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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors ACT/SCENE: 2.1 SPEAKER: Adriana CONTEXT: Patience unmoved! No marvel though she pause;
They can be meek that have no other cause.
A wretched soul, bruised with adversity
We bid be quiet when we hear it cry,
But were we burdened with like weight of pain,
As much or more we should ourselves complain.
So thou, that hast no unkind mate to grieve thee,
With urging helpless patience would relieve me;
But, if thou live to see like right bereft,
This fool-begged patience in thee will be left. DUTCH: Een armen mensch, door ‘t nijdig lot geplaagd,
Vermanen wij tot kalm zijn, als hij klaagt;
Maar drukte eens ons hetzelfde leed als hem,
Niet min, licht meer, verhieven we onze stem
MORE: Proverb: All commend patience but none can endure to suffer
Proverb: Let him be begged for a fool
Begging for a fool refers to the practice of petitioning for custody of the mentally ill or minors so as to gain control of their assets
Pause=Pause to consider marriage
Like=Similar
Like right bereft=To have rights similarly taken from you

Schmidt:
Helpless=Receiving no aid, wanting support
Bereave (bereft)=Taken from, spoiled, impaired

Compleat:
Bereft, bereaved=Beroofd
To beg one for a fool, to beg his estate of the King=Het bestier der goederen van een Krankzinnig mensch, van den Koning verzoeken Topics: adversity, law/legal, patience, poverty and wealth

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.6
SPEAKER: Montjoy
CONTEXT:
Thus says my king: “Say thou to Harry of England, though we seemed dead, we did but sleep. Advantage is a better soldier than rashness. Tell him we could have rebuked him at Harfleur, but that we thought not good to bruise an injury till it were full ripe. Now we speak upon our cue, and our voice is imperial. England shall repent his folly, see his
weakness, and admire our sufferance. Bid him therefore consider of his ransom, which must proportion the losses we have borne, the subjects we have lost, the disgrace we have digested, which, in weight to reanswer, his pettiness would bow under.

DUTCH:
Ofschoon wij dood schenen, wij sliepen slechts;
omzichtigheid is een beter krijgsman dan overijling.

MORE:

Sufferance=A bearing with patience; moderation, patience
Advantage=Opportunity
Proportion=Be in proportion with
Digested=Stomached
Weight=Equal weight
Reanswer=Compensate, answer for

Compleat:
Sufferance=Verdraagzaamheid, toegeevendheid
To digest (put up with)=Verdraagen

Topics: patience, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
Be advised.
Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself. We may outrun
By violent swiftness that which we run at
And lose by overrunning. Know you not
The fire that mounts the liquor till ’t run o’er
In seeming to augment it wastes it? Be advised.
I say again there is no English soul
More stronger to direct you than yourself,
If with the sap of reason you would quench
Or but allay the fire of passion.
BUCKINGHAM
Sir, I am thankful to you, and I’ll go along
By your prescription. But this top-proud fellow—
Whom from the flow of gall I name not, but
From sincere motions—by intelligence,
And proofs as clear as founts in July when
We see each grain of gravel, I do know
To be corrupt and treasonous.

DUTCH:
O laat u raden,
Stook de’ oven voor uw vijand niet zoo heet,
Dat die uzelf verzengt.

MORE:
Outrun=Run past
Overrun=Overshoot, run past, leave behind
Run over=Boil over
Augment=Increase in size
Go along by=Go along with, follow
Prescription=Advice, direction
Gall=Bitterness of mind, rancour
Motions=Motives
Compleat:
To out-run=Voorby loopen, ontloopen, voorby rennen
To augment=Vermeerderen, vergrooten, toeneemen
I will go along with thee=Ik zal met u gaan
Prescription=Voorschryving, verordening; Aaloud gebruyk
Gall=Gal. Bitter as gall=Zo bitter als gal
Motion=Beweeging, aandryving, voorslag

Topics: patience, anger, caution, reason

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
FRIAR LAWRENCE
Hence from Verona art thou banishèd.
Be patient, for the world is broad and wide.
ROMEO
There is no world without Verona walls
But purgatory, torture, hell itself.
Hence “banishèd” is banished from the world,
And world’s exile is death. Then “banishèd,”
Is death mistermed. Calling death “banishment,”
Thou cutt’st my head off with a golden ax
And smilest upon the stroke that murders me.

DUTCH:
Wees geduldig want de wereld is groot en wijd /
Wees kalm, de wereld toch is ruim en wijd.

MORE:

Topics: patience, proverbs and idioms, punishment

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Claudius
CONTEXT:
This sudden sending him away must seem
Deliberate pause. Diseases desperate grown,
By desperate appliance are relieved,
Or not at all.

DUTCH:
Wanhopige ziekten worden door wanhopige middelen genezen, of in het geheel niet genezen. /
Maar, zooals iemand met een gore ziekte, Bevreesd voor ruchtbaarheid, wij lieten juist De kwaal het merg aantasten.

MORE:
“A desperate disease must have a desperate cure.” Or “Desperate times call for desperate measures.”

Topics: still in use, caution, patience, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
CHIEF JUSTICE
To punish you by the heels would amend the attention of your ears, and I care not if I do become your physician.
FALSTAFF
I am as poor as Job, my lord, but not so patient. Your Lordship may minister the potion of imprisonment to me in respect of poverty, but how I should be your patient to follow your prescriptions, the wise may make some dram of a scruple, or indeed a scruple itself.

DUTCH:
Ik ben zoo arm als Job, mylord, maar zulk een lijdzaam lijder zou ik niet zijn. Uwe lordschap kan mij den drank der gevangenschap opdringen; maar of ik als lijder uwe voorschriften zou opvolgen, daarover kan de wijze wel een grein van een scrupel koesteren, ja geheel scrupuleus zijn.

MORE:

Proverb: To have the patience of Job

“To punish you by the heels” is another reference to the punishment of baffling. This was formally a punishment of infamy inflicted on recreant nights, which included hanging them up by the heels.

Schmidt:
Minister to=Administer (medicines), to prescribe, to order
Scruple=The third part of a dram; proverbially a very small quantity
Make a dram of a scruple=Quibble
Potion=Medicine, remedy

Compleat:
Dram=Vierendeel loods; een zoopje, een borrel
Scruple=Een gewigtje van xx greinen
To scrupule=Zwaarigheid maaken

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised, patience

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
LEAR
No, I will be the pattern of all patience.
I will say nothing.

DUTCH:
Nee, toonbeeld wil ik wezen van geduld;
ik zal niets zeggen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Pattern=something of supreme excellence, fit to serve as a model or exemplar
Compleat:
Pattern=Een voorbeeld, staal

Topics: patience, respect

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
If, by the Tribunes’ leave, and yours, good people,
I may be heard, I would crave a word or two,
The which shall turn you to no further harm
Than so much loss of time.
SICINIUS
Speak briefly then,
For we are peremptory to dispatch
This viperous traitor. To eject him hence
Were but one danger, and to keep him here
Our certain death. Therefore it is decreed
He dies tonight.

DUTCH:
.
Zoo gij, tribunen, en
Gij, goede burgers, mij gehoor verleent,
Vraag ik: vergunt me een woord of twee; zij kosten
U verder niets dan wat verloren tijd.

MORE:
Viperous (venomous, malignant) was a common source of metaphor in Elizabethan writing.
Peremptory=Resolved, determined

Compleat:
Peremptory=Volstrekt, uitvoering, volkomen, uiteindig

Topics: anger, punishment, language, patience

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Archbishop
CONTEXT:
Note this: the King is weary
Of dainty and such picking grievances,
For he hath found to end one doubt by death
Revives two greater in the heirs of life;
And therefore will he wipe his tables clean
And keep no telltale to his memory
That may repeat and history his loss
To new remembrance.

DUTCH:
Neen, neen, mylord. Bedenk: de koning is
Dat vergezocht, spitsvondig wrokken moe.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Dainty=minute, detailed
Picking=fastidious
Wipe his tables clearn=A tablet of slate or ivory

Compleat:
Picking=Poikking, pluizing; pikkende
Tell-tale=Een verklikker, klikspaan

Topics: memory, truth, patience

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
I did but smile till now:
Now, good my lord, give me the scope of justice.
My patience here is touch’d. I do perceive
These poor informal women are no more
But instruments of some more mightier member
That sets them on: let me have way, my lord,
To find this practise out.

DUTCH:
Tot nu toe glimlachte ik;
Thans smeek ik, heer, vergun aan ‘t recht zijn loop;
Voorbij is mijn geduld.

MORE:
Touched=Tested
Member=One of a community
Practise=Plot

Topics: law/legal, justice, patience, conspiracy

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
O, reason not the need! Our basest beggars
Are in the poorest thing superfluous.
Allow not nature more than nature needs,
Man’s life’s as cheap as beast’s. Thou art a lady.
If only to go warm were gorgeous,
Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear’st,
Which scarcely keeps thee warm. But, for true need—
You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need.

DUTCH:
Spreek niet van nodig! De armste bedelaar
heeft aan een vod nog meer dan nodig is./
0, zwijgt van noodig! De armste beed’laar zelfs
Heeft iets, hoe min ook, nog in overvloed;

MORE:

Schmidt:
Reason not= Don’t argue or debate (the need)
Basest = poorest, lowest.
True need=Non-material needs

Topics: reason, life, justification, poverty and wealth, patience

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
I am sorry, sir, that I have hindered you,
But I protest he had the chain of me,
Though most dishonestly he doth deny it.
SECOND MERCHANT
How is the man esteemed here in the city?
ANGELO
Of very reverend reputation, sir,
Of credit infinite, highly beloved,
Second to none that lives here in the city.
His word might bear my wealth at any time.

DUTCH:
Hij heeft een besten naam, heer; zijn crediet
Is onbeperkt, hij algemeen bemind;
Hij is van de allereersten van de stad,
Ja, meer dan mijn vermogen geldt zijn woord

MORE:
Second to none wasn’t invented by Shakespeare, although he was an early user.
Reverend (or reverent)=Entitled to high respect, venerable
Bear his wealth=(1) His word is as good as his bond; (2) I would trust him with all my wealth without security

Compleat:
Reverend=Eerwaardig, geducht

Topics: adversity, law/legal, patience, poverty and wealth

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
Patience herself would startle at this letter
And play the swaggerer. Bear this, bear all.
She says I am not fair, that I lack manners.
She calls me proud, and that she could not love me
Were man as rare as phoenix. ‘Od’s my will,
Her love is not the hare that I do hunt.
Why writes she so to me? Well, shepherd, well,
This is a letter of your own device.

DUTCH:
Bij zoo iets stoof Geduld, zichzelf vergetend,
Als razend op; wie dit verdraagt, duldt alles.
Ze zegt: ik ben niet mooi, heb geen manieren,
Ben trotsch; kortom nooit zou zij mij beminnen,
Al ware een man zoo zeldzaam als de Phenix.

MORE:
Schmiddt:
Swaggerer=A blusterer, a bully
Startle=Intr. to move in a sudden alarm; to be frighted or shocked: “patience herself would s. at this letter”.
Compleat:
Swaggerer=Een snorker, pocher

Topics: patience, language

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KEEPER
My lord, I dare not: Sir Pierce of Exton, who
lately came from the king, commands the contrary.
KING RICHARD II
The devil take Henry of Lancaster and thee!
Patience is stale, and I am weary of it.
KEEPER
Help, help, help!
KING RICHARD II
How now! what means death in this rude assault?
Villain, thy own hand yields thy death’s instrument.
Go thou, and fill another room in hell.
That hand shall burn in never-quenching fire
That staggers thus my person. Exton, thy fierce hand
Hath with the king’s blood stain’d the king’s own land.
Mount, mount, my soul! thy seat is up on high;
Whilst my gross flesh sinks downward, here to die.

DUTCH:
Geduld is duf, ik heb een walg er van.

MORE:

Stale=Worse for age, vapid and tasteless, worn out by use
Stagger=To cause to reel, to fell

Compleat:
Stale=Oud
To stagger (move or shake)=Schudden, beweegen, doen waggelen

Topics: patience, good and bad

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Balthazar
CONTEXT:
And doubt not, sir, but she will well excuse
Why at this time the doors are made against you.
Be ruled by me; depart in patience,
And let us to the Tiger all to dinner,
And about evening come yourself alone
To know the reason of this strange restraint.
If by strong hand you offer to break in
Now in the stirring passage of the day,
A vulgar comment will be made of it;
And that supposèd by the common rout
Against your yet ungallèd estimation
That may with foul intrusion enter in
And dwell upon your grave when you are dead;
For slander lives upon succession,
Forever housèd where it gets possession.

DUTCH:
Want laster, eens gezaaid, is schielijk groot,
En blijft aan ‘t groeien, waar zij wortel schoot.

MORE:
Proverb: Envy never dies

Doors made against you=Doors closed to you
Possession had a strong meaning, akin to ‘infect’
Ungallèd=unsullied, untarnished
Estimation=Reputation
Vulgar=Public
Foul=Forced

Compleat:
Vulgar= (common) Gemeen
To gall (vex)=Tergen, verbitteren

Topics: proverbs and idioms, envy, patience, caution, reputation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Ah, Nell, forbear! Thou aimest all awry;
I must offend before I be attainted;
And had I twenty times so many foes,
And each of them had twenty times their power,
All these could not procure me any scathe,
So long as I am loyal, true and crimeless.
Wouldst have me rescue thee from this reproach?
Why, yet thy scandal were not wiped away
But I in danger for the breach of law.
Thy greatest help is quiet, gentle Nell:
I pray thee, sort thy heart to patience;
These few days’ wonder will be quickly worn

DUTCH:
Leer, bid ik, aan uw hart geduld; deze opspraak
Van weinig dagen is weldra gedaan.

MORE:

Forbear=Abstain, refrain from doing
Aimest=Guess
Attaint=Convicted of treason
Scathe=Harm
Sort=Adapt, Adjust

Compleat:
Forbear=Zich van onthouden
To attaint=Schuldidg verklaaren, betichten
Attainted=Overtuigd van misdaad, misdaadig verklaard
To do scathe=Bezeeren

Topics: patience, loyalty, caution

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
Things done well,
And with a care, exempt themselves from fear;
Things done without example, in their issue
Are to be fear’d. Have you a precedent
Of this commission? I believe, not any.
We must not rend our subjects from our laws,
And stick them in our will. Sixth part of each?
A trembling contribution! Why, we take
From every tree lop, bark, and part o’ the timber;
And, though we leave it with a root, thus hack’d,
The air will drink the sap. To every county
Where this is question’d send our letters, with
Free pardon to each man that has denied
The force of this commission: pray, look to’t;
I put it to your care.

DUTCH:
Goed gedane zaken,
Met zorg volbracht, ontdoen zichzelf van vrees;
Maar zaken zonder voorbeeld zijn te duchten
In haar gevolgen

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
Example=Precedent
Exaction=Extortion of tax, compulsion to pay
Issue=Outcome
Commission=Taxes, instructions to impose tax
Rend=Tear
Trembling=Terrifying
Force=Validity
Compleat:
To exact=Afeysschen, afvorderen
Issue=Een uytgang, uytslag, uytkomst
Commission=Last, volmagt, lastbrief, provisie
To rend=Scheuren, van een ryten
Trembling=Beevende
Force=Kracht, magt

Topics: patience, preparation, merit

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Though other things grow fair against the sun,
Yet fruits that blossom first will first be ripe.
Content thyself awhile. By th’mass, ’tis morning :
Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.
Retire thee, go where thou art billeted.
Away, I say, thou shalt know more hereafter –
Nay, get thee gone.
Two things are to be done.
My wife must move for Cassio to her mistress –
I’ll set her on.
Myself the while to draw the Moor apart,
And bring him jump when he may Cassio find
Soliciting his wife. Ay, that’s the way :
Dull not device by coldness and delay.

DUTCH:
Genoegen en bedrijvigheid maken de uren kort./
Plezier en daden lijken de uren kort te maken.

MORE:

Other things grow fair=Long-term plans blossom slowly
Fruits that blossom first=Preliminary plans (have already borne fruit)
Move for=Plead for
Jump=At that precise time
Device=Plot
To dull=To incapacitate, make inert
Coldness=Lack of enthusiasm or energy

Compleat:
To move (to stir up, to egg on, to solicit or persuade)=Aanstooken, oprokkenen
To move to compassion=Tot medelyden beweegen

Topics: time, plans/intentions, conspiracy, patience, purpose

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
Was there ever man had such luck? When I kissed the jack, upon an upcast to be hit away? I had a hundred pound on ’t. And then a whoreson jackanapes must take me up for swearing, as if I borrowed mine oaths of him and might not spend them at my pleasure.
FIRST LORD
What got he by that? You have broke his pate with your bowl.
SECOND LORD
If his wit had been like him that broke it, it would have run all out.
CLOTEN
When a gentleman is disposed to swear, it is not for any standers-by to curtail his oaths, ha?
SECOND LORD
No, my lord, (aside) nor crop the ears of them.

DUTCH:
Als een man van rang verkiest te vloeken, behoeft
niemand het hart te hebben zijn vloeken te kortstaarten;
hè?


Proverb: May we not do with our own what we list?

Pate=The head; used in contempt or in ridicule
Curtail=Curtal, having a docked tail (followed by ‘crop the ears’)
Upcast=A throw at the game of bowls
Take up=Rebuke

Kissed the jack … away=The jack being the small ball in bowls, the closest to the jack at the end of the game wins. If the bowl ends up close to it, it is ‘kissing the jack’ (a great advantage). Cloten’s bowl is then hit away by the ‘upcast’ (throw of an opponent).

Compleat:
Jack (in bowling)=Honk, in de klosbaan
To take one up sharply (check, reprimand)=Iemand scherpelyk berispen
Pate=De kop, het hoofd
He threatened to break his pate=Hy dreigde hem den kop in te slaan
Burgersdijk notes:
Had ooit een mensch zulk een geluk?
Cloten spreekt van het geluk, dat zijn tegenspeler gehad heeft.

Topics: language, civility, patience, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
ROMEO
Oh, let us hence. I stand on sudden haste.
FRIAR LAWRENCE
Wisely and slow. They stumble that run fast.

DUTCH:
Al zacht, mijn zoon! wie voortholt, struikelt licht.

MORE:
Still in use
Compleat:
Haste=Haast, spoed
He made too much hast=Hy maakte al te groot een haast
The more haste the worse speed=Hoe meerder haast hoe minder spoed

Topics: patience, caution, proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, wisdom, haste, still in use

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
My blood hath been too cold and temperate,
Unapt to stir at these indignities,
And you have found me, for accordingly
You tread upon my patience. But be sure
I will from henceforth rather be myself,
Mighty and to be feared, than my condition,
Which hath been smooth as oil, soft as young down,
And therefore lost that title of respect
Which the proud soul ne’er pays but to the proud.

DUTCH:
Te koel en te gematigd was mijn bloed,
Niet vatbaar om hij zulk een hoon te koken;
En dit hebt gij ontdekt, want daarom treedt gij
Op mijn lankmoedigheid;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Temperate=moderate, calm
Found me=Found me out, have my measure
Unapt=Not propense or ready
Condition=Quality
Tread upon (in a moral sense)=To trample, to set the foot on in contempt
Indignity=Contemptuous injury, insult
Title of respect=Claim to respect, respect to which I have title
Compleat:
Unapt=Onbekwaam
Temperate=Maatig, gemaatigd
To tread upon=Optreeden, vertreeden
To tread underfoot=Met den voet treeden

Topics: identity, dignity, failure, respect, patience, authority

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