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PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Sebastian
CONTEXT:
A living drollery. Now I will believe
That there are unicorns, that in Arabia
There is one tree, the phoenix’ throne, one phoenix
At this hour reigning there.

DUTCH:
Een levend poppenspel. ‘k Geloof nu ook
Aan eenhoorns; ik stem toe, dat in Arabië
Eén boom, de troon des Feniks’, wast, een Feniks
Nog heden daar regeert.


MORE:
A living drollery=A comic puppet show enacted by living beings
Compleat:
Drollery=Boertery, snaakery

Topics: life, gullibility, manipulation

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
Then, the whining school-boy with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then, a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden, and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then, the justice,
In fair round belly, with a good capon lined,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws, and modern instances,
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

DUTCH:
De hele wereld is een schouwtoneel en alle mensen zijn maar acteurs./
Heel de wereld is tooneel; En mannen, vrouwen, allen, enkel spelers.

MORE:
CITED IN IRISH LAW: Ellis v Minister for Justice and Equality & Ors [2019] IESC 30 (15 May 2019)
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “mewling and puking”: Lett v Texas, 727 SW 2d 367, 371 (Tex. Crim. App. 1987)

“Policies of shutting people away for life or for ages within life, in Shakespeare’s sense, may be appropriate depending on the gravity of the crime”.
Bubble reputation=empty, pointless reputation.Short-lived fame..
Referred to as The Seven Ages of Man monologue
This phrase is generally abbreviated to ‘All the world’s a stage’ nowadays

Reference to the “justice, in fair round belly with good capon lined”: from the North Briton, no. 64: “a justice of peace is a human creature; yet, for half a dozen of chickens, will dispense with the whole dozen of penal statutes. These be the basket-justices…”.
Wise saws=Sayings, precepts
Instances=Arguments or examples used in a defence

Burgersdijk notes:
Heel de wereld is tooneel enz. In Sh.’s schouwburg, de Globe, was de spreuk van Petronius (die onder keizer Nero leefde) te lezen: Totus mundus agit histrionem. De gedachte is meermalen uitgesproken, vroeger ook reeds door Sh. zelven in “den Koopman van Venetie”, 1. 1. Men herinnert zich ook Vondels:
„De weerelt is een speeltooneel,
Elk speelt zijn rol en krijght zijn deel.”
In zeven levenstrappen. De verdeeling van het leven in zeven bedrijven is reeds zeer oud en wordt aan Hippocrates toegeschreven; zij is in overeenstemming met het aantal planeten (zon, maan en vijf planeten).
En net geknipten baard. Van de snede, die den rechter past, in tegenstelling met den wilden, niet gekorten krijgsmansbaard.

Topics: still in use, cited in law, life, age/experience, invented or popularised

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Rosencrantz
CONTEXT:
Happily he’s the second time come to them, for they say an old man is twice a child.

DUTCH:
Men zegt, dat een oud man ten tweede male een kind is /
Men zegt een oud mensch is opnieuw een kind.

MORE:
Shakespeare’s ‘second childhood’ from the Seven Ages of Man
(Jaques, As You Like It: Infant, Schoolboy, Lover, Soldier, Justice, Pantaloon, Second Childishness).

Topics: life, age/experience

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: Epilogue
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
Now my charms are all o’erthrown,
And what strength I have’s mine own,
Which is most faint. Now, ’tis true,
I must be here confined by you,
Or sent to Naples. Let me not,
Since I have my dukedom got
And pardoned the deceiver, dwell
In this bare island by your spell,
But release me from my bands
With the help of your good hands.
Gentle breath of yours my sails
Must fill, or else my project fails,
Which was to please. Now I want
Spirits to enforce, art to enchant,
And my ending is despair,
Unless I be relieved by prayer,
Which pierces so that it assaults
Mercy itself and frees all faults.
As you from crimes would pardoned be,
Let your indulgence set me free.

DUTCH:
k Derf mijn geesten thans en kunst;
Wanhoop is mijn eind, tenzij
Vroom gebed mijn ziel bevrij,
En mij, nimmer smeekensmoe,
Al mijn schuld vergeven doe!
Hoopt gijzelf eens op gená,
Dat uw gunst mij dan ontsla!

MORE:

Topics: pity, mercy, life, offence, punishment, failure

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Tamora
CONTEXT:
LAVINIA
O, let me teach thee! for my father’s sake,
That gave thee life, when well he might have slain thee,
Be not obdurate, open thy deaf ears.
TAMORA
Hadst thou in person ne’er offended me,
Even for his sake am I pitiless.
Remember, boys, I poured forth tears in vain,
To save your brother from the sacrifice;
But fierce Andronicus would not relent;
Therefore, away with her, and use her as you will,
The worse to her, the better loved of me.

DUTCH:
Die u liet leven, toen hij u kon dooden,
Wees thans niet doof, maar leen mijn beden ‘t oor.

MORE:
Obdurate=Resistant
Compleat:
Obdurate=Verhard, hardnekkig, verstokt

Topics: life, revenge, understanding, punishment

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither. I’ll smell thee on the tree.
Oh, balmy breath, that dost almost persuade
Justice to break her sword! One more, one more.
Be thus when thou art dead and I will kill thee
And love thee after.

DUTCH:
Als jij zo dood zult zijn, zal ik je doden,
en liefhebben erna. Nog eens, voor ’t laatst…
nooit zag men dodelijker schoonheid.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Barkauskas v. Lane, 78 F.2d 1031, 1032 (7th Cir. 1989)(Posner, J.); See also Hornstein v. Hornstein, 195 Md. 627, 75 A.2d 103 (Md. Ct. App. 1950)(husband reading from Othello and threatening to treat her as Othello treated Desdemona).

Schmidt:
Balmy=Fragrant
Sword=Emblem of power and authority

Compleat:

Topics: life, strength, regret, death, cited in law

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Demetrius
CONTEXT:
DEMETRIUS
Listen, fair madam: let it be your glory
To see her tears; but be your heart to them
As unrelenting flint to drops of rain.
LAVINIA
When did the tiger’s young ones teach the dam?
O, do not learn her wrath; she taught it thee;
The milk thou suckedst from her did turn to marble;
Even at thy teat thou hadst thy tyranny.
Yet every mother breeds not sons alike:
Do thou entreat her show a woman pity.
CHIRON
What, wouldst thou have me prove myself a bastard?
LAVINIA
‘Tis true; the raven doth not hatch a lark:
Yet have I heard,—O, could I find it now!—
The lion moved with pity did endure
To have his princely paws pared all away:
Some say that ravens foster forlorn children,
The whilst their own birds famish in their nests:
O, be to me, though thy hard heart say no,
Nothing so kind, but something pitiful!

DUTCH:
Hoor haar, vorstin; het zij uw roem, haar tranen
Te aanschouwen; doch voor deze zij uw hart,
Wat harde keien zijn voor regendroppels.

MORE:
Proverb: Constant dropping will wear the stone
Proverb: An eagle does not hatch a dove
Proverb: He sucked evil from the dug
Proverb: The lion spares the suppliant

Glory=Pride
Learn her=Teach her
Hadst=Took in
Children=Chicks
Forlorn=Wretched, abandoned
Compleat:
Glory=Heerlykheid, gloori, roem
Learn=Leren
Forlorn=Wanhoopig, neerslagtig door een mislukking; Verlaaten

Topics: proverbs and idioms, pride, life, pity

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
I fear too early, for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night’s revels, and expire the term
Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
But he that hath the steerage of my course,
Direct my sail. On, lusty gentlemen.

DUTCH:
Maar Hij, die op mijn vaart de roerpen houdt,
Richt’ mij mijn zeil!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Mind misgives=To have a presentiment of evil
Vile=Having a bad effect or influence, evil
Forfeit=The loss or penalty incurred by a trespass or breach of condition. Loss of life, death: “expire the term of (…)”
Compleat:
A vile mercenary soul=Een laage haatzuchtige ziel
A vile commodity=Een slegte waar
Forfeit (or default)=Defout.
Forfeit (fine or penalty)=Boete
To forfeit=Verbeuren

Topics: plans/intentions, fate/destiny, life, adversity

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
Roep wee, verlies, vernieling, val en nood;
De dood is ‘t ergst, en komen moet de dood.

MORE:

Proverb: All men must die (The worst is death, and death will have his day.)

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, death, life

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Why, let the stricken deer go weep,
The hart ungallèd play.
For some must watch while some must sleep.
So runs the world away.

DUTCH:
Men kan verheugd zijn of benard, Zo is ’t op aard verdeeld. /
Gewaakt er moet, zal slapen eene: Zoo blijft de wereld aan ‘t rollen. /
Wij komen voor- of achteraan, Zoo is de loop der zaken.

MORE:
“For some must watch while some must sleep” is still in use today; also the basis for titles of several works.

Topics: life, still in use, status, order/society, status

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Peace, good pint-pot. Peace, good tickle-brain.— Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy time, but also how thou art accompanied. For though the camomile, the more it is trodden on, the faster it grows, so youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.

DUTCH:
Al waren er gronden zoo overvloedig als bramen, van mij zou niemand een grond door dwang vernemen, van mij niet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Tickle-brain=A species of strong liquor
Marvel=To find something strange, to wonder
Burgersdijk notes:
De naam Spraakwater is in het Engelsch Ticklebrain, de naam van een likeur.

Topics: life, age/experience, excess, integrity, identity, respect

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
Nay, forward, old man. Do not break off so,
For we may pity though not pardon thee.
EGEON
O, had the gods done so, I had not now
Worthily termed them merciless to us.
For, ere the ships could meet by twice five leagues,
We were encounterd by a mighty rock,
Which being violently borne upon,
Our helpful ship was splitted in the midst;
So that, in this unjust divorce of us,
Fortune had left to both of us alike
What to delight in, what to sorrow for.

DUTCH:
Neen, oude, breek niet af; want mededoogen
Mag ik u schenken, schoon genade niet..

MORE:
Worthily=Deservedly, justly
Helpful ship=Mast, which was helpful when the ship was “sinking-ripe”
In the midst=Down the middle

Compleat:
Worthily=Waardiglyk
Helpful=Behulpelyk
Midst=Het middenst, midden

Topics: pity, mercy, judgment, fate/destiny, life

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
LANCASTER
A famous rebel art thou, Colevile.
FALSTAFF
And a famous true subject took him.
COLEVILE
I am, my lord, but as my betters are
That led me hither. Had they been ruled by me,
You should have won them dearer than you have.
FALSTAFF
I know not how they sold themselves, but thou, like a kind fellow, gavest thyself away gratis, and I thank thee for thee.

DUTCH:
Ik weet niet, waarvoor zij zich verkocht hebben; maar
gij, goede jongen, gaaft uzelven voor niet weg, en ik
dank u voor u.

MORE:

You should have won them dearer=Victory would have cost you more

Topics: life, dispute, achievement

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
What hope is there of his majesty’s amendment?
LAFEW
He hath abandoned his physicians, madam; under whose
practices he hath persecuted time with hope, and
finds no other advantage in the process but only the
losing of hope by time.
COUNTESS
This young gentlewoman had a father, —O, that
‘had’! how sad a passage ’tis! —whose skill was
almost as great as his honesty; had it stretched so
far, would have made nature immortal, and death
should have play for lack of work. Would, for the
king’s sake, he were living! I think it would be
the death of the king’s disease.

DUTCH:
Hij heeft aan zijne artsen hun afscheid gegeven, mevrouw, nadat hij onder hunne behandeling den tijd met hoop vervolgd had, en er op den duur geen ander voordeel van heeft, dan dat hij met den tijd de hoop verloor.

MORE:
Amendment=Recovery
Persecute=To afflict, to harass; not very intelligibly used.
Persecuted time with hope=Wasted his time hoping for a cure.
Passage=Punning on passing
Compleat:
Persecute=Lastig vallen; vervolgen.

Topics: hope/optimism, remedy, time, trust, life, death

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
I have almost forgot the taste of fears.
The time has been my senses would have cooled
To hear a night-shriek, and my fell of hair
Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
As life were in ’t. I have supped full with horrors.
Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
Cannot once start me.

DUTCH:
k Heb schier vergeten, hoe het vreezen smaakt.

MORE:
Onions:
Fell=Skin, covering
Schmidt:
Treatise=Discourse, talk, tale
Dismal=Striking the mind with sorrow or dismay
Compleat:
Treatise=Een verhandeling, traktaat
Dismal=Schrikkelyk, gruuwelyk, yslyk, overdroevig, naar
Fell (skin)=Vel, huid

Topics: time, memory, age/experience, life

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
I have neither the scholar’s melancholy, which is emulation; nor the musician’s, which is fantastical; nor the courtier’s, which is proud; nor the soldier’s, which is ambitious; nor the lawyer’s, which is politic; nor the lady’s, which is nice; nor the lover’s, which is all these, but it is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and indeed the sundry contemplation of my travels, which, by often rumination, wraps me in the most humorous sadness.

DUTCH:
Ik heb noch de melancholie van den geleerde, die niets
dan naijver is, noch die van den musicus, die phantastisch,
noch die van den hoveling, die trotsch, noch die
van den soldaat, die roemgierig, noch die van den jurist,
die staatzuchtig …is;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Emulation=Rivalry; jealousy, envy, envious contention
Fantastical=Indulging the vagaries of imagination, capricious, whimsical
Politic=Prudent, wise, artful, cunning
Humorous=Sad
Compleat:
Emulation=Haayver, volgzucht, afgunst
Fantastical=Byzinnig, eigenzinnig, grilziek
Politick (or cunning)=Slim, schrander, doorsleepen

Topics: life, nature, skill/talent, identityemotion and mood

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY
Even as men wracked upon a sand, that look to be washed off the next tide.
BATES
He hath not told his thought to the king?
KING HENRY
No. Nor it is not meet he should, for, though I speak it to you, I think the king is but a man as I am. The violet smells to him as it doth to me. The element shows to him as it doth to me. All his senses have but human conditions. His ceremonies laid by, in his nakedness he appears but a man, and though his affections are higher mounted than ours, yet when they stoop, they stoop with the like wing. Therefore, when he sees reason of fears as we do, his fears, out of doubt, be of the same relish as ours are. Yet, in reason, no man should possess him with any appearance of fear, lest he, by showing it, should dishearten his army.

DUTCH:
Want, al zeg ik dit tot u, ik geloof, dat de koning maar een mensch is zooals ik ben. Het viooltjen ruikt voor hem evenals voor mij

MORE:
Wracked=Wrecked
The element=The sky (Latin clementum ignis as a name for the starry sphere – or with a mixture of the sense of ‘air’)
Meet=Appropriate

Compleat:
Wrack (or shipwrack)=Schipbreuk
Affections=Emotions, feelings
Stoop=Another allusion to falconry. The hawk soars (mounts) and then descends (stoops)
To go to wrack=Verlooren gaan, te gronde gaan
Wrack ( the part of the ship that is perished and cast a shoar, belonging to the King)=Wrak van een verongelukt Schip
Wracked=Aan stukken gestooten, te gronde gegaan
Meet=Dienstig

Topics: nature, order/society, life

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Desdemona
CONTEXT:
For let our finger ache, and it endues
Our other healthful members even to a sense
Of pain. Nay, we must think men are not gods,
Nor of them look for such observancy
As fits the bridal. Beshrew me much, Emilia,
I was – unhandsome warrior as I am –
Arraigning his unkindness with my soul;
But now I find I had suborned the witness

DUTCH:
Wee mij, wee, Emilia;
‘k Liet, tegen alle krijgstucht in, daar toe,
Dat wegens stuurschheid hem mijn ziel verklaagde;
Thasn ken ik die getuige als omgekocht
En hem als valsch beticht.

MORE:

Proverb: We are but men, not gods

Unhandsome=Unskilled, unfair, illiberal
Suborned=Influenced to bear false witness
Observancy=Homage
Arraigning=Accusing
Member=Limb

Compleat:
Member=Lid, Lidmaat. Member of the body=Een lid des lichaams
Arraign=Voor ‘t recht ontbieden; voor ‘t recht daagen
To suborn a witness=Eenen getuige opmaaken of omkoopen
Unhandsomly=Op een fatsoenlyke wyze
Abuser=Misbruiker, belediger, smyter en vegter

Topics: proverbs and idioms, nature, life, manipulation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Boy
CONTEXT:
Would I were in an alehouse in London! I would
give all my fame for a pot of ale, and safety.

DUTCH:
Ik wenschte, dat ik in een bierhuis zat, in Londen!
Ik zou al mijn roem voor een kan bier geven en voor
veiligheid.

MORE:

Topics: adversity, security, life

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
But to say I know more harm in him than in myself were to say more than I know. That he is old, the more the pity, his white hairs do witness it. But that he is, saving your reverence, a whoremaster, that I utterly deny. If sack and sugar be a fault, God help the wicked. If to be old and merry be a sin, then many an old host that I know is damned. If to be fat be to be hated, then Pharaoh’s lean kine are to be loved. No, my good lord, banish Peto, banish Bardolph, banish Poins, but for sweet Jack Falstaff, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Falstaff, valiant Jack Falstaff, and therefore more valiant being, as he is, old Jack Falstaff,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company.
Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.

DUTCH:
Als sek met suiker boos is, dan sta God de zondaars bij! Als oud en vroolijk zijn zonde is, dan is menig oude waard, dien ik ken, verdoemd; als vet te zijn hatenswaardig is, dan zijn Pharao’s magere koeien beminnelijk.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Sack=The generic name of Spanish and Canary wines
Kine=Cow (Pharaoh’s lean kine: a sign that times of starvation are ahead (Genesis 41))
Host=Innkeeper
Saving your reverence=With respect (used before an impolite remark)
Compleat:
Kine=Koeien
Sack=Sek, een soort van sterke wyn
Host=een Waerd, herbergier
Burgersdijk:
In de wijnhuizen kregen de gasten hij den wijn een zakjen suiker. Men mag er uit vermoeden, dat of de wijn of die hem dronk vaak niet al te best van smaak was.

Topics: life, age/experience, excess, offence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
But to say I know more harm in him than in myself were to say more than I know. That he is old, the more the pity, his white hairs do witness it. But that he is, saving your reverence, a whoremaster, that I utterly deny. If sack and sugar be a fault, God help the wicked. If to be old and merry be a sin, then many an old host that I know is damned. If to be fat be to be hated, then Pharaoh’s lean kine are to be loved. No, my good lord, banish Peto, banish Bardolph, banish Poins, but for sweet Jack Falstaff, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Falstaff, valiant Jack Falstaff, and therefore more valiant being, as he is, old Jack Falstaff,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company,
Banish not him thy Harry’s company.
Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.

DUTCH:
Als sek met suiker boos is, dan sta God de zondaars bij! Als oud en vroolijk zijn zonde is, dan is menig oude waard, dien ik ken, verdoemd; als vet te zijn hatenswaardig is, dan zijn Pharao’s magere koeien beminnelijk.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Sack=The generic name of Spanish and Canary wines
Kine=Cow
Compleat:
Kine=Koeien
Sack=Sek, een soort van sterke wyn

Topics: life, age/experience, excess, offence

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
To bait fish withal. If it will feed nothing else, it
will feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me and hindered
me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my
gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled
my friends, heated mine enemies—and what’s his reason? I
am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands,
organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed
with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject
to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed
and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian
is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us,
do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if
you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you
in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew
wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a
Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by
Christian example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach
me I will execute—and it shall go hard but I will better
the instruction.

DUTCH:
Als gij ons een messteek geeft, bloeden wij dan
niet? als gij ons vergiftigt, sterven wij dan niet? en als
gij ons beleedigt, zullen wij dan geen wraak nemen?

MORE:
If you prick us with a pin, don’t we bleed? If you tickle us, don’t we laugh? If you poison us, don’t we die? And if you treat us badly, won’t we try to get revenge? If we’re like you in everything else, we’ll resemble you in that respect

CITED IN EWCA LAW:
In a direct quotation or “borrowed eloquence” psychiatric injury also prompted Lady Justice Hale in Sutherland v Hatton and other appeals [2002] EWCA Civ 76 at [23] to differentiate it from physical harm saying: “Because of the very nature of psychiatric disorder … it is bound to be harder to foresee than is physical injury. Shylock could not say of a mental disorder, ‘If you prick us, do we not bleed?’” (https://www.counselmagazine.co.uk/articles/quote-or-not-quote-…)
CITED IN US LAW:
National Life Ins., Co. v. Phillips Publ., Inc., 793 F. Supp. 627 (1992) – in reference to commercial interests: “A corporation’s reputation interest is primarily commercial. To paraphrase Shylock, ‘If you prick them they do not bleed.’ Nor do corporations have the same intense interest in dignity that so defines society’s interest in protecting private individual plaintiffs.”

Hindered me=Lost me, cost me
Bargain=Deal, contract
Thwart=Frustrate, interfere with
Cooled my friends=Turned my friends against me
Compleat:
To hinder=Beletten, weerhouden, verhinderen
Bargain=Een verding, verdrag, koop
Thwart=Dwarsdryven, draaiboomen, beleetten
To wrong=Verongelyken, verkoten
He wrongs me=Hy verongelykt my. I was very much wronged=Ik wierd zeer veerongelykt.
To revenge=Wreeken. To revenge an affront=Een belédiging wreeken.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Then let them anatomise Regan; see what breeds about her
heart. Is there any cause in nature that makes these hardhearts?
[To Edgar] You, sir, I entertain for one of my hundred,
only I do not like the fashion of your garments. You will say
they are Persian; but let them be changed.

DUTCH:
Is er een natuurlijke oorzaak die harten zo hard maakt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Anatomize = dissect
Compleat:
Anatomize=Opsnyding, ontleeden

Topics: life, nature, mercy, appearance, fashion/trends

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

DUTCH:
Het is een sprookjen,
Verteld, vol galm en drift, door een onnooz’le,
Gansch zonder zin.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America v. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 636 F.2d 464, 469 (D.C.Cir. 1980);
McNeil v. Butz, Secretary of Agriculture, 480 F.2d 314, 323 (4th Cir. 1973)(|Winter, J): In a due process case the court writes that “without the right of confrontation, the process provided by the government here is mere sound and fury signifying nothing.”;
Action for Children’s Television v. Federal Communications Commission, 821 F.2d 741, 747 (D.C.Cir. 1987);
Jenkins v. Tatem, 795 F.2d 112, 113 (D.C.Cir. 1986);
Schering Corporation v. Vitarine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 124 F.R.D. 580, 587 (D.N.J. 1989);
Bell v. Busse, 633 F.Supp. 628, 632 (S.D.Ohio 1986);
Cebula v. General Electric Company, 614 F.Supp. 260, 265 (N.D.Ill. 1985)(Aspen, J.): In disparaging the plaintiff’ s statistical evidence, the court writes, “the so-called statistical evidence … is filled with sound and fury…”;
Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. v. Campbell, 512 So.2d 72.5, 729 Ala. 1987);
Arnold v. Parry, 173 Ind. App. 300, 363 N.E.2d 1055, 1061 (1977);
Claybrooks v. State, 36 Md. A,pp. 295,374 A.2d 365 (1977);
State v. Schweikert, 39 Ohio St.3d 603,604,529 N.E.2d 1271 (1988).

Topics: life, death, sorrow, cited in law, still in use

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
Why, how now, Adam? No greater heart in thee? Live a little, comfort a little, cheer thyself a little. If this uncouth forest yield anything savage, I will either be food for it or bring it for food to thee. Thy conceit is nearer death than thy powers.

DUTCH:
Komaan, Adam, hoe is het? hebt gij niet meer hart
in ‘t lijf? Leef nog wat, verman u wat, vervroolijk u
wat! Als dit woeste woud iets wilds voortbrengt, zal
ik er spijs voor zijn, of het u als spijze brengen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Conceit=conception, idea, image in the mind
Power=vital organ, physical or intellectual function
Anything savage=game
Compleat:
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening

Topics: life, wellbeing, imagination, nature, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: Ophelia
CONTEXT:
Well, God’ield you! They say the owl was a baker’s daughter. Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be. God be at your table.

DUTCH:
Wij weten wat we zijn, maar wij weten niet wat we misschien zullen worden /
Ach, heer, wij weten wel wat we zijn, maar niet wat we nog worden kunnen.

MORE:
God yield you= God bless you
The legend had been often used to enkindle kind feelings for the poor and unfortunate. The story, which is current to-day among the nursery tales of Gloucestershire, relates that the Savior in disguise entered a baker’s shop, asking for some bread; and, when the baker charitably put a large piece of dough into the oven to bake for Him, his daughter rebuked him, and for her unkindness was changed into an owl.

Burgersdijk notes:
Men zegt, dat de uil een bakkersdochter geweest is. Ophelia denkt aan een oude legende, die in Glocestershire algemeen in omloop was: de Heiland vroeg eens een bakkersvrouw om brood, wat zij hem ook dadelijk wilde
bakken. De dochter vond, dat hare moeder er te veel deeg voor gebruikte en nam het grootste deel er van weg. Toen zwol het overschot plotseling allergeweldigst op, zoodat de dochter, in haar verbazing, kreten uitte, niet ongelijk aan uilengeschreenw, waarop de Heiland haar in een uil veranderde. Vandaar Ophelia’s zeggen: „wij weten niet, wat wij kunnen worden .” Dit verhaal werd aan kinderen gedaan, om hun barmhartigheid in te prenten.

Topics: status, fate/destiny, life

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
In a most weak—and debile minister, great power, great
transcendence: which should, indeed, give us a further
use to be made than alone the recovery of the king, as
to be—generally thankful.
PAROLLES
I would have said it; you say well. Here comes the king.
LAFEW
Lustig, as the Dutchman says: I’ll like a maid
the better, whilst I have a tooth in my head.
Why, he’s able to lead her a carranto.

DUTCH:
En lustigjes, lustigjes, zooals de Hollander zegt; nu mag ik de meisjes nog te meer lijden, zoolang ik een tand in mijn mond heb. Wel, ik acht hem in staat een coranto met haar te dansen.

MORE:
Lustig: Dutch word used by English writers in Shakespeare’s time (lustick, lustique).
Carranto (Coranto)=Lively dance (from French courant or couranto).
Compleat:
Coranto (Courant)=Een soort van een dans
Stout (lusty)=Lustig

Burgersdijk notes:
En lustigjes, lustigjes, zooals de Hollander zegt. De folio heeft: Lustique, as the Dutchman saies. Capell teekent bij deze plaats aan: ,In een oud stuk, dat groote verdiensten bezit, getiteld The Weakest goeth to the Wall, gedrukt in 1600, maar hoeveel vroeger en door wien geschreven, is mij onbekend, – komt een Hollander voor, Jacob van Smelt geheeten, die een mengelmoes van Hollandsch en onze taal spreekt en bij verschillende gelegenheden ditzelfde woord (lustick) gebruikt, dat in het Engelsch lusty is .”

Topics: life, age/experience

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Titus Andronicus
CONTEXT:
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Peace, tender sapling; thou art made of tears,
And tears will quickly melt thy life away.
What dost thou strike at, Marcus, with thy knife?
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
At that that I have killed, my lord; a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Out on thee, murderer! thou kill’st my heart;
Mine eyes are cloyed with view of tyranny:
A deed of death done on the innocent
Becomes not Titus’ brother: get thee gone:
I see thou art not for my company.
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Alas, my lord, I have but killed a fly.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
But how, if that fly had a father and mother?
How would he hang his slender gilded wings,
And buzz lamenting doings in the air!
Poor harmless fly, That, with his pretty buzzing melody, Came here to make us merry! and thou hast killed him.

DUTCH:
Foei, schaam u, moord’naar! mij doodt gij het hart.
Mijn oogen zijn verzaad van ‘t zien van gruw’len

MORE:
Cloyed=Satiated
View=Perception
Becomes not=Is not becoming for
But=Only
Compleat:
To cloy=Verkroppen, overlaaden
To view=Beschouwen, bezien
Become=Betaamen
But=Maar, of, dan, behalven, maar alleen

Topics: life, regret, nature, error, guilt

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
Nothing in his life
Became him like the leaving it. He died
As one that had been studied in his death
To throw away the dearest thing he owed
As ’twere a careless trifle.

DUTCH:
Niets in heel zijn leven
Deed hij zoo schoon als ‘t gaan ter dood; hij stierf
Als een, die zijnen dood had bestudeerd

MORE:
Schmidt:
Careless (passive sense)=Not cared for, indifferent (worthless)

Topics: life, value, dignity

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Regan
CONTEXT:
O sir, to wilful men,
The injuries that they themselves procure
Must be their schoolmasters. Shut up your doors.
He is attended with a desperate train.
And what they may incense him to, being apt
To have his ear abused, wisdom bids fear.

DUTCH:
Wie eigenzinnig is; Heeft in het leed, dat hij zichzelf bereidt; Een goede leerschool./
Dwarskoppen moeten
hun lesje leren van het leed dat zij
zichzelf toebrengen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wilful=Obstinate, stubborn, refractory
Train=Retinue
To have his ear abused=Susceptible to misleading tales
Compleat:
Wilfull (obstinate)=Halstarrig

Topics: life, age/experience, gullibility, manipulation

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
They shall be married tomorrow, and I will bid the duke to the nuptial. But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man’s eyes. By so much the more shall I tomorrow be at the height of heart-heaviness, by how much I shall think my brother happy in having what he wishes for.

DUTCH:
Hoe bitter is het in het geluk te kijken door de ogen van een ander./
Maar ach! hoe bitter is het, gelukzaligheid door eens anders oogen te zien!

MORE:
Schmiddt:
Heart-heaviness=Sadness

Topics: life, satisfaction, emotion and mood, envy

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Put out the light, and then put out the light.
If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
I can again thy former light restore
Should I repent me. But once put out thy light,
Thou cunning’st pattern of excelling nature,
I know not where is that Promethean heat
That can thy light relume. When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither.

DUTCH:
Doe uit het licht en doe dan uit het licht:
als ik u doof, gedienstige flambouw,
en mij dat spijt, kan ik uw vroeger licht;
opnieuw ontsteken.

MORE:

Put out the light, and then put out the light = Extinguish the candle and kill Desdemona
Relume = re-illuminate, rekindle
Flaming=Carrying a light (Cf. Psalms 104.4; ‘Which maketh he spirits his messengers, and a flaming fire his ministers’.)
Cunning=Dexterously wrought or devised

Onions:
Fire stolen by the demigod Prometheus from Olympus and conveyed to men, to whom he taught its use; allusively applied to that which inspires or infuses life

Compleat:
Cunning=Behendig, Schrander, Naarstig
A cunning fellow=Een doortrapte vent, een looze gast
To cast a cunning look=Iemand snaaks aanzien

Topics: life, strength, regret, death

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything

DUTCH:
Gezicht en tanden, smaak en alles kwijt

MORE:

Topics: life, age/experience, still in use

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
O world, thy slippery turns! Friends now fast sworn,
Whose double bosoms seems to wear one heart,
Whose hours, whose bed, whose meal and exercise
Are still together, who twin, as ’twere, in love
Unseparable, shall within this hour,
On a dissension of a doit, break out
To bitterest enmity; so fellest foes,
Whose passions and whose plots have broke their sleep
To take the one the other, by some chance,
Some trick not worth an egg, shall grow dear friends
And interjoin their issues. So with me:
My birthplace hate I, and my love’s upon
This enemy town. I’ll enter. If he slay me,
He does fair justice; if he give me way,
I’ll do his country service.

DUTCH:
En zij, die felle vijandschap steeds scheidde,
Wien haat en woede, door verdelgingsplannen,
Niet slapen liet, — zij worden door een toeval,
Een gril, geen ei zelfs waard, tot boezemvrienden,
Verzwaag’ren hunne kind’ren

MORE:
Slippery turns=Instability, sudden changes
Dissenion of a doit=An insignificant, trifling dispute
Interjoin issues=Marry their children

Schmidt:
Doit=Smallest piece of money, a trifle
Fell=Fierce, savage, cruel, pernicious

Compleat:
Doit=Een duit (achtste deel van een stuiver)
Fell (cruel)=Wreede, fel

Topics: friendship, loyalty, dispute, betrayal, life

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
So man and man should be;
But clay and clay differs in dignity,
Whose dust is both alike. I am very sick.

DUTCH:
Menschen moesten ‘t zijn;
Maar stof en stof verschillen wel in rang,
Hoezeer hun asch gelijk zij.


Proverb: All are of the same dust

Compleat:
We are but dust and ashes=Wy zyn niet dan stof en asch

Topics: status, relationship, proverbs and idioms, life

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
So sick I am not, yet I am not well;
But not so citizen a wanton as
To seem to die ere sick. So please you, leave me.
Stick to your journal course. The breach of custom
Is breach of all. I am ill, but your being by me
Cannot amend me. Society is no comfort
To one not sociable. I am not very sick,
Since I can reason of it. Pray you trust me here—
I’ll rob none but myself—and let me die,
Stealing so poorly.

DUTCH:
Gezelschap helpt niet wie niet gezellig is;

Journal course=Daily routine
Citizen a wanton=City-bred (soft) “wanton” spoilt child or indulged and self-indulgent youth
Reason=Speak of it

Compleat:
Journal=Dag-register, dag-verhaal
Wanton=Onrein, vuil, ontuchtig
To grow wanton with too much prosperity=In voorspoed weeldrig worden

Topics: wellbeing, emotion and mood, custom, life

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
O gentlemen, the time of life is short!
To spend that shortness basely were too long,
If life did ride upon a dial’s point,
Still ending at the arrival of an hour
An if we live, we live to tread on kings;
If die, brave death, when princes die with us.
Now, for our consciences, the arms are fair
When the intent of bearing them is just.

DUTCH:
De tijd van leven is kort: die korte tijd laag bij de gronds doorbrengen zou te lang zijn

MORE:
Dial’s point=Hand of a sun-dial
Tread on=Bring about the downfall of
Compleat:
Dial, sun-dial=Zonnewyzer.

Topics: life, nature, time, hope/optimism, conscience, merit, value

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: First Lord
CONTEXT:
FIRST LORD
How mightily sometimes we make us comforts of our
losses!
SECOND LORD
And how mightily some other times we drown our gain
in tears! The great dignity that his valour hath
here acquired for him shall at home be encountered
with a shame as ample.
FIRST LORD
The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and
ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our
faults whipped them not; and our crimes would
despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues.

DUTCH:
Het weefsel van ons leven bestaat uit gemengd garen,
goed en slecht dooreen; onze deugden zouden trotsch
zijn, indien zij niet door onze ondeugden gestriemd werden; en onze slechtheid zou wanhopig zijn, als ze niet door onze deugden vertroost werd.

MORE:
Cherish=Comfort, encourage, console
Despair=Cause (us to) despair
Whipped (Metaphorically)= to lash with sarcasm, to have a lash at, to put to the blush
Compleat:
To put to the blush=Iemand eene kleur aanjaagen, beschaamd maaken
Cherish=Koesteren, opkweeken, streelen, aankweeken

Topics: life, virtue, good and bad

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
GUIDERIUS
Why, worthy father, what have we to lose
But that he swore to take, our lives? The law
Protects not us. Then why should we be tender
To let an arrogant piece of flesh threat us,
Play judge and executioner all himself,
For we do fear the law? What company
Discover you abroad?
BELARIUS
No single soul
Can we set eye on, but in all safe reason
He must have some attendants. Though his humour
Was nothing but mutation—ay, and that
From one bad thing to worse—not frenzy,
Not absolute madness could so far have raved
To bring him here alone. Although perhaps
It may be heard at court that such as we
Cave here, hunt here, are outlaws, and in time
May make some stronger head, the which he
hearing—
As it is like him—might break out and swear
He’d fetch us in, yet is ’t not probable
To come alone, either he so undertaking
Or they so suffering. Then on good ground we fear,
If we do fear this body hath a tail
More perilous than the head.

DUTCH:
k Vrees met grond,
Dat deze romp nog wel een nasleep heeft,
Gevaarlijker dan ‘t hoofd.


Proverb: To go from bad to worse

For (we do fear)=Because
Humour=Disposition
Mutation=Change (as an effect of inconsistency)
Stronger head=Gather strength
Fetch us in=Capture us
Tender=Delicate, in a physical and moral sense: easily impressed

Compleat:
Humour (or disposition of the mind)=Humeur, gemoeds gesteldheid
Mutation=Verandering, verwisseling
To draw to a head=Zich tot dragt zetten, de verhaaalde zaaken in een trekken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, law/legal, life, flaw/fault

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
PRINCE HENRY
The southern wind
Doth play the trumpet to his purposes,
And by his hollow whistling in the leaves
Foretells a tempest and a blust’ring day.
KING
Then with the losers let it sympathize,
For nothing can seem foul to those that win.

DUTCH:
Zoo uite hij zijn leed aan wie ‘t verliezen,
Want aan wie winnen dunkt geen weder slecht.

MORE:
Play trumpet to=Announce, proclaim
Compleat:
To proclaim by sound of trumpet=Met trompetten geschal afkondigen.

Topics: life, nature, conflict, hope/optimism

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
Your enemies, with nodding of their plumes,
Fan you into despair! Have the power still
To banish your defenders; till at length
Your ignorance, which finds not till it feels,
Making not reservation of yourselves,
Still your own foes, deliver you as most
Abated captives to some nation
That won you without blows! Despising,
For you, the city, thus I turn my back:
There is a world elsewhere.

DUTCH:
Ook elders is een wereld!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Plume=Feathers which serve to adorn, particularly a tuft of feathers worn as an ornament
Making not reservation (in some versions “making but reservations”)
Abated=Humbled, discouraged
Ignorance=Stupidity

Compleat:
Plume=Pluim, veder
He had a white plume of feathers upon his hat=Hy had witte pluimen op zyn hoed
To abate one’s pride=Iemands hoogmoed fnuiken

Topics: life, free will, independence, failure

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
Thus we may see,” quoth he, “how the world wags.
‘Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
And after one hour more ’twill be eleven.
And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe,
And then from hour to hour we rot and rot,
And thereby hangs a tale.”

DUTCH:
En dit geeft dan een sprookjen

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wag=To go one’s way
How the world wags=the way the world turns
Compleat:
To wag (to move or stir)=Schudden, beweegen

Topics: life, still in use

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Lucius
CONTEXT:
MARCUS ANDRONICUS
Now let hot Etna cool in Sicily,
And be my heart an ever-burning hell!
These miseries are more than may be borne.
To weep with them that weep doth ease some deal;
But sorrow flouted at is double death.
LUCIUS
Ah, that this sight should make so deep a wound,
And yet detested life not shrink thereat!
That ever death should let life bear his name,
Where life hath no more interest but to breathe!

DUTCH:
Dit leed is grooter dan te dragen is.
Meêschreien met die schreien brengt wel troost,
Maar leed, door hoon verscherpt, is dubb’le dood.

MORE:
Weep with them that week=Biblical (Romans)
Flouted at=Mocked
Some deal=Somewhat
Interest=Concern
Compleat:
Flout=Spotterny, schimpscheut
Interest=Belang

Topics: grief, regret, life

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Edmund
CONTEXT:
This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains on necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical pre-dominance; drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforc’d obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine thrusting on. An admirable evasion of whore-master man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!

DUTCH:

Dit is wel de uitstekende dwaasheid der wereld

MORE:
Schmidt:
Foppery= Foolishness
Sick in fortune=Down on our luck
Heavenly compulsion=Astrological influence
Divine thrusting on= Supernatural force
Compleat:
Foppery=Zotte kuuren, grillen, snaakerij.
‘T is a mere foppery=Het is loutere dwaasheid

Topics: life, nature, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Why, thou wert better in thy grave than to answer with thy uncovered body this extremity of the skies.—Is man no more than this? Consider him well.—Thou owest the worm no silk, the beast no hide, the sheep no wool, the cat no perfume. Ha! Here’s three on ’s are sophisticated. Thou art the thing itself.
Unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor, bare, forked animal as thou art.
Off, off, you lendings! Come, unbutton here.

DUTCH:
“Ach nee, wij drieën zijn niet werkelijk natuurlijk meer, jij bent
nog helemaal echt. Zonder kleren is de mens niet meer dan
zo’n povere, naakte, gevorkte tweevoeter als jij.

MORE:
Cat=Civet cat, which secretes civet musk used in perfume
Unaccommodated=without the trappings of civilization
Sophisticated=Unadulterated
Forked=Two-legged
Lendings=borrowed clothes
Compleat:
Accommodated=Geriefd

Topics: order/society, nature, life

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
We that are true lovers run into strange capers. But as all is mortal in nature, so is all nature in love mortal in folly.
ROSALIND
Thou speak’st wiser than thou art ware of.
TOUCHSTONE
Nay, I shall ne’er be ware of mine own wit till I break my shins against it.

DUTCH:
Gij spreekt wijzer, dan gij zelf gewaar wordt

MORE:
Schmidt:
Caper=A leap, a spring, in dancing or mirth: “we that are true lovers run into strange –s,”
Folly=”Remarkable passage: “so is all nature in love m. in folly,” (perhaps == human, resembling man in folly. Johnson: abounding in folly).
Compleat:
Caper=een Kaper, als mede een Sprong
Folly=Dwaasheid, zotheid, zotterny
Folly (Vice, excess, imperfection)=Ondeugd, buitenspoorigheid, onvolmaaktheid

Topics: love, wisdom, life, nature

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Cornwall
CONTEXT:
Though well we may not pass upon his life
Without the form of justice, yet our power
Shall do a courtesy to our wrath, which men
May blame, but not control.—Who’s there? The traitor?

DUTCH:
Al mag ik zonder rechtspraak hem niet dooden,
Ik zal mijn macht nu voor mijn toorn doen buigen,
En wie dit ook veroordeelt, niemand zal
Het tegengaan./
Al kan ik hem niet zonder een proces
ter dood veroordelen, mijn rechtsmacht zal
zich voegen naar mijn toorn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Pass upon=Pass judgment on
Courtesy (curtsy in some versions)=Do a courtesy to, yield to (bend to)
Compleat:
To make a courtesy (curtsy)=Neigen
To pass sentence upon one=Vonnis over iemand vellen, vonnis over iemand uitspreeken,
Burgersdijk notes:
Zonder rechtspraak. Men bedenke, dat Gloster onder de pairs van het rijk te rekenen is.

Topics: life, justice, authority, punishment, blame, judgment

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
And why not the swift foot of time? Had not that been as proper?
ROSALIND
By no means, sir. Time travels in diverse paces with diverse persons. I’ll tell you who time ambles withal, who time trots withal, who time gallops withal, and who he stands still withal.
ORLANDO
I prithee, who doth he trot withal?
ROSALIND
Marry, he trots hard with a young maid between the contract of her marriage and the day it is solemnized. If the interim be but a se’nnight, time’s pace is so hard that it seems the length of seven year.
ORLANDO
Who ambles time withal?
ROSALIND
With a priest that lacks Latin and a rich man that hath not the gout, for the one sleeps easily because he cannot study and the other lives merrily because he feels no pain—the one lacking the burden of lean and wasteful learning, the other knowing no burden of heavy tedious penury. These time ambles withal.
ORLANDO
Who doth he gallop withal?
ROSALIND
With a thief to the gallows, for though he go as softly as foot can fall, he thinks himself too soon there.
ORLANDO
Who stays it still withal?
ROSALIND
With lawyers in the vacation, for they sleep between term and term, and then they perceive not how time moves.

DUTCH:
de Tijd reist met verschillende personen in verschillenden gang. Ik kan u zeggen, met wie de Tijd den tel gaat, met wie de Tijd draaft, met wie de Tijd galoppeert en met wie hij stil staat.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Term=The time in which a court is held for the trial of causes. The legal year was divided into
terms with recesses in between.

Topics: time, lawyers, life, order/society

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them?

DUTCH:
Various translations. including:
Te zijn of niet te zijn, dat is de kwestie/
Zijn of niet zijn, daar komt het hier op neêr /
Te zijn of niet te zijn, daar gaat het om/
Zijn of niet zijn; dat is de vraag /
Leven, of niet ?.. .. Dit is het, waar ‘t om gaat

MORE:
Hamlet’s “To be or not to be” soliliquy.
CITED IN EU LAW:
Opinion of A-G Bobek delivered on 7 September 2017(1) in Case C‑298/16.
“To be or not to be within the scope of EU law, that is indeed the question (again)”.
CITED IN US LAW:
Slip Opinion US Supreme Court Ford Motor Co. v. Montana Eighth Judicial District Court et al.
Certiorari to the Supreme Court of Montana No. 19–368. Argued October 7, 2020—Decided March 25, 202: “Really, their strategy was to do business without being seen to do business. Id., at 438 (“No longer is the foreign corporation confronted with the problem ‘to be or not to be’—it can both be and not be!”).”
Wetzel v. Liberty Mutual Ins. Co., 508 F.2d 239, 248 (3d Cir. 1975) cert. denied, 421 U.S. 1011 (1976):
“Whether (b)(2) or not (b)(2) is indeed the question.”

Topics: life, proverbs and idioms, cited in law, still in use

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
You do look, my son, in a moved sort,
As if you were dismayed. Be cheerful, sir.
Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air.
And like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself—
Yea, all which it inherit—shall dissolve,
And like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep. Sir, I am vexed.
Bear with my weakness. My old brain is troubled.
Be not disturbed with my infirmity.
If you be pleased, retire into my cell
And there repose. A turn or two I’ll walk
To still my beating mind.

DUTCH:
Wij zijn van de stof, Waar droomen van gevormd zijn; ‘t korte leven Is van een slaap omringd./
Van dezelfde stof zijn wij als onze dromen; en ons kleine leven is door de slaap omringd

MORE:
Frequently misquoted as “Such stuff as dreams are made of”
These our actors…not a rack behind. This passage is often extracted from its context and treated as farewell to his art; Al Pacino recited it in his 1996 film ‘Looking for Richard’.
In a moved sort=Agitated, upset
Revels=Courtly entertainment
Insubstantial pageant=imagined pageant
Baseless fabric of this vision=Having no basis in reality
Rack=’driving mist or fog’ (OED): scarcely a trace
Compleat:
Pageant=Een grootsche vertooning. Pageantry+Praal, pracht, triiomfelyke vertooning. Het is but meer (sic) pageantry=Het is maar klatergoud, niets anders dan een ydele vertooning.
Moved=Bewoogen, verroerd, ontroerd

Topics: life, age/experience, misquoted

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
My life upon her faith!—Honest Iago,
My Desdemona must I leave to thee.
I prithee, let thy wife attend on her,
And bring them after in the best advantage.
Come, Desdemona, I have but an hour
Of love, of worldly matter and direction,
To spend with thee. We must obey the time.

DUTCH:
Kom, Desdemona; slechts een enkel uur
Is mij voor liefde en reeg’ling van ons huis
Met u vergund; de tijd beheerscht ons doen.

MORE:
In the best advantage=Most favourable opportunity (Arden)
Obey the time=Time is pressing

Topics: time, plans/intentions, life, deceit, truth

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
How all occasions do inform against me,
And spur my dull revenge! What is a man
If his chief good and market of his time
Be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more.

DUTCH:
Wat is een mensch, Wiens hoogste goed en markt zijns levens gaat Om slaap en voedsel slechts? /
Wat man is dat, Wiens hoogste goed en tijdsbesteding enkel Maar slapen is en eten?

MORE:
Schmidt:
To inform against=to communicate by way of accusation, to denounce
To spur (figurative)=to incite, to impel
Compleat:
To inform against=Iemand verklikken, of beklappen
to spur on=Aanspooren, noopen, aandryven
To spur one a question ( to start him a question in haste)=Een onverwagte, schielyke vraag doen

Topics: life, satisfaction, revenge

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
PRINCE HENRY
Why, thou owest God a death.
Tis not due yet. I would be loath to pay Him before His day. What need I be so forward with Him that calls not on me? Well, ’tis no matter. Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on? How then? Can honor set to a leg? no. Or an arm? no. Or take away the grief of a wound? No. Honour hath no skill in surgery, then? No. What is honour? A word. What is in that word “honour”? What is that “honour”? Air. A trim reckoning. Who hath it? He that died o’ Wednesday. Doth he feel it? No. Doth he hear it? No. ‘Tis insensible, then? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? No. Why? Detraction will not suffer it. Therefore, I’ll none of it. Honour is a mere scutcheon. And so ends my catechism.

DUTCH:
Wat is eer? Een woord. Wat is het woord eer? Lucht. De rekening sluit! — Wie Iieeft haar? Die woensdag gestorven is. Voelt hij ze? Neen. Hoort hij ze? Neen. Is ze dus niet waar te nemen? Neen, door de dooden niet. Maar leeft ze dan nooit bij de levenden? Neen. Waarom niet? De afgunst duldt dit niet.

MORE:
Death. Debt. The word-play on “death” and “debt” occurs as early as 1400.
Onions:
Prick on=Encourage, incite
Prick off=to mark or indicate by a ‘prick’ or tick, mark or tick off
Set to a leg=Restore a leg cut off
Insensible=Not to be apprehended by the senses
Scutcheon=A shield with armorial ensigns. Scutcheon is the lowest description of heraldic ensign used for funerals.
Compleat:
Scutcheon=Schild, wapenschild
REFERENCED IN E&W LAW: AM v Local Authority & Anor [2009] EWCA Civ 205 (16 March 2009)
Burgersdijk notes:
De eer is niets dan een wapenschild. Dat bij de begrafenis van een edelman mede rond gedragen wordt, zonder dat de doode er iets aan heeft. — Falstaff noemt, wat hij gezegd heeft, een catechismus, omdat hij in vragen en antwoorden zijn geloofsbelijdenis heeft afgelegd.

Topics: honour, cited in law, skill/talent, life

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
She that is Queen of Tunis; she that dwells
Ten leagues beyond man’s life; she that from Naples
Can have no note, unless the sun were post—
The man i’ th’ moon’s too slow—till newborn chins
Be rough and razorable; she that from whom
We all were sea-swallowed, though some cast again,
And by that destiny to perform an act
Whereof what’s past is prologue, what to come
In yours and my discharge.

DUTCH:
Zij, door wier echt de zee ons allen inzwolg,
Schoon ze enk’len weergaf, die zij daardoor wenkt
Een stuk te doen, waarvan ‘t gebeurde een voorspel,
Wat volgt ons beider rol is.

MORE:
CITED IN EU LAW: SARGSYAN v. AZERBAIJAN – 40167/06 – Grand Chamber Judgment [2015] ECHR 588 (16 June 2015)/(2017) 64 EHRR 4, [2015] ECHR 588, 64 EHRR 4
Cast=Thrown ashore
By that destiny=Thus destined
Discharge=Fulfilment, performance, execution (of an obligation, duty, function) (“what to come… discharge”=What is to come is down to you and me)
Compleat:
To earthen=Begraven, met aarde overdekken
To cast up=Opwerpen, braaken
“Past is prologue” even inspired the title of a Star Trek episode!

Topics: life, still in use, fate/destiny, cited in law

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
O Father Abram, what these Christians are,
Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect
The thoughts of others!—Pray you, tell me this:
If he should break his day, what should I gain
By the exaction of the forfeiture?
A pound of man’s flesh taken from a man
Is not so estimable, profitable neither,
As flesh of muttons, beefs, or goats. I say,
To buy his favor I extend this friendship.
If he will take it, so. If not, adieu.
And for my love I pray you wrong me not.

DUTCH:
O vader Abram! hoe de christ’nen toch,
Omdat zij zelf hardvochtig zijn, van andren
Hetzelfde denken!

MORE:
Hard dealings=harsh treatment/experience.
Suspect=Mistrust
Break his day=Fails to pay on the stipulated date (break the deadline)
Compleat:
Dealings=Verkeering
Basely dealt with=Slecht behandeld

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Gratiano
CONTEXT:
GRATIANO
Let me play the fool.
With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.
And let my liver rather heat with wine
Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
Why should a man whose blood is warm within
Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster,
Sleep when he wakes, and creep into the jaundice
By being peevish?

DUTCH:

’k Wacht dartlend, lachend, rimplige’ ouderdom /
Laat mij maar rimpels krijgen van ‘t lachen en de vrolijkheid /
Laat de oude rimpels komen met gelach

MORE:
Jaundice was thought to be caused by excess choler ( one of the four humors)
Compleat:
Sooth=Zéker, voorwaar
Jaundice=De Geelzucht
Peevish=Kribbig, gémelyk, korsel, ligt geraakt.
Early 16c corsel (now ‘korselig’) (J. de Vries (1971), Nederlands Etymologisch Woordenboek, Leiden)

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Cromwell
CONTEXT:
CHAMBERLAIN
’Tis now too certain.
How much more is his life in value with him!
Would I were fairly out on ’t!
CROMWELL
My mind gave me,
In seeking tales and informations
Against this man, whose honesty the devil
And his disciples only envy at,
You blew the fire that burns you. Now, have at you!

DUTCH:
k Voelde inwendig,
Dat gij, naar praatjes en berichten zoekend,
Om dezen man te schaden, aan wiens braafheid
De duivel en zijn jong’ren slechts zich erg’ren,
‘t Vuur aanbliest, u ter blaak’ring. Redt u thans!

MORE:
In value to=Worth
Mind gave me=I worried/had misgivings that
Tales=Rumours
Informations=Intelligence
Compleat:
To value=Waardeeren, achten, schatten
Tell tales=Verklikken

Topics: life, value, honesty

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
Fare you well: pray heaven I be deceived in you!
CELIA
Your heart’s desires be with you!

DUTCH:
Uws harten wensch geworde u!

MORE:
Schmidt:
To deceive=To mislead themind, to cause to err. To be deceived in a person=mistaken about
Compleat:
You are deceived=Gy vergist u.
Heart’s desire=wat zyn hart begeert

Topics: life, fate/destiny, misc.

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