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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry V ACT/SCENE: 4.3 SPEAKER: King Henry CONTEXT: KING HENRY
All things are ready if our minds be so.
WESTMORELAND
Perish the man whose mind is backward now! DUTCH: Wij zijn geheel gereed, zoo ‘t hart het is. MORE: Topics: wellbeing, emotion and mood, preparation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Orleans
CONTEXT:
CONSTABLE
Just, just; and the men do sympathize with the mastiffs in robustious and rough coming on, leaving their wits with their wives. And then give them great meals of beef and iron and steel, they will eat like wolves and fight like devils.
ORLÉANS
Ay, but these English are shrewdly out of beef.
CONSTABLE
Then shall we find tomorrow they have only stomachs to eat and none to fight. Now is it time to arm. Come, shall we about it?

DUTCH:
Ja, maar bij die Engelschen is het rundvleesch nu verduiveld
schaarsch.

MORE:

Robustious=Violent
Give=If you give
Shrewdly=Grievously, intensely, highly, very much
Stomachs=Inclination to, appetite for

Compleat:
Shrewdly (very much)=Sterk
To stomach=Kroppen

Topics: preparation, conflict

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
DUKE
The Turk with a most mighty preparation makes for Cyprus. Othello, the fortitude of the place is best known to you, and though we have there a substitute of most allowed sufficiency, yet opinion, a sovereign mistress of effects, throws a more safer voice on you. You must therefore be content to slubber the gloss of your new fortunes with this more stubborn and boist’rous expedition.
OTHELLO
The tyrant custom, most grave senators,
Hath made the flinty and steel couch of war
My thrice-driven bed of down. I do agnise
A natural and prompt alacrity
I find in hardness, and do undertake
These present wars against the Ottomites.
Most humbly therefore bending to your state,
I crave fit disposition for my wife.
Due reference of place and exhibition,
With such accommodation and besort
As levels with her breeding.

DUTCH:
Gij moet dieshalve er genoegen mee nemen, den frisschen glans van uw nieuw geluk te laten verdooven door deze ruwe en stormachtige onderneming.

MORE:

Allowed=Acknowledged
Slubber=Sully
Sufficiency=Capability
Safer voice=More reliable, offering more security
Sovereign mistresss of effect=Opinion has greatest effect
Stubborn=Rough, harsh
Boisterous=Wild, intractable, rudely violent, noisy and tumultuous
Alacrity=Eagerness
At levels with=Commensurate with
Hardness=Hardship
Besort=Suitable companionship
Agnise=Acknowledge
Bending to=Bowing to (figuratively)
Disposition=Arrangement, settlement

Compleat:
To know how to be on a level with=Op een gelyken voet weten te stellen
Agnition=Herkenning, wederkenning
Level=Paslood
Hardiness (difficult)=Zwaarigheid
He bends himself wholly to this=Hy is ganschelyk daarop gevallen
Allow=Bekennen
Slubber=Beslobberen
Stubborn=Hardnekkig, wederspannig
Boisterous=Onstuimig, stormachtig, windig
Sufficiency (or capacity)=Bekwaamheid. Sufficiency (ability)=Genoegzaamheid

Topics: preparation, adversity, order/society

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Sir Stephen Scroop
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
t Verheugt mij, dat mijn vorst gewapend is,
Om tijdingen van onheil te vernemen.

MORE:

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: preparation, strength, fate/destiny, failure, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: York
CONTEXT:
YORK
Lords, let him go. Please it your majesty,
This is the day appointed for the combat;
And ready are the appellant and defendant,
The armourer and his man, to enter the lists,
So please your highness to behold the fight.
QUEEN MARGARET
Ay, good my lord; for purposely therefore
Left I the court, to see this quarrel tried.
KING HENRY VI
O God’s name, see the lists and all things fit:
Here let them end it; and God defend the right!
YORK
I never saw a fellow worse bestead,
Or more afraid to fight, than is the appellant,
The servant of this armourer, my lords.

DUTCH:
Nog nooit zag ik een knaap, zoo erg ontdaan,
Zoo angstig om te vechten, als de klager,
De dienaar van den wapensmid, mylords.

MORE:

Day appointed=Date scheduled
Lists=Enclosure designated for fights
Quarrel=Dispute
Bestead=(or bested) in a worse plight, worse prepared

Compleat:
To appoint (time and place)=Tijd en plaats bestemmen
Quarrel=Krakeel; twist
To bestead one=Iemand eenen goeden dienst doen

Topics: defence, law/legal, justice, dispute, preparation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Fluellen
CONTEXT:
FLUELLEN
So. In the name of Jesu Christ, speak fewer. It is the greatest admiration in the universal world when the true and aunchient prerogatifes and laws of the wars is not kept. If you would take the pains but to examine the wars of Pompey the Great, you shall find, I warrant you, that there is no tiddle toddle nor pibble babble in Pompey’s camp. I warrant you, you shall find the ceremonies of the wars and the cares of it and the forms of it and the sobriety of it and the modesty of it to be otherwise.
GOWER
Why, the enemy is loud. You hear him all night.
FLUELLEN
If the enemy is an ass and a fool and a prating coxcomb, is it meet, think you, that we should also, look you, be an ass and a fool and a prating coxcomb, in your own conscience, now?

DUTCH:
Als de vijand een ezel is en een nar en een snappende windmaker, is het choed, denkt gij, dat wij ook zouden zijn, ziet gij, een ezel en een nar en een snappende windmaker? Op uw geweten af, spreek!

MORE:
Admiration=Wonder
Prating=Prattling, chattering
Coxcomb=Fool (From fool’s cap)
Meet=Appropriate

Compleat:
Admiration=Verwondering
To prate=Praaten
Coxcomb=Een haanekam; een nar, uilskuiken
An ignorant coxcomb=Een onweetende zotskap
Meet=Dienstig

Topics: preparation, intellect, value, conflict

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
HORATIO
If your mind dislike anything, obey it. I will forestall their repair hither and say you are not fit.
HAMLET
Not a whit. We defy augury. There’s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come. If it be not to come, it will be now. If it be not now, yet it will come—the readiness is all. Since no man of aught he leaves knows, what is ’t to leave betimes? Let be.

DUTCH:
Als uw innerlijk zich ergens tegen verzet, gehoorzaam het dan. /
Als uw gemoed met jets geen vrede heeft, geef er gehoor
aan. /
Als uw gemoed van iets afkeerig mocht zijn, luister er naar.

MORE:
Not a whit: not at all
Schmidt:
Forestall=Anticipate, to be beforehand with, to prevent
Repair hither=arrival
Augury=Art of prophesying
Compleat:
Forestall=Voor-inneemen, onderscheppen, verrassen, voor-opkoopen
Augury=Wichlery, vogelwaarzeggery

Topics: fate/destiny, free will, plans/intentions, preparation

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Lord Bardolph
CONTEXT:
Much more in this great work,
Which is almost to pluck a kingdom down
And set another up, should we survey
The plot of situation and the model,
Consent upon a sure foundation,
Question surveyors, know our own estate,
How able such a work to undergo,
To weigh against his opposite. Or else
We fortify in paper and in figures,
Using the names of men instead of men,
Like one that draws the model of a house
Beyond his power to build it, who, half through,
Gives o’er and leaves his part-created cost
A naked subject to the weeping clouds
And waste for churlish winter’s tyranny.

DUTCH:
Versterken wij ons met papier en cijfers,
Met menschennamen slechts en niet met menschen,
Als iemand, die een plan maakt van een huis,
Ver boven zijn vermogen, ‘t bouwt ter helfte,
Het opgeeft, en zijn stukwerk-kost’lijkheid
Aan ‘t weenend zwerk als naakte speelpop laat,
Aan ‘s barren winters will’keur als een buit.

MORE:
This great work=The impending war
Pluck=Pull down by force
Plot of situation=Punning on plot (plan) and plot (of land)
Churlish=Rough, violent, brutal
Fortify=To strengthen and secure by works of defence
Consent upon a sure foundation=Agree, be certain of a sound basis

Compleat:
Churlish=Woest, boersch, onbeschoft
Pluck=Rukken, plukken

Topics: preparation, value

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
Mine ear is open and my heart prepared;
The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold.
Say, is my kingdom lost? why, ’twas my care
And what loss is it to be rid of care?
Strives Bolingbroke to be as great as we?
Greater he shall not be; if he serve God,
We’ll serve Him too and be his fellow so:
Revolt our subjects? that we cannot mend;
They break their faith to God as well as us:
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay:
The worst is death, and death will have his day.
SIR STEPHEN SCROOP
Glad am I that your highness is so arm’d
To bear the tidings of calamity.
Like an unseasonable stormy day,
Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores,
As if the world were all dissolved to tears,
So high above his limits swells the rage
Of Bolingbroke, covering your fearful land
With hard bright steel and hearts harder than steel.
White-beards have arm’d their thin and hairless scalps
Against thy majesty; boys, with women’s voices,
Strive to speak big and clap their female joints
In stiff unwieldy arms against thy crown:
The very beadsmen learn to bend their bows
Of double-fatal yew against thy state;
Yea, distaff-women manage rusty bills
Against thy seat: both young and old rebel,
And all goes worse than I have power to tell.

DUTCH:
Mijn oor is open, voorbereid mijn hart;
Wereldsch verlies is ‘t ergst, wat gij kunt melden.

MORE:

Care=Worry, responsibillity
His fellow=Equal
Mend=Remedy
Bear the tidings of calamity=Cope with calamitous news
Women’s voices=High, shrill voices
Double-fatal=Dangerous or deadly in two ways (on account of the poisonous quality of the leaves, and of the wood being used for instruments of death)
Billls=Weapons
Distaff=The staff from which the flax is drawn in spinning

Compleat:
Care=Zorg, bezorgdheid, zorgdraagendheid, zorgvuldigheid, vlytigheid
He has not his fellow=Hy heeft zyns gelyk niet, hy heeft zyn weerga niet
Bill=Hellebaard, byl
Distaff=Een spinrok, spinrokken

Topics: preparation, strength, fate/destiny, failure, conflict

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Lord Talbot
CONTEXT:
My thoughts are whirled like a potter’s wheel;
I know not where I am, nor what I do;
A witch, by fear, not force, like Hannibal,
Drives back our troops and conquers as she lists:
So bees with smoke and doves with noisome stench
Are from their hives and houses driven away.
They call’d us for our fierceness English dogs;
Now, like to whelps, we crying run away.

DUTCH:
Mijn hoofd is als eens pottenbakkers wiel;
Ik weet niet wat ik ben, noch wat ik doe.

MORE:
Hannibal, a renowned general of Carthage from the third century, who vanquished a larger Roman army in the Battle of Ager Falernus, by tying fagots to the horns of oxen
Noisome=Noxious, harmful
Lists=Pleases

Compleat:
Noisom=Besmettelyk, schaadelyk, vuns, leelyk, vuil
To list=Genegen zijn, lust hebben

Burgersdijk notes:
Als Hannibal. Toespeling op Hannibals krijgslist, die den Romeinen ontkwam, door ossen met brandende struiken aan de horens naar hen toe te drijven.

Topics: preparation, conflict, courage

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Corin
CONTEXT:
TOUCHSTONE
Wilt thou rest damned? God help thee, shallow man. God make incision in thee; thou art raw.
CORIN
Sir, I am a true labourer. I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man’s happiness, glad of other men’s good, content with my harm, and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and my lambs suck.

DUTCH:
Vriend, ik ben een eerlijk daglooner; ik verdien mijn kost en mijn kleeding, draag niemand haat toe, benijd niemand zijn geluk, verheug mij in een andermans welvaren, en schik mij in mijn leed; en mijn grootste trots is, mijn ooien te zien grazen en mijn lammeren te zien zuigen.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Make incision=Blood-letting
Onions:
Raw=Unripe, immature; inexperienced, unskilled, untrained

Burgersdijk notes:
God late u de schillen van de oogen vallen, God geneze u (door een operatie)! gij zijt rauw, d. i. niet toebereid, niet gaar.

Topics: preparation, skill/talent, work, honesty, integrity, envy

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Gardener
CONTEXT:
GARDENER
They are; and Bolingbroke
Hath seized the wasteful king. O, what pity is it
That he had not so trimm’d and dress’d his land
As we this garden! We at time of year
Do wound the bark, the skin of our fruit-trees,
Lest, being over-proud in sap and blood,
With too much riches it confound itself:
Had he done so to great and growing men,
They might have lived to bear and he to taste
Their fruits of duty: superfluous branches
We lop away, that bearing boughs may live:
Had he done so, himself had borne the crown,
Which waste of idle hours hath quite thrown down.

DUTCH:
Te gellé takken,
Die kappen wij, opdat de vruchttak leve;
Had hij zoo ook gedaan, hij droeg de kroon;
‘t Verlies is zijner tijdverspilling loon.

MORE:

At time of year=At appropriate times/seasons of the year
Confound=Spoil, destroy
Bear=Bear fruit
Waste of=Wasteful

Compleat:
Confound=Verwarren, verstooren, te schande maaken, verbysteren
To bear fruit=Vrucht draagen
To lop trees=Boomen snoeijen, kleine takjes afkappen

Topics: preparation, strength, nature

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Countess of Avergne
CONTEXT:
COUNTESS
Porter, remember what I gave in charge;
And when you have done so, bring the keys to me.
PORTER
Madam, I will.
COUNTESS
The plot is laid: if all things fall out right,
I shall as famous be by this exploit
As Scythian Tomyris by Cyrus’ death.
Great is the rumor of this dreadful knight,
And his achievements of no less account:
Fain would mine eyes be witness with mine ears,
To give their censure of these rare reports.

DUTCH:
De val is nu gesteld; gaat alles goed,

MORE:
Gave in charge=Instructed
Tomyris=Queen of the Massagetae who killed Cyrus the Great
Fain=Gladly
Censure=Judgement

Compleat:
He gave it to me in charge=Hy belaste het my; hy gaf er my last toe
Fain=Gaern
Censure=Bestraffing, berisping, oordeel, toets

Topics: plans/intentions, conspiracy, preparation

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.8
SPEAKER: King Edward IV
CONTEXT:
Seize on the shame-faced Henry! Bear him hence:
And once again proclaim us King of England.
You are the fount that makes small brooks to flow:
Now stops thy spring; my sea shall suck them dry,
And swell so much the higher by their ebb.
Hence with him to the Tower! let him not speak.
And, lords, towards Coventry bend we our course,
Where peremptory Warwick now remains:
The sun shines hot; and, if we use delay,
Cold biting winter mars our hop’d-for hay.

DUTCH:
Heet schijnt de zon, verzuim gaav’ licht het hooi,
‘t Gehoopte, aan snerpend winterweer ter prooi.

MORE:

Proverb: Make hay while the sun shines

Another reference to the York family symbol of the sun (see 2.6, ‘gnats to the sun’).
Shamefaced=Ashamed, bashful (also shamefast)
Peremptory=Positive, bold
Hoped-for hay=Anticipated harvest

Compleat:
Shame-faced=Schaamachtig, beschaamd, bloode
Peremptory=Volstrekt, uitvoerig, volkomen, uiteindig

Topics: delay, proverbs and idioms, still in use, achievement, preparation

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
ROMAN
There hath been in Rome strange insurrections, the people against the senators, patricians, and nobles.
VOLSCE
Hath been? Is it ended, then? Our state thinks not so. They are in a most warlike preparation and hope to come upon them in the heat of their division.
ROMAN
The main blaze of it is past, but a small thing would make it flame again; for the nobles receive so to heart the banishment of that worthy Coriolanus that they are in a ripe aptness to take all power from the people and to pluck from them their tribunes forever. This lies glowing, I can tell you, and is almost mature for the violent breaking out.

DUTCH:
Er zijn in Rome geweldige onlusten geweest; het volk
tegen de senatoren, de patriciërs en den geheelen adel.

MORE:
Preparation (ante)=The result of preparation, forces assembled
Ripe aptness=Proper time, readiness

Compleat:
Apt=Bequaam, gevoeglyk, gereed
Tribune=Een voorstander des volks onder de aloude Romeinen

Topics: preparation, order/society, conflict, uncertainty

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
I muse my Lord of Gloucester is not come:
‘Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man,
Whate’er occasion keeps him from us now.
QUEEN MARGARET
Can you not see? Or will ye not observe
The strangeness of his alter’d countenance?
With what a majesty he bears himself,
How insolent of late he is become,
How proud, how peremptory, and unlike himself?
We know the time since he was mild and affable,
And if we did but glance a far-off look,
Immediately he was upon his knee,
That all the court admired him for submission:
But meet him now, and, be it in the morn,
When every one will give the time of day,
He knits his brow and shows an angry eye,
And passeth by with stiff unbowed knee,
Disdaining duty that to us belongs.

DUTCH:
t Verbaast mij, dat lord Gloster nog ontbreekt,
Die anders nooit de laatste pleegt te wezen, —
Wat ook de reden zij, dat hij niet kwam.

MORE:

Muse=Wonder
Hindmost=Last in line
Wont=Habit
Strangeness=Aloofness, reserve
Knits his brow=Frown

Compleat:
Muse=Bepeinzen
Hindmost (hindermost)=De agterste, de alleragterste
Strangeness=Vreemdheid
To knit the brows=Het voorhoofd in rimpels trekken

Topics: respect, risk, caution, preparation, ambition, duty

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