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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Diana
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
How have I sworn!
DIANA
‘Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vow’d true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the High’st to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God’s great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love,
That I will work against him: therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal’d,
At least in my opinion.

DUTCH:
Een tal van eeden maakt de trouw niet hecht;
Een eed, eenvoudig, waar en trouw, volstaat;
Men zweert slechts bij wat heilig is, vooral
Bij de’ Allerhoogste;


MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)
The many=The number of
Single=One; sincere
Ill=Poorly; not at all
Unsealed=Without a (validating) seal
Compleat:
Ill=Quaad, ondeugend, onpasselijk
Sealed=Gezegeld, verzegeld
To set a seal to a thing=Een zegel aan iets steeken/hangen

Topics: truth, honesty, love, promise

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
I prithee now, my son,
Go to them, with this bonnet in thy hand;
And thus far having stretch’d it—here be with them—
Thy knee bussing the stones—for in such business
Action is eloquence, and the eyes of the ignorant
More learned than the ears—waving thy head,
Which often, thus, correcting thy stout heart,
Now humble as the ripest mulberry
That will not hold the handling: or say to them,
Thou art their soldier, and being bred in broils
Hast not the soft way which, thou dost confess,
Were fit for thee to use as they to claim,
In asking their good loves, but thou wilt frame
Thyself, forsooth, hereafter theirs, so far
As thou hast power and person.

DUTCH:
Want gebaren
Zijn reed’naars bij onnooz’len, daar hun oog
Min stomp is dan hun oor

MORE:
Schmidt:
Bonnet=Take off a bonnet (sign of respect, courtesy)
To buss=To kiss
Broil=War, combat, battle
Hold=Bear, stand up to

Compleat:
To buss=Zoenen, kussen
Broil=Oproer, beroerte, gewoel

Topics: language, appearance, flattery, manipulation, promise

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
To the king I’ll say’t; and make my vouch as strong
As shore of rock. Attend. This holy fox,
Or wolf, or both,— for he is equal ravenous
As he is subtle, and as prone to mischief
As able to perform’t; his mind and place
Infecting one another, yea, reciprocally—
Only to show his pomp as well in France
As here at home, suggests the king our master
To this last costly treaty, the interview,
That swallow’d so much treasure, and like a glass
Did break i’ the rinsing.

DUTCH:
Want hij is vraatzuchtig
Niet min dan sluw, en even tuk op boosheid,
Als tot het doen in staat.

MORE:
Vouch=Assertion, allegation
Place=Position, rank
Pomp=Magnificence, splendour
Suggest=Tempt
Interview=Meeting
Compleat:
To vouch=Staande houden, bewyzen, verzekeren
Place=Plaats
Pomp=Pracht, praal, staatsi
Suggest=Ingeeven, insteeken, inluysteren, inblaazen
Interview=Een t’Zamenkomst, mondeling gesprek

Topics: promise, appearance, ambition, manipulation

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
IMOGEN
If you but said so, ’twere as deep with me:
If you swear still, your recompense is still
That I regard it not.
CLOTEN
This is no answer.
IMOGEN
But that you shall not say I yield being silent,
I would not speak. I pray you, spare me: ‘faith,
I shall unfold equal discourtesy
To your best kindness: one of your great knowing
Should learn, being taught, forbearance.

DUTCH:
Zoudt ge, als ik zweeg, niet denken, dat ik toegaf,
Dan sprak ik niet


Proverb: Silence is (gives) consent

Deep=Weighty, serious
Equal discourtesy=Discourtesy equal to your kindness

Compleat:
Deep=Diepzinnig
Discourtesy=Onbeleefdheid, onheusheid
You have done me a great discourtesy=Gy hebt my daar mede een groote ondienst gedaan

Topics: promise, reply, perception, law/legal, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Ephesus
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
Nay, come, I pray you, sir, give me the chain.
Both wind and tide stays for this gentleman,
And I, to blame, have held him here too long.
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
Good Lord! You use this dalliance to excuse
Your breach of promise to the Porpentine.
I should have chid you for not bringing it,
But, like a shrew, you first begin to brawl.
SECOND MERCHANT
The hour steals on. I pray you, sir, dispatch.
ANGELO
You hear how he importunes me. The chain!
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
Why, give it to my wife, and fetch your money.
ANGELO
Come, come. You know I gave it you even now.
Either send the chain, or send me by some token.
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
Fie, now you run this humor out of breath.
Come, where’s the chain? I pray you, let me see it.
SECOND MERCHANT
My business cannot brook this dalliance.
Good sir, say whe’er you’ll answer me or no.
If not, I’ll leave him to the Officer.

DUTCH:
Mijn hemel! wis moet deze scherts bewimp’len,
Dat gij mij in den Egel zitten liet.
Het was aan mij u daarom hard te vallen,
Maar als een feeks zoekt gij het eerste twist.

MORE:
Proverb: Time and tide (The tide) tarries (stays for) no man
Proverb: Some complain to prevent complaint (I should have chid you for not bringing it, But like a shrew you first begin to brawl)

Chid (impf., to chide.)=To rebuke, to scold at
Run this humour out of breath=Taking the joke too far
Token=A sign or attestion of a right

Compleat:
Importune=Lastig vallen, zeer dringen, gestadig aanhouden, overdringen, aandringen
To sail with wind and tide=Voor wind and stroom zeilen
Chide=Kyven, bekyven
Token=Teken, getuigenis
Dalliance=Gestoei, dartelheid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, time, fate/destiny, complaint, promise, business

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
Nay, that’s past praying for. I have peppered two of them. Two I am sure I have paid, two rogues in buckram suits. I tell thee what, Hal, if I tell thee a lie, spit in my face, call me horse. Thou knowest my old ward. Here I lay, and thus I bore my point.

DUTCH:
Ik zal je wat zeggen, Hein;—als ik je iets voorlieg, spuw me dan in het gezicht, noem mij een paard. Je kent mijn oude parade: zoo lag ik, en zoo hield ik mijn kling.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Buckram=Coarse linen stiffened with glue
Pepper=To serve out, to finish, to make an end of
Ward=Guard made in fencing, posture of defence
Compleat:
Buckram=Gewascht doek, trilje
Forswear (or renounce)=afzweeren
To ward off a blow=Eenen slag afweeren
Burgersdijk:
Buckram=Stijflinnen

Topics: honesty, truth, promise

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Boy
CONTEXT:
For indeed three such antics do not amount to a man: for Bardolph, he is white-livered and red-faced, by the means whereof he faces it out but fights not; for Pistol, he hath a killing tongue and a quiet sword, by the means whereof he breaks words and keeps whole weapons; for Nym, he hath heard that men of few words are the best men, and therefore he scorns to say his prayers, lest he should be thought a coward, but his few bad words are matched with as few good deeds, for he never broke any man’s head but his own, and that was against a post when he was drunk. They will steal anything and call it purchase.

DUTCH:
Pistool, die heeft een moorddadige tong en
een vreedzaam zwaard; en daarom breekt hij woorden
den nek, maar houdt zijn wapens heel

MORE:

Antic=Buffoon, practising odd gesticulations
White-livered=Cowardly (White livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare)
Face it out=To get through one’s business by effrontery
Scorn=To disdain, to refuse or lay aside with contempt
Words=Also in the sense of promises

Compleat:
To scorn=Verachten, verfooijen
White-livered=Een die er altijd bleek uitziet; een bleek-neus, kwaadaardig, nydig
To face out=Iemand iets in ‘t gezigt staande houden

Topics: reputation, honour, language, promise

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Stephano
CONTEXT:
STEPHANO
How didst thou ’scape? How camest thou hither? Swear by this bottle how thou camest hither. I escaped upon a butt of sack which the sailors heaved o’erboard, by this bottle, which I made of the bark of a tree with mine own hands since I was cast ashore.
CALIBAN
I’ll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject, for the liquor is not earthly.
STEPHANO
Here. Swear then how thou escapedst.
TRINCULO
Swum ashore, man, like a duck. I can swim like a duck, I’ll be sworn.
STEPHANO
Here, kiss the book. Though thou canst swim like a duck, thou art made like a goose.

DUTCH:
Nu, kus het boek. Maar al kun je zwemmen als een
eend, je hebt toch nog meer van een gans.

MORE:

Kiss the book=Sign of fealty, akin to kissing the Bible when swearing an oath. (Here metaphor for take another drink.)
Butt of sack=Cask of wine
Compleat:
Butt=Wynvat, wynkuip, houdende honderd zes-en-twintig gallons
Burgersdijk notes:
Nu, kus het boek. De flesch moet hier het boek, den bijbel, vervangen, die in Engeland bij het afleggen van een eed gekust wordt.

Topics: promise, truth, honesty

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
Yet thus far, Griffith, give me leave to speak him,
And yet with charity. He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
Himself with princes; one that, by suggestion,
Tied all the kingdom: simony was fair-play;
His own opinion was his law: i’ the presence
He would say untruths; and be ever double
Both in his words and meaning: he was never,
But where he meant to ruin, pitiful:
His promises were, as he then was, mighty;
But his performance, as he is now, nothing:
Of his own body he was ill, and gave
The clergy in example

DUTCH:
Simonie was eerlijk doen; zijn eigen wil zijn wet;
Voor ‘s konings aanschijn sprak hij logens; dubbel
Was hij van tong en hart.

MORE:
Speak=Speak of
Stomach=Pride, greed
Tied=Ruled, subjected
Simony=Trading of ecclesiastical privileges (after Simon the Sorcerer)
Presence=In the presence of the king
Be ever double=Equivocal
Pitiful=Having pity
Compleat:
Stomach=Gramsteurigheyd
Tied=Gebonden
Simony=Geestelyke amptkooping, koophandel van geestelyke dingen (naar Simon den Toveraar)
Presence=Tegenwoordigheyd, byzyn, byweezen
The Presence Chamber=De Koninklyke voorkamer, de gehoor-zaal
Pitifull=Vol medelyden

Topics: death, legacy, reputation, law/legal, promise

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
Yet thus far, Griffith, give me leave to speak him,
And yet with charity. He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
Himself with princes; one that, by suggestion,
Tied all the kingdom: simony was fair-play;
His own opinion was his law: i’ the presence
He would say untruths; and be ever double
Both in his words and meaning: he was never,
But where he meant to ruin, pitiful:
His promises were, as he then was, mighty;
But his performance, as he is now, nothing:
Of his own body he was ill, and gave
The clergy in example

DUTCH:
Grootsch, als hijzelf eens, was wat hij beloofde,
Doch wat hij hield, was, als hijzelf nu, niets.
Hij zondigde in den vleesche, en ging alzoo
De geest’lijkheid slecht voor.

MORE:
Speak=Speak of
Stomach=Pride, greed
Tied=Ruled, subjected
Simony=Trading of ecclesiastical privileges (after Simon the Sorcerer)
Presence=In the presence of the king
Be ever double=Equivocal
Pitiful=Having pity
Compleat:
Stomach=Gramsteurigheyd
Tied=Gebonden
Simony=Geestelyke amptkooping, koophandel van geestelyke dingen (naar Simon den Toveraar)
Presence=Tegenwoordigheyd, byzyn, byweezen
The Presence Chamber=De Koninklyke voorkamer, de gehoor-zaal
Pitifull=Vol medelyden

Topics: death, legacy, reputation, law/legal, promise

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
By my troth, and in good earnest, and so God mend me, and by all pretty oaths that are not dangerous, if you break one jot of your promise or come one minute behind your hour, I will think you the most pathetical break-promise and the most hollow lover and the most unworthy of her you call Rosalind that may be chosen out of the gross band of the unfaithful. Therefore beware my censure, and keep your promise.

DUTCH:
Bij mijn eer en trouw, en in allen ernst, en zoo waar de Hemel mij bijsta, en bij alle kleine eeden, die niet gevaarlijk zijn, als gij een tittel van uw beloften breekt, of één minuut over uw uur komt, dan acht ik u den meest snoevenden eedverkrachter;

MORE:
Schmidt:
So God mend me, used as an oath

Topics: debt/obligation, time, contract, duty, promise

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
Ariel, thy charge
Exactly is performed. But there’s more work.
What is the time o’ th’ day?
ARIEL
Past the mid season.
PROSPERO
At least two glasses. The time ’twixt six and now
Must by us both be spent most preciously.
ARIEL
Is there more toil? Since thou dost give me pains,
Let me remember thee what thou hast promised,
Which is not yet performed me.

DUTCH:
Meer arbeids nog? Nu gij mij zooveel vergt,
Moge ik u ook op uw belofte wijzen,
Die gij nog niet vervuld hebt.

MORE:
Proverb: ‘Great promise small performance’
Two glasses=Two o’clock (Reference to hour glasses)
Pains=Labours
Preciously=Valuably
Compleat:
Burgersdijk notes:
Twee glazen ruim. Twee uren, naar het uurglas, een zandlooper voor een vol uur, berekend. —Bij de zeevaart is een glas een half uur.

Topics: promise, proverbs and idioms, time, work, contract

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Boy
CONTEXT:
For indeed three such antics do not amount to a man: for Bardolph, he is white-livered
and red-faced, by the means whereof he faces it out but fights not; for Pistol, he hath a killing tongue and a quiet sword, by the means whereof he breaks words and keeps whole weapons; for Nym, he hath heard that men of few words are the best men, and therefore he scorns to say his prayers, lest he should be thought a coward, but his few bad words are matched with as few good deeds, for he never broke any man’s head but his own, and that was against a post when he was drunk.

DUTCH:
Nym, die heeft wel eens gehoord, dat menschen van weinig woorden de besten zijn, en daarom verdraait hij het, ooit te bidden, opdat men hem niet voor een lafaard zou houden, maar naast zijn weinige en slechte woorden staan even weinige goede daden.

MORE:

Antic=Buffoon, practising odd gesticulations
White-livered=Cowardly (White livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare)
Face it out=To get through one’s business by effrontery
Scorn=To disdain, to refuse or lay aside with contempt
Words=Also in the sense of promises

Compleat:
To scorn=Verachten, verfooijen
White-livered=Een die er altijd bleek uitziet; een bleek-neus, kwaadaardig, nydig
To face out=Iemand iets in ‘t gezigt staande houden

Topics: reputation, honour, language, promise

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Gentle cousin,
Let us go thank him and encourage him.
My father’s rough and envious disposition
Sticks me at heart. Sir, you have well deserved.
If you do keep your promises in love
But justly, as you have exceeded all promise,
Your mistress shall be happy.
ROSALIND
Gentleman,
Wear this for me—one out of suits with fortune
That could give more but that her hand lacks means.
Shall we go, coz?
CELIA
Ay. Fare you well, fair gentleman.
ORLANDO
Can I not say “I thank you”? My better parts
Are all thrown down, and that which here stands up
Is but a quintain, a mere lifeless block.

DUTCH:
Mijn beter deel
Ligt neergeveld, en wat nog overeind staat,
Is als een pop bij ‘t steekspel, roerloos, dood.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quintain=a post or figure set up for beginners in tilting to run at.

Burgersdijk notes:
Een pop bij ‘t steekspel. A quintain: een houten figuur, die vooral bij oefeningen in het toernooirijden als doel voor de lans diende. Volgens Douce was dit doel, in zijn meest volkomen vorm, een afgezaagde boomstam, waarop een menschelijke figuur geplaatst was, die aan den linkerarm een schild, in de rechterhand een zak met zand vasthield. De toernooiruiters poogden in galop met hun lans den kop of het lijf van de pop te treffen; mislukte dit en raakten zij het schild, dan draaide de pop snel om en gaf hun, tot groot vermaak der toeschouwers, een slag met den zandzak.

Topics: emotion and mood, civility, merit, promise, respect

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
O Swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable

DUTCH:
O zweer niet bij de maan; ze is ongestadig,
En eeuwig wisselt ze in haar schijf;

MORE:

Topics: promise, uncertainty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Helen
CONTEXT:
HELEN
What I can do can do no hurt to try,
Since you set up your rest ‘gainst remedy.
He that of greatest works is finisher
Oft does them by the weakest minister:
So holy writ in babes hath judgment shown,
When judges have been babes; great floods have flown
From simple sources, and great seas have dried
When miracles have by the greatest been denied.
Oft expectation fails and most oft there
Where most it promises, and oft it hits
Where hope is coldest and despair most fits.

DUTCH:
Verwachting faalt niet zelden, ‘t meest, wanneer
Zij ‘t meest belooft; en vaak maakt ze alles goed,
Als hoop, verkild, voor wanhoop wijken moet.

MORE:
To fit=To be fitting, appropriate: “oft it hits where hope is coldest and despair most fits”
Hope is coldest=Most hopeless
Compleat:
To fit=Passen, pas maaken, gereed maaken, voegen
You must fit your humour to it=Gy moet ‘er uw humeur toe schikken

Topics: hope/optimism, ambition, promise

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Clarence
CONTEXT:
CLARENCE
Look here, I throw my infamy at thee
I will not ruinate my father’s house,
Who gave his blood to lime the stones together,
And set up Lancaster. Why, trow’st thou, Warwick,
That Clarence is so harsh, so blunt, unnatural,
To bend the fatal instruments of war
Against his brother and his lawful king?
Perhaps thou wilt object my holy oath:
To keep that oath were more impiety
Than Jephthah’s, when he sacrificed his daughter.
I am so sorry for my trespass made
That, to deserve well at my brother’s hands,
I here proclaim myself thy mortal foe,
With resolution, wheresoe’er I meet thee—
As I will meet thee, if thou stir abroad—
To plague thee for thy foul misleading me.

DUTCH:
Gij houdt wellicht mijn heil’gen eed mij voor?

MORE:

Proverb: An unlawful oath is better broken than kept

Ruinate=Ruin
Lime=Bond (glue together)
Jephthah=A warrior and judge whose story can be found in the Book of Judges. Jephthah swore to God that in excange for victory over the Ammonites, he would sacrifice the first person to greet him after the battle; the first person he saw was his daughter.
Trow=Think, believe
Bend=Used of instruments of war (Schmidt)
Were more impiety=Would be more of a sin, more wicked

Compleat:
Bird-lime=Vogellym
I trow=Ik denk, ik acht
To bend a sword=Een zwaard buigen
Impiety=Ongodvruchtigheid, godloosheid

Topics: promise, conflict, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Ariel
CONTEXT:
PROSPERO
How now? Moody?
What is ’t thou canst demand?
ARIEL
My liberty.
PROSPERO
Before the time be out? No more!
ARIEL
I prithee,
Remember I have done thee worthy service,
Told thee no lies, made thee no mistakings, served
Without or grudge or grumblings. Thou didst promise
To bate me a full year.

DUTCH:
Bedenk, ik bid u, ‘k deed u trouwen dienst,
Beloog u nooit, deed niets verkeerd, en diende
U willig zonder klacht. Een vol jaar afslag
Hebt gij mij toegezegd.

MORE:
Moody=Ill- humoured; discontented, peevish, angry
Time=Period of indenture
Bate (abate)=Reduce length of indenture
Mistakings=Mistakes
Grudge=Grudging; ill-will
Compleat:
In an ill mood=In een kwaade luim
Moody=Eenzinnig, eigenzinnig
The mood of a verb=De wyze van een werkwoord
Worthy=Waardig
Bate=Verminderen, afkorten, afslaan

Topics: work, contract, promise, claim, loyalty

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE:
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
FALSTAFF
That can hardly be, Master Shallow. Do not you grieve at this. I shall be sent for in private to him. Look you, he must seem thus to the world. Fear not your advancements. I will be the man yet that shall make you great.
SHALLOW
I cannot well perceive how, unless you should give me your doublet and stuff me out with straw. I beseech you, good Sir John, let me have five hundred of my thousand.
FALSTAFF
Sir, I will be as good as my word. This that you heard was but a color.

DUTCH:
Heer, ik zal zoo goed als mijn woord zijn; wat gij
daar gehoord hebt, was maar voor den schijn.

MORE:
Proverb: An honest man is as good as his word

Topics: promise, appearance

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 4.6
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
They flattered me like a dog and told me I had white hairs in my beard ere the black ones were there. To say “Ay” and “No” to everything that I said “Ay” and “No” to was no good divinity. When the rain came to wet me once, and the wind to make me chatter, when the thunder would not peace at my bidding—there I found ’em, there I smelt ’em out. Go to, they are not men o’ their words. They told me I was everything. ‘Tis a lie, I am not ague-proof.

DUTCH:
Zij zeiden mij, dat ik alles en nog wat was ;
gelogen is ‘t – ik kan niet eens tegen de koorts op./
Loop heen, hun woorden betekenden
niets, ze zeiden dat ik alles voor hen was. Dat is een leugen.
Ik ben niet onvatbaar voor koorts.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Ague-proof=Able to resist the causes which produce agues (also: Immune to severe chill)
Divinity=Theology
Compleat:
Ague=Koorts die met koude komt, een verpoozende koorts

Topics: flattery, deceit, truth, promise, betrayal

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Bassanio
CONTEXT:
BASSANIO
Yes, here I tender it for him in the court—
Yea, twice the sum. If that will not suffice,
I will be bound to pay it ten times o’er,
On forfeit of my hands, my head, my heart.
If this will not suffice, it must appear
That malice bears down truth.—
And I beseech you,
Wrest once the law to your authority.
To do a great right, do a little wrong,
And curb this cruel devil of his will.

DUTCH:
Om waarlijk recht te doen, pleeg luttel onrecht,
En toom dien boozen duivel in zijn vaart.

MORE:
Curb=restrain from
Wrest=Turn the worng way, misinterpret
Malice=Hate, enmity, ill will.
To bear down=Overturn, overwhelm, crush
Compleat:
To curb=Betoomen, intoomen, bedwingen, beteugelen
To curb the licentiousness of the stage-Poets=De moedwilligheid van de Toneeldichters beteugelen
To curb one’s ambition=Iemands hoogmoed fnuiken
To wrest=Verdraaijen, wringen
To wrest one’s words maliciously=Iemands woorden kwaardaardig verdraaijen
To bear malice=Iemand nydig zyn, iemand een kwaad hart toedraagen
CITED IN US LAW:
People v. Hampton, 384 Mich. 669, 685 (1971).

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Antipholus
CONTEXT:

And so do I, yet did she call me so,
And this fair gentlewoman, her sister here,
Did call me brother. What I told you then
I hope I shall have leisure to make good,
If this be not a dream I see and hear.

DUTCH:
Wat ik u toen zeide,
Dit worde, wensch ik vurig, dra vervuld,
Zoo niet al wat ik zie en hoor, een droom is.

MORE:

Topics: promise

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Player King
CONTEXT:
What to ourselves in passion we propose,
The passion ending, doth the purpose lose.
The violence of either grief or joy
Their own enactures with themselves destroy.

DUTCH:
Wat wij onszelf hartstochtelijk beloofden,Verwaait zodra die hartstocht is gedoofd. /
Wat door onszelf hartstochtlijk werd bedoeld, Te loor gaat als de hartstocht is verkoeld. /
Als hij vol ijver tot een daad besluit, Wordt deze onnuttig, heeft die ijver uit.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Enacture=Action, representation (Ff enactors)
Compleat:
To enact=Vaststellen, bezluiten.
Enacter=Een vaststeller, wetmaaker

Topics: promise, contract, purpose, negligence, plans/intentions

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Gower
CONTEXT:
Go, go. You are a counterfeit cowardly knave. Will you mock at an ancient tradition begun upon an honorable respect and worn as a memorable trophy of predeceased valour, and dare not avouch in your deeds any of your words? I have seen you gleeking and galling at this gentleman twice or thrice. You thought because he could not speak English in the native garb, he could not therefore handle an English cudgel. You find it otherwise, and henceforth let a Welsh correction teach you a good English condition. Fare you well.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij spotten over een oud gebruik, dat uit een eervolle aanleiding ontsproot en als een gedenkwaardig teeken van vroegere dapperheid gedragen wordt, en waagt gij het niet, zelfs éen uwer woorden door daden waar te maken?

MORE:

To gleek=Scoff, sneer
Schmidt:
To gall (with at)=To quiz, to scoff: “gleeking and galling at this gentleman”
Predeceased valour=Brave men who have died
Garb=Fashion
Correction=Chastisement
Condition=Disposition

Compleat:
Condition=Staat, gesteltenis
Good-conditioned=Goedaardig
Correction=Verbetering, tuchtiging, berisping
Garb=Kleeding; (carriage)=houding

Topics: betrayal, language, promise, appearance, intellect

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