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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1 ACT/SCENE: 1.3 SPEAKER: Hotspur CONTEXT: Out of the bowels of the harmless earth,
Which many a good tall fellow had destroyed
So cowardly, and but for these vile guns
He would himself have been a soldier.
This bald unjointed chat of his, my lord,
I answered indirectly, as I said,
And I beseech you, let not his report
Come current for an accusation
Betwixt my love and your high Majesty. DUTCH: En ik bezweer u, dat, wat hij bericht,
Nooit als een aanklacht tusschen mijne liefde
En uwe hooge majesteit zich dring’!
MORE: Schmidt:
Bald=Void of reason, unfounded
Unjointed=incoherent
Tall=stout, sturdy, lusty, spirited
Indirectly=Not in a straight course, by second hand, not in express terms
Current= generally received, of full value, sterling, having currency (Come current as=have currency, be accepted as)
Compleat:
Current. The current of most writers=Het algemeen gevoelen van de meeste Schryvers. Topics: loyalty, merit, evidence, value, perception, judgment

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Cade
CONTEXT:
CADE
And good reason; for thereby is England mained, and fain to go with a staff, but that my puissance holds it up. Fellow kings, I tell you that that Lord Say hath gelded the commonwealth, and made it an eunuch: and more than that, he can speak French; and therefore he is a traitor.
SIR HUMPHREY
O gross and miserable ignorance!

DUTCH:
En nog erger dan dit: hij kan Fransch
spreken en dus is hij een verrader.

MORE:

(See also Away with him! He speaks Latin)

Mained=Maimed
Fain to=Obliged to
Puissance=Power, strength, force
Geld=Castrate; fig. deprive of an esssential part
Gross=Dull, stupid

Compleat:
Maimed=Verminkt
Fain to=Gaern, genoodzaakt
To geld=Lubben
Gross=Grof, plomp

Topics: learning/education, language, misunderstanding, perception

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN
If you but said so, ’twere as deep with me:
If you swear still, your recompense is still
That I regard it not.
CLOTEN
This is no answer.
IMOGEN
But that you shall not say I yield being silent,
I would not speak. I pray you, spare me: ‘faith,
I shall unfold equal discourtesy
To your best kindness: one of your great knowing
Should learn, being taught, forbearance.

DUTCH:
Zoudt ge, als ik zweeg, niet denken, dat ik toegaf,
Dan sprak ik niet


Proverb: Silence is (gives) consent

Deep=Weighty, serious
Equal discourtesy=Discourtesy equal to your kindness

Compleat:
Deep=Diepzinnig
Discourtesy=Onbeleefdheid, onheusheid
You have done me a great discourtesy=Gy hebt my daar mede een groote ondienst gedaan

Topics: promise, reply, perception, law/legal, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Bushy
CONTEXT:
Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadows
Which shows like grief itself but is not so;
For sorrow’s eyes, glazed with blinding tears,
Divides one thing entire to many objects,
Like perspectives, which rightly gazed upon
Show nothing but confusion, eyed awry
Distinguish form. So your sweet majesty,
Looking awry upon your lord’s departure,
Find shapes of grief, more than himself, to wail;
Which, look’d on as it is, is nought but shadows
Of what it is not. Then, thrice-gracious queen,
More than your lord’s departure weep not: more’s not seen;
Or if it be, ’tis with false sorrow’s eye,
Which for things true weeps things imaginary.

DUTCH:
Het wezen van elk leed heeft twintig schimmen,
Die wel als leed er uitzien, maar ‘t niet zijn.

MORE:

Perspectives=(a) Multifaceted crystal balls, often mounted; (b) A type of painting which, when viewed obliquely, reveals another (more complex or deeper) meaning

Schmidt:
Shadow=Any thing unsubstantial or unreal, a reflected image, having the appearance of reality
Rightly=From directly in front (hence perspective painting)
Eyes awry distinguish form=Viewed from an angle to reveal the meaning

Compleat:
Perspective=Een verschiet, doorzigt
A piece of perspective=Een afbeelding in ‘t verschiet
A perspective glass=Een verrekyker
Awry=Scheef, krom, verdraaid

Topics: grief, sorrow, imagination, perception

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
I have rubbed this young quat almost to the sense,
And he grows angry. Now, whether he kill Cassio
Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other,
Every way makes my gain. Live Roderigo,
He calls me to a restitution large
Of gold and jewels that I bobbed from him
As gifts to Desdemona.
It must not be. If Cassio do remain
He hath a daily beauty in his life
That makes me ugly. And besides, the Moor
May unfold me to him—there stand I in much peril.
No, he must die. But so, I hear him coming.

DUTCH:
Ik kneep tot berstens toe dien jongen windbuil;
Hij wordt nu boos. Nu, ‘t zij hij Cassio doode,
Of Cassio hem, of dat ze elkander vellen,
Hoe ‘t loop’, ik win er bij.

MORE:

Quat=Contemptible youth; boil or pimple
To the sense=To the quick, raw
Makes my gain=Is to my advantage
Bobbed=Swindled
Unfold=Expose

Compleat:
Unfold=Ontvouwen, open leggen
To bob=Begekken, bedriegen, loeren, foppen

Burgersdijk notes:
Dien jongen windbuil. In ‘t Engelsch staat quat, welk woord tegelijk een blaar of vin, en een ellendig, verachtelijk wezen beteekent.

Topics: age/experience, learning and education, dispute, appearance, perception

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1 Prologue
SPEAKER: Rumour
CONTEXT:
But what mean I
To speak so true at first? My office is
To noise abroad that Harry Monmouth fell
Under the wrath of noble Hotspur’s sword,
And that the King before the Douglas’ rage
Stooped his anointed head as low as death.
This have I rumoured through the peasant towns
Between that royal field of Shrewsbury
And this worm-eaten hold of ragged stone,
Where Hotspur’s father, old Northumberland,
Lies crafty-sick. The posts come tiring on,
And not a man of them brings other news
Than they have learnt of me. From Rumour’s tongues
They bring smooth comforts false, worse than true wrongs.

DUTCH:
Waar Heetspoors vader, graaf Northumberland,
Sluw krank ligt. Moede boden komen aan,
Doch geen brengt ander nieuws dan ik hem leerde,
Elk zoeten schijntroost, komende uit mijn mond,
Veel erger dan een waar bericht, dat wondt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
To noise abroad=Verb meaning to report or spread rumour
Peasant=Condescending description of village inhabitants as ignorant
Crafty-sick=Feigning illness
Post=Courier, messenger

Compleat:
To noise abroad=Uitbrommen, uittrompetten
Peasant=Landman, boer
Crafty=Loos, listig, schalk, doortrapt, leep

Topics: betrayal, deceit, appearance, perception, language

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.5
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
None does offend—none, I say, none. I’ll able ’em.
Take that of me, my friend, who have the power
To seal th’ accuser’s lips. Get thee glass eyes,
And like a scurvy politician seem
To see the things thou dost not.

DUTCH:
Koop u glazen oogen;
Veins als een staatsman laag, eat ge alles ziet
Wat gij niet ziet./
Voorzie je van een bril en doe dan als
een huichelaar alsof je dingen ziet
die je niet ziet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Scurvy=despicable
Able=Vouch for, warrant
Compleat:
Scurvy=ondeugend schobbejak

Topics: insult, appearance, perception, intellect, understanding

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: First Lord
CONTEXT:
FIRST LORD
Sir, as I told you always, her beauty and her brain go not together. She’s a good sign, but I have seen small reflection of her wit.
SECOND LORD
She shines not upon fools, lest the reflection should hurt her.

DUTCH:
Zooals ik u altijd zeide, heer, haar verstand houdt
geen gelijken tred met haar schoonheid.


Proverb: Beauty and folly are often matched together

In Shakespeare’s time beauty was seen as a signifier of virtue. See Thomas Hoby’s translation of the Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier (1561). Fourth Book: True beauty, the reflection of goodness.
Her beauty and her brain go not together=Her brain can’t match her beauty.
A good sign=Semblance. (Fig.: something of a deceptive semblance, not answering the promise)
Reflection=Shining back AND thoughtful consideration

Compleat:
Reflection=Terugkaatzing
Reflection=Overdenking, overpeinzing

Topics: appearance, intellect, perception, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: Lucio
CONTEXT:
The duke is very strangely gone from hence;
Bore many gentlemen, myself being one,
In hand and hope of action: but we do learn
By those that know the very nerves of state,
His givings-out were of an infinite distance
From his true-meant design. Upon his place,
And with full line of his authority,
Governs Lord Angelo; a man whose blood
Is very snow-broth; one who never feels
The wanton stings and motions of the sense,
But doth rebate and blunt his natural edge
With profits of the mind, study and fast.

DUTCH:
Dat wat hij voorgaf hemelsbreed verschilt
Van wat hij inderdaad bedoelt.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Givings-out=Utterances, assertions
True-meant design=Intention
Sting=Impulse, incitement.
Rebate=Abate
Profit of the mind=Proficiency, improvement

Topics: perception, justification, innocence, integrity, intellect, learning/education

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
You strain too far.
I rather of his absence make this use:
It lends a luster and more great opinion,
A larger dare, to our great enterprise
Than if the Earl were here, for men must think
If we without his help can make a head
To push against a kingdom, with his help
We shall o’erturn it topsy-turvy down.
Yet all goes well, yet all our joints are whole.

DUTCH:
Gij gaat te ver;
Ik zie voor ons eer voordeel in zijn afzijn:
‘t Leent hoog’ren luister en een groot’ren roem
En meerdre koenheid aan ons groote werk,
Dan zoo de graaf hier was.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Strain=Effort of thought (as if by violent stretching of the mind); to extend, to stretch (you go too far in your apprehensions).
Lustre=Brightness, splendour
Dare=Boldness

Topics: plans/intentions, ambition, hope/optimism, reputation, perception

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
TRAVELERS
O, we are undone, both we and ours forever!
FALSTAFF
Hang, you gorbellied knaves! Are you undone? No, you fat chuffs. I would your store were here. On, bacons, on! What, you knaves, young men must live. You are grandjurors, are you? We’ll jure you, faith.
PRINCE HAL
The thieves have bound the true men. Now could thou and I rob the thieves and go merrily to London, it would be argument for a week, laughter for a month, and a good jest forever.

DUTCH:
Het zou een onderwerp zijn voor een week, gelach voor een maand en een goede mop voor altijd./
De dieven hebben de eerlijke lui gebonden. Als wij tweeën nu de dieven konden berooven en lustig naar Londen trekken, zou dat stof tot onderhoud geven voor een week, gelach voor een maand, en een prachtige grap voor altoos.

MORE:
Grandjurors: Only men of some wealth and social standing would be entitled to serve on a grand jury.
Schmidt:
Bound=Confined, limited
True men=Honest men
Compleat:
A bound=Een grens, landperk

Topics: age/experience, memory, perception

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
I will in Cassio’s lodging lose this napkin
And let him find it. Trifles light as air
Are to the jealous confirmations strong
As proofs of holy writ. This may do something.
The Moor already changes with my poison :
Dangerous conceits are in their natures poisons,
Which at the first are scarce found to distaste
But, with a little act upon the blood,
Burn like the mines of sulphur. I did say so.

DUTCH:
Nietigheden, ijl als lucht, zijn voor de jaloersen bevestiging, zo sterk als bewijzen uit de Heilige Schrift./
Voor wie jaloers is, Zijn dingen, ijl als lucht, sterker bewijzen, Dan spreuken uit de Schrift.

MORE:

Proverb: As light as air

Schmidt:
Napkin=Handkerchief
Conceits=Conceptions, ideas
To distaste=To be distasteful, unsavoury

Compleat:
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening
Distaste=Weersmaak, weerzin, misnoegen
To give distaste=Misnoegen veroorzaaken
To distaste=Geen smaak in iets vinden; (to take distaste)=Een walg krygen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, envy, perception, imagination

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1 Prologue
SPEAKER: Rumour
CONTEXT:
Open your ears, for which of you will stop
The vent of hearing when loud Rumour speaks?
I, from the orient to the drooping west,
Making the wind my post-horse, still unfold
The acts commenced on this ball of earth.
Upon my tongues continual slanders ride,
The which in every language I pronounce,
Stuffing the ears of men with false reports.
I speak of peace while covert enmity
Under the smile of safety wounds the world.

DUTCH:
Voortdurend zweeft er laster op mijn topgen,
En dien verkondig ik in elke taal ,
Der menschen oor met valsche tijding vullend.
Van vrede spreek ik, als verholen haat,
Schijngoedig lachend, diep de wereld wondt;

MORE:

Stop=Block
Vent of hearing=Ears
Post-horse=A horse kept at a post-house or the inn for messengers or travellers; emblem of swiftness
Drooping=West, where the sun sets
Unfold=Reveal

Compleat:
Unfold=Ontvouwen, open leggen
Drooping=Neerslagtig, moedeloosheid; quynenende

Topics: betrayal, deceit, appearance, perception, language

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