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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Measure for Measure ACT/SCENE: 3.2 SPEAKER: Pompey CONTEXT: ’Twas never merry world since, of two usuries, the
merriest was put down, and the worser allowed by
order of law a furred gown to keep him warm; and
furred with fox and lamb-skins too, to signify, that
craft, being richer than innocency, stands for the facing. DUTCH: Met het vroolijk leventjen in de wereld is het uit, sinds,
van twee woekerzaken, de vroolijkste verboden is en aan
de slechtste van de twee bij de wet een pelsrok werd
toegekend om zich warm te houden,
MORE: Schmidt:
Usury=The practice of taking interest for money
Craft=Cunning, artifice, guile
Compleat:
To lend upon usury=Op rente leenen
I shall pay you with usury=Ik zal het met woeker betaalen
Craft=List, loosheyd Topics: law/legal, offence, corruption, status, money, order/society

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Cade
CONTEXT:
SAY
Nothing but this; ’tis ‘bona terra, mala gens.’
CADE
Away with him, away with him! He speaks Latin.
SAY
Hear me but speak, and bear me where you will.
Kent, in the Commentaries Caesar writ,
Is term’d the civil’st place of this isle:
Sweet is the country, because full of riches;
The people liberal, valiant, active, wealthy;
Which makes me hope you are not void of pity.
I sold not Maine, I lost not Normandy,
Yet, to recover them, would lose my life.
Justice with favour have I always done;
Prayers and tears have moved me, gifts could never.
When have I aught exacted at your hands,
But to maintain the king, the realm and you?
Large gifts have I bestow’d on learned clerks,
Because my book preferr’d me to the king,
And seeing ignorance is the curse of God,
Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven,
Unless you be possess’d with devilish spirits,
You cannot but forbear to murder me:
This tongue hath parley’d unto foreign kings
For your behoof

DUTCH:
Weg met hem! weg met hem! hij spreekt Latijn.

MORE:
See also “He can speak French; and therefore he is a traitor” (4.2)

Civil’st=Most civilized
Clerks=Scholars
Liberal=Refined
Favour=Lenience
Aught=Anything
Exacted=Taken in the form of taxes
My book=My learning, education
Preferred me=Recommended me to, put me in favour with
Parley=Talks, negotiations for an agreement
Behoof=Advantage, benefit

Compleat:
Civilized=Welgemanierd, beschaafd, heusch
Clerk=Klerk, schryver
A liberal education=Een goede of ruime opvoeding
Favourable (jkind)=Vriendelyk
Aught=Iets
To exact=Afvorderen, afeisschen
To prefer one=Iemand bevorderen, zyn fortuin maaken
To parley=Gesprek houden, te spraake staane, te woorde staan van overgaave spreeken
Behoof=Nut, geryf, gemak

Burgersdijk notes:
Bona terra, mala gens. Het land goed, maar het volk kwaad.
De leefste streek. In Arthur Golding’s vertaling der Commentaren van Julius Czesar (1565) kon Shakespeare lezen: Of all the inhabitants of this isle the Kentishnien are the civilest. Sh. spreekt hier ook van the civil’st place.

Topics: money, value, learning/education, language

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN, [as Fidele]Good masters, harm me not.
Before I entered here, I called, and thought
To have begged or bought what I have took. Good troth,
I have stol’n naught, nor would not, though I had found
Gold strewed i’ th’ floor. Here’s money for my meat.
I would have left it on the board so soon
As I had made my meal, and parted
With prayers for the provider.
GUIDERIUS [as Polydor]
Money, youth?
ARVIRAGUS [as Cadwal]All gold and silver rather turn to dirt,
As ’tis no better reckoned but of those
Who worship dirty gods.

DUTCH:
Doet, goede menschen, mij geen leed; ik riep,
Aleer ik binnentrad, en was van plan
Te vragen of te koopen, wat ik nu
Genomen heb.


Thought to have:
I had thought (followed by the perf. inf.)=I intended, I supposed, I was going
Part=Depart, go away from
Reckon=To esteem, to think, to hold

Compleat:
He thought to serve me a base trick=Hy meende my een lelyke poets te speelen
To reckon (or esteem)=Achten, voorhouden
Dirty (base)=Vuil, laag

Topics: money, honesty, poverty and wealth

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
But little. I am armed and well prepared.—
Give me your hand, Bassanio. Fare you well
Grieve not that I am fall’n to this for you,
For herein Fortune shows herself more kind
Than is her custom. It is still her use
To let the wretched man outlive his wealth,
To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow
An age of poverty—from which lingering penance
Of such misery doth she cut me off.
Commend me to your honourable wife.
Tell her the process of Antonio’s end.
Say how I loved you. Speak me fair in death.
And when the tale is told, bid her be judge
Whether Bassanio had not once a love.
Repent but you that you shall lose your friend,
And he repents not that he pays your debt.
For if the Jew do cut but deep enough,
I’ll pay it presently with all my heart.

DUTCH:
Slechts luttel; ‘k ben bereid en welgewapend! —
Geef mij de hand, Bassanio, vaar gij wel!

MORE:
But little=Just a little
Use=Habit
Process=Tale
Repent but you=Only regret

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Thus do I ever make my fool my purse.
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well.
The better shall my purpose work on him.
Cassio’s a proper man. Let me see now,

DUTCH:
Zoo moet mijn nar mij steeds als buidel dienen.
Want voor mijn groote ervaring ware ‘t schande,
Als ik met zulk een eend mijn tijd verspilde,
Zoo niet tot scherts en voordeel

MORE:

Snipe=Bird, also ‘worthless’ fellow, simpleton
Gained knowledge=Practical experience
In that kind=In that regard
‘Twixt=Betwixt (between)
Surety=Certainty
Holds me well=Respects, has a good opinion of
Purpose=Plan

Compleat:
Snipe=Snip, snep
Betwixt=Tusschen, tusschenbeide
Betwixt the devil and the red sea=Tusschen hangen en worgen
Purpose (design, resolution, project)=Voorneemen, besluit, ontwerp

Topics: money, skill/talent, age/experience, respect, suspicion

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Corin
CONTEXT:
No more but that I know the more one sickens, the worse at ease he is, and that he that wants money, means, and content is without three good friends; that the property of rain is to wet, and fire to burn; that good pasture makes fat sheep; and that a great cause of the night is lack of the sun; that he that hath learned no wit by nature nor art may complain of good breeding or comes of a very dull kindred.

DUTCH:
Hij die gebrek heeft aan geld, middelen en tevredenheid mist drie goede vrienden./Iemand die geen inkomsten, kapitaal en plezier in het leven heeft, mist drie goede vrienden./
Niet meer, dan dat ik weet, dat iemand, hoe zieker hij is, zich minder pleizierig voelt; en dat wie geen geld, geen goed en geen tevredenheid heeft, drie goede vrienden minder heeft.

MORE:

Topics: order/society, intellect, money, poverty and wealth, nature

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
I can get no remedy against this consumption of the purse.
Borrowing only lingers and lingers it out, but the disease is
incurable. Go bear this letter to my Lord of Lancaster, this
to the Prince, this to the Earl of Westmoreland; and this to
old Mistress Ursula, whom I have weekly sworn to marry
since I perceived the first white hair on my chin. About it.
You know where to find me.

DUTCH:
Ik weet geen middel tegen die uittering van de beurs; borgen rekt en rekt de ziekte, maar de kwaal is ongeneeslijk,

MORE:

Proverb: He is purse-sick and lacks a physician

Linger=To protract, to draw out, not to bring to a speedy end
Consumption=A wasting disease
Ursula=Name meaning ‘bear’

Compleat:
Consumption=Verquisting, vertier
To linger=Leuteren, draalen

Topics: remedy, excess, money

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Roderigo
CONTEXT:
RODERIGO
Tush! Never tell me. I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.
IAGO
‘Sblood, but you’ll not hear me! If ever I did dream of such a matter, abhor me.
RODERIGO
Thou told’st me
Thou didst hold him in thy hate.
IAGO
Despise me
If I do not. Three great ones of the city
(In personal suit to make me his lieutenant)
Off-capped to him, and by the faith of man
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place.

DUTCH:
Ik neem je kwalijk, Jago,
dat jij die zo goed weg wist in mijn beurs
alsof dat ding van jou was, hiervan wist.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Unkindly=In a harsh and ungentle manner
Abhor=To detest to extremity, to loathe; with an accusation
Personal=Done or experienced in one’s own person, not by a representative or other indirect means
Suit=Petition, address of entreaty

Compleat:
Unkindly: To take a thing unkindly=Iets onvriendelyk opvatten
Abhor=Verfooijen, een afschrik hebben
Personal=In eigen hoofde
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding

Burgersdijk notes:
Geen praatjens, Jago. In ‘t Engelsch: Never tell me. Wij vallen hier midden in een gesprek; deze woorden
slaan op iets, dat Jago gezegd heeft; men mag aannemen, dat hij verklaard heeft, niets van de betrekking tasschen Othello en Desdemona geweten te hebben. — Daarop slaat ook Rodrigo’s gezegde in reg. 6: Gij haat hem innig; gij zult hem dus wel gade geslagen en er dus wel van geweten hebben; waarop Jago hem van zijn onderwerp af wil brengen door de redenen van zijn haat uiteen te zetten.

Topics: money, friendship, loyalty, respect

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.8
SPEAKER: Fluellen
CONTEXT:
WILLIAMS
I will none of your money.
FLUELLEN
It is with a good will. I can tell you it will serve you to mend your shoes. Come, wherefore should you be so pashful? Your shoes is not so good. ‘Tis a good silling, I warrant you, or I will change it.

DUTCH:

Ik wil uw geld niet.
Fluellen. Het is met een goeden wil; ik kan u zeggen, dat het
u dienen kan voor het lappen van uw schoenen

MORE:

Pashful=Bashful
Silling=Shilling

Mend your shoes: Shoes being an object of attention to the common soldier and most liable to be worn out (Malone).

Topics: money, dignity, poverty and wealth

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
I am as like to call thee so again,
To spet on thee again, to spurn thee too.
If thou wilt lend this money, lend it not
As to thy friends, for when did friendship take
A breed for barren metal of his friend?
But lend it rather to thine enemy,
Who, if he break, thou mayst with better face
Exact the penalty.
SHYLOCK
Why, look you how you storm!
I would be friends with you and have your love,
Forget the shames that you have stained me with,
Supply your present wants and take no doit
Of usance for my moneys—and you’ll not hear me!
This is kind I offer.
BASSANIO
This were kindness.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij dit geld ons leenen, leen het niet
Als aan uw vrienden, — vriendschap zou geen vrucht
Van dood metaal ooit eischen van zijn vriend, —
Maar leen ‘t veeleer uw vijand uit, want blijft
Die in gebreke, des te scherper kunt gij
Het uiterste eischen.

MORE:
Take a breed for barren metal=Charge interest
For=For the sake of
With better face=With no loss of face
Storm=Rage
Doit=Coin of little value
Usance=Interest
Kind=Kindness, an act of generosity
Compleat:
Face=’t Aangezigt, gelaat, gedaante
To storm=Bestormen, raazen en tieren
He storms and rages mightily=Hy buldert en raast geweldig
Doit=Een duyt (achttste deel van een stuyver)
Usance=Koopmans gebruik, Uso, een woord onder de Koopluiden gebruikelyk omtrent de betaaling der Wisselbrieven, betekenende een maand tyd; en tusschen dit en Spanje, enz. twee maanden.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Saye
CONTEXT:
SAYE
Nothing but this; ’tis ‘bona terra, mala gens.’
CADE
Away with him, away with him! He speaks Latin.
SAYE
Hear me but speak, and bear me where you will.
Kent, in the Commentaries Caesar writ,
Is term’d the civil’st place of this isle:
Sweet is the country, because full of riches;
The people liberal, valiant, active, wealthy;
Which makes me hope you are not void of pity.
I sold not Maine, I lost not Normandy,
Yet, to recover them, would lose my life.
Justice with favour have I always done;
Prayers and tears have moved me, gifts could never.
When have I aught exacted at your hands,
But to maintain the king, the realm and you?
Large gifts have I bestow’d on learned clerks,
Because my book preferr’d me to the king,
And seeing ignorance is the curse of God,
Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven,
Unless you be possess’d with devilish spirits,
You cannot but forbear to murder me:
This tongue hath parley’d unto foreign kings
For your behoof

DUTCH:
Veel giften schonk ik aan geleerde mannen,
Omdat mijn weten bij den koning gold,
En wijl onwetendheid Gods vloek, maar kennis
De vleugel is, die ons ten hemel voert.

MORE:
See also “He can speak French; and therefore he is a traitor” (4.2)

Civil’st=Most civilized
Clerks=Scholars
Liberal=Refined
Favour=Lenience
Aught=Anything
Exacted=Taken in the form of taxes
My book=My learning, education
Preferred me=Recommended me to, put me in favour with
Parley=Talks, negotiations for an agreement
Behoof=Advantage, benefit

Compleat:
Civilized=Welgemanierd, beschaafd, heusch
Clerk=Klerk, schryver
A liberal education=Een goede of ruime opvoeding
Favourable (jkind)=Vriendelyk
Aught=Iets
To exact=Afvorderen, afeisschen
To prefer one=Iemand bevorderen, zyn fortuin maaken
To parley=Gesprek houden, te spraake staane, te woorde staan van overgaave spreeken
Behoof=Nut, geryf, gemak

Burgersdijk notes:
Bona terra, mala gens. Het land goed, maar het volk kwaad.
De leefste streek. In Arthur Golding’s vertaling der Commentaren van Julius Czesar (1565) kon Shakespeare lezen: Of all the inhabitants of this isle the Kentishnien are the civilest. Sh. spreekt hier ook van the civil’st place.

Topics: money, value, learning/education, language

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
EGEON
Proceed, Solinus, to procure my fall,
And by the doom of death end woes and all.
DUKE
Merchant of Syracuse, plead no more.
I am not partial to infringe our laws.
The enmity and discord which of late
Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your duke
To merchants, our well-dealing countrymen,
Who, wanting guilders to redeem their lives,
Have sealed his rigorous statutes with their bloods,
Excludes all pity from our threat’ning looks.
For since the mortal and intestine jars
’Twixt thy seditious countrymen and us,
It hath in solemn synods been decreed,
Both by the Syracusians and ourselves,
To admit no traffic to our adverse towns.

DUTCH:
Koopman van Syracuse, spaar uw reed’nen;
Ik volg, steeds onpartijdig, streng de wet.
De bitt’re vijandschap, die onlangs rees,
Doordien uws hertogs wreede toren woedde
Op hand’laars, wakk’re burgers onzer stad, —
Die, ‘t geld ontberend om zich los te koopen,
Zijn wet bezeeg’len moesten met hun bloed, —
Bant alle ontferming van ons gram gelaat.
Want sedert tusschen uw onrustig volk
En ons een diep rampzaal’ge twist ontstond,
Verboden hier en ginder raadsbesluiten,
Zoowel van die van Syracuse als ons,
Den handel tusschen beide ontvlamde steden

MORE:
Doom=Judgment, sentence. This exact phrase also appears in Henry V, 3.6. and in Titus Andronicus, 3.1
Intestine=Domestic, internal, between people of the same nation.
Jars=Quarrels
Partial=Inclined (meaning now obsolete (OED))
Sealed … with their bloods=Cost their lives
Adverse=hostile

Compleat:
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
A heavy doom=een zwaar vonnis
Dooms-man=een Rechter, Scheidsman
Dooms-day=De dag des oordeels
Dooms-day in the Afternoon=St Jutmis, nooit
To doom=Veroordelen, verwyzen, doemen
Jar=Getwist, geharrewar, gekrakkeel, gekyf
Intestine=Inwendig, inheemsch
An intestine war=Een inlandsche oorlog

Burgersdijk notes:
Verboden hier en ginder raadsbesluiten. In een stuk, uitgevaardigd in het begin van Elizabeth’s regeering, wordt erkend, dat beperkende bepalingen tot bescherming van eigen handel groot ongenoegen wekken tusschen vorsten, en aan de kooplieden veel leed en schade toebrengen. Toch riep Elizabeth zelve, weinige jaren later, zulke bepalingen in het leven. Het is, of de dichter hier wil uitdrukken, welke noodlottige gevolgen zij des noods zouden kunnen hebben.

Topics: law/legal, business, money

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
Neither a borrower nor a lender be, for loan oft loses both itself and friend, and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry

DUTCH:
Geen borger zult gij zijn, ook niet een leener /
Leen niet aan en leen niet van; je verliest wat je leent en een vriend.

MORE:
Husbandry=economy, thrift
Compleat:
Borrower=Ontleener, inleener, borger.
Oft-quoted list of maxims in Polonius’ ‘fatherly advice’ monologue to Laertes. Many of these nuggets have acquired proverb status today, although they weren’t invented by Shakespeare (in this case, for example, Who lends to a friend loses double, c1594).
CITED IN US LAW:
Williams v. Public Finance Corporation, 598 F.2d 349, 359 (5th Cir. 1979);
Browner v. District of Columbia, 549 A.2d 1107 (D.C. 1988);
Metropolitan Life lnsurance Company v. Promenade. Towers Mutual Housing Corporation, 84 Md. App. 702, 705,581 A.2d 846, 848 (1990).
CITED IN EU LAW: LOKHIN v. RUSSIA – 47152/06 (Judgment (Merits and Just Satisfaction) : Court (Grand Chamber)) [2016] ECHR 300 (23 March 2016)/[2016] ECHR 300
Judge Motoc: “As Shakespeare said in the words of Hamlet: “Neither a borrower nor a lender be; for loan oft loses both itself and friend”. I find that our Court is in exactly the situation described by Hamlet.”

Topics: wisdom, proverbs and idioms, money, cited in law, still in use

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: First Jailer
CONTEXT:
A heavy reckoning for you, sir. But the comfort
is, you shall be called to no more payments, fear
no more tavern bills, which are often the sadness
of parting as the procuring of mirth. You come in
faint for want of meat, depart reeling with too
much drink; sorry that you have paid too much,
and sorry that you are paid too much; purse and
brain both empty; the brain the heavier for being
too light; the purse too light, being drawn of heaviness:
of this contradiction you shall now be
quit. O, the charity of a penny cord! It sums up
thousands in a trice: you have no true debitor and
creditor but it; of what’s past, is, and to come,
the discharge: your neck, sir, is pen, book and
counters; so the acquittance follows.

DUTCH:
Hoofd en beurs
beide leeg, het hoofd des te zwaarder, naarmate het
lichter is, de beurs des te opgeruimder, naarmate zij
meer zwaarte verloren heeft.


Proverb: A heavy purse makes a light heart
Proverb: In a trice

Heavier=Sleepier with drink
Drawn=Emptied
Drawn of heaviness=Lighter, being emptied of coins
Paid too much=Punished by excess drinking
To quit=To set at liberty, to free, to deliver
Acquittance=Receipt in full

Compleat:
To quit (dispense with, excluse)=Bevryden, verschoonen, ontslaan
I quit you from it=Ik ontsla ‘er u van
Forbearance is no acquittance=Uitstellen is geen quytschelden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, intellect, excess, money, debt/obligation

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Belarius
CONTEXT:
You, Polydor, have proved best woodman and
Are master of the feast. Cadwal and I
Will play the cook and servant; ’tis our match.
The sweat of industry would dry and die
But for the end it works to. Come, our stomachs
Will make what’s homely savoury. Weariness
Can snore upon the flint when resty sloth
Finds the down pillow hard. Now peace be here,
Poor house, that keep’st thyself.

DUTCH:
Het loon verzoet den arbeid; zonder dat
Zou ‘t vuur allicht verdooven


Woodman=Hunter
Match=Compact
Resty is an obsolete form of restive (Century Dictionary: “By transition through the sense ‘impatient under restraint,’ and partly by confusion with ‘restless,’ the word has taken in
present use the additional sense ‘restless.'”)
Onions defines restive as inactive, inert and sluggish (rusty).
Schmidt explains resty sloth as “stiff with too much rest”, comparing “resty-stiff” in Edward III.

Compleat:
Wood-men=Oppassers in des Konings bosschaagie, boomsnoeijers
Match (bargain)=Koop, onderhandeling, overeenstemming
Restive/Resty (froward, stubborn)=Stug, koppig
A resty horse=Een paerd dat niet voort wil of zich niet wil laaten regeeren

Topics: money, honesty, poverty and wealth, work, satisfaction

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Miranda
CONTEXT:
There be some sports are painful, and their labour
Delight in them sets off. Some kinds of baseness
Are nobly undergone. And most poor matters
Point to rich ends. This my mean task
Would be as heavy to me as odious, but
The mistress which I serve quickens what’s dead
And makes my labours pleasures. Oh, she is
Ten times more gentle than her father’s crabbed,
And he’s composed of harshness. I must remove
Some thousands of these logs and pile them up,
Upon a sore injunction. My sweet mistress
Weeps when she sees me work, and says such baseness
Had never like executor. I forget,
But these sweet thoughts do even refresh my labours,
Most busiest when I do it.

DUTCH:
Vermaken zijn er, die vermoeien, ‘t zwoegen
Verhoogt den lust er van; soms wordt verneed’ring
Met eer verduurd en voert ook het geringste
Tot heerlijke uitkomst

MORE:
Baseness=Low rank manual labour
Mean=humble
Heavy=Sorrowful, grievous
Quickens=Enlivens
Sore injunction=Harsh command
Crabbed=Churlish, morose
Compleat:
Baseness=Laagheid, lafhartigheid; Geringheid
Mean=Gering, slecht
Heavy (sasd)=Droevig, verdrietig
The burden lay sore upon me=De last lag zwaar op my (of drukte my zeer)
Crabbed=Wrang, stuursch, kribbig, nors, korzel
A crabbed fellow=Een norse vent

Topics: work, status, civility, satisfaction, money

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
Thou sayest well, and it holds well too, for the fortune of us that are the moon’s men doth ebb and flow like the sea, being governed, as the sea is, by the moon. As for proof now: a purse of gold most resolutely snatched on Monday night and most dissolutely spent on Tuesday morning, got with swearing “Lay by” and spent with crying “Bring in”; now in as low an ebb as the foot of the ladder, and by and by in as high a flow as the ridge of the gallows

DUTCH:

Zeer goed gezegd, en zeer juist bovendien; want het geluk van ons, die dienaars zijn der maan, heeft zijn eb en vloed als de zee, en wordt, evenals de zee, door de maan bestuurd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Holds=to be fit, to be consistent: “thou sayest well, and it –s well too
Ridge=The top of a long and narrow elevation
Compleat:
Hold (bear up)=Ondersteunen

Topics: language, understanding, money, reason

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Thoughts tending to content flatter themselves
That they are not the first of fortune’s slaves,
Nor shall not be the last; like silly beggars
Who sitting in the stocks refuge their shame,
That many have and others must sit there;
And in this thought they find a kind of ease,
Bearing their own misfortunes on the back
Of such as have before endured the like.
Thus play I in one person many people,
And none contented: sometimes am I king;
Then treasons make me wish myself a beggar,
And so I am: then crushing penury
Persuades me I was better when a king;
Then am I king’d again: and by and by
Think that I am unking’d by Bolingbroke,
And straight am nothing: but whate’er I be,
Nor I nor any man that but man is
With nothing shall be pleased, till he be eased
With being nothing. Music do I hear?

DUTCH:
Zoo speel ik veel personen, gansch alleen,
Nooit een tevreed’ne

MORE:

Proverb: I am not the first and shall not be the last

Refuge=Protection from danger, expedient in distress

Compleat:
Refuge=Toevlugt, wyk, schuilplaats

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, poverty and wealth, money, satisfaction

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL
The commons hast thou rack’d; the clergy’s bags
Are lank and lean with thy extortions.
SOMERSET
Thy sumptuous buildings and thy wife’s attire
Have cost a mass of public treasury.
BUCKINGHAM
Thy cruelty in execution
Upon offenders, hath exceeded law,
And left thee to the mercy of the law.
QUEEN MARGARET
Thy sale of offices and towns in France,
If they were known, as the suspect is great,
Would make thee quickly hop without thy head.

DUTCH:
De wet werd overtreden door de wreedheid,
Waarmee gij euveldaders hebt bestraft;
Dit levert wis u aan haar strengheid over.

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Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Commons=common people
Rack=Hurt (by exacting taxes)
Mass=Great quantities
Public treasure=Public funds
Suspect=Suspicion
Extortion=Rapacious and illegal exaction of taxes

Compleat:
The common (vulgar) people=Het gemeene Volk
To rack=(torture) Pynigen; (torment) Plaagen, kwellen, pynigen; (grind, oppress the people) Het volk verdrukken, onderdrukken
The public treasury=’s Lands schatkamer
Extortion (or extorsion)=Afkneveling, afpersen, afdwinging

Topics: law/legal, punishment, money, poverty and wealth, integrity

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Pistol
CONTEXT:
Come, let’s away.—My love, give me thy lips.
Look to my chattels and my movables.
Let senses rule. The word is “Pitch and pay.”
Trust none, for oaths are straws, men’s faiths are wafer-cakes,
And Holdfast is the only dog, my duck.
Therefore, caveto be thy counselor.
Go, clear thy crystals.—Yoke-fellows in arms,
Let us to France, like horse-leeches, my boys,
To suck, to suck, the very blood to suck

DUTCH:
Een eed is stroo; geloof en -trouw zijn wafels,
En slechts „Hou vast” de ware hond, mijn duifjen

MORE:

Proverb: Pitch and pay (pay ready money) (15th century)
Proverb: Touch pot, touch penny
Proverb: Promises and pie-crusts are made to be broken (1599)
Proverb: Brag is a good dog, but holdfast is a better

Let senses rule=Be governed by prudence
Men’s faiths are wafer-cakes=Faith crumbles
Clear thy crystals=Dry your eyes (or clean your glasses (Johnson))
Look to=Look after
Caveto=Caution
Yoke-fellow=Companion

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, business, money, caution

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Not so, my lord. Your ill angel is light, but I hope he that
looks upon me will take me without weighing. And yet in
some respects I grant I cannot go. I cannot tell. Virtue is of
so little regard in these costermongers’ times that true valor
is turned bear-herd; pregnancy is made a tapster, and hath his
quick wit wasted in giving reckonings. All the other gifts
appurtenant to man, as the malice of this age shapes them,
are not worth a gooseberry. You that are old consider not the
capacities of us that are young. You do measure the heat of
our livers with the bitterness of your galls, and we that are in
the vaward of our youth, I must confess, are wags too.

DUTCH:
De deugd is in deze kruidenierstijden zoo weinig in aanzien, dat echte dapperheid berenhoeder moet worden.

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Schmidt:
Angel=A coin (ill angel=false coin, a coin that is light (clipped)) (Every person was traditionally thought to have a good angel and a bad angel, sometimes appearing in the morality plays)
Regard=Opinion, estimation, or judgement
Costermonger=A petty dealer, a mercenary soul, (In these costermonger times: These times when the prevalence of trade has produced that meanness that rates the merit of every thing by money. Johnson)
Bear-herd (other passages have berrord, berard and bearard)=Bear leader
Pregnancy=Cleverness
Malice=Malignity, disposition to injure others
Liver=Regarded as the seat of love and passion
Gall=Source of bile, hence seat of rancour
Vaward=Vanguard
Wag=Light-hearted youth, joker

Compleat:
Costermonger (one who sells fruit)=Fruitkooper
Pregnancy of wit=Doordringendheid van verstand
Malice=Kwaadaardigheid, boosheid, spyt, kwaadheid
Wag=Een potsemaaker, boef
Vaward=Voorhoede

Topics: virtue, age/experience, money, honesty

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Banquo
CONTEXT:
ROSS
And, for an earnest of a greater honor,
He bade me, from him, call thee thane of Cawdor:
In which addition, hail, most worthy thane,
For it is thine.
BANQUO
What, can the devil speak true?
MACBETH
The thane of Cawdor lives. Why do you dress me
In borrowed robes?

DUTCH:
Wat! spreekt de duivel waarheid?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Earnest=Subst., handsel, part paid beforehand as a pledge
Compleat:
Handsel, Hansel=Handgift
To give/take hansel=Handgift geeven/ontvangen
To hansel something=een ding voor ‘t eerst gebruiken
I took hansel before my shop was quite open=Ik ontving handgeld voor dat myn winkel nog ter deeg open was.

Topics: truth, good and bad, honesty, money, business

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