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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: As You Like It ACT/SCENE: 4.1 SPEAKER: Orlando CONTEXT: ROSALIND
Or else she could not have the wit to do this. The wiser, the waywarder. Make the doors upon a woman’s wit, and it will out at the casement. Shut that, and ’twill out at the keyhole. Stop that, ’twill fly with the smoke out at the chimney.
ORLANDO
A man that had a wife with such a wit, he might say “Wit, whither wilt?”
ROSALIND
Nay, you might keep that check for it, till you met your wife’s wit going to your neighbor’s bed. DUTCH: Een man, die een vrouw had met zulk een geest,
mocht wel zeggen: „Geest, geest, waar wilt gij heen ?”
MORE: Proverb: Wit, whither wilt thou?
Schmidt:
Wit=Intellect
Wayward=Capricious and obstinate
Check=Rebuke, reproof; “patience bide each check”.
Compleat:
Wayward=Kribbig, korsel, nors, boos
Check=Berisping, beteugeling, intooming Topics: intellect, wisdom, marriage, proverbs and idioms, still in use

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
CLAUDIUS
Take thy fair hour, Laertes. Time be thine,
And thy best graces spend it at thy will.—
But now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son—
HAMLET
A little more than kin and less than kind.

DUTCH:
Wat meer dan neef, doch niet in ‘t minst uw zoon /
Iets meer dan bloed – en minder geestverwant.

MORE:
Kin = kindred, family
Kind = generous AND nature, class.
Hamlet’s first words in the play. Claudius is “more than kin” because he is both uncle and stepfather. “Less than kind” can either be taken at face value or “kind” can be taken to mean both generous and class/breeding/nature.
A similar proverb is said to have existed at that time: “The nearer in kin, the less in kindness”, or the less pithy “The greater the kindred is, the less the kindness must be”.
Compleat:
Kin=Maagschap, verwantschap.
Kind=Soort
Elsewhere ‘kin’ is translated as ‘verwant’ and ‘kind’ as welwillend, with no play on words.

Burgersdijk notes:
Wat meer dan neef, doch niet in ‘t minst uw zoon. Meer dan een neef (daar ik uw stiefzoon ben), maar weinig of geenszins met u van een aard, een natuur (niet als een zoon, die naar zijn vader aardt) . In ‘t Engelsch :A little more titan kin, and less than kind. Kind beteekent niet alleen aard” of ,natuur”, maar ook ,,vriendelijk”. Deze woordspeling liet zich niet teruggeven, maar de zin is in de vertaling opgenomen, daar een zoon gehouden is zijn vader lief te hebbeu, wat Hamlet zijn stiefvader niet doet; hierom: „niet in ‘t minst uw zoon”. De vertaling heeft dit voordeel, dat zij volkomen op ‘s konings zeggen terugslaat.

Topics: marriage, relationship, still in use

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
Yea, bloody cloth, I’ll keep thee, for I wish’d
Thou shouldst be colour’d thus. You married ones,
If each of you should take this course, how many
Must murder wives much better than themselves
For wrying but a little! O Pisanio!
Every good servant does not all commands:
No bond but to do just ones. Gods! if you
Should have ta’en vengeance on my faults, I never
Had lived to put on this: so had you saved
The noble Imogen to repent, and struck
Me, wretch more worth your vengeance.

DUTCH:
Een goede dienaar volgt niet elk bevel; Slechts aan ‘t gerechte is hij gehouden/
Een goed dienaar voert niet alle bevelen uit


Proverb: Yours to command in the way of honesty

Just=Moral
Wrying=Swerving, deviating from the right course
Put on=Instigate

Compleat:
Just (righteous)=Een rechtvaardige
Just=Effen, juist, net
Wry=Scheef, verdraaid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, honesty, marriage, work, flaw/fault

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurn at me,
And hurl the name of husband in my face,
And tear the stained skin off my harlot brow,
And from my false hand cut the wedding ring,
And break it with a deep-divorcing vow?
I know thou canst, and therefore see thou do it.
I am possessed with an adulterate blot;
My blood is mingled with the crime of lust;
For if we two be one, and thou play false,
I do digest the poison of thy flesh,
Being strumpeted by thy contagion.
Keep then fair league and truce with thy true bed,
I live unstained, thou undishonourèd.

DUTCH:
Want zijn wij tweeën één en zijt gij valsch,
Dan stroomt het gif van uw bloed in het mijn’,
En door uw smetstof word ik tot boelin.

MORE:
Possession had a stronger meaning, akin to ‘infect’
Harlot brow=Branding on the forehead with a hot iron was punishment for prostitution
Strumpeted=Turned into a strumpet, prostitute (by contamination)
Unstained=Undefiled (some editors use disstain here)

Compleat:
To enter into a league=In een verbond treeden, een verbond aangaan
Truce=Een bestand, stilstand van wapenen, treves

Topics: loyalty, ruin, reputation, marriage, love, respect

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Now, brother of Clarence, how like you our choice,
That you stand pensive, as half malcontent?
CLARENCE
As well as Lewis of France, or the Earl of Warwick,
Which are so weak of courage and in judgment
That they’ll take no offence at our abuse.
KING EDWARD IV
Suppose they take offence without a cause,
They are but Lewis and Warwick: I am Edward,
Your king and Warwick’s, and must have my will.
GLOUCESTER
And shall have your will, because our king:
Yet hasty marriage seldom proveth well.

DUTCH:
Dit doet hij, wijl gij onze koning zijt;
Maar toch, een haastige echt blijkt zelden best.

MORE:

Proverb: Marry in haste and repent at leisure

Malcontent=Disaffected
Weak of courage=Lacking in courage

Compleat:
Pensive=Peinzend, peinsachtig, beducht, bedrukt, zwaarmoedig, suf
Malecontent=Misnoegd, ‘t onvrede

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, marriage, courage

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
I came from Edward as ambassador,
But I return his sworn and mortal foe:
Matter of marriage was the charge he gave me,
But dreadful war shall answer his demand.
Had he none else to make a stale but me?
Then none but I shall turn his jest to sorrow.
I was the chief that raised him to the crown,
And I’ll be chief to bring him down again:
Not that I pity Henry’s misery,
But seek revenge on Edward’s mockery.

DUTCH:
Ik was de man, die hem ten troon verhief;
Ik wil de man zijn, die hem vallen doet.

MORE:

Charge he gave me=My order, commission
Stale=Dupe, laughing stock
Chief=Principal

Compleat:
Charge=Belasten, bevelen, opleggen, te laste leggen,
This shall be your charge=Dat zal uw post zyn

Topics: marriage, conflict, revenge

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Desdemona
CONTEXT:
My noble father,
I do perceive here a divided duty.
To you I am bound for life and education.
My life and education both do learn me
How to respect you. You are the lord of duty.
I am hitherto your daughter. But here’s my husband.
And so much duty as my mother showed
To you, preferring you before her father,
So much I challenge that I may profess
Due to the Moor my lord.

DUTCH:
k Zie, eed’le vader, hier mijn plicht gedeeld;
En ‘t leven dank ik u èn leer voor ‘t leven;
En beide, leer en leven, leeren wij
U te eeren, als wien al mijn eerbied toekomt;
Ja, ‘k ben uw kind

MORE:

Education=Upbringing
Learn=Teach
Challenge=Claim

Topics: duty, debt/obligation, relationship, marriage, learning/education, respect

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
I am out o’ friends, madam; and I hope to have
friends for my wife’s sake.
COUNTESS
Such friends are thine enemies, knave.
CLOWN
You’re shallow, madam, in great friends; for the
knaves come to do that for me which I am aweary of.
He that ears my land spares my team and gives me
leave to in the crop; if I be his cuckold, he’s my
drudge: he that comforts my wife is the cherisher
of my flesh and blood; he that cherishes my flesh
and blood loves my flesh and blood; he that loves my
flesh and blood is my friend: ergo, he that kisses
my wife is my friend. If men could be contented to
be what they are, there were no fear in marriage;
for young Charbon the Puritan and old Poysam the
Papist, howsome’er their hearts are severed in
religion, their heads are both one; they may jowl
horns together, like any deer i’ the herd.

DUTCH:
Als de mannen tevreden waren met te zijn wat ze zijn, zou niemand in het huwelijk iets duchten.

MORE:
Proverb: Young flesh and old fish are best
Proverb: Hearts may agree though heads differ
Shallow=Shallow of understanding
In great friends=About great friends; ingrate friends
Charbon (Chair bonne) (for Puritans who were opposed to fasting)
Poysam (Poisson) (appropriate for Roman Catholics)
Ears=Ploughs
To in=Gather, collect: “to in the crop”
Howsome’er=Howsoever
Jowl=Lock horns
Compleat:
To ear=Land bouwen
Cuckold=Hoorndraager
Drudge=Iemand die het vuilste en slobbigste werk doet

Topics: marriage, friendship, satisfaction

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
His company must do his minions grace,
Whilst I at home starve for a merry look.
Hath homely age th’ alluring beauty took
From my poor cheek? Then he hath wasted it.
Are my discourses dull? Barren my wit?
If voluble and sharp discourse be marred,
Unkindness blunts it more than marble hard.
Do their gay vestments his affections bait?
That’s not my fault; he’s master of my state.
What ruins are in me that can be found
By him not ruined? Then is he the ground
Of my defeatures. My decayèd fair
A sunny look of his would soon repair.
But, too unruly deer, he breaks the pale
And feeds from home. Poor I am but his stale.

DUTCH:
Ontnam reeds rimp’lige ouderdom mijn wang
Haar boeiend schoon? Wie heeft het mij geroofd,
Dan hij? Is geest en scherts in mij verdoofd?
Neemt iets aan vlug en lucht gekout den moed,
‘t Is barschheid, ruw en hard als steen, die ‘t doet.
Lokt and’rer fraai gewaad hem van mijn zij,
‘t Is mijn schuld niet, want hij koopt mij kleedij.
Wat is in mij vervallen en is ‘t niet
Door hem? Ja, zoo hij mij vervallen ziet,
Hij ziet zijn eigen werk; één zonnestraal
Van hem, mijn schoon herleeft in morgenpraal.

MORE:
Proverb: As hard as a stone (flint, rock)

Voluble=Fluent, articulate
Sharp=Subtle, witty
Voluble and sharp discourse=Articulate and witty conversation
To blunt=Dull the edge of, repress, impair, i.e. blunt the natural edge
Ground of=Reason for
Defeatures=Disfigurements
Stale= Laughing-stock, dupe; decoy or bait set up as a lure
Pale=Enclosure

Compleat:
A voluble tongue=Een vloeijende tong, een gladde tong, een tong die wel gehangen is
Court minion=Een gunsteling van den Vorst; Troetelkind
To pale in=Met paalen afperken, afpaalen. Paled in=Rondom met paalen bezet, afgepaald
To make on a stale (property or stalking-horse) to one’s design=Iemand gebruiken om ons oogmerk te bereiken

Topics: language, intellect, respect, marriage, relationship, loyalty

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King of France
CONTEXT:
Is it no more but this—a tardiness in nature
Which often leaves the history unspoke
That it intends to do?—My lord of Burgundy,
What say you to the lady? Love’s not love
When it is mingled with regards that stands
Aloof from th’ entire point. Will you have her?
She is herself a dowry.

DUTCH:
Want liefde is geen liefde, als zij met zaken wordt vermengd die daar volkomen vreemd aan zijn./
Die liefde is geen liefde, Waarmeê gedachten zich vermengen, verre Van ‘t ware doelwit dwalend.

MORE:

Tardiness=Slowness, or rather a habit of being behindhand in sth.
Aloof=Irrelevant to
Mingled with=Adulterated by
Regards=Consideration, respect, account
Compleat:
Tardiness=Traagheyd, Slofheyd, Langzaamheyd
Aloof=To loofwaard, loof op. In de ruymte, van verre

Topics: caution, value, , marriage, purpose

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
HAMLET: Farewell, dear mother.
KING: Thy loving father, Hamlet.
HAMLET: My mother : father and mother is man
and wife;/ Man and wife is one flesh ; and so, my mother

DUTCH:
Mijn moeder: vader en moeder is man en vrouw; man en vrouw is één vleesch; alzoo, mijn moeder vleesch; alzoo, mijn moeder.

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, relationship, marriage

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Suffolk
CONTEXT:
A dower, my lords! disgrace not so your king,
That he should be so abject, base and poor,
To choose for wealth and not for perfect love.
Henry is able to enrich his queen
And not seek a queen to make him rich:
So worthless peasants bargain for their wives,
As market-men for oxen, sheep, or horse.
Marriage is a matter of more worth
Than to be dealt in by attorneyship;
Not whom we will, but whom his grace affects,
Must be companion of his nuptial bed:
And therefore, lords, since he affects her most,
It most of all these reasons bindeth us,
In our opinions she should be preferr’d.
For what is wedlock forced but a hell,
An age of discord and continual strife?
Whereas the contrary bringeth bliss,
And is a pattern of celestial peace.

DUTCH:
Het huwlijk is een zaak, veel te gewichtig,
Om die door zaakwaarnemers af te doen;
En niet, wie gij, neen, wie de koning wenscht,
Zij de genoote van zijn huwlijksbed.

MORE:
Affects=Desires
Pattern=Model

Topics: marriage

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
Wilt thou needs be a beggar?
CLOWN
I do beg your good will in this case.
COUNTESS
In what case?
CLOWN
In Isbel’s case and mine own. Service is no
heritage: and I think I shall never have the
blessing of God till I have issue o’ my body; for
they say barnes are blessings.
COUNTESS
Tell me thy reason why thou wilt marry.
CLOWN
My poor body, madam, requires it: I am driven on
by the flesh; and he must needs go that the devil
drives.

DUTCH:
Mijn arm lichaam, doorluchte vrouw, verlangt het; ik
word door het vleesch er toe gedreven; en wien de duivel aandrijft, die moet loopen.

MORE:
Proverb: He must needs go that the devil drives, meaning necessity compels (Shakespeare meaning clearer that there’s no option)
Compleat:
He must needs go that the devil drives=Hy moet wel loopen die door de duivel gedreven word

Topics: marriage, reason, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, necessity

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN
O, blessèd that I might not! I chose an eagle
And did avoid a puttock.
CYMBELINE
Thou took’st a beggar, wouldst have made my throne
A seat for baseness.
IMOGEN
No, I rather added
A lustre to it.
CYMBELINE
O thou vile one!
IMOGEN
Sir,
It is your fault that I have loved Posthumus.
You bred him as my playfellow, and he is
A man worth any woman, overbuys me
Almost the sum he pays.

DUTCH:
Wèl mij, ik wachtte niet; ik koos een aad’laar,
En meed een gier.


Puttock=Kite, not a hawk worthy of training (a kite, buzzard or marsh harrier)
Overbuys=I am worth but a small fraction of what he gives for me
Baseness=Vileness, meanness
Take=Marry (take in marriage)

Compleat:
Puttock (buzzard)=Een buizard, zekere roofvogel
Baseness=Laagheid, lafhartigheid

Topics: marriage, value, order/society, status, love

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
You or any man living may be drunk at a time, man. I tell you what you shall do. Our general’s wife is now the general. I may say so in this respect, for that he hath devoted and given up himself to the contemplation, mark, and denotement of her parts and graces. Confess yourself freely to her, importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter, and, my fortunes against any lay worth naming, this crack of your love shall grow stronger than it was before.

DUTCH:
De vrouw van onzen Generaal is nu de Generaal; — ik
mag dit wel in zoo verre zeggen, als hij zich geheel
heeft toegewijd en overgegeven aan de beschouwing,
waarneming en opsomming van hare gaven en bevalligheden

MORE:

Proverb: A broken bone is the stronger when it is well set

Denotement=Contemplation; mark, indication: “in a man that’s just they are close –s, working from the heart”.
Importune (in the sense of ‘ask urgently and persistently’ usu. with a person as obj.)
Parts=Accomplishments, qualities

Compleat:
To importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen

Topics: excess, marriage, authority, marriage, love, skill/talent, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
That such a crafty devil as is his mother
Should yield the world this ass! A woman that
Bears all down with her brain, and this her son
Cannot take two from twenty, for his heart,
And leave eighteen. Alas, poor princess,
Thou divine Imogen, what thou endur’st,
Betwixt a father by thy step-dame governed,
A mother hourly coining plots, a wooer
More hateful than the foul expulsion is
Of thy dear husband, than that horrid act
Of the divorce he’d make! The heavens hold firm
The walls of thy dear honour, keep unshaked
That temple, thy fair mind, that thou mayst stand
T’ enjoy thy banished lord and this great land.

DUTCH:
Dat zulk een sluwe duivelin, zijn moeder,
Der wereld zulk een ezel schonk! Een vrouw,
Die met haar slimheid alles dwingt; en hij
Trekt, schoon ‘t den hals hem kostte, twee van twintig
Niet af, en houdt er achttien


Crafty=Cunning, devious
To coin=To fabricate, in a good as well as bad sense: “coining plots”
Step-dame=Stepmother
Expulsion=A driving away, banishment
Stand=To remain upright, not to fall, not to be lost, not to perish

Compleat:
Crafty=Loos, listig, schalk, doortrapt, leep
To coin (new words)=Smeeden, verzinnen

Topics: marriage, intellect, relationship, plans/intentions

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
Ay, marry, uncle; for I always thought
It was both impious and unnatural
That such immanity and bloody strife
Should reign among professors of one faith.
GLOUCESTER
Beside, my lord, the sooner to effect
And surer bind this knot of amity,
The Earl of Armagnac, near knit to Charles,
A man of great authority in France,
Proffers his only daughter to your grace
In marriage, with a large and sumptuous dowry.

DUTCH:
Om zulk verbond des te eerder te bewerken
En vaster vriendschapsknoop te leggen, biedt
Graaf Armagnac, een naverwant van Karel,
Een man van veel en groot gezag in Frankrijk
Zijn een’ge dochter, heer, aan uwe hoogheid
Ten echt aan, met een grooten, rijken bruidschat.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Immanity=Ferocity
Professor=One who makes declaration of his sentiments
Surer=More firmly
Near knit=Closely related

Compleat:
Immanity=Gruwelykheid, yslykheid
To profess=(hold a doctrine) Een leer belyden, gelooven, belydenis doen
Sure=Zeker, vast
To knit friendship=Vriendschap aangaan
To link together in a bond of amity=Zich door den band der vriendschap vereenigen

Topics: marriage, friendship, contract

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Emilia
CONTEXT:
Yes, a dozen, and as many to th’ vantage as
would store the world they played for.
But I do think it is their husbands’ faults
If wives do fall. Say that they slack their duties
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
And pour our treasures into foreign laps,
Or else break out in peevish jealousies,
Throwing restraint upon us. Or say they strike us,
Or scant our former having in despite.
Why, we have galls, and though we have some grace,
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
Their wives have sense like them. They see and smell
And have their palates both for sweet and sour,
As husbands have. What is it that they do
When they change us for others? Is it sport?
I think it is. And doth affection breed it?
I think it doth. Is ’t frailty that thus errs?
It is so too. And have not we affections,
Desires for sport, and frailty, as men have?
Then let them use us well, else let them know,
The ills we do, their ills instruct us so.

DUTCH:
Dus, dat ze ons goed behand’len of bedenken,
Dat, zoo ze ons krenken, zij ons leeren krenken.

MORE:

In despite=Out of spite
Peevish=Silly, spiteful
Galls=Tempers or spirits to cause resentment
Affection=Passion

Compleat:
Peevish=Kribbig, gemelyk

Topics: marriage, trust, betrayal, revenge, age/experience, equality, respect

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Parolles
CONTEXT:
PAROLLES
I am so full of businesses, I cannot answer thee
acutely. I will return perfect courtier; in the
which, my instruction shall serve to naturalize
thee, so thou wilt be capable of a courtier’s
counsel and understand what advice shall thrust upon
thee; else thou diest in thine unthankfulness, and
thine ignorance makes thee away: farewell. When
thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast
none, remember thy friends; get thee a good husband,
and use him as he uses thee; so, farewell.

DUTCH:
Als gij tijd hebt, zeg dan uwe gebeden op, en hebt gij dien niet, denk dan aan uwe vrienden.

MORE:
Answer thee acutely=Give a witty response
“None” believed by some to be a misprint for “money”.
Courtier=Paradigm of true courtesy
Use=Treat
Makes thee away=Finishes you off
Compleat:
Leisurably=By ledigen tyd
Courtier=Hoveling

Topics: marriage, friendship, loyalty, civility

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
Good my lord,
You are full of heavenly stuff, and bear the inventory
Of your best graces in your mind; the which
You were now running o’er: you have scarce time
To steal from spiritual leisure a brief span
To keep your earthly audit: sure, in that
I deem you an ill husband, and am glad
To have you therein my companion.

DUTCH:
Mijn waarde lord,
Vol heil’ge schatten zijt ge, en de’ inventaris
Van uw genadegaven draagt ge in ‘t hart;
Dien liept gij juist eens door.

MORE:
Stuff=Characteristics, substance
Grace=Virtue, best qualities
Audit=Reckoning
Husband=Manager (ref. husbandry)
Compleat:
Stuff=Stof, stoff
Grace=Gunst, bevalligheid
Husbandman=Akkerman, landman
Husband of a ship=Iemand die zorg draaft voor het aangeeven, lossen, en zolderen van een scheeps laading, een boekhouder van een schip

Topics: value, merit, respect, marriage

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