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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Cymbeline ACT/SCENE: 2.3 SPEAKER: Cymbeline CONTEXT: MESSENGER
So like you, sir, ambassadors from Rome;
The one is Caius Lucius.
CYMBELINE
A worthy fellow,
Albeit he comes on angry purpose now.
But that’s no fault of his. We must receive him
According to the honour of his sender,
And towards himself, his goodness forespent on us,
We must extend our notice. DUTCH: t Is een waardig man,
Al is ook toorn het doel van zijne komst;
Want zijn schuld is dit niet

Goodness forespent=Good offices done/shown previously
Notice=Attention, regard Topics: value, status, blame, anger, merit

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
Most sweet voices!
Better it is to die, better to starve,
Than crave the hire which first we do deserve.
Why in this woolvish gown should I stand here,
To beg of Hob and Dick, that do appear,
Their needless vouches? Custom calls me to’t:
What custom wills, in all things should we do’t,
The dust on antique time would lie unswept,
And mountainous error be too highly heapt
For truth to o’er-peer. Rather than fool it so,
Let the high office and the honour go
To one that would do thus. I am half through;
The one part suffer’d, the other will I do.

DUTCH:
Dit wil ‘t gebruik? — Maar deden
Wij alles naar den eisch van oude zeden,
Dan wierd het stof des tijds nooit weggevaagd;
De dwaling wies tot berg, en nimmer waagt
De waarheid dan de slechting

MORE:
Proverb: Custom makes sin no sin

Schmidt:
Hob and Dick=Tom, Dick and Harry
Vouches=Attestations
Custom= (1) Common use, received order; (2) Habit, regular practice
O’erpeer (archaic definition)=Rise or tower above, overcome, excel.
Compleat:

Custom=Gewoonte, neering
The customary laws of a nation=De gewoone wetten van een Volk
Peer=Gelyk, weergaa

Topics: merit, achievement, status, authority, leadership, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Gardener
CONTEXT:
GARDENER
Go, bind thou up yon dangling apricocks,
Which, like unruly children, make their sire
Stoop with oppression of their prodigal weight:
Give some supportance to the bending twigs.
Go thou, and like an executioner,
Cut off the heads of too fast growing sprays,
That look too lofty in our commonwealth:
All must be even in our government.
You thus employ’d, I will go root away
The noisome weeds, which without profit suck
The soil’s fertility from wholesome flowers.
SERVANT
Why should we in the compass of a pale
Keep law and form and due proportion,
Showing, as in a model, our firm estate,
When our sea-walled garden, the whole land,
Is full of weeds, her fairest flowers choked up,
Her fruit-trees all upturned, her hedges ruin’d,
Her knots disorder’d and her wholesome herbs
Swarming with caterpillars?

DUTCH:
En gij, sla als een dienaar des gerichts
Den kop af aan die al te weel’ge spruiten,
Die zich te hoog in onzen staat verheffen

MORE:

Apricock=Abricot
Spray=Small branches, shoots
Noisome=Harmful
Compass of a pale=Within a fenced area, enclosure
Firm=Well-ordered, stable
Knots=Intricate flowerbeds and plots

Compleat:
Apricock, abricock=Apricot
Noisom=Besmettelyk, schaadelyk, vuns, leelyk, vuil
Pale=Een paal, bestek
Pale fence=Een afschutsel met paalen
Compass=Omtrek, omkreits, begrip, bestek, bereik
Firm=Vast, hecht
Knot (difficulty)=Eene zwaarigheid
A garden with knots=Een bloemperk met figuuren

Topics: merit, envy, order/society

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
So far be mine, my most redoubted lord,
As my true service shall deserve your love.
KING RICHARD II
Well you deserve: they well deserve to have,
That know the strong’st and surest way to get.
Uncle, give me your hands: nay, dry your eyes;
Tears show their love, but want their remedies.
Cousin, I am too young to be your father,
Though you are old enough to be my heir.
What you will have, I’ll give, and willing too;
For do we must what force will have us do.
Set on towards London, cousin, is it so?

DUTCH:
Wij moeten doen, wat overmacht gebiedt. —
Naar Londen; — neef, niet waar, daar gaan wij heen

MORE:

Proverb: They that are bound must obey

Redoubted=Feared, respected (often used to address a monarch)
Want=Fail to provide (a remedy)

Compleat:
Redoubted=Geducht, ontzaglyk
Want=Gebrek

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, status, remedy, merit

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Countess
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
How called you the man you speak of, madam ?
COUNT
He was famous, sir, in his profession, and it was his great right to be so: Gerard de Narbon.
LAFEW
He was excellent indeed, madam: the king very
Lately spoke of him admiringly, and mourningly.
He was skilful enough to have liv’d still,
if knowledge could be set up against mortality.

DUTCH:
Hij was zeer beroemd, heer, in zijn vak, en met het volste recht: Gerard van Narbonne .

MORE:
His great right=His fame was justified
Mortality=Subjection to death, necessity of dying
Compleat:
Mortality=Sterflykheid

Topics: death, life, skill/talent, legacy, merit

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
CHAMBERLAIN
My lords, you speak your pleasures:
What he deserves of you and me I know;
What we can do to him, though now the time
Gives way to us, I much fear. If you cannot
Bar his access to the king, never attempt
Any thing on him; for he hath a witchcraft
Over the king in’s tongue.
NORFOLK
O, fear him not;
His spell in that is out: the king hath found
Matter against him that for ever mars
The honey of his language. No, he’s settled,
Not to come off, in his displeasure.

DUTCH:
O, wees niet bezorgd;
Die tooverkracht is uit. De koning kwam
Iets op het spoor, wat zijner woorden honig
Voortaan vergalt. In ‘s konings ongenade
Steekt hij nu zoo, dat hij er nimmer uitkomt.

MORE:
Gives way=Gives us an opportunity
Out=Over, at an end
Settled=Decided
Compleat:
To give way=Wyken, plaats maaken
Settled=Vastgezet, vastgesteld, bevestigd

Topics: merit, manipulation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Williams
CONTEXT:
I am afeard there are few die well that die in a battle, for how can they charitably dispose of anything when blood is their argument? Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it, who to disobey were against all proportion of subjection.

DUTCH:
Nu, en als die menschen niet goed sterven, dan ziet het er donker uit voor den koning, die hen er toe gebracht
heeft, daar toch ongehoorzaamheid aan hem tegen
alle regels van onderdanigheid zou strijden.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
In Re Taxman Clothing Company, Ine., 1991 Bankr. LEXIS 1659, at 1 (Katz, J.).

Topics: cited in law, justification, merit, justice

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
I do not care. I’ll give thrice so much land
To any well-deserving friend;
But in the way of bargain, mark you me,
I’ll cavil on the ninth part of a hair.
Are the indentures drawn? Shall we be gone?

DUTCH:
t Is me onverschillig; driemaal zooveel land
Geef ik den eersten, besten, trouwen vriend;
Maar geldt het een verdrag of koop, let wel,
Dan twist ik om het tiende van een haar.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cavil=To quarrel, to find fault (the phrase “splitting hairs” was recorded in the 1652 OED and would mean one who is very persistent, stubborn)
Well-deserving=Full of merit, worthy (deserving)
Indentures=Contracts
Compleat:
Cavil=Haairkloovery, woordentwist
To cavil=Knibbelen, kibbelen, haairklooven, woordvitten, bedillen, schimpen
Indenture=Een verdragsbrief [zo genoemd] om dat men daar van twee al-eens luidende kopyen maakt, en die met tanden of hoeken van malkanderen snydt.
CITED IN US LAW:
United States v. Jones, 176 F.2d 278, 289-90 (9th Cir. 1949)(Yankwich, J.) (In a government contract dispute: “To use Hotspur’ s phrasing, the Government was not ‘in the way of bargain’ caviling ‘on the ninth part of a hair.’ …”

Topics: cited in law, contract, merit, dispute

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Where virtue is, these are more virtuous.
Nor from mine own weak merits will I draw
The smallest fear or doubt of her revolt,
For she had eyes and chose me. No, Iago,
I’ll see before I doubt, when I doubt, prove,
And on the proof there is no more but this:
Away at once with love or jealousy!

DUTCH:
Nee, vóór ik twijfel,
wil ik eerst zien, ná twijfel eerst bewijs.
Als dat bewijs er is, is het meteen
met liefde uit en uit met jaloezie.

MORE:

Doubt=Suspicion
Revolt=Gross departure from duty; unfaithfulness

Compleat:
Revolt=Afvallen, oproerig worden, aan ‘t muiten slaan

Topics: suspicion, evidence, virtue, merit, flaw/fault, betrayal

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
And for me,
I have no further gone in this than by
A single voice, and that not passed me but
By learnèd approbation of the judges. If I am
Traduced by ignorant tongues, which neither know
My faculties nor person, yet will be
The chronicles of my doing, let me say
’Tis but the fate of place, and the rough brake
That virtue must go through. We must not stint
Our necessary actions in the fear
To cope malicious censurers, which ever,
As ravenous fishes, do a vessel follow
That is new trimmed, but benefit no further
Than vainly longing. What we oft do best,
By sick interpreters, once weak ones, is
Not ours or not allowed; what worst, as oft,
Hitting a grosser quality, is cried up
For our best act. If we shall stand still
In fear our motion will be mocked or carped at,
We should take root here where we sit,
Or sit state-statues only.

DUTCH:
Zijn wij roerloos,
Bevreesd voor smalen zoo we iets doen, wij moesten
Hier, waar wij zitten, wortel slaan, of als
Staatsbeelden zitten.

MORE:
Approbation=Approval
Traduced=Slandered
Faculties=Qualities
Doing=Actions
Brake=Thicket, as an obstacle
Cope=Face, deal with
Sick=Malicious
Compleat:
Approbation=Goedkeuring
Traduce=Kwaadspreeken, lasteren; (accuse) beschuldigen
Faculties=Vermoogens
Doing=Een doening, daad
Brake=Een Vlas-braak

Topics: intellect, betrayal, order/society, merit

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Gentle cousin,
Let us go thank him and encourage him.
My father’s rough and envious disposition
Sticks me at heart. Sir, you have well deserved.
If you do keep your promises in love
But justly, as you have exceeded all promise,
Your mistress shall be happy.
ROSALIND
Gentleman,
Wear this for me—one out of suits with fortune
That could give more but that her hand lacks means.
Shall we go, coz?
CELIA
Ay. Fare you well, fair gentleman.
ORLANDO
Can I not say “I thank you”? My better parts
Are all thrown down, and that which here stands up
Is but a quintain, a mere lifeless block.

DUTCH:
Mijn beter deel
Ligt neergeveld, en wat nog overeind staat,
Is als een pop bij ‘t steekspel, roerloos, dood.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quintain=a post or figure set up for beginners in tilting to run at.

Burgersdijk notes:
Een pop bij ‘t steekspel. A quintain: een houten figuur, die vooral bij oefeningen in het toernooirijden als doel voor de lans diende. Volgens Douce was dit doel, in zijn meest volkomen vorm, een afgezaagde boomstam, waarop een menschelijke figuur geplaatst was, die aan den linkerarm een schild, in de rechterhand een zak met zand vasthield. De toernooiruiters poogden in galop met hun lans den kop of het lijf van de pop te treffen; mislukte dit en raakten zij het schild, dan draaide de pop snel om en gaf hun, tot groot vermaak der toeschouwers, een slag met den zandzak.

Topics: emotion and mood, civility, merit, promise, respect

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
All this was order’d by the good discretion
Of the right reverend Cardinal of York.
BUCKINGHAM
The devil speed him! no man’s pie is freed
From his ambitious finger. What had he
To do in these fierce vanities? I wonder
That such a keech can with his very bulk
Take up the rays o’ the beneficial sun
And keep it from the earth.
NORFOLK
Surely, sir,
There’s in him stuff that puts him to these ends;
For, being not propp’d by ancestry, whose grace
Chalks successors their way, nor call’d upon
For high feats done to the crown; neither allied
For eminent assistants; but, spider-like,
Out of his self-drawing web, he gives us note,
The force of his own merit makes his way
A gift that heaven gives for him, which buys
A place next to the king.

DUTCH:
De duivel haal’ hem! Zijn eergier’ge vinger
Wil ieders brijpan roeren

MORE:
Often misquoted as “People’s good deeds we write in water. The evil deeds are etched in brass”
Proverb: Injuries are written in brass
Live=Live on (are etched)
Manners=Conduct, actions
Speak his good=Speak of his goodness, virtue, charitable deeds
Compleat:
Manners=Manierlykheid

Topics: merit, ambition, work, status, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
For I dare so far free him—made him fear’d,
So hated, and so banish’d: but he has a merit,
To choke it in the utterance. So our virtues
Lie in the interpretation of the time:
And power, unto itself most commendable,
Hath not a tomb so evident as a chair
To extol what it hath done.
One fire drives out one fire; one nail, one nail;
Rights by rights falter, strengths by strengths do fail.
Come, let’s away. When, Caius, Rome is thine,
Thou art poor’st of all; then shortly art thou mine.

DUTCH:
Voor nagels wijken nagels, gloed voor gloed;
Door rechten struik’len rechten, moed breekt moed.

MORE:
Proverb: Fire drives out fire (1592)
Proverb: One fire (or one nail or one poison) drives out another.

In the interpretation of the time=Evaluation according to prevailing standards
Unto itself most commendable=Having a very high opinion of itself

Schmidt:
Extol=Praise, magnify
Chair=A seat of public authority

Compleat:
Chair of state=Zetel
Extoll=Verheffen, pryzen, looven
To extol one, raise him up to the sky=Iemand tot den Hemel toe verheffen
Highly commendable=Ten hoogste pryselyk

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, merit, virtue, reputation, ruin, remedy

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Abergavenny
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
Surely, sir,
There’s in him stuff that puts him to these ends;
For, being not propp’d by ancestry, whose grace
Chalks successors their way, nor call’d upon
For high feats done to the crown; neither allied
For eminent assistants; but, spider-like,
Out of his self-drawing web, he gives us note,
The force of his own merit makes his way
A gift that heaven gives for him, which buys
A place next to the king.
ABERGAVENNY
I cannot tell
What heaven hath given him,—let some graver eye
Pierce into that; but I can see his pride
Peep through each part of him: whence has he that,
If not from hell? the devil is a niggard,
Or has given all before, and he begins
A new hell in himself.

DUTCH:
Want, niet gestut op voorgeslacht, welks glans
Den weg voor ‘t nakroost teekent, niet geroepen
Om grootsche daden, voor de kroon volbracht,
Aan hooge helpers niet verwant, maar als
De spin in ‘t web, door haar geweven, toont
Hij ons, dat hem de kracht van zijn verdienste
Zijn weg baant

MORE:
Stuff=Characteristics, substance
Propped=Propped up, lean on
Grace=Rank, distinction
Chalk=Marks (the path of)
Compleat:
Stuff=Stof, stoffe
Prop=Een stut, steun. To prop=Ondersteunen, stutten
Grace=Gunst, bevalligheid
To chalk=Bekryten, met kryt schetsen. To chalk out=Uytmerken, afteykenen

Burgersdijk notes:
Toont hij ons. In het Engelsch: he gives us note, zooals in de meeste uitgaven, volgens de verbetering van Capell gelezen wordt; de folio heeft hiervoor den tusschenzin: O give us note, als het ware „mark what I say”, welke door Knight voor de juiste lezing gehouden wordt.

Topics: fate/destiny, order/society, wisdom, merit, pride

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: First Citizen
CONTEXT:
CORIOLANUS
No, sir,’twas never my desire yet to trouble the
poor with begging.
THIRD CITIZEN
You must think, if we give you any thing, we hope to
gain by you.
CORIOLANUS
Well then, I pray, your price o’ the consulship?
FIRST CITIZEN
The price is to ask it kindly.
CORIOLANUS
Kindly! Sir, I pray, let me ha’t: I have wounds to
show you, which shall be yours in private. Your
good voice, sir; what say you?
SECOND CITIZEN
You shall ha’ it, worthy sir.
CORIOLANUS
A match, sir. There’s in all two worthy voices
begged. I have your alms: adieu.

DUTCH:
De prijs is, dat gij vriendlijk er om vraagt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Consulship=Position of consul
A match=Agreement, compact, bargain

Compleat:
Match (or bargain)=Koop, onderhandeling, overeenstemming
Consulship=Consulaat, consulschap

Topics: poverty/wealth, promise, leadership, merit

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Plantagenet
CONTEXT:
PLANTAGENET
Tut, tut, here is a mannerly forbearance:
The truth appears so naked on my side
That any purblind eye may find it out.
SOMERSET
And on my side it is so well apparell’d,
So clear, so shining and so evident
That it will glimmer through a blind man’s eye.
PLANTAGENET
Since you are tongue-tied and so loath to speak,
In dumb significants proclaim your thoughts:
Let him that is a true-born gentleman
And stands upon the honour of his birth,
If he suppose that I have pleaded truth,
From off this brier pluck a white rose with me.

DUTCH:
Aan mijne zijde is zij zoo welgekleed;
Zoo helder, glansrijk, zoo volkomen duid’lijk,
Dat zij een blinde zelfs in ‘t oog moet stralen.

MORE:
Mannerly=Polite
Forbearance=Reserve
Purblind=Partially blind
Apparelled=Dressed up
Dumb significants=Mute signs

Compleat:
Purblind=Stikziende
Signification=Beeteknis, betekening, beduidenis, beduidsel
To forbear (let alone)=Staan laaten, nalaaten, vermyden

Topics: dispute, truth, merit, evidence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
Things done well,
And with a care, exempt themselves from fear;
Things done without example, in their issue
Are to be fear’d. Have you a precedent
Of this commission? I believe, not any.
We must not rend our subjects from our laws,
And stick them in our will. Sixth part of each?
A trembling contribution! Why, we take
From every tree lop, bark, and part o’ the timber;
And, though we leave it with a root, thus hack’d,
The air will drink the sap. To every county
Where this is question’d send our letters, with
Free pardon to each man that has denied
The force of this commission: pray, look to’t;
I put it to your care.

DUTCH:
Goed gedane zaken,
Met zorg volbracht, ontdoen zichzelf van vrees;
Maar zaken zonder voorbeeld zijn te duchten
In haar gevolgen

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
Example=Precedent
Exaction=Extortion of tax, compulsion to pay
Issue=Outcome
Commission=Taxes, instructions to impose tax
Rend=Tear
Trembling=Terrifying
Force=Validity
Compleat:
To exact=Afeysschen, afvorderen
Issue=Een uytgang, uytslag, uytkomst
Commission=Last, volmagt, lastbrief, provisie
To rend=Scheuren, van een ryten
Trembling=Beevende
Force=Kracht, magt

Topics: patience, preparation, merit

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.9
SPEAKER: Cominius
CONTEXT:
COMINIUS
You shall not be
The grave of your deserving; Rome must know
The value of her own: ’twere a concealment
Worse than a theft, no less than a traducement,
To hide your doings; and to silence that,
Which, to the spire and top of praises vouch’d,
Would seem but modest: therefore, I beseech you
In sign of what you are, not to reward
What you have done—before our army hear me.
MARTIUS
I have some wounds upon me, and they smart
To hear themselves remember’d.

DUTCH:
Gij moogt het graf
Niet zijn van uw verdienste; Rome wete,
Wat het in u bezit; het waar’ verraad,
‘t Ware erger dan een diefstal, te verhelen,
Wat gij volbracht hebt; dat te zwijgen, wat,
Door welken lof ook hemelhoog verheven,
Toch nog bescheiden klinkt

MORE:
Schmidt:
Be the grave of=Bury, swallow up as in a grave
Traducement=Censure, obloquy
Vouch=Maintain, assert

Compleat:
Traduce=Kwaadspreeken, lasteren; (accuse) beschuldigen
To vouch=Staande houden, bewyzen, verzekeren

Topics: merit, flattery, value, achievement

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
And for me,
I have no further gone in this than by
A single voice; and that not pass’d me but
By learned approbation of the judges. If I am
Traduced by ignorant tongues, which neither know
My faculties nor person, yet will be
The chronicles of my doing, let me say
‘Tis but the fate of place, and the rough brake
That virtue must go through. We must not stint
Our necessary actions, in the fear
To cope malicious censurers; which ever,
As ravenous fishes, do a vessel follow
That is new-trimm’d, but benefit no further
Than vainly longing. What we oft do best,
By sick interpreters, once weak ones, is
Not ours, or not allow’d; what worst, as oft,
Hitting a grosser quality, is cried up
For our best act. If we shall stand still,
In fear our motion will be mock’d or carp’d at,
We should take root here where we sit, or sit
State-statues only.

DUTCH:
Volbrenge een elk
Wat moet gebeuren; niemand weif’le uit angst
Voor strijd met booze vitters, die toch steeds
Als vraat’ge visschen ieder vaartuig volgen,
Dat nieuw is uitgerust, doch niets bejagen
Dan ijdel spart’len

MORE:
Approbation=Approval
Traduced=Slandered
Faculties=Qualities
Doing=Actions
Brake=Thicket, as an obstacle
Cope=Face, deal with
Sick=Malicious
Compleat:
Approbation=Goedkeuring
Traduce=Kwaadspreeken, lasteren; (accuse) beschuldigen
Faculties=Vermoogens
Doing=Een doening, daad
Brake=Een Vlas-braak

Topics: intellect, betrayal, order/society, merit

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
So far be mine, my most redoubted lord,
As my true service shall deserve your love.
KING RICHARD II
Well you deserve: they well deserve to have,
That know the strong’st and surest way to get.
Uncle, give me your hands: nay, dry your eyes;
Tears show their love, but want their remedies.
Cousin, I am too young to be your father,
Though you are old enough to be my heir.
What you will have, I’ll give, and willing too;
For do we must what force will have us do.
Set on towards London, cousin, is it so?

DUTCH:
0, veel verdient gij; — hij verdient te ontvangen,
Die vast en goed den weg weet om te erlangen. —

MORE:

Proverb: They that are bound must obey

Redoubted=Feared, respected (often used to address a monarch)
Want=Fail to provide (a remedy)

Compleat:
Redoubted=Geducht, ontzaglyk
Want=Gebrek

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, statys, remedy, merit

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Servant
CONTEXT:
GARDENER
Go, bind thou up yon dangling apricocks,
Which, like unruly children, make their sire
Stoop with oppression of their prodigal weight:
Give some supportance to the bending twigs.
Go thou, and like an executioner,
Cut off the heads of too fast growing sprays,
That look too lofty in our commonwealth:
All must be even in our government.
You thus employ’d, I will go root away
The noisome weeds, which without profit suck
The soil’s fertility from wholesome flowers.
SERVANT
Why should we in the compass of a pale
Keep law and form and due proportion,
Showing, as in a model, our firm estate,
When our sea-walled garden, the whole land,
Is full of weeds, her fairest flowers choked up,
Her fruit-trees all upturned, her hedges ruin’d,
Her knots disorder’d and her wholesome herbs
Swarming with caterpillars?

DUTCH:
Wat moeten we, in den omvang van een heining,
Naar wet en vorm en juistheid alles reeg’len,

MORE:

Apricock=Abricot
Spray=Small branches, shoots
Noisome=Harmful
Compass of a pale=Within a fenced area, enclosure
Firm=Well-ordered, stable
Knots=Intricate flowerbeds and plots (Curious-knotted: “thy c. garden,” Love’s Labour’s Lost)

Compleat:
Apricock, abricock=Apricot
Noisom=Besmettelyk, schaadelyk, vuns, leelyk, vuil
Pale=Een paal, bestek
Pale fence=Een afschutsel met paalen
Compass=Omtrek, omkreits, begrip, bestek, bereik
Firm=Vast, hecht
Knot (difficulty)=Eene zwaarigheid
A garden with knots=Een bloemperk met figuuren

Topics: merit, envy, order/society

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
My lord, my lord,
I am a simple woman, much too weak
To oppose your cunning. You’re meek and humble-mouth’d;
You sign your place and calling, in full seeming,
With meekness and humility; but your heart
Is cramm’d with arrogancy, spleen, and pride.
You have, by fortune and his highness’ favours,
Gone slightly o’er low steps and now are mounted
Where powers are your retainers, and your words,
Domestics to you, serve your will as’t please
Yourself pronounce their office. I must tell you,
You tender more your person’s honour than
Your high profession spiritual: that again
I do refuse you for my judge; and here,
Before you all, appeal unto the pope,
To bring my whole cause ‘fore his holiness,
And to be judged by him.

DUTCH:
U hief ‘t geluk en zijner hoogheid gunst
Licht over lage trappen tot deez’ hoogte,
Waar grooten uw vazallen, en uw woorden
Uw knechten zijn, u dienen, naar uw luim
Hen tot hun ambt benoemt

MORE:
Sign=Show, display
Full seeming=Every outward appearance
Slightly=Effortlessly, carelessly, complacently
Powers=Those in power
Domestics=Servants (words serving)
Tender=Have regard to, care about
Compleat:
Seeming=Schynende
Slightly=Slechtelyk. To make slight=Verachten, kleynachten
Domestick=Een huysgenoot, dienstboode
To tender=Aanbieden, van harte bezinnen, behartigen

Topics: insult, appearance, merit, status

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Martius
CONTEXT:
He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? The one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
Where he should find you lions, finds you hares;
Where foxes, geese: you are no surer, no,
Than is the coal of fire upon the ice,
Or hailstone in the sun. Your virtue is
To make him worthy whose offence subdues him
And curse that justice did it.
Who deserves greatness
Deserves your hate; and your affections are
A sick man’s appetite, who desires most that
Which would increase his evil. He that depends
Upon your favours swims with fins of lead
And hews down oaks with rushes. Hang ye! Trust Ye?
With every minute you do change a mind,
And call him noble that was now your hate,
Him vile that was your garland. What’s the matter,
That in these several places of the city
You cry against the noble senate, who,
Under the gods, keep you in awe, which else
Would feed on one another? What’s their seeking?

DUTCH:
Een vriend’lijk woord tot u waar’ laag gevlei,
Geen afschuw waard

MORE:
Schmidt:
Virtue=Merit, what you excel in
Make worthy=Exalt, glorify
Proud=Full of self-esteem, haughty
Offence subdues=Ruined, disabled, tamed, crushed by their crime
Sure=Reliable, stable

Compleat:
Subdue=Onderbrengen
Virtue (efficacy, power, propriety)=Kracht, vermogen, hoedanigheid, eigenschap
Proud=Hovaardig, hoogmoedig, verwaand

Topics: flattery, trust, justice, merit, value

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