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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Hamlet ACT/SCENE: 5.2 SPEAKER: Horatio CONTEXT: And let me speak to th’ yet-unknowing world
How these things came about. So shall you hear
Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts,
Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters,
Of deaths put on by cunning and forced cause,
And, in this upshot, purposes mistook
Fall’n on th’ inventors’ heads. All this can I
Truly deliver. DUTCH: En eind’lijk van bedoelingen, mislukt, Die haar ontwerpers troffen /
Hoe bij dit einde, ongeslaagde plannen, Hem die ze smeedde, troffen. /
En, aan het eind, mislukte plannen, die neerkwamen op het hoofd der samenzweerders.
MORE: Schmidt:
Mistook= Committed an error, misjudged
Purpose=Design, plan, project
Inventor=Contriver, author
Compleat
Art (cunning or industry)=Behendigheid, Schranderheid, Naarstigheid Topics: justification, reason, error, purpose, defence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
If your grace
Could but be brought to know our ends are honest,
You’ld feel more comfort: why should we, good lady,
Upon what cause, wrong you? alas, our places,
The way of our profession is against it:
We are to cure such sorrows, not to sow ’em.
For goodness’ sake, consider what you do;
How you may hurt yourself, ay, utterly
Grow from the king’s acquaintance, by this carriage.
The hearts of princes kiss obedience,
So much they love it; but to stubborn spirits
They swell, and grow as terrible as storms.
I know you have a gentle, noble temper,
A soul as even as a calm: pray, think us
Those we profess, peace-makers, friends, and servants.

DUTCH:
Wij moeten kommer heelen, niet hem zaaien.
Bedenk om ‘s hemels wille, wat gij doet,
Hoe gij uzelve leed doen.

MORE:
End=Objective
Place=Position, rank
Carriage=Conduct, action
Calm=Calm sea
Compleat:
End=Het end, eynde, oogmerk
Place=Plaats
Carriage=Gedrag, aanstelling, ommegaan, handel en wandel
Calm=Kalmte

Topics: purpose, remedy, authority

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Isabella
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
Believe me, on mine honour,
My words express my purpose.
ISABELLA
Ha! little honour to be much believed,
And most pernicious purpose! Seeming, seeming!
I will proclaim thee, Angelo; look for’t:
Sign me a present pardon for my brother,
Or with an outstretch’d throat I’ll tell the world aloud
What man thou art.

DUTCH:
Neen, geloof mij,
Neen, op mijn eer, ik zeg, wat ik bedoel .

MORE:
Onions:
Pernicious=Wicked, villainous
Compleat:
Pernicious=Schadelyk, verderflyk
A pernicious counsel=Een schadelyke, snoode raad
A pernicious maxim or doctrine=Een schadelyke stokregel, verderflyke leer.

Topics: language, honour, plans/intentions, purpose, deceit, manipulation, gullibility

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Chamberlain
CONTEXT:
CHAMBERLAIN
Heaven keep me from such counsel! ‘Tis most true
These news are every where; every tongue speaks ’em,
And every true heart weeps for’t: all that dare
Look into these affairs see this main end,
The French king’s sister. Heaven will one day open
The king’s eyes, that so long have slept upon
This bold bad man.
SUFFOLK
And free us from his slavery.

DUTCH:
Eenmaal opent
God ‘s konings oogen, die zoo lange sliepen,
En doet dien driesten, boozen man hem zien.

MORE:
End=Objective
Slept upon=Have been blind to
Compleat:
End=Eynde, oogmerk

Topics: purpose, marriage, deceit, advice

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
How poor are they that have not patience!
What wound did ever heal but by degrees?
Thou know’st we work by wit and not by witchcraft,
And wit depends on dilatory time.

DUTCH:
Wie geen geduld heeft, is zeer arm/
Wat dom is hij die zijn geduld verliest!

MORE:

Proverb: He that has no patience has nothing

Depends on dilatory time = Time moves slowly

Compleat:
Dilatory=Uitstel-zoekende

Topics: intellect, patience, proverbs and idioms, purpose

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
By the worst means, the worst. For mine own good,
All causes shall give way. I am in blood
Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more,
Returning were as tedious as go o’er.
Strange things I have in head, that will to hand,
Which must be acted ere they may be scanned.

DUTCH:
k Heb in bloed
Zoo ver gewaad, dat, als ik nu bleef staan,
Mij de omkeer zwaarder viel, dan ‘t voorwaarts gaan.

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb: “Go forward and fall, go backward and mar all” (1580)

Topics: purpose, uncertainty, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Gloucester
CONTEXT:
Ay, Edward will use women honourably.
Would he were wasted, marrow, bones and all,
That from his loins no hopeful branch may spring,
To cross me from the golden time I look for!
And yet, between my soul’s desire and me—
The lustful Edward’s title buried—
Is Clarence, Henry, and his son young Edward,
And all the unlook’d for issue of their bodies,
To take their rooms, ere I can place myself:
A cold premeditation for my purpose!
Why, then, I do but dream on sovereignty;
Like one that stands upon a promontory,
And spies a far-off shore where he would tread,
Wishing his foot were equal with his eye,
And chides the sea that sunders him from thence,
Saying, he’ll lade it dry to have his way:
So do I wish the crown, being so far off;
And so I chide the means that keeps me from it;
And so I say, I’ll cut the causes off,
Flattering me with impossibilities.

DUTCH:
Ja, ja, zoo is ‘t, ik droom van kroon en rijk,
Als een, die op een voorgebergte staat

MORE:

That=So that
Hopeful=With potential, prospect of success
Cross=Block
Gold time=Golden age, of wearing a crown
Unlooked-for=Unwelcome
Rooms=Places, positions
Cold=Discouraging
Lade=Ladle
Chide=To scold, curse
Means that keep me from it=Obstacles
Flattering me=Deluding myself

Compleat:
Chide=Kyven, bekyven
Hopefull=Van goede hope; wiens veel belooft
To cros=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, dwarsboomen, wederestreeven, kruisen
Chide=Kyven, bekyven

Topics: honour, ambition, purpose

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
I have possessed your grace of what I purpose,
And by our holy Sabbath have I sworn
To have the due and forfeit of my bond.
If you deny it, let the danger light
Upon your charter and your city’s freedom.
You’ll ask me why I rather choose to have
A weight of carrion flesh than to receive
Three thousand ducats. I’ll not answer that
But say it is my humour. Is it answered?
What if my house be troubled with a rat
And I be pleased to give ten thousand ducats
To have it baned? What, are you answered yet?
Some men there are love not a gaping pig,
Some that are mad if they behold a cat,
And others, when the bagpipe sings i’ th’ nose,
Cannot contain their urine. For affection,
Mistress of passion, sways it to the mood
Of what it likes or loathes. Now, for your answer:
As there is no firm reason to be rendered
Why he cannot abide a gaping pig;
Why he, a harmless necessary cat;
Why he, a woollen bagpipe, but of force
Must yield to such inevitable shame
As to offend, himself being offended—
So can I give no reason, nor I will not
(More than a lodged hate and a certain loathing
I bear Antonio), that I follow thus
A losing suit against him. Are you answered?

DUTCH:
Ik deelde uw hoogheid mee wat ik verlang,
En ik bezwoer bij onzen heil’gen sabbath,
Te vord’ren, wat mij toekomt door mijn schuldbrief.

MORE:
To possess=To inform, acquaint (To put one in possession of)
Due and forfeit=Debt and penalty
Humour=Whim
Baned=Poisoned
Affection=Impulse
Of force=Perforce
Lodged=Deep-seated
Bond=A deed by which one binds oneself to another to make a payment or fulfil a contract
Compleat:
To possess one with an opinion=Iemand tot een gevoelen overbaalen, voorinnemen
Light on (his head)=’t zal op zyn kop aankomen
Enter into a bond=In een verband treeden, zich verbinden
Bane=Verderf, vergif

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
YORK
Whom have we here? Buckingham, to disturb me?
The king hath sent him, sure: I must dissemble.
BUCKINGHAM
York, if thou meanest well, I greet thee well.
YORK
Humphrey of Buckingham, I accept thy greeting.
Art thou a messenger, or come of pleasure?
BUCKINGHAM
A messenger from Henry, our dread liege,
To know the reason of these arms in peace;
Or why thou, being a subject as I am,
Against thy oath and true allegiance sworn,
Should raise so great a power without his leave,
Or dare to bring thy force so near the court.

DUTCH:
Zoo gij als vriend komt, York, dan groet ik vriendlijk.

MORE:

Dissemble=Assume a false appearance
Arms=Army
Dread=Greatly revered

Compleat:
To dissemble (conceal)=Bedekken, bewimpelen; veinzen, ontveinzen, verbloemen
Dread sovereign=Geduchte Vorst

Topics: appearance, deceit, civility, purpose, loyalty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
My high-repented blames,
Dear sovereign, pardon to me.
KING
All is whole;
Not one word more of the consumed time.
Let’s take the instant by the forward top;
For we are old, and on our quick’st decrees
The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time
Steals ere we can effect them. You remember
The daughter of this lord

DUTCH:
t Is alles goed ;
Geen woord meer van ‘t verleed’ne. ‘t Oogenblik
Zij bij de voorhoofdslok door ons gegrepen;
Want wij zijn oud, en wat wij ras ontwerpen,
Besluipt de zachte onhoorb’re voet des tijds,
Eer ‘t is volvoerd .

MORE:
Proverb: Take time (occasion) by the forelock, for she is bald behind
Take the instant by the forward top=Seize the moment
Quickest= Most keenly felt
Compleat:
At this very instant=Op dit eygenste Oogenblik
Quick=Scherp
Cut to the quick=Tot aan ‘t leeven snyden

Topics: time, risk, caution, purpose, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
LADY MACBETH
Was the hope drunk
Wherein you dressed yourself? Hath it slept since?
And wakes it now, to look so green and pale
At what it did so freely? From this time
Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard
To be the same in thine own act and valor
As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that
Which thou esteem’st the ornament of life,
And live a coward in thine own esteem,
Letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would, ”
Like the poor cat i’ th’ adage?
MACBETH
Prithee, peace:
I dare do all that may become a man;
Who dares do more is none.

DUTCH:
Wilt gij dat bezitten,
Wat gij des levens sieraad schat, en wilt gij
In eigen schatting als een lafaard leven,
Die „’k Durf niet” volgen laat op: „O, ik wilde!”
Als de arme kat in ‘t spreekwoord?
Ik durf en waag al wat een man betaamt; Wie meer durft, is geen man.

MORE:
The cat in the adage: “The Cat would eat fish but she will not wet her feet” (1225).
P.G. Wodhouse quoted this in Right Ho, Jeeves:
“I remember. Yes, I recall the Sipperley case. He couldn’t bring himself to the scratch. A marked coldness of the feet, was there not? I recollect you saying he was letting–what was it?–letting something do something. Cats entered into it, if I am not mistaken.”
“Letting ‘I dare not’ wait upon ‘I would’, sir.”
“That’s right. But how about the cats?”
“Like the poor cat i’ the adage, sir.”
“Exactly. It beats me how you think up these things. And Gussie, you say, is in the same posish?”

Topics: courage, ambition, purpose

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King of France
CONTEXT:
Is it no more but this—a tardiness in nature
Which often leaves the history unspoke
That it intends to do?—My lord of Burgundy,
What say you to the lady? Love’s not love
When it is mingled with regards that stands
Aloof from th’ entire point. Will you have her?
She is herself a dowry.

DUTCH:
Want liefde is geen liefde, als zij met zaken wordt vermengd die daar volkomen vreemd aan zijn./
Die liefde is geen liefde, Waarmeê gedachten zich vermengen, verre Van ‘t ware doelwit dwalend.

MORE:

Tardiness=Slowness, or rather a habit of being behindhand in sth.
Aloof=Irrelevant to
Mingled with=Adulterated by
Regards=Consideration, respect, account
Compleat:
Tardiness=Traagheyd, Slofheyd, Langzaamheyd
Aloof=To loofwaard, loof op. In de ruymte, van verre

Topics: caution, value, , marriage, purpose

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Lady Macbeth
CONTEXT:
That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold:
What hath quenched them hath given me fire.

DUTCH:
Wat hen bedwelmde, heeft mij stout gemaakt;
Wat hen verdoofde, gaf mij vuur

MORE:

Topics: courage, ambition, purpose

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
The purpose you undertake is dangerous. Why, that’s certain. ‘Tis dangerous to take a cold, to sleep, to drink; but I tell you, my lord fool, out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety. The purpose you undertake is dangerous, the friends you have named uncertain, the time itself unsorted, and your whole plot too light for the counterpoise of so great an opposition.

DUTCH:
De onderneming, die gij op touw zet, is gevaarlijk; de vrienden, die gij noemt, zijn onzeker; de tijd zelf is slecht gekozen en geheel uw plan te licht voor het tegenwicht van zulk een grooten wederstand.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Purpose=That which a person intends to do, design, plan, project
Compleat:
Nettle=Netel, brandnetel
To nettle=Branden of steeken als netelen, quellen, ontrusten, onthutselen, plaagen

Topics: purpose, courage, plans/intentions, risk

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Alonso
CONTEXT:
ALONSO
This is as strange a maze as e’er men trod,
And there is in this business more than nature
Was ever conduct of. Some oracle
Must rectify our knowledge.
PROSPERO
Sir, my liege,
Do not infest your mind with beating on
The strangeness of this business. At picked leisure
Which shall be shortly, single I’ll resolve you—
Which to you shall seem probable—of every
These happened accidents. Till when, be cheerful
And think of each thing well.
(to Ariel)  Come hither, spirit.
Set Caliban and his companions free.
Untie the spell.

DUTCH:
t Is ‘t vreemdste doolhof, waar een mensch ooit dwaalde.

MORE:
Maze=A labyrinth: “one encompassed with a winding m.”
Conduct of=Led, guided by (directed by nature)
Single=Privately, separately, alone
Resolve=To free from uncertainty or ignorance, to satisfy, to inform
Accidents=Unforeseen events
Infest your mind=Trouble, assail your mind
Compleat:
Maze=Doolhof, bedwelming
To resolve (to untie, to decide, to determine a hard question, a difficulty)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopen
Accident=Een toeval, kwaal

Topics: nature, plans/intentions, resolution, purpose

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
How poor are they that have not patience!
What wound did ever heal but by degrees?
Thou know’st we work by wit and not by witchcraft,
And wit depends on dilatory time.

DUTCH:
Wie geen geduld heeft, is zeer arm/
Wat dom is hij die zijn geduld verliest!

MORE:

Proverb: He that has no patience has nothing

Depends on dilatory time = Time moves slowly

Compleat:
Dilatory=Uitstel-zoekende

Topics: intellect, patience, proverbs and idioms, purpose

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Though other things grow fair against the sun,
Yet fruits that blossom first will first be ripe.
Content thyself awhile. By th’mass, ’tis morning :
Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.
Retire thee, go where thou art billeted.
Away, I say, thou shalt know more hereafter –
Nay, get thee gone.
Two things are to be done.
My wife must move for Cassio to her mistress –
I’ll set her on.
Myself the while to draw the Moor apart,
And bring him jump when he may Cassio find
Soliciting his wife. Ay, that’s the way :
Dull not device by coldness and delay.

DUTCH:
Genoegen en bedrijvigheid maken de uren kort./
Plezier en daden lijken de uren kort te maken.

MORE:

Other things grow fair=Long-term plans blossom slowly
Fruits that blossom first=Preliminary plans (have already borne fruit)
Move for=Plead for
Jump=At that precise time
Device=Plot
To dull=To incapacitate, make inert
Coldness=Lack of enthusiasm or energy

Compleat:
To move (to stir up, to egg on, to solicit or persuade)=Aanstooken, oprokkenen
To move to compassion=Tot medelyden beweegen

Topics: time, plans/intentions, conspiracy, patience, purpose

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Polonius
CONTEXT:
HAMLET
Slanders, sir. For the satirical rogue says here that old men have gray beards, that their faces are wrinkled, their eyes purging thick amber and plum-tree gum, and that they have a plentiful lack of wit, together with most weak hams—all which, sir, though I most powerfully and potently believe, yet I hold it not honesty to have it thus set down; for yourself, sir, should be old as I am, if like a crab you could go backward.
POLONIUS
(aside) Though this be madness, yet there is method in ’t.—(to HAMLET) Will you walk out of the air, my lord?

DUTCH:
Al is dit waanzin, er zit toch methode in. /
Al is ‘t krankzinnigheid, er zit methode in. /
Al moge dit gekkepraat zijn, toch is er orde in.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Slander= Defamation, calumny
Satirical= full of bitter mockery
Rogue, a term of reproach=rascal, knave
Compleat:
Rogue (or rascal)=Schurk, Schobbejak
The poignancy of a satire=De scherpheid van een schimpdicht
Method in his madness coined by Shakespeare and still in (frequent) use today.

Topics: still in use, proverbs and idioms, madness, purpose

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
GONZALO
I assure you, Carthage.
SEBASTIAN
His word is more than the miraculous harp. He hath raised the wall and houses too.
ANTONIO
What impossible matter will he make easy next?
SEBASTIAN
I think he will carry this island home in his pocket and give it his son for an apple.
ANTONIO
And sowing the kernels of it in the sea, bring forth more islands.
GONZALO
Ay.
ANTONIO
Why, in good time.

DUTCH:
Wat voor een onmogelijkheid zal hij den volgenden
keer uithalen.?

MORE:
Miraculous harp: In Greek mythology, Amphion used a harp to raise the walls of Thebes. Sebastian
suggests that Gonzalo rebuilt all of Carthage by conflating it with Tunis. (Arden)
Compleat:
Miraculous=Wonderbaarlyk
Kernel=Pit, kern, korrel
Burgersdijk notes:
Dan Amphion’s wonderharp. In het oorspronkelijke staat alleen: „dan de wonderharp” of „dan de wonderdoende harp”; de harp, of lier, van Amphion wordt bedoeld, op wier klanken de steenen zich samenvoegden tot den opbouw van Thebe’s muren.

Topics: achievement, ambition, purpose, fate/destiny

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ADRIANA
By thee; and this thou didst return from him:
That he did buffet thee and, in his blows,
Denied my house for his, me for his wife.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Did you converse, sir, with this gentlewoman?
What is the course and drift of your compact?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
I, sir? I never saw her till this time.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Villain, thou liest; for even her very words
Didst thou deliver to me on the mart.

DUTCH:
Dus hebt ge met deze edelvrouw gesproken?
Van waar die afspraak? en wat wilt ge er mee?

MORE:
Course=Gist
Drift=Scope, aim, intention or drive
Compact=Covenant, contract or collusion, alliance

Compleat:
Course (way or means)=Wegen of middelen
To take bad courses=Kwaade gangen gaan
Drift=Oogmerk, opzet, vaart
Compact=Verdrag, verding, verbond
It was done by compact=Het geschiede met voorbedachten raad (or door een hemelyk verdrag)

Topics: purpose, contract, plans/intentions, conspiracy

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Player King
CONTEXT:
What to ourselves in passion we propose,
The passion ending, doth the purpose lose.
The violence of either grief or joy
Their own enactures with themselves destroy.

DUTCH:
Wat wij onszelf hartstochtelijk beloofden,Verwaait zodra die hartstocht is gedoofd. /
Wat door onszelf hartstochtlijk werd bedoeld, Te loor gaat als de hartstocht is verkoeld. /
Als hij vol ijver tot een daad besluit, Wordt deze onnuttig, heeft die ijver uit.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Enacture=Action, representation (Ff enactors)
Compleat:
To enact=Vaststellen, bezluiten.
Enacter=Een vaststeller, wetmaaker

Topics: promise, contract, purpose, negligence, plans/intentions

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Claudio
CONTEXT:
Unhappily, even so.
And the new deputy now for the duke—
Whether it be the fault and glimpse of newness,
Or whether that the body public be
A horse whereon the governor doth ride,
Who, newly in the seat, that it may know
He can command, lets it straight feel the spur;
Whether the tyranny be in his place,
Or in his eminence that fills it up,
I stagger in:—but this new governor
Awakes me all the enrolled penalties
Which have, like unscour’d armour, hung by the wall
So long that nineteen zodiacs have gone round
And none of them been worn; and, for a name,
Now puts the drowsy and neglected act
Freshly on me: ’tis surely for a name.

DUTCH:
Zij ‘t, dat aan ‘t ambt de tyrannie verknocht is,
Of aan den hoogen geest van die ‘t bekleedt,
Ik weet niet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Glimpse=A transient lustre
Eminence=High place, distinction
Stagger=Waver, hesitate
Awake=Metaphorically, to put to action
Zodiacs=Years
Compleat:
Glimpse=Een Blik, flikkering, schemering
Eminence=Uytsteekendheyd, hoogte
Stagger=Waggelen, wankelen, doen wankelen
He staggers in his opinion=Hy wankelt in zyn gevoelen
To awake=Wekken, wakker maaken, opwekken, ontwaaken

Topics: authority, ambition, law/legal, purpose, status

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