child, understanding, it strikes a man more dead than a great reckoning in a little room. Truly, I would the gods had made thee poetical.

DUTCH:
Als iemands verzen niet begrepen worden en iemands geestigheid niet wordt bijgestaan door het voorlijke kind Verstand,

MORE:
Schmidt:
Reckoning (substantively)=the money charged by a host (a Bill)

Topics: intellect, understanding, skill/talent, language

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Basset
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
What is that wrong whereof you both complain?
First let me know, and then I’ll answer you.
BASSET
Crossing the sea from England into France,
This fellow here, with envious carping tongue,
Upbraided me about the rose I wear;
Saying, the sanguine colour of the leaves
Did represent my master’s blushing cheeks,
When stubbornly he did repugn the truth
About a certain question in the law
Argued betwixt the Duke of York and him;
With other vile and ignominious terms:
In confutation of which rude reproach
And in defence of my lord’s worthiness,
I crave the benefit of law of arms.

DUTCH:
Toen die de waarheid vinnig had weerstreefd
Bij zeek’ren redetwist om recht en wetten,
Dien hij gehad had met den hertog York,
Met verdre lage schimp- en lastertaal

MORE:
Wrong=Wrongdoing, offence, trespass
Envious=Malicious, spiteful, jealous of another’s good fortune
Carping=Mocking
Upbraid=To reproach
Sanguine=Blood-red
Repugn=Reject
Confutation=Legal refutation
Law of arms=A duel

Compleat:
Wrong=Nadeel
Envious=Nydig, afgunstig, wangunstig
To upbraid=Verwyten, smaadelyk toedryven
Sanguine=Bloed-rood
To repugn=Wederstreeven, bestryden, tegenstryden, wederstaan
Confutation=Wederlegging

Topics: dispute, envy, truth, language

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
Madam, you have bereft me of all words.
Only my blood speaks to you in my veins.
And there is such confusion in my powers
As after some oration fairly spoke
By a belovèd prince there doth appear
Among the buzzing pleasèd multitude,
Where every something, being blent together,
Turns to a wild of nothing, save of joy,
Expressed and not expressed. But when this ring
Parts from this finger, then parts life from hence.
O, then be bold to say Bassanio’s dead!

DUTCH:
Gelijk zich, als een aangebeden vorst
Door schoone taal de schare heeft geboeid,
Een blij gemurmel onder ‘t volk doet hooren,
Waar iedre klank en elk gebaar, schoon niets,
Tot de uiting samensmelt van loutre vreugd,
Welsprekend zonder spraak

MORE:
Pleasèd multitude=gratified, amused crowd.
A wild=wilderness
Blent=Blended
Bold=Have confidence
Bereft me=Robbed me
Powers=Vital organ, physical or intellectual faculties
Compleat:
Wilds=wildernissen
Bereft=Beroofd

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Stephano
CONTEXT:
This is some monster of the isle with four legs who hath got, as I take it, an ague. Where the devil should he learn our language? I will give him some relief if it be but for that. If I can recover him and keep him tame and get to Naples with him, he’s a present for any emperor that ever trod on neat’s leather.

DUTCH:
Dit is het een of ander monster van het eiland met vier pooten, dat, zoo het schijnt, de koorts heeft gekregen. Maar waar, voor den duivel heeft hij onze taal geleerd?

MORE:
Recover=Revive
Neat’s leather=Cowhide.
Proverbial: As good a man as ever trod on shoe (beat’s) leather. (See also Julius Caesar 1.1: ‘As proper men as ever trod upon neat’s leather…).
Compleat:
Neat=Een rund, varre (Os of koe)

Topics: language, civility, order/society

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
DUKE OF YORK
Vex not yourself, nor strive not with your breath;
For all in vain comes counsel to his ear.
JOHN OF GAUNT
O, but they say the tongues of dying men
Enforce attention like deep harmony:
Where words are scarce, they are seldom spent in vain,
For they breathe truth that breathe their words in pain.
He that no more must say is listen’d more
Than they whom youth and ease have taught to glose;
More are men’s ends mark’d than their lives before:
The setting sun, and music at the close,
As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last,
Writ in remembrance more than things long past:
Though Richard my life’s counsel would not hear,
My death’s sad tale may yet undeaf his ear

DUTCH:
Vaak klemt het woord van hem, wiens stemme breekt,
Want waarheid ademt, wie zwaar-aad’mend spreekt.

MORE:

Proverb: Dying mean speak true (prophesy)

CITED IN US LAW: People v. Smith 214 Cal. App. 3d 904, 907 (Cal. Ct. App 1989)(Arabian, J).

Must=Can
Listened more=Heard, listened to more closely
Gloze=To make tirades, to make mere words. Veil with specious comments (OED)
Close=Closing phrase (musical)
Remembrance=In memory
Undeaf=To free from deafness

Compleat:
Remembrance=Gedachtenis, geheugenis
To gloze=Vleijen, flikflooijen

Topics: language, value, death, proverbs and idioms, cited in law

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Iden
CONTEXT:
CADE
Here’s the lord of the soil come to seize me for a
stray, for entering his fee-simple without leave.
Ah, villain, thou wilt betray me, and get a thousand
crowns of the king carrying my head to him: but
I’ll make thee eat iron like an ostrich, and swallow
my sword like a great pin, ere thou and I part.
IDEN
Why, rude companion, whatsoe’er thou be,
I know thee not; why, then, should I betray thee?
Is’t not enough to break into my garden,
And, like a thief, to come to rob my grounds,
Climbing my walls in spite of me the owner,
But thou wilt brave me with these saucy terms?
CADE
Brave thee! Ay, by the best blood that ever was
broached, and beard thee too. Look on me well: I
have eat no meat these five days; yet, come thou and
thy five men, and if I do not leave you all as dead
as a doornail, I pray God I may never eat grass more.

DUTCH:
Gij onbeschofte knaap, wie ge ook moogt zijn,
Ik ken u niet; wat zou ik u verraden?

MORE:

Proverb: As dead (deaf, dumb) as a doornail.

Dead as a doornail wasn’t coined by Shakespeare but can be traced back to the 14th century.

To stand seised in fee simple=A feudal term that meant to have both possession and title of property, a form of freehold ownership. Shakespeare sometimes used the phrase to mean absoluteness.

Stray=Trespass, straying animals
Ostriches were believed to eat iron
Brave=Challenge
Terms=Language
Beard=Defy, challenge (e.g. ‘beard the lion in his den’)

Compleat:
To stray=Verdwaalen, doolen
To brave=Trotsen, braveeren, trotseeren, moedig treden
Term=Woord, uitdrukking
To beard (outbrave)=Uittarten, eenen anderen by den baard trekken, braveeren
Fee-simple (or fee absolute)=Een onbepaald leen, ons en onze erfgenaamen voor altoos toebehorende

Topics: law/legal, dispute, language, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Lord Polonius: What do you read, my lord?
Hamlet: Words, words, words.
Lord Polonius: What is the matter, my lord?
Hamlet: Between who?
Lord Polonius: I mean, the matter that you read, my lord.

DUTCH:
Woorden, woorden, woorden.

MORE:

Topics: language, learning/education

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
You know neither me, yourselves nor any thing. You are ambitious for poor knaves’ caps and legs: you wear out a good wholesome forenoon in hearing a cause between an orange wife and a fosset-seller; and then rejourn the controversy of three pence to a second day of audience. When you are hearing a matter between party and party, if you chance to be pinched with the colic, you make faces like mummers; set up the bloody flag against all patience; and, in roaring for a chamber-pot, dismiss the controversy bleeding the more entangled by your hearing: all the peace you make in their cause is calling both the parties knaves. You are a pair of strange ones.
BRUTUS
Come, come, you are well understood to be a
perfecter giber for the table than a necessary
bencher in the Capitol.

DUTCH:
Kom, kom, het is overbekend, dat gij veeleer een onverbeterlijk grappenmaker aan tafel zijt, dan een onontbeerlijk bijzitter op het Kapitool.

MORE:
Proverb: Know thyself

Ambitious for caps and legs=Wanting people to bow and doff caps
Bencher=member of a court or council
Set up the bloody flag=Declare war on (patience)

Schmidt:
Fosset, forset, faucet=Kind of tap for drawing liquor from a barrel; only in “faucet-seller”
Giber=entertainer, (aftr-dinner) jester
Mummer=Someone wearing a mask
The more entangled=To make (the dispute) more confused and intricate

Compleat:
To gibe=Boerten, gekscheeren
Bencher=Een byzitter, Raad, een Rechtsgeleerde van den eersten rang in ‘t Genootschap
Mummer=Een vermomde
Faucet (or peg)=Zwikje, pennetje tot een vat

Topics: language, intellect, reputation, judgment, dispute

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Alonso
CONTEXT:
GONZALO
Is not, sir, my doublet as fresh as the first day I wore it? I mean, in a sort.
ANTONIO
That “sort” was well fished for.
GONZALO
When I wore it at your daughter’s marriage?
ALONSO
You cram these words into mine ears against
The stomach of my sense. Would I had never
Married my daughter there! For, coming thence,
My son is lost and, in my rate, she too,
Who is so far from Italy removed
I ne’er again shall see her.—O thou mine heir
Of Naples and of Milan, what strange fish
Hath made his meal on thee?
FRANCISCO
Sir, he may live.
I saw him beat the surges under him,
And ride upon their backs. He trod the water,
Whose enmity he flung aside, and breasted
The surge most swoll’n that met him. His bold head
‘Bove the contentious waves he kept, and oared
Himself with his good arms in lusty stroke
To th’ shore, that o’er his wave-worn basis bowed,
As stooping to relieve him. I not doubt
He came alive to land.

DUTCH:
Gij propt die woorden in mijn oor, al weigert
Mijn geest dit voedsel.

MORE:
In a sort=In a way, manner (comparatively)
Well fished for=lucky catch, after fishing for it.
Schmidt:
Fished. Figuratively, to catch at sth., to seek to obtain by artifice: “that sort was well –ed for”
Cram=To thrust in, to press, against his will: “you c. these words into mine ear”.
Stomach=Inclination, disposition: “you cram these words into mine ears against the s. of my sense.”
Oared=Rowed
Compleat:

Topics: language, relationship

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Gonzalo
CONTEXT:
SEBASTIAN
Look he’s winding up the watch of his wit. By and by it will strike.
GONZALO
(to ALONSO) Sir—
SEBASTIAN
One. Tell.
GONZALO
When every grief is entertained that’s offered,
comes to th’entertainer –
SEBASTIAN
A dollar.
GONZALO
Dolour comes to him, indeed. You have spoken truer than you purposed.

DUTCH:
Ja juist, de tering; gij hebt het beter geraden, dan
gijzelf wel dacht.

MORE:
A visitor is ‘One who visits from charitable motives or with a view of doing good’ (OED)
Dollar=’The English name for the German thaler, a large silver coin’ (OED).
Dolour=Sorrow, grief (wordplay on ‘dollar’)
Tell=Count
Entertain=To conceive, to harbour, to feel, to keep (When everyone who feels grief embraces every grief that comes their way)
Compleat:
Entertain (receive or believe) a principle, an opinion, etc.=Een stelling, een gevoelen aanneemen, koesteren’ gelooven of voorstaan
Dolor=Droefheid, smerte
Dolorous=Pynlyk, droevig
To visit (to go about to see whether things be as they should)=Bezoeken, nazien, onderzoeken
To visit (to affect, to try)=Bezoeken, beproeven

Topics: language, truth, understanding

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
Farewell, Monsieur Traveler. Look you lisp and wear strange suits, disable all the benefits of your own country, be out of love with your nativity, and almost chide God for making you that countenance you are, or I will scarce think you have swam in a gondola.

DUTCH:
Vaarwel, signore Reiziger. Zorg vooral, dat gij lispelt en u uitheemsch kleedt, al wat er goed is in uw eigen land nietswaardig noemt, met het uur van uw geboorte overhoop ligt en bijna tegen den lieven God uitvaart, omdat hij u geen ander gezicht gegeven heeft;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Disable=To disparage, to undervalue
Countenance=Face, air
Compleat:
Disable=Onmagtig maaken, onvermogend maaken
Countenance=Gelaat, gezigt, uitzigt, weezen

Topics: language, appearance, value, ingratitude

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Pisanio
CONTEXT:
You must forget to be a woman; change
Command into obedience, fear and niceness—
The handmaids of all women, or, more truly,
Woman it pretty self—into a waggish courage,
Ready in gibes, quick-answered, saucy, and
As quarrellous as the weasel. Nay, you must
Forget that rarest treasure of your cheek,
Exposing it—but O, the harder heart!
Alack, no remedy—to the greedy touch
Of common-kissing Titan, and forget
Your laboursome and dainty trims, wherein
You made great Juno angry.

DUTCH:
Vergeet, dat gij een vrouw zijt; ruil ‘t gebieden.
Voor dienstbaarheid, de schuchterheid en kieschheid, —
Der vrouwen gezellinnen, ja veeleer,
Haar lieflijk wezen zelf, — voor dart’len moed;
Wees spotziek, onbeschaamd, vlug met de tong,
En twistziek als een wezel;


Niceness=Delicacy, daintiness, coyness
Quarrellous as the weasel. Weasels were kept for killing vermin. Cf. Henry IV Part 1: “A weasel hath not such a deal of spleen as you are toss’d with.”
Laboursome=Elaborate, requiring much pains and industry (also laboursome petition, Hamlet)
Common-kissing=Kissing anybody and anything
Trims=Ornamental dress

Compleat:
To gibe=Boerten, gekscheeren
Quarrelsome=Krakeelachtig, twistig, twistgierig, kyfachtig
Laboursom=Lastig, verdrdietig, verveelend
Niceness=Viezigheid, keurigheid

Burgersdijk notes:
Den fellen straler van omhoog. In het oorspronkelijke wordt gesproken van the greedg touch of common-kissing Titan. De zonnegod wordt meermalen Titan genoemd.

Topics: appearance, intellect, independence, language, reply

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
DUKE SENIOR
Art thou thus boldened, man, by thy distress
Or else a rude despiser of good manners,
That in civility thou seem’st so empty?
ORLANDO
You touched my vein at first. The thorny point
Of bare distress hath ta’en from me the show
Of smooth civility, yet am I inland bred
And know some nurture. But forbear, I say.
He dies that touches any of this fruit
Till I and my affairs are answerèd.
JAQUES
An you will not be answered with reason, I must die.
DUKE SENIOR
What would you have? Your gentleness shall force
More than your force move us to gentleness.

DUTCH:
Doch vriend’lijkheid dwingt meer,
Dan ooit uw dwang tot vriend’lijkheid ons stemt.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb of the time: “There is a great force hidden in a sweet command” (1581).
Schmidt:
Empty: void, destitute; followed by in: “that in civility thou seemest so e.”
Vein=Disposition, temper, humour
Bare distress=A quibble
Inland: a word of a very vague signification, not so much denoting remoteness from the sea or the frontier, as a seat of peace and peaceful civilization; (perhaps opposed to mountainous districts as the seats of savage barbarousness and meaning the flat country)
Nurture=Good breeding, humanity

Topics: proverbs and idioms, order/society, language, civility, learning/education

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