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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Hamlet ACT/SCENE: 2.2 SPEAKER: Polonius CONTEXT: How pregnant sometimes his replies are. A happiness that often madness hits on, which reason and sanity could not so prosperously be delivered of. DUTCH: Wat zijn zijn antwoorden soms gevat! Een gelukkige eigenschap van de waanzin, waar de redelijkheid niet zo voor­spoedig van bevalt /
Hoe raak zijn soms zijn antwoorden ! Een mooi iets, dat krankzinnigheid dikwijls bereikt, terwijl het bij rede en gezond verstand niet zoo voorspoedig loskomt!
MORE: Schmidt:
Pregnant=expert, clever, ingenious, artful
Prosperously = successfully
Compleat:
A pregnant (or subtle) wit=Een schrander vernuft
Pregnant reasons=Krachtige redenen
Negative pregnant=Eene ontkenning, die een stelling insluit ( negative pregnant denial still used in law today)
Prosperously=Voorspoediglyk
Topics: madness, reason

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Madam, this is a mere distraction;
You turn the good we offer into envy.
QUEEN KATHERINE
You turn me into nothing: woe upon you
And all such false professors! would you have me—
If you have any justice, any pity;
If you be any thing but churchmen’s habits—
Put my sick cause into his hands that hates me?
Alas, has banish’d me his bed already,
His love, too long ago! I am old, my lords,
And all the fellowship I hold now with him
Is only my obedience. What can happen
To me above this wretchedness? all your studies
Make me a curse like this.

DUTCH:
Wat kan mij overkomen,
Nog boven deze ellend’? Uw streven maakt
Mij zulk een vloek.

MORE:
Distraction=Deranged, madness
Envy=Spite, malice
Professor=One who professes, declares (here: to be Christian)
Habit=Clothes
Sick=Poor, weak
Studies=Efforts
Fellowship=Relationship, bond
Compleat:
Distraction=Gescheurdheyd, verwydering; krankzinnigheyd
Envy=Nyd, afgunst
To profess=(hold a doctrine) Een leer belyden, gelooven, belydenis doen
To study=Benaarstigen, betrachten
Fellowship=Gemeenschap, medegenootschap, gezelschap

Topics: madness, justice

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Edmund
CONTEXT:
And pat he comes, like the catastrophe of the old comedy. My cue is villainous melancholy, with a sigh like Tom o’ Bedlam. Oh, these eclipses do portend these divisions! Fa, sol, la, mi.

DUTCH:
Ah, daar komt hij, even plotseling als de catastrofe
in een oud tooneelstuk; mijn rol is een schurkachtige
melancholie, met een zucht als van Tom uit het dolhuis.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Pat=To the purpose, fitly (on cue)
Catastrophe= Concluding episode, final event in a drama
Villainous=Wretched
Tom o’Bedlam=Common name for a real or pretended madman (as in an inmate of Bedlam, the ‘London lunatic asylum’.)
Compleat:
Catastrophe=Einde, droevige uytkomst
The catastrophe of a Tragedy=Laast en aanmerkelykst bedryf, tot ontknooping van een Treurspel.

Topics: madness, fate/destiny

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
He has some reason, else he could not beg.
I’ th’ last night’s storm I such a fellow saw,
Which made me think a man a worm. My son
Came then into my mind, and yet my mind
Was then scarce friends with him. I have heard more since.
As flies to wanton boys are we to th’ gods.
They kill us for their sport.

DUTCH:
Nu weet ik meer: wij zijn
voor goden slechts wat vliegen zijn voor jongens:
zij doden voor de grap./
Hem toen niet goed gezind ; sinds hoorde ik meer
Den Goden zijn we als vliegen voor kwajongens ;
Zij doode’ ons uit de grap .

MORE:
Compare Job 25.6: ‘How 38-9 How much more man, a worme, euen the sonne of man, which is but a worme?’ (Kittredge); Psalms 22:6 ‘But I am a worm and not a man’.
Schmidt:
Compleat:
Plague=Plaag
Scarce=Hardly, scantly
Those kind of people are the plague (pest or bane) of mankind=Dat soort van menschen is de pest van het menschdom
Plague (punishment or judgment)=Straffe
A wanton child=Een speelsch kind
Scarce (or scarcely)=Naauwlyks

Topics: madness, poverty and wealth, fate/destiny

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
I hope I dream,
For so I thought I was a cave-keeper
And cook to honest creatures. But ’tis not so.
’Twas but a bolt of nothing, shot at nothing,
Which the brain makes of fumes. Our very eyes
Are sometimes like our judgments, blind. Good faith,
I tremble still with fear; but if there be
Yet left in heaven as small a drop of pity
As a wren’s eye, feared gods, a part of it!

DUTCH:
O, groote goden,
Is boven nog erbarming, slechts een drup,
Als ‘t oog der grasmusch, schenkt me een deel er van!


Schmidt:
A fume=A delusion, a phantasm, anything hindering, like a mist, the function of the brain

Compleat:
The glory of mortals is but a fume=De eerre der stervelingen is maar rook
To be in a fume=In een woede zyn

Topics: pity, imagination, madness, evidence

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Lord Bardolph
CONTEXT:
LORD BARDOLPH
It was, my lord; who lined himself with hope,
Eating the air on promise of supply,
Flatt’ring himself in project of a power
Much smaller than the smallest of his thoughts,
And so, with great imagination
Proper to madmen, led his powers to death
And, winking, leapt into destruction.
HASTINGS
But, by your leave, it never yet did hurt
To lay down likelihoods and forms of hope.

DUTCH:
Geheel, Inylord; hij voedde zich met hoop,
Met de’ ijdlen klank van toegezegden bijstand,
Zich vleiend met het droombeeld eener macht,
Die minder bleek zelfs dan zijn minste raming;

MORE:

Proverb:
Look before you leap

Schmidt:
To eat the air=To be deluded with hopes, living on nothing
Likelihood=Probability, chance
Project of=A chalking out, a forming in the mind, an idea
Wink=To shut the eyes or to have them shut so as not to see
Forms of hope=Hopeful plans

Compleat:
To line=To fortify, to strengthen
To wink=Door de vingeren zien
Likelyhood=Waarschynlykheid

Topics: hope/optimism, promise, imagination, madness

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Doctor
CONTEXT:
Foul whisp’rings are abroad. Unnatural deeds
Do breed unnatural troubles. Infected minds
To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets.
More needs she the divine than the physician.

DUTCH:
Men fluistert gruw’len. Onnatuurlijk doen
Baart onnatuurlijk wee.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Foul=Disgraceful, derogatory, detractive
Whisperings = rumours
Unnatural = supernatural (sleepwalkers were considered to be cursed; sleepwalking a sign of demonic possession)

Topics: madness, guilt, conspiracy, language

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Hamlet is of the faction that is wronged.
His madness is poor Hamlet’s enemy.
Sir, in this audience,
Let my disclaiming from a purposed evil
Free me so far in your most generous thoughts
That I have shot mine arrow o’er the house
And hurt my brother.

DUTCH:
Laat mijn ontkenning van opzetlijk kwaad Me ontheffen in uw ridderziel tot op: Dat ik mijn pijl schoot over ‘t huis en trof
Mijn broeder. /
Laat mijn ontkenning hier van kwaad bedoelen Mijn vrijspraak zijn in uw grootmoedig denken, Dat ik mijn pijl heb over ‘t huis geschoten En trof mijn broeder.

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
Schmidt:
Disclaiming= disavowal
To purpose= plan, design
Compleat:
To disclaim=Otkennen, verzaaken, afstaan
To purpose=Voornemen, voor hebben

Topics: madness, innocence, law/legal, conspiracy

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Claudius
CONTEXT:
POLONIUS
We heard it all.—My lord, do as you please.
But, if you hold it fit, after the play
Let his queen mother all alone entreat him
To show his grief. Let her be round with him,
And I’ll be placed, so please you, in the ear
Of all their conference. If she find him not,
To England send him or confine him where
Your wisdom best shall think.
CLAUDIUS
It shall be so.
Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.

DUTCH:
Uw raad staat me aan; ‘n Hooggeplaatste en gek mag vrij niet gaan /
Dat zal ik, want de waanzin van vorstenzonen eist een wakend oog. /
‘t Zij zoo. Onderwijl Waanzin bij grooten eischt een oog in ‘t zeil.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Round=roundly, straightforwardly and without much ceremony:
Compleat:
To have a round delivery (or clear utterance)=Glad ter taal zyn
Round about=Rondt-om

Topics: madness, caution, trust, order/society

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Ophelia
CONTEXT:
Now see that noble and most sovereign reason
Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;
That unmatched form and feature of blown youth
Blasted with ecstasy. O, woe is me,
T’ have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

DUTCH:
O, wee mij, die gezien heeft wat ik zag, zie wat ik zie! / Wee, wee, o, die Zag wat ik heb gezien, ziet wat ik zie.

MORE:
Woe is me’ wasn’t a Shakespeare invention – there are several instances the Bible (‘woe unto me’ in Job, ‘woe is me’ in Psalms, Isiah and Jeremiah)
Schmidt:
Sovereign= Supreme, paramount, excellent: “That noble and most sovereign reason”
Blasted=Blighted
Ecstasy=Madness
Onions:
Blown=Blossomed (in the full bloom of youth)
Compleat:
Extasy=Verrukking, opgetoogenheid, vertrekking van zinnen
To blast one’s reputation=Iemands goeden naam bezwalken

Topics: still in use, sorrow, madness, still in use

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Thou think’st ’tis much that this contentious storm
Invades us to the skin. So ’tis to thee.
But where the greater malady is fixed
The lesser is scarce felt. Thou’dst shun a bear,
But if thy flight lay toward the raging sea
Thou’dst meet the bear i’ th’ mouth. When the mind’s free,
The body’s delicate. The tempest in my mind
Doth from my senses take all feeling else
Save what beats there—filial ingratitude.
Is it not as this mouth should tear this hand
For lifting food to ’t? But I will punish home.
No, I will weep no more. In such a night
To shut me out! Pour on, I will endure.
In such a night as this! O Regan, Goneril,
Your old kind father, whose frank heart gave all—
Oh, that way madness lies. Let me shun that.
No more of that.

DUTCH:
O, Regan, Goneril,
uw goede vader die u alles gaf…
nee, daar niet heen, daar wacht de waanzin mij;
niet meer daarover.

MORE:
Contentious=Tempestuous
Greater malady=Mental torment (here)
Fixed=Established, diagnosed
Meet the bear i’ th’ mouth=Meet the bear face to face
Home=Thoroughly
Frank=Liberal, bountiful
Compleat:
Home=Goed
Fix=Vaststellen, besluiten

Topics: emotion and mood, wellbeing, madness, punishment

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
Were such things here as we do speak about?
Or have we eaten on the insane root
That takes the reason prisoner?

DUTCH:
Wat? of aten
Wij dolkruid, dat de rede in boeien slaat?

MORE:
Dyce:
The insane root: perhaps hemlock or more probably henbane (Douce: “Henbane . . . is called Insana, mad, for the use thereof is perillous; for if it be eate or dronke, it breedeth madnesse, or slow lykenesse of sleepe. Therefore this hearb is called commonly Mirilidium, for it taketh away wit and reason.” Batman Uppon Bartholome de propriet. rerum, lib. xvii. ch. 87.)
CITED IN US LAW:
Cruzan v. Harmon, 760 S.W.2d 408,413 (Mo. 1988)(Robertson, J.). (One majority writer writes, “the
dissenters work backwards, choosing a result then creating reasons to ‘support’ it. lt is our duty in a case of first impression in this state not only to consider precedents from other states, but also to determine their strength. We have found them wanting and refuse to eat ‘on the insane root which takes the reason prisoner.'”

Topics: madness, reason, justification, cited in law, law/legal

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
When as a lion’s whelp shall, to himself unknown,
without seeking find, and be embraced by a piece of
tender air; and when from a stately cedar shall be
lopped branches, which, being dead many years,
shall after revive, be jointed to the old stock and
freshly grow; then shall Posthumus end his miseries,
Britain be fortunate and flourish in peace and plenty.’
‘Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen
Tongue and brain not; either both or nothing;
Or senseless speaking or a speaking such
As sense cannot untie. Be what it is,
The action of my life is like it, which
I’ll keep, if but for sympathy.

DUTCH:
t Is nog een droom, of wel het zinn’loos kallen
Van hersenlooze onnooz’len; dit of niets;
Of zinnelooze taal, of taal waarvan
‘t Verstand den zin niet vat


Such stuff as madmen tongue=The nonsensical, irrational talk of madmen
Or=Either (as in Dutch ‘óf dit, of dat’)
Jointed=Grafted
Sympathy=Any conformity, correspondence, resemblance.

Compleat:
Sympathy (natural agreement of things)=Natuurlyke overeenstemming of trek der dingen

Topics: madness, nature, language, reason

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
My liege, and madam, to expostulate
What majesty should be, what duty is,
What day is day, night night, and time is time,
Were nothing but to waste night, day, and time;
Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit,
And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes,
I will be brief. Your noble son is mad. . . .

DUTCH:
Beknoptheid is het kenmerk van verstand./
Wijl de ziel van wijsheid kortheid is /
Sinds bondigheid de ziel is van ‘t vernuft

MORE:

If you are quoting this, be aware of the irony that Polonius is a sly and devious blowhard with no self-awareness who says this in the middle of a grand speech!

Proverb: Brevity is the soul of wit

Wit=acumen, keen intelligence.
Soul=quintessence

Compleat:
“Een man van goed verstand”

CITED IN EU LAW: Telefonica SA and Telefonica de Espana v Commission (Advocate General’s Opinion) [2013] EUECJ C-295/12
Opinion of Advocate General Wathelet delivered on 26 September 2013.: ‘It is true that ‘brevity is the soul of wit’ (Shakespeare in Hamlet, 1602), but unlimited jurisdiction requires more than wit’.
CITED IN US LAW:
Louisville and Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District v. Simpson, 730 S.W.2d 939, 942 (Ky. 1987)(“Shakespeare described …. This may be true in many situations, hut the majority opinion in this case is not one of them.”);
State v. Eichstedt, 20 Conn. App. 395, 401, 567 A.2d 1237 (1989)(“there must be sufficient
amplification to make an intelligent argument. The briefs fail in this regard.”);
Indiana Alcoholic Beverage Commission v. W-W Associates, Inc., 152 Ind. App. 622,284 N.E.2d
534,536 (1972)(“and while we find no humor in entering judgment against ABC before
its time limit had lapsed within which to answer, we can be brief.”)

Topics: cited in law, proverbs and idioms, still in use, language, madness

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Doctor
CONTEXT:
MACBETH
Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
DOCTOR
Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
MACBETH
Throw physic to the dogs; I’ll none of it.

DUTCH:
Hier moet de kranke Zichzelf tot arts zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Minister to=Administer (medicines), to prescribe, to order
CITED IN LAW: In a direct quotation or “borrowed eloquence” in White v Chief Constable of the South Yorkshire Police [1999] 1 All ER 1, considering the concepts of foreseeability and psychiatric injury, Lord Hoffmann noted, as the Doctor of Physic tells Macbeth: “therein the patient must minister to himself” (Macbeth Act 5, Scene 3).

Topics: madness, memory, guilt, conscience, remedy

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
Bravely the figure of this harpy hast thou
Performed, my Ariel. A grace it had, devouring.
Of my instruction hast thou nothing bated
In what thou hadst to say.—So with good life
And observation strange, my meaner ministers
Their several kinds have done. My high charms work
And these mine enemies are all knit up
In their distractions. They now are in my power,
And in these fits I leave them while I visit
Young Ferdinand, whom they suppose is drowned,
And his and mine loved darling.

DUTCH:
Mijn tooverkracht
Werkt machtig; mijne vijanden zijn allen
Verstrikt in hun verbijst’ring; ik beheersch hen;
En ‘k laat hen in hun waanzin, om nu eerst
Tot Ferdinand, — dien zij verdronken wanen, —
En zijne en mijne liev’ling mij te spoeden.

MORE:
Bated=Omitted, neglected
Schmidt:
Bravely=Admirably
Figure=Image, representation
Harpy=A monster of ancient fable, with the face of a woman and the body of a bird of prey
Strange=extraordinary, enormous, remarkable, singular
Observation strange=Attention to detail
Several=In keeping with their separate natures
High charms=Superior magic
Knit up in=Tied up with, entangled in
Compleat:
Harpy (or fabelous monster)=Harpy, een fabel-achtig monster
Harpy or griping woman=Een giereige feeks
Bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afslaan
Figure (representation)=Afbeelding
Knit together=Verknocht, samengeknoopt
He is knit to his master’s interest=Hy is het belang van zynen Heer zeer toegedaan

Topics: conflict, plans/intentions, madness

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Now sir, the sound that tells what hour it is
Are clamorous groans, which strike upon my heart,
Which is the bell: so sighs and tears and groans
Show minutes, times, and hours: but my time
Runs posting on in Bolingbroke’s proud joy,
While I stand fooling here, his Jack o’ the clock.
This music mads me; let it sound no more;
For though it have holp madmen to their wits,
In me it seems it will make wise men mad.
Yet blessing on his heart that gives it me!
For ’tis a sign of love; and love to Richard
Is a strange brooch in this all-hating world.

DUTCH:
Dol maakt mij die muziek, dat zij verstomme!
Want bracht zij dollen soms tot hun verstand,
In mij, zoo schijnt het, maakt zij wijsheid dol

MORE:

Clamorous=Vociferous, loud
Posting=Fast
Jack o’ the clock=Figure who would strike the bell on the clock
Holp=Short for holpen, helped. Have holp=May have helped
Wits=Senses
Brooch=Ornament

Compleat:
Holpen=Geholpen
Holp op=Opgeholpen
Wits=Zinnen, oordeel

Topics: time, regret, madness, wisdom

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Gertrude
CONTEXT:
GERTRUDE
This the very coinage of your brain.
This bodiless creation ecstasy
Is very cunning in.
HAMLET
Ecstasy?
My pulse as yours doth temperately keep time
And makes as healthful music. It is not madness
That I have uttered. Bring me to the test,
And I the matter will reword, which madness
Would gambol from.

DUTCH:
Het is niets anders dan een hersenschim.Waanzin is sterk in het bezweren van onstoffelijke dingen. /
Dat is een zuiver maaksel van uw hersens, Een schepping zonder houvast, overspanning Is daar een meester in. /
Dit is de muntslag van uw eigen brein, Die lichaamlooze schepping [is] de waanzin!

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Claim of misdiagnosis in McArdle v. Tronetti, 769 F.Supp. 188, 189 (W.D.Pa. 1991)(Mencer,J.)
CITED IN ENGLISH LAW:
Shakespeare entered the English law reports in 1827. Considering the concept of madness and with sensibilities characteristic of the period, Nichol J asked: “What says the great poet of Nature and master of the passions upon the subject? What is one of the tests of madness that he suggests? Hamlet, being charged with ‘coinage of the brain,’ answers: ‘It is not madness That I have uttered; bring me to the test And I the matter will reword which madness cannot’.” (See Groom and Evans v Thomas and Thomas (1829) 162 ER 914.)
https://www.counselmagazine.co.uk/articles/quote-or-not-quote-…

Schmidt:
Ecstasy=Madness

Compleat:
Cunning=Behendig
A cunning fellow=Een doortrapte vent, een looze gast
To cast a cunning look=Iemand snaaks aanzien

Topics: madness, reason, cited in law

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Fool
CONTEXT:
FOOL
Thou shouldst not have been old till thou hadst been wise.
LEAR
O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven! I would not be mad. Keep me in temper. I would not be mad.

DUTCH:
Je had niet oud moeten zijn voordat je wijs geworden was.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wise=In one’s right mind
In temper= Emphatically, wonted disposition, freedom from excess or extravagance, equanimity
Compleat:
A man of an instable temper=Een man van een ongestadig humeur, van eenen wispelteurigen aart.

Topics: insult, wisdom, madness

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
HAMLET
Slanders, sir. For the satirical rogue says here that old men have gray beards, that their faces are wrinkled, their eyes purging thick amber and plum-tree gum, and that they have a plentiful lack of wit, together with most weak hams—all which, sir, though I most powerfully and potently believe, yet I hold it not honesty to have it thus set down; for yourself, sir, should be old as I am, if like a crab you could go backward.
POLONIUS
(aside) Though this be madness, yet there is method in ’t.—(to HAMLET) Will you walk out of the air, my lord?

DUTCH:
Al is dit waanzin, er zit toch methode in. /
Al is ‘t krankzinnigheid, er zit methode in. /
Al moge dit gekkepraat zijn, toch is er orde in.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Slander= Defamation, calumny
Satirical= full of bitter mockery
Rogue, a term of reproach=rascal, knave
Compleat:
Rogue (or rascal)=Schurk, Schobbejak
The poignancy of a satire=De scherpheid van een schimpdicht
Method in his madness coined by Shakespeare and still in (frequent) use today.

Topics: still in use, proverbs and idioms, madness, purpose

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lady Percy
CONTEXT:
Thy spirit within thee hath been so at war,
And thus hath so bestirred thee in thy sleep,
That beads of sweat have stood upon thy brow
Like bubbles in a late-disturbèd stream,
And in thy face strange motions have appeared,
Such as we see when men restrain their breath
On some great sudden hest. O, what portents are these?

DUTCH:
Uw geest in u was zoozeer bij den krijg,
En heeft u zoo in uwen slaap verhit,
Dat parels zweet u op het voorhoofd stonden,
Als blazen op een pas verwoeden stroom;

MORE:

Some great sudden hest=A sudden important command
Schmidt:
Soul=Represented as the seat of real, not only professed, sentiments
Hest=behest
CITED IN IRISH LAW:
Murtagh -v- Minister for Defence & Ors [2008] IEHC 292 (22 July 2008) /[2008] IEHC 292

Topics: madness, conflict, wellbeing, emotion and mood

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Gravedigger
CONTEXT:
HAMLET
Ay, marry, why was he sent into England?
GRAVEDIGGER
Why, because he was mad. He shall recover his wits there, or, if he do not, it’s no great matter there.
HAMLET
Why?
GRAVEDIGGER
‘Twill not be seen in him there. There the men are as mad as he.

DUTCH:
Het zal niet in hem opvallen daar; daar zijn de menschen even gek als hij. /
Hij mot daar z’n verstand terugkrijgen, en krijgt ie ’t niet terug, dan komp ’t er daar nog niet veel op an.

MORE:
Kin = kindred, family
Kind = generous AND nature, class.
Hamlet’s first words in the play. Claudius is “more than kin” because he is both uncle and stepfather. “Less than kind” can either be taken at face value or “kind” can be taken to mean both generous

Topics: cited in law, still in use, madness, reason

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Abbess
CONTEXT:
It seems his sleeps were hinder’d by thy railing,
And therefore comes it that his head is light.
Thou sayst his meat was sauced with thy upbraidings.
Unquiet meals make ill digestions.
Thereof the raging fire of fever bred,
And what’s a fever but a fit of madness?

DUTCH:
Zijn maal werd, zegt gij, met uw twist gekruid;
Onrustig eten stoort de spijsvertering.

MORE:
Upbraidings=Reproaches
To rail=To reproach, scold
Sauced with=Accompanied by

Compleat:
Upbraiding=Verwyting
To rail=Schelden

Topics: emotion and mood, wellbeing, madness

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
YORK
Will not this malice, Somerset, be left?
SOMERSET
Your private grudge, my Lord of York, will out,
Though ne’er so cunningly you smother it.
KING HENRY VI
Good Lord, what madness rules in brainsick men,
When for so slight and frivolous a cause
Such factious emulations shall arise!
Good cousins both, of York and Somerset,
Quiet yourselves, I pray, and be at peace.

DUTCH:
God! welk een waanzin heerscht in dolle mannen,
Als om zoo nietige en zoo ijd’le reden
Zoo vinnige partijschap zich verheft! —

MORE:
Be left (leave)=To cease, desist, discontinue
Factious=Dissentious, rebellious, partisan
Emulation=Rivalry

Compleat:
Factious=Oproerig, muitzuchtig, muitziek
Emulation=Naayver, volgzucht, afgunst

Topics: dispute, envy, truth, madness

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macduff
CONTEXT:
LADY MACDUFF
He had none.
His flight was madness. When our actions do not,
Our fears do make us traitors.
ROSS
You know not
Whether it was his wisdom or his fear.

DUTCH:
Zijn vlucht was waanzin. Als geen daden ‘t doen,
Maakt onze vrees ons tot verraders.

MORE:

Topics: madness, appearance, wisdom

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Thou think’st ’tis much that this contentious storm
Invades us to the skin. So ’tis to thee.
But where the greater malady is fixed
The lesser is scarce felt. Thou’dst shun a bear,
But if thy flight lay toward the raging sea
Thou’dst meet the bear i’ th’ mouth. When the mind’s free,
The body’s delicate. The tempest in my mind
Doth from my senses take all feeling else
Save what beats there—filial ingratitude.
Is it not as this mouth should tear this hand
For lifting food to ’t? But I will punish home.
No, I will weep no more. In such a night
To shut me out! Pour on, I will endure.
In such a night as this! O Regan, Goneril,
Your old kind father, whose frank heart gave all—
Oh, that way madness lies. Let me shun that.
No more of that.

DUTCH:
Een ongestoorde geest
maakt onze leden broos; mijn zielenstorm
ontneemt mijn zinnen alles wat ik voel,
behalve wat dáár klopt:

MORE:
Contentious=Tempestuous
Greater malady=Mental torment (here)
Fixed=Established, diagnosed
Meet the bear i’ th’ mouth=Meet the bear face to face
Home=Thoroughly
Frank=Liberal, bountiful
Compleat:
Home=Goed
Fix=Vaststellen, besluiten
Some translations into Dutch have “Als de geest gewillig is, is het lichaam zwak”, which is not a translation of Shakespeare’s text but of Matthew 26:41, ‘the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak”

Topics: emotion and mood, wellbeing, madness, punishment

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
I never came within these abbey walls,
Nor ever didst thou draw thy sword on me.
I never saw the chain, so help me heaven,
And this is false you burden me withal.
DUKE
Why, what an intricate impeach is this!
I think you all have drunk of Circe’s cup.
If here you housed him, here he would have been.

DUTCH:
Dit is een zaak vol wondervreemde raadsels!
Het schijnt, gij allen dronkt uit Circe’s nap.
Waar’ hij hier ingevlucht, hij zou er zijn;
En waar’ hij dol, hij pleitte niet zoo kalm

MORE:
Circe=A sorceress in Greek mythology; in Homer’s Odyssey, Circe transforms Odysseus’s men into pigs by giving them a magic potion.
Impeach=Accusation, reproach

Compleat:
To impeach=Betichten, beschuldigen, aanklagen
To impeach (or oppose) the truth of a thing=Zich tegen de waarheid van een zaak aankanten

Topics: law/legal, appearance, evidence, madness

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