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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1 ACT/SCENE: 1.3 SPEAKER: Hotspur CONTEXT: Out of the bowels of the harmless earth,
Which many a good tall fellow had destroyed
So cowardly, and but for these vile guns
He would himself have been a soldier.
This bald unjointed chat of his, my lord,
I answered indirectly, as I said,
And I beseech you, let not his report
Come current for an accusation
Betwixt my love and your high Majesty. DUTCH: En ik bezweer u, dat, wat hij bericht,
Nooit als een aanklacht tusschen mijne liefde
En uwe hooge majesteit zich dring’!
MORE: Schmidt:
Bald=Void of reason, unfounded
Unjointed=incoherent
Tall=stout, sturdy, lusty, spirited
Indirectly=Not in a straight course, by second hand, not in express terms
Current= generally received, of full value, sterling, having currency (Come current as=have currency, be accepted as)
Compleat:
Current. The current of most writers=Het algemeen gevoelen van de meeste Schryvers. Topics: loyalty, merit, evidence, value, perception, judgment

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
My queen, my mistress!
O lady, weep no more, lest I give cause
To be suspected of more tenderness
Than doth become a man. I will remain
The loyal’st husband that did e’er plight troth.
My residence in Rome at one Philario’s,
Who to my father was a friend, to me
Known but by letter; thither write, my queen,
And with mine eyes I’ll drink the words you send,
Though ink be made of gall.

DUTCH:
k Neem mijn verblijf in Rome, bij Philario,
Een vriend mijns vaders, dien ikzelf alleen
Uit brieven ken; geliefde, schrijf mij daar;
Mijn oogen zullen uwe woorden drinken,
Al wordt ook inkt uit gal bereid.


Gall=Bile; any thing bitter and disagreeable; bitterness of mind, rancour
Gall=An ingredient in ink (iron gall ink)

Compleat:
Gall=Gal
To gall (or vex)=Tergen, verbitteren
Bitter as gall=Zo bitter als gal

Topics: sorrow, appearance, loyalty, language

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurn at me,
And hurl the name of husband in my face,
And tear the stained skin off my harlot brow,
And from my false hand cut the wedding ring,
And break it with a deep-divorcing vow?
I know thou canst, and therefore see thou do it.
I am possessed with an adulterate blot;
My blood is mingled with the crime of lust;
For if we two be one, and thou play false,
I do digest the poison of thy flesh,
Being strumpeted by thy contagion.
Keep then fair league and truce with thy true bed,
I live unstained, thou undishonourèd.

DUTCH:
Want zijn wij tweeën één en zijt gij valsch,
Dan stroomt het gif van uw bloed in het mijn’,
En door uw smetstof word ik tot boelin.

MORE:
Possession had a stronger meaning, akin to ‘infect’
Harlot brow=Branding on the forehead with a hot iron was punishment for prostitution
Strumpeted=Turned into a strumpet, prostitute (by contamination)
Unstained=Undefiled (some editors use disstain here)

Compleat:
To enter into a league=In een verbond treeden, een verbond aangaan
Truce=Een bestand, stilstand van wapenen, treves

Topics: loyalty, ruin, reputation, marriage, love, respect

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Exton
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
How now! what means death in this rude assault?
Villain, thy own hand yields thy death’s instrument.
Go thou, and fill another room in hell.
That hand shall burn in never-quenching fire
That staggers thus my person. Exton, thy fierce hand
Hath with the king’s blood stain’d the king’s own land.
Mount, mount, my soul! thy seat is up on high;
Whilst my gross flesh sinks downward, here to die.
EXTON
As full of valour as of royal blood:
Both have I spill’d; O would the deed were good!
For now the devil, that told me I did well,
Says that this deed is chronicled in hell.
This dead king to the living king I’ll bear
Take hence the rest, and give them burial here.

DUTCH:
Aan moed zoo rijk, als koninklijk van bloed!
‘k Vergoot die beide; — waar’ mijn daad slechts goed!
Nu zegt de duivel, die mij heeft gedreven,
Dat in de hel die daad is aangeschreven.

MORE:

Rude=Brutal
Stagger=To cause to reel, to fell
Chronicle=To record, to register

Compleat:
Rude=Ruuw
To stagger (move or shake)=Schudden, beweegen, doen waggelen
To chronicle=In eenen kronyk aanschryven

Topics: loyalty, conspiracy, death

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Westmorland
CONTEXT:

NYM
The king is a good king, but it must be as it may.
He passes some humours and careers.
PISTOL
Let us condole the knight, for, lambkins, we will live.
BEDFORD
’Fore God, his Grace is bold to trust these traitors.
EXETER
They shall be apprehended by and by.
WESTMORELAND
How smooth and even they do bear themselves,
As if allegiance in their bosoms sat
Crownèd with faith and constant loyalty.
BEDFORD
The king hath note of all that they intend,
By interception which they dream not of.

DUTCH:
Wat doen zij zich eenvoudig, arg’loos voor,
Alsof de oprechtheid in hun boezem woonde,
Gekroond door liefde en ongekrenkte trouw.

MORE:

Passes humours=Indulges in strange tendencies
Careers=Short sprints, race
Smooth=unruffled, even, balanced
Hath note of=Is informed of
Interception=The stopping and seizing of something in its passage
Constant=Faithful

Compleat:
The humours=De humeuren van het lichaam; grillen
Humour (dispositon of the mind)=Humeur, of gemoeds gesteldheid

Topics: deceit, conspiracy, appearance, loyalty, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
A plague upon that villain Somerset,
That thus delays my promised supply
Of horsemen, that were levied for this siege!
Renowned Talbot doth expect my aid,
And I am lowted by a traitor villain
And cannot help the noble chevalier:
God comfort him in this necessity!
If he miscarry, farewell wars in France.

DUTCH:
Vervloekt die schurk, die booswicht Somerset,
Die den beloofden bijstand zoo vertraagt:
De ruiterij , voor dit beleg verzameld!

MORE:
Lowted=(also louted) Made to look foolish
Chevalier=Knight
Miscarry=Fail, not succeed, perish
Levy=Collect, raise (e.g. raising a force for war)

Compleat:
Miscarry=Mislukken; (ship at sea) Vergaan, schipbreuk lyden
To levy=(soldiers) Soldaaten ligten, krygsvolk werven

Topics: loyalty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
Truly, madam, if God have lent a man any manners, he may easily put it off at court: he that cannot make a leg, put off’s cap, kiss his hand, and say nothing, has neither leg, hands, lip, nor cap; and indeed such a fellow, to say precisely, were not for the court. But for me, I have an answer will serve all men.
COUNTESS
Marry, that’s a bountiful answer that fits all questions.
CLOWN
It is like a barber’s chair that fits all buttocks, the pin-buttock, the quatch-buttock, the brawnbuttock, or any buttock.

DUTCH:
COUNTESS
Nu voorwaar, dat is een rijk antwoord, dat voor alle vragen passend is.
CLOWN
Het is als een scheerdersstoel, die voor alle achterstevens passend is, voor de spitse, voor de platte, voor de ronde, kortom voor alle achterstevens.

MORE:
Proverb: As common a a barber’s chair
Make a leg=A bow, an obeisance made by drawing one leg backward
Lent=To bestow on, to endow with, to adorn, to arm with
Put off=Doff
Bountiful=Of rich contents, full of meaning
Quatch=Squat
Compleat:
To make a leg=Buigen
To put off one’s hat=Zyn hoed afneemen
Bountiful=Milddaadig, goedertieren

Topics: reply, reason, understanding, loyalty

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Earl of Salisbury
CONTEXT:
CAPTAIN
’Tis thought the king is dead; we will not stay.
The bay-trees in our country are all wither’d
And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
The pale-faced moon looks bloody on the earth
And lean-look’d prophets whisper fearful change;
Rich men look sad and ruffians dance and leap,
The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
The other to enjoy by rage and war:
These signs forerun the death or fall of kings.
Farewell: our countrymen are gone and fled,
As well assured Richard their king is dead.
EARL OF SALISBURY
Ah, Richard, with the eyes of heavy mind
I see thy glory like a shooting star
Fall to the base earth from the firmament.
Thy sun sets weeping in the lowly west,
Witnessing storms to come, woe and unrest:
Thy friends are fled to wait upon thy foes,
And crossly to thy good all fortune goes.

DUTCH:
0 Richard, met een blik vol hangen kommer
Zie ik, gelijk een sterre die verschiet,
Uw glans van ‘t firmament ter aarde ploffen.

MORE:

Lean-looked=Thin-faced
Meteor=A bright phenomenon, thought to be portentous, harbinger of doom
Fixed stars=Symbol of permanence
Forerun=Precede
Assured=Convinced, persuaded
Witness=Portend
Wait upon=Serve
Crossly=Adversely

Compleat:
To assure=Verzekeren
Portend=Voorduiden, voorzeggen

Topics: reputation, failure, betrayal, friendship, loyalty, fate/destiny

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Roderigo
CONTEXT:
RODERIGO
Tush! Never tell me. I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.
IAGO
‘Sblood, but you’ll not hear me! If ever I did dream of such a matter, abhor me.
RODERIGO
Thou told’st me
Thou didst hold him in thy hate.
IAGO
Despise me
If I do not. Three great ones of the city
(In personal suit to make me his lieutenant)
Off-capped to him, and by the faith of man
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place.

DUTCH:
Ik neem je kwalijk, Jago,
dat jij die zo goed weg wist in mijn beurs
alsof dat ding van jou was, hiervan wist.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Unkindly=In a harsh and ungentle manner
Abhor=To detest to extremity, to loathe; with an accusation
Personal=Done or experienced in one’s own person, not by a representative or other indirect means
Suit=Petition, address of entreaty

Compleat:
Unkindly: To take a thing unkindly=Iets onvriendelyk opvatten
Abhor=Verfooijen, een afschrik hebben
Personal=In eigen hoofde
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding

Burgersdijk notes:
Geen praatjens, Jago. In ‘t Engelsch: Never tell me. Wij vallen hier midden in een gesprek; deze woorden
slaan op iets, dat Jago gezegd heeft; men mag aannemen, dat hij verklaard heeft, niets van de betrekking tasschen Othello en Desdemona geweten te hebben. — Daarop slaat ook Rodrigo’s gezegde in reg. 6: Gij haat hem innig; gij zult hem dus wel gade geslagen en er dus wel van geweten hebben; waarop Jago hem van zijn onderwerp af wil brengen door de redenen van zijn haat uiteen te zetten.

Topics: money, friendship, loyalty, respect

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
I am much too venturous
In tempting of your patience; but am bolden’d
Under your promised pardon. The subjects’ grief
Comes through commissions, which compel from each
The sixth part of his substance, to be levied
Without delay; and the pretence for this
Is named, your wars in France: this makes bold mouths:
Tongues spit their duties out, and cold hearts freeze
Allegiance in them; their curses now
Live where their prayers did: and it’s come to pass,
This tractable obedience is a slave
To each incensed will. I would your highness
Would give it quick consideration, for
There is no primer business.

DUTCH:
O, mocht uw hoogheid
Dit daad’lijk willen overwegen, want
Geen zaak is sterker dringend!

MORE:
Venturous=Daring
Commissions=Taxes, instructions to impose tax
Grief=Complaints, grievances
Substance=Assets, wealth
Spit=Tongues spit out: Refuse with disrespectful language
Tractable=Compliant
Primer=More significant
Compleat:
Venturous=Ligtwaagend, stout
Commission=Last, volmagt, lastbrief, provisie
Grievance=Bezwaarenis
Substance=Zelfsandigheyd; bezit
Spit out=Uytspuuwen
Tractable=Handelbaar, leenig, buygzaam, zachtzinnnig
Prime=Eerste, voornaamste

Topics: loyalty, language, order/society, leadership

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
YORK
Whom have we here? Buckingham, to disturb me?
The king hath sent him, sure: I must dissemble.
BUCKINGHAM
York, if thou meanest well, I greet thee well.
YORK
Humphrey of Buckingham, I accept thy greeting.
Art thou a messenger, or come of pleasure?
BUCKINGHAM
A messenger from Henry, our dread liege,
To know the reason of these arms in peace;
Or why thou, being a subject as I am,
Against thy oath and true allegiance sworn,
Should raise so great a power without his leave,
Or dare to bring thy force so near the court.

DUTCH:
Zoo gij als vriend komt, York, dan groet ik vriendlijk.

MORE:

Dissemble=Assume a false appearance
Arms=Army
Dread=Greatly revered

Compleat:
To dissemble (conceal)=Bedekken, bewimpelen; veinzen, ontveinzen, verbloemen
Dread sovereign=Geduchte Vorst

Topics: appearance, deceit, civility, purpose, loyalty

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Cranmer
CONTEXT:
CRANMER
My good lords, hitherto, in all the progress
Both of my life and office, I have labour’d,
And with no little study, that my teaching
And the strong course of my authority
Might go one way, and safely; and the end
Was ever, to do well: nor is there living,
I speak it with a single heart, my lords,
A man that more detests, more stirs against,
Both in his private conscience and his place,
Defacers of a public peace, than I do.
Pray heaven, the king may never find a heart
With less allegiance in it! Men that make
Envy and crooked malice nourishment
Dare bite the best. I do beseech your lordships,
That, in this case of justice, my accusers,
Be what they will, may stand forth face to face,
And freely urge against me.
SUFFOLK
Nay, my lord,
That cannot be. You are a councillor,
And by that virtue no man dare accuse you.

DUTCH:
Een mensch,
Die zich van haat en slinksche boosheid voedt,
Bijt driest den beste.

MORE:
No little=Significant
End=Objective
Ever=Always
Single=True
Urge against=Accuse
By that virtue=By virtue of that
Compleat:
End=Eynde, oogmerk
Ever=Altoos, altyd
Urge=Dringen, pressen, aandringen, aanstaan
By virtue of=Uyt krachte van

Topics: envy, work, learning/education, loyalty

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Bedford
CONTEXT:
BURGUNDY
Courageous Bedford, let us now persuade you.
BEDFORD
Not to be gone from hence; for once I read
That stout Pendragon in his litter sick
Came to the field and vanquished his foes:
Methinks I should revive the soldiers’ hearts,
Because I ever found them as myself.
TALBOT
Undaunted spirit in a dying breast!
Then be it so: heavens keep old Bedford safe!
And now no more ado, brave Burgundy,
But gather we our forces out of hand
And set upon our boasting enemy.

DUTCH:
k Verlevendig misschien den moed der strijders,
Want steeds bevond ik hen, zooals mijzelven.

MORE:

Pendragon=Uther Pendragon, father of the legendary King Arthur.

Schmidt:
Stout=Bold
Out of hand=Immediately

Compleat:
Out of hand=Terstond, op staande voet
Stout (courageous)=Moedig, dapper

Burgersdijk notes:
De stoute Pendragoon. De oud-Engelsche sage verhaalt dit zoowel van Pendragoon, den vader van koning Arthur, als van zijn broeder Aurelius.
Dapper Bourgondie. De Maagd van Orleans heeft niet mondeling, maar door een brief den hertog van Bourgondië, schoon te vergeefs, tot afval van Engeland trachten te bewegen en daarbij dezelfde beweeggronden gebezigd, die Shakespeare haar hier in den mond legt. In Holinshed wordt dit echter niet vermeld; of en hoe het aan Sh. bekend was, weten wij niet.

Topics: friendship, emotion and mood, loyalty

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Lucio
CONTEXT:
By my troth, I’ll go with thee to the lane’s end:
if bawdy talk offend you, we’ll have very little of
it. Nay, friar, I am a kind of burr; I shall stick.

DUTCH:
Op mijn woord, ik ga tot het eind van de straat met
u mede; als bordeelpraatjes u hinderen, zullen wij er
zeer weinig van hebben. Ja, pater, ik ben een soort
van klis, moeilijk af te schudden.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Burr=Rough head of the burdock
Compleat:
Kliskruid

Topics: loyalty

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Angus
CONTEXT:
Now does he feel
His secret murders sticking on his hands.
Now minutely revolts upbraid his faith-breach.
Those he commands move only in command,
Nothing in love. Now does he feel his title
Hang loose about him, like a giant’s robe
Upon a dwarfish thief.

DUTCH:
Thans voelt hij recht, hoe los zijn waardigheid
Om ‘t lijf hem hangt

MORE:
Schmidt:
Faith-breach= Breach of fidelity, disloyalty
Minutely=Continual, happening every minute
Revolt= Desertion, going to the enemy
Upbraid=Reproach; with an accusation of the thing

Topics: loyalty, disappointment, failure, truth, discovery

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
What should this mean?
What sudden anger’s this? how have I reap’d it?
He parted frowning from me, as if ruin
Leap’d from his eyes: so looks the chafed lion
Upon the daring huntsman that has gall’d him;
Then makes him nothing. I must read this paper;
I fear, the story of his anger. ‘Tis so;
This paper has undone me: ’tis the account
Of all that world of wealth I have drawn together
For mine own ends; indeed, to gain the popedom,
And fee my friends in Rome. O negligence!
Fit for a fool to fall by: what cross devil
Made me put this main secret in the packet
I sent the king? Is there no way to cure this?
No new device to beat this from his brains?
I know ’twill stir him strongly; yet I know
A way, if it take right, in spite of fortune
Will bring me off again. What’s this? ‘To the Pope!’
The letter, as I live, with all the business
I writ to’s holiness. Nay then, farewell!
I have touch’d the highest point of all my greatness;
And, from that full meridian of my glory,
I haste now to my setting: I shall fall
Like a bright exhalation in the evening,
And no man see me more.

DUTCH:
O onachtzaamheid!
Zoo valt een dwaas! wat dwarse duivel deed
Dit aartsgeheim geraken in ‘t paket,
Dat ik den koning zond

MORE:
Chafed=Angry
Galled=Injured
Undone=Ruined
Fee=Pay
Packet=Package of papers
Device=Scheme, plot
Stir=Irritate
Meridian=Top point
Exhalation=Meteor
Compleat:
Chafed=Verhit, vertoornd, gevreeven
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten
To gall the enemy=Den vyand benaauwen
Undone=Ontdaan, losgemaakt, bedurven
To fee=Beloonen, betaalen, de handen vullen, de oogen uytsteken door giften
Device=List; uytvindsel, gedichtsel
Stir=Gewoel, geraas, beroerte, oproer
Meridian=Middagslyn

Topics: loyalty, anger, negligence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
‘Tis nobly spoken:
Take notice, lords, he has a loyal breast,
For you have seen him open’t. Read o’er this;
And after, this: and then to breakfast with
What appetite you have.
CARDINAL WOLSEY
What should this mean?
What sudden anger’s this? how have I reap’d it?
He parted frowning from me, as if ruin
Leap’d from his eyes: so looks the chafed lion
Upon the daring huntsman that has gall’d him;
Then makes him nothing. I must read this paper;
I fear, the story of his anger. ‘Tis so;
This paper has undone me: ’tis the account
Of all that world of wealth I have drawn together
For mine own ends; indeed, to gain the popedom,
And fee my friends in Rome.

DUTCH:
Lees dit eens over;
Daarna ook dit; en ga dan kalm ontbijten,
Indien gij trek hebt.

MORE:
Chafed=Angry
Galled=Injured
Undone=Ruined
Fee=Pay
Compleat:
Chafed=Verhit, vertoornd, gevreeven
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten
To gall the enemy=Den vyand benaauwen
Undone=Ontdaan, losgemaakt, bedurven
To fee=Beloonen, betaalen, de handen vullen, de oogen uytsteken door giften

Topics: loyalty, anger, negligence

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
How now? Moody?
What is ’t thou canst demand?
ARIEL
My liberty.
PROSPERO
Before the time be out? No more!
ARIEL
I prithee,
Remember I have done thee worthy service,
Told thee no lies, made thee no mistakings, served
Without or grudge or grumblings. Thou didst promise
To bate me a full year.

DUTCH:
Bedenk, ik bid u, ‘k deed u trouwen dienst,
Beloog u nooit, deed niets verkeerd, en diende
U willig zonder klacht. Een vol jaar afslag
Hebt gij mij toegezegd.

MORE:
Moody=Ill- humoured; discontented, peevish, angry
Time=Period of indenture
Bate (abate)=Reduce length of indenture
Mistakings=Mistakes
Grudge=Grudging; ill-will
Compleat:
In an ill mood=In een kwaade luim
Moody=Eenzinnig, eigenzinnig
The mood of a verb=De wyze van een werkwoord
Worthy=Waardig
Bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afslaan

Topics: work, contract, promise, claim, loyalty

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Iachimo
CONTEXT:
You may wear her in title yours, but you
Know strange fowl light upon neighbouring ponds.
Your ring may be stolen too. So your brace of unprizable
Estimations, the one is but frail and the other casual.
A cunning thief or a that way accomplished courtier
Would hazard the winning both of first and last.

DUTCH:
Ook uw ring kan u gestolen worden;
en zoo is van uwe twee onwaardeerbare schatten de een
slechts zwak, de ander verliesbaar; een geslepen dief of
een in dit opzicht uitgeleerd hoveling kunnen het wagen
u zoowel den een’ als den anderen te ontfutselen.


Schmidt:
In title=As in title to an estate
So=In such a manner, thus
Unprizable=Invaluable, inestimable
Casual=Accidental, by chance
Frail=Weak, in a physical as well as moral sense
Hazard=To venture, to risk, take a bet on

Compleat:
Title=Recht, eisch
He has no good title to it=Hy heeft geen goed recht daar toe
Title=Papieren, geschriften om zyn recht to bewyzen
Hazard=Waagen, aventuuren, in de waagschaal stellen
Casual=Gevallig, toevallig
Frail=Bros

Topics: loyalty, betrayal, value, risk

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
That sir which serves and seeks for gain,
And follows but for form,
Will pack when it begins to rain
And leave thee in the storm.
But I will tarry. The fool will stay.
And let the wise man fly.
The knave turns fool that runs away;
The fool, no knave, perdie.

DUTCH:
Wie zich door geldzucht laat bewegen
en werkt slechts voor de vorm,
gaat ervandoor bij de eerste regen
en laat jou in de storm.

MORE:

Serves and seeks for gain=Self-serving individuals
To rain=A fall in fortune
Schmidt:
Form=Show, appearance
Tarry=to continue in a place, to remain, not to go away
Perdie (or perdy)=In sooth
Compleat:
Tarry (behind) (stay or remain)=Blyven, Agterblyven
Self-seeking=Inhaalend, voor zich zelfs zorgende
Gainery or gainage, these two law words signify the profit most properly that comes by the tillage of land held by the baser kind of fokemen [menfolk] or villains=Deeze twee woorden betekenen allereigentlykst het voordeel dat men trekt van de landen, die door het schuim van volk bebouwt worden.

Topics: loyalty, wisdom, duty, ambition

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
Here burns my candle out; ay, here it dies,
Which, whiles it lasted, gave King Henry light.
O Lancaster, I fear thy overthrow
More than my body’s parting with my soul!
My love and fear glued many friends to thee;
And, now I fall, thy tough commixture melts.
Impairing Henry, strengthening misproud York,
The common people swarm like summer flies;
And whither fly the gnats but to the sun?
And who shines now but Henry’s enemies?
O Phoebus, hadst thou never given consent
That Phaethon should check thy fiery steeds,
Thy burning car never had scorch’d the earth!
And, Henry, hadst thou sway’d as kings should do,
Or as thy father and his father did,
Giving no ground unto the house of York,
They never then had sprung like summer flies;
I and ten thousand in this luckless realm
Had left no mourning widows for our death;
And thou this day hadst kept thy chair in peace.
For what doth cherish weeds but gentle air?

DUTCH:
Maar nu ik val, nu smelt die taaie menging,
Maakt Hendrik zwak, versterkt den driesten York.
Waar vliegen muggen heen, dan in de zon?

MORE:

Proverb: His candle burns within the socket

Commixture=Compound (the ‘glued’ friends)
Misproud=Arrogant, viciously proud (Schmidt)
Phoebus=Apollo
Check=Control
Car=Chariot
Swayed=Governed, ruled
Give ground=Yield, recede
Chair=Throne
Cherish=Encourage (growth)

Compleat:
To keep a check on one=Iemand in den teugel houden
Sway=(power, rule, command) Macht, gezach, heerschappy
To bear sway=Heerschappy voeren
To sway=(govern) Regeeren. To sway the scepter=Den schepter zwaaijen
To cherish=Koesteren, opkweeken, streelen, aankweeken

Topics: leadership, rivalry, friendship, loyalty, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Northumberland, thou ladder wherewithal
The mounting Bolingbroke ascends my throne,
The time shall not be many hours of age
More than it is ere foul sin gathering head
Shalt break into corruption: thou shalt think,
Though he divide the realm and give thee half,
It is too little, helping him to all;
And he shall think that thou, which know’st the way
To plant unrightful kings, wilt know again,
Being ne’er so little urged, another way
To pluck him headlong from the usurped throne.
The love of wicked men converts to fear;
That fear to hate, and hate turns one or both
To worthy danger and deserved death.

DUTCH:
Bij snoode vrienden wordt licht liefde vrees,
De vrees tot haat, en haat brengt éen van beiden,
Of beiden, welverdiend gevaar en dood.

MORE:
Wherewithal=With which, by means of which (he is using your ladder)
Gathering head=Coming to a head
Sin=Transgression of the divine law
Helping=Having helped
Unrightful=Illegitimate
So little urged=With only the slightest encouragement
Headlong=Unceremoniously

Compleat:
Now my designs gathering to a head=Nu beginnen myn voornemens ryp te worden
Urged=Gedrongen, geprest, aangedrongen
Headlong=Vlak voorover, plotseling

Topics: loyalty, betrayal, conspiracy, corruption, consequence

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Northumberland, thou ladder wherewithal
The mounting Bolingbroke ascends my throne,
The time shall not be many hours of age
More than it is ere foul sin gathering head
Shalt break into corruption: thou shalt think,
Though he divide the realm and give thee half,
It is too little, helping him to all;
And he shall think that thou, which know’st the way
To plant unrightful kings, wilt know again,
Being ne’er so little urged, another way
To pluck him headlong from the usurped throne.
The love of wicked men converts to fear;
That fear to hate, and hate turns one or both
To worthy danger and deserved death.

DUTCH:
De tijd zal niet veel ouder zijn dan nu,
Eer booze zonde rijpt en zich verzamelt
En openbreekt

MORE:
Wherewithal=With which, by means of which (he is using your ladder)
Gathering head=Coming to a head
Sin=Transgression of the divine law
Helping=Having helped
Unrightful=Illegitimate
So little urged=With only the slightest encouragement
Headlong=Unceremoniously

Compleat:
Now my designs gathering to a head=Nu beginnen myn voornemens ryp te worden
Urged=Gedrongen, geprest, aangedrongen
Headlong=Vlak voorover, plotseling

Topics: loyalty, betrayal, conspiracy, corruption, time

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
I am solicited, not by a few,
And those of true condition, that your subjects
Are in great grievance: there have been commissions
Sent down among ’em, which hath flaw’d the heart
Of all their loyalties: wherein, although,
My good lord cardinal, they vent reproaches
Most bitterly on you, as putter on
Of these exactions, yet the king our master—
Whose honour heaven shield from soil!—even he escapes not
Language unmannerly, yea, such which breaks
The sides of loyalty, and almost appears
In loud rebellion.

DUTCH:
Er werd bij mij geklaagd, — en niet door wein’gen,
En door de besten, — dat uw onderdanen
Recht diep gegriefd zijn. Schatters zond men tot hen,
Waardoor het hart van al hun trouw en liefde
Doorpriemd werd.

MORE:
True=Loyal
Grievance=Distress
Commissions=Taxes, instructions to impose tax
Exactions=Extortion of tax, compulsion to pay
Soil=Stain (Shield his honour from soil: Protect his honour)
Compleat:
True=Trouw, oprecht
Grievance=Bezwaarenis
Grieved=Bedroefd, bedrukt, gegriefd
Commission=Last, volmagt, lastbrief, provisie
To exact=Afeysschen, afvorderen
To soil=Bezoedelen, vuyl maaken, bevlekken

Topics: loyalty, language

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
O good old man, how well in thee appears
The constant service of the antique world,
When service sweat for duty, not for meed.
Thou art not for the fashion of these times,
Where none will sweat but for promotion,
And having that do choke their service up
Even with the having. It is not so with thee.
But, poor old man, thou prun’st a rotten tree
That cannot so much as a blossom yield
In lieu of all thy pains and husbandry.

DUTCH:
Gij volgt niet, neen, de mode dezer dagen,
Nu niemand zwoegen wil, dan om wat winst,
En hij, die winst bekomt, in ‘t voordeel zelf
Zijn ijver smoort

MORE:
Schmidt:
Antic=(O. Edd. promiscuously antick and antique, but always accented on the first syllable), adj. belonging to the times, or resembling the manners of antiquity
Sweat=Toil, labour
Constant=Faithful
Choke up (Reflectively)=Oppress, make away with, kill
Meed=Reward, recompense, hire
Compleat:
Meed=Belooning, vergelding, verdiensten

Topics: duty, age/experience, work, loyalty, achievement, fashion/trends

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Dauphin
CONTEXT:
CHARLES
Welcome, brave duke! thy friendship makes us fresh.
BASTARD OF ORLEANS
And doth beget new courage in our breasts.
ALENCON
Pucelle hath bravely play’d her part in this,
And doth deserve a coronet of gold.
CHARLES
Now let us on, my lords, and join our powers,
And seek how we may prejudice the foe.

DUTCH:
Heil, dapp’re hertog! uw verbond verfrischt ons.

MORE:
Makes us fresh=Revives me
Beget=Produce, create
Join=Unite, combine

Compleat:
Refresh=(recreate) Verquikken, verfrisschen; (renew) vernieuwen, hernieuwen; zich ververschen
Beget=Gewinnen, teelen, voortbrengen, verkrygen
Idleness begets beggary=Luiheid veroorzaakt bedelaary
To join=Saamenvoegen; vereenigen, voegen, vervoegen

Topics: friendship, emotion and mood, loyalty, unity/collaboration

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
O sir, content you.
I follow him to serve my turn upon him.
We cannot all be masters, nor all masters
Cannot be truly followed. You shall mark
Many a duteous and knee-crooking knave
That (doting on his own obsequious bondage)
Wears out his time much like his master’s ass
For naught but provender, and when he’s old, cashiered.

DUTCH:
Wel, maak je maar geen zorg!
Ik dien hem slechts om ’t hem betaald te zetten.
Niet elk kan meester zijn, noch alle meesters
getrouw gediend. Je zult er wel een kennen,
zo’n plichtsgetrouwe, kruiperige knecht
die, opgaand in zijn lage slavernij,
als de ezel van zijn baas voor slechts wat voer
zijn tijd uitdient en, oud, wordt afgedankt.

MORE:

Proverb: Every man cannot be a master (lord)

Whipping was a cruel punishment. In the days of Henry VIII an Act decreed that vagrants were to be carried to some market town, or other place, and there tied to the end of a cart, naked, and beaten with whips throughout such market-town, or other place, till the body should be bloody by reason of such whipping. The punishment was mitigated in Elizabeth’s reign, to the extent that vagrants need only to be “stripped naked from the middle upwards and whipped till the body should be bloody”.

Schmidt:
Content you=Be quiet, calm
Doting=to be fond, to love to excess
Knee-crooking=Flattering
Obsequious=Zealous, officious, devoted
Wear out=To spend all of, to come to the end of
Provender=Dry food for beasts
Cashiered=Discarded from service

Compleat:
Dote upon=Op iets verzot zyn; zyne zinnen zeer op iets gezet hebben
Obsequious=Gehoorzaam, gedienstig
To cashiere=Den zak geeven, afdanken, ontslaan

Topics: loyalty, deceit, proverbs and idioms, leadership, duty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
I am so full of businesses, I cannot answer thee
acutely. I will return perfect courtier; in the
which, my instruction shall serve to naturalize
thee, so thou wilt be capable of a courtier’s
counsel and understand what advice shall thrust upon
thee; else thou diest in thine unthankfulness, and
thine ignorance makes thee away: farewell. When
thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast
none, remember thy friends; get thee a good husband,
and use him as he uses thee; so, farewell.

DUTCH:
Als gij tijd hebt, zeg dan uwe gebeden op, en hebt gij dien niet, denk dan aan uwe vrienden.

MORE:
Answer thee acutely=Give a witty response
“None” believed by some to be a misprint for “money”.
Courtier=Paradigm of true courtesy
Use=Treat
Makes thee away=Finishes you off
Compleat:
Leisurably=By ledigen tyd
Courtier=Hoveling

Topics: marriage, friendship, loyalty, civility

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Who can be wise, amazed, temp’rate, and furious,
Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man.
Th’ expedition of my violent love
Outrun the pauser, reason.

DUTCH:
Wie is ontzet en wijs, bedaard en woedend,
Vol liefde en koud, in ‘t eigen oogenblik?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Amaze= To put in confusion, to put in a state where one does not know what to do or to say or to think
Temperate= Moderate, calm
Pauser= One who deliberates much
Compleat:
Temperate=Maatig, gemaatigd

Topics: reason, caution, haste, loyalty, uncertainty

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Albany
CONTEXT:
GONERILL
I have been worth the whistle.
ALBANY
You are not worth the dust which the rude wind
Blows in your face. I fear your disposition.
That nature, which condemns its origin
Cannot be bordered certain in itself.
She that herself will sliver and disbranch
From her material sap perforce must wither
And come to deadly use.
Burgersdijk notes:
Weleer was ik nog ‘t fluiten waard. Een Engelsch spreekwoord zegt: „Het is een armzalige hond, die het fluiten niet waard is.”

DUTCH:
O Goneril,
je bent het stof niet waard dat ruwe wind
jou in ’t gezicht blaast./
Gij zijt het stof niet waard, dat de ruwe wind
U in ‘t gelaat blaast.

MORE:
Proverb: It is a poor dog that is not worth the whistling
Schmidt:
Dust (fig.)= for any worthless thing: “vile gold, dross, dust”
Sliver and disbranch=Detach, break or tear a branch from a tree
Wither and come to deadly use=Degenerate and die
Fear=Have concerns about
Compleat:
Disposition (of mind)=Gesteltenis van gemoed
Deadly=Doodelyk, gruwelyk

Topics: nature, insult, trust, loyalty, relationship

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