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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: Measure for Measure ACT/SCENE: 1.3 SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio CONTEXT: I prithee,
Supply me with the habit and instruct me
How I may formally in person bear me
Like a true friar. More reasons for this action
At our more leisure shall I render you;
Only, this one: Lord Angelo is precise;
Stands at a guard with envy; scarce confesses
That his blood flows, or that his appetite
Is more to bread than stone : hence shall we see,
If power change purpose, what our seemers be. DUTCH: Zoo machtbezit een mensch kan toetsen, blijkt
Bij hem ook, of zijn aard zijn schijn gelijkt.
MORE: Biblical reference; Matthew 7
(Or what man is there of you, whom if his son ask bread, will he give him a stone?)
Schmidt:
At our more leisure=When we have more time
Seemer=One who makes a show of something
Purpose=That which a person pursues and wishes to obtain, aim, object, and hence bent of mind Topics: appearance, ambition, reason, justification, authority, purpose

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ADRIANA
Come, come, no longer will I be a fool,
To put the finger in the eye and weep
Whilst man and master laugh my woes to scorn.
Come, sir, to dinner.—Dromio, keep the gate. —
Husband, I’ll dine above with you today,
And shrive you of a thousand idle pranks.
Sirrah, if any ask you for your master,
Say he dines forth, and let no creature enter.—
Come, sister.—Dromio, play the porter well.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Am I in earth, in heaven, or in hell?
Sleeping or waking, mad or well-advised?
Known unto these, and to myself disguised!
I’ll say as they say, and persever so,
And in this mist at all adventures go.

DUTCH:
Wat is het, hemel, hel of aarde, hier?
Slaap, waak ik? Ben ik wijs of buiten west?
Ik ken mijzelven niet en zij mij best.

MORE:
Proverb: To put finger in the eye (force tears, generate sympathy)

Mist=Confusion
Well-advised=In my right mind
Persever=Persevere
To shrive=To hear confession and absolve (between condemnation and execution of punishment – origin of short shrift (korte metten))
At all adventures=Whatever the risk, consequences

Compleat:
To shrive=Biechten
At all adventures=Laat komen wat wil, ‘t gaa hoe ‘t gaa

Topics: imagination, evidence, judgment, reason, risk, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 2.7
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
JAQUES
…And in his brain,
Which is as dry as the remainder biscuit
After a voyage, he hath strange places crammed
With observation, the which he vents
In mangled forms. Oh, that I were a fool!
I am ambitious for a motley coat.
DUKE SENIOR
Thou shalt have one.
JAQUES
It is my only suit
Provided that you weed your better judgements
Of all opinion that grows rank in them
That I am wise

DUTCH:
Een noob’le nar! — Hij was weleer een hoov’ling,
En zegt, dat, zijn de vrouwen jong en schoon,
Zij ook de gaaf bezitten van ‘t te weten.
Zijn brein, zoo droog als restjens scheepsbeschuit,
Heeft hij gepropt met vreemde spreuken, vol
Opmerkingsgeest; en geeft die wijsheid lucht,
Verminkt, bij stukjens

MORE:
Elizabethans believed that the three main organsi were the heart, liver and brain. The brain had to be cool and moist to sleep; someone with a ‘cool and moist’ humour would be able to sleep, unlike a choleric person of hot and dry humour. A dry brain was believed to take longer to be impressed with information.
Provided . . . wise as long as you
disabuse yourselves of the prejudice
that I am a wise man.rank gross (homonym with grows),
often including foul smell

Topics: insult, intellect, reason, fashion/trends

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Nay, this was but his dream.
OTHELLO
But this denoted a foregone conclusion.
IAGO
‘Tis a shrewd doubt, though it be but a dream.
And this may help to thicken other proofs
That do demonstrate thinly.
OTHELLO
I’ll tear her all to pieces!
IAGO
Nay, yet be wise, yet we see nothing done,
She may be honest yet. Tell me but this,
Have you not sometimes seen a handkerchief
Spotted with strawberries in your wife’s hand?

DUTCH:
En ’t kan ook andere bewijzen schragen,
die niet zo overtuigend zijn.

MORE:

Still in use: A foregone conclusion=a decision made before (‘afore’) evidence is known; or a certainty, an inevitable result.

Schmidt:
Foregone=Gone before, previous
Shrewd=Bad, evil, mischievous

Compleat:
Fore-conceived=Vooraf bevat
A fore-conceived=Voor-opgevatte waan, vooroordeel
Fore-deem=Raamen, gissen

Topics: proverbs and idioms, invented or popularised, still in use, suspicion, reason, evidence

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
Be advised.
Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself. We may outrun
By violent swiftness that which we run at
And lose by overrunning. Know you not
The fire that mounts the liquor till ’t run o’er
In seeming to augment it wastes it? Be advised.
I say again there is no English soul
More stronger to direct you than yourself,
If with the sap of reason you would quench
Or but allay the fire of passion.
BUCKINGHAM
Sir, I am thankful to you, and I’ll go along
By your prescription. But this top-proud fellow—
Whom from the flow of gall I name not, but
From sincere motions—by intelligence,
And proofs as clear as founts in July when
We see each grain of gravel, I do know
To be corrupt and treasonous.

DUTCH:
O laat u raden,
Stook de’ oven voor uw vijand niet zoo heet,
Dat die uzelf verzengt.

MORE:
Outrun=Run past
Overrun=Overshoot, run past, leave behind
Run over=Boil over
Augment=Increase in size
Go along by=Go along with, follow
Prescription=Advice, direction
Gall=Bitterness of mind, rancour
Motions=Motives
Compleat:
To out-run=Voorby loopen, ontloopen, voorby rennen
To augment=Vermeerderen, vergrooten, toeneemen
I will go along with thee=Ik zal met u gaan
Prescription=Voorschryving, verordening; Aaloud gebruyk
Gall=Gal. Bitter as gall=Zo bitter als gal
Motion=Beweeging, aandryving, voorslag

Topics: patience, anger, caution, reason

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Suffolk
CONTEXT:
SUFFOLK
Before we make election, give me leave
To show some reason, of no little force,
That York is most unmeet of any man.
YORK
I’ll tell thee, Suffolk, why I am unmeet:
First, for I cannot flatter thee in pride;
Next, if I be appointed for the place,
My Lord of Somerset will keep me here,
Without discharge, money, or furniture,
Till France be won into the Dauphin’s hands:
Last time, I danced attendance on his will
Till Paris was besieged, famish’d, and lost.
WARWICK
That can I witness; and a fouler fact
Did never traitor in the land commit.

DUTCH:
Aleer we een keuze doen, zij mij vergund,
Dat ik met gronden van gewicht hier aantoon,
Hoe York het minst van allen er voor deugt.

MORE:

Make election=Select
Of no little force=Of substantial weight, powerful
Dance attendance=Wait upon
Cannot flatter thee in pride=My pride/self-respect won’t allow me to flatter you
Furniture=Military equipment, supplies
For the place=To the position

Compleat:
To dance attendance=Lang te vergeefsch wagten

Topics: integrity, reputation, justification, reason

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Plantagenet
CONTEXT:
MORTIMER
That cause, fair nephew, that imprison’d me
And hath detain’d me all my flowering youth
Within a loathsome dungeon, there to pine,
Was cursed instrument of his decease.
PLANTAGENET
Discover more at large what cause that was,
For I am ignorant and cannot guess.
MORTIMER
I will, if that my fading breath permit
And death approach not ere my tale be done.

DUTCH:
Onthul mij breeder, welke grond dit was;
Want ik vernam het nooit en kan ‘t niet raden.

MORE:
Flowering=Blossom (of youth)
Discover=Reveal
At large=At length, in full, in detail

Compleat:
To flower=Bloeijen

Topics: reason, discovery

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Juliet
CONTEXT:
How art thou out of breath when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?
The excuse that thou dost make in this delay
Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse.
Is thy news good, or bad? Answer to that.
Say either, and I’ll stay the circumstance.
Let me be satisfied. Is ’t good or bad?

DUTCH:
Gij buiten adem? en gij hebt toch adem,
Dat gij me uw buiten-adem-zijn vertelt?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Stay=Wait for
Circumstance=Particulars, detail
Compleat:
Stay (to tarry or sejourn)=Verblyven
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
A fact set out in all its circumstances=Een geval in alle zyne omsandigheden verhaalen.

Topics: time, good and bad, reason, reply, truth

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 3.5
SPEAKER: Capulet
CONTEXT:

How, how, how, how? Chopped logic! What is this?
“Proud,” and “I thank you,” and “I thank you not,”
And yet “not proud”? Mistress minion you,
Thank me no thankings, nor proud me no prouds,

DUTCH:
Zie, wat spitsvondig nest! wat praat is dit?

MORE:
Contranym. Either (1) to argue skilfully with sophisticated reasoning or (2) to advance an illogical argument, usually overcomplicated.
Onions:
Chop-logic: contentious sophistical arguer. (Q1 “chop logicke,” but the rest “chopt logic,” which would naturally mean ‘sophistical or contentious argument’).

Topics: reason, justification, plans/intentions

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Second Lord
CONTEXT:
SECOND LORD
Good my lord,
The reasons of our state I cannot yield,
But like a common and an outward man,
That the great figure of a council frames
By self-unable motion: therefore dare not
Say what I think of it, since I have found
Myself in my incertain grounds to fail
As often as I guess’d.

DUTCH:
En daarom durf ik
Niet uiten wat ik denk, daar ik mij reeds,
Als ik vermoedens waagde, heb bedrogen,
Zoo vaak ik giste.

MORE:
Yield=Give, explain
State=Body politic
Frame=Construct
Self-unable motion=Insight I do not have
Compleat:
Yield=Overgeevven, toegeeven, geeven
Motion=Beweeging, aandryving

Topics: reason, justification

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 2.9
SPEAKER: Arragon
CONTEXT:
ARRAGON
And so have I addressed me. Fortune now
To my heart’s hope! Gold, silver, and base lead.
“Who chooseth me must give and hazard all he hath.”
You shall look fairer ere I give or hazard.
What says the golden chest? Ha, let me see.
“Who chooseth me shall gain what many men desire.”
“What many men desire”—that “many” may be meant
By the fool multitude that choose by show,
Not learning more than the fond eye doth teach;
Which pries not to th’ interior, but like the martlet
Builds in the weather on the outward wall,
Even in the force and road of casualty.
I will not choose what many men desire
Because I will not jump with common spirits
And rank me with the barbarous multitudes.
Why then, to thee, thou silver treasure house.
Tell me once more what title thou dost bear.
“Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves.”
And well said too—for who shall go about
To cozen fortune and be honorable
Without the stamp of merit? Let none presume
To wear an undeserved dignity.
Oh, that estates, degrees and offices
Were not derived corruptly, and that clear honor
Were purchased by the merit of the wearer!
How many then should cover that stand bare!
How many be commanded that command!
How much low peasantry would then be gleaned
From the true seed of honor! And how much honor
Picked from the chaff and ruin of the times
To be new varnished! Well, but to my choice.
“Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves.”
I will assume desert.—Give me a key for this,
And instantly unlock my fortunes here.

DUTCH:
Ik wil mij niet naar lage geesten schikken,
Niet voegen bij den grooten dommen hoop.

MORE:
CITED IN EWCA LAW:
Cruddas v Calvert & Ors [2013] EWCA Civ 748 (21 June 2013)
DeRonde v. Regents of the Univ. of California, 102 Cal. App. 3d 221 (1980): “We close with a quotation from Shakespeare, who so eloquently reminds us that competition on the basis of merit alone is the lifeblood of a democratic society: ‘For who shall go about….’.”

Fool multitude=Foolish commoners
Fond=Doting, simple.
Fond eye=What meets the eye
Jump with=Agree with
Barbarous=Ignorant, unlettered
Cozen=Cheat
Undeservèd=Unmerited
Dignity=Elevated rank, high office
Compleat:
Multitude=Menigte, veelheid, het gemeene volk, het gepeupel
Jump (to agree)=Het ééns worden, overenstemmen.
Their opinions jump much with ours=Hunne gevoelens komen veel met de onzen overeen
Wits jump always together=De groote verstanden beulen altijd saamenCozen=Bedriegen
Merit=Verdienste.
What ever may be said of him wil fall short of his merit=Alles wat men van hem zeggen kan, is minder dan zyne verdienste.
Dignity (Merit, importance)=Waardigheid, Staat-ampt, verdiensten.
Dignity (Greatness, Nobleness)=Grootheid, Adelykheid.

Burgersdijk notes:
Als de zwaluw. De huiszwaluw, in het Engelsch martlet (Hirundo urbica), maakt haar nest aan de buitenzijde van gebouwen; meestal vindt men er verscheidene dicht bijeen, zooals Sh. uitvoeriger in Macbeth I. 6.4. beschrijft. Sh. wist, welke soort hij koos; de boerenzwaluw (Hirundo rustics) nestelt
binnenshuis, b.v. in stallen, of, in onbewoonde streken, in rotsholten enz.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
Pray you, be gone:
I’ll try whether my old wit be in request
With those that have but little: this must be patch’d
With cloth of any colour.
COMINIUS
Nay, come away.

A PATRICIAN
This man has marr’d his fortune.
MENENIUS
His nature is too noble for the world:
He would not flatter Neptune for his trident,
Or Jove for’s power to thunder. His heart’s his mouth:
What his breast forges, that his tongue must vent;
And, being angry, does forget that ever
He heard the name of death.

DUTCH:
Hij is voor de aard te grootsch; hij zou Neptunus
Niet om zijn drietand vleien, Jupiter
Niet om zijn dondermacht. Zijn hart en tong
Zijn één; wat de eene smeedt, moet de ander uiten;
En wordt hij toornig, dan vergeet hij steeds,
Dat hij den naam van dood ooit hoorde

MORE:
Proverb: The heart of a fool is in his tongue (mouth)
Proverb: What the heart thinks the tongue speaks

Wit=Sound sense or judgement, understanding. Intelligence
In request=To be of use

Topics: proverbs and idioms, honour, intellect, reason, honesty

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
What, upon compulsion? Zounds, an I were at the strappado or all the racks in the world, I would not tell you on compulsion. Give you a reason on compulsion? If reasons were as plentiful as blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I.

DUTCH:
Al waren er gronden zoo overvloedig als bramen, van mij zou niemand een grond door dwang vernemen, van mij niet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Compulsion=forced applied, constraint
Strappado=A species of torture, usually a military punishment, in which a person was drawn up by his arms tied behind his back, and then suddenly let down with a jerk. The result was usually to dislocate the shoulder blade.
Compleat:
Compulsion=Dwang, drang
Burgersdijk notes:
Aan de wipgalg. In ‘t Engelsch: at the strappado. Bij deze pijniging trok men het slachtoffer met een koord, dat over een katrol liep, omhoog, liet het tot halfweg vallen en hield het dan op met een ruk, zoo, dat de schouders ontwricht waren.

Topics: reason, justification, free will, independence, authority, punishment

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
To bait fish withal. If it will feed nothing else, it
will feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me and hindered
me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my
gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled
my friends, heated mine enemies—and what’s his reason? I
am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands,
organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed
with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject
to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed
and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian
is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us,
do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if
you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you
in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew
wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a
Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by
Christian example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach
me I will execute—and it shall go hard but I will better
the instruction.

DUTCH:
Als gij ons een messteek geeft, bloeden wij dan
niet? als gij ons vergiftigt, sterven wij dan niet? en als
gij ons beleedigt, zullen wij dan geen wraak nemen?

MORE:
If you prick us with a pin, don’t we bleed? If you tickle us, don’t we laugh? If you poison us, don’t we die? And if you treat us badly, won’t we try to get revenge? If we’re like you in everything else, we’ll resemble you in that respect

CITED IN EWCA LAW:
In a direct quotation or “borrowed eloquence” psychiatric injury also prompted Lady Justice Hale in Sutherland v Hatton and other appeals [2002] EWCA Civ 76 at [23] to differentiate it from physical harm saying: “Because of the very nature of psychiatric disorder … it is bound to be harder to foresee than is physical injury. Shylock could not say of a mental disorder, ‘If you prick us, do we not bleed?’” (https://www.counselmagazine.co.uk/articles/quote-or-not-quote-…)
CITED IN US LAW:
National Life Ins., Co. v. Phillips Publ., Inc., 793 F. Supp. 627 (1992) – in reference to commercial interests: “A corporation’s reputation interest is primarily commercial. To paraphrase Shylock, ‘If you prick them they do not bleed.’ Nor do corporations have the same intense interest in dignity that so defines society’s interest in protecting private individual plaintiffs.”

Hindered me=Lost me, cost me
Bargain=Deal, contract
Thwart=Frustrate, interfere with
Cooled my friends=Turned my friends against me
Compleat:
To hinder=Beletten, weerhouden, verhinderen
Bargain=Een verding, verdrag, koop
Thwart=Dwarsdryven, draaiboomen, beleetten
To wrong=Verongelyken, verkoten
He wrongs me=Hy verongelykt my. I was very much wronged=Ik wierd zeer veerongelykt.
To revenge=Wreeken. To revenge an affront=Een belédiging wreeken.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
BUCKINGHAM
I read in’s looks
Matter against me; and his eye reviled
Me, as his abject object: at this instant
He bores me with some trick: he’s gone to the king;
I’ll follow and outstare him.
NORFOLK
Stay, my lord,
And let your reason with your choler question
What ’tis you go about: to climb steep hills
Requires slow pace at first: anger is like
A full-hot horse, who being allow’d his way,
Self-mettle tires him. Not a man in England
Can advise me like you: be to yourself
As you would to your friend.

DUTCH:
Blijf, mylord.
Eerst houde uw rede aan uwe gramschap voor,
Wat gij begint.

MORE:
Matter=Substance of a complaint
Abject object=Object of contempt
Bore=To bore into, wound
Trick=Art, knack, contrivance
Outstare=Face down
Choler=Anger, bile
Compleat:
Matter=Stoffe, zaak, oorzaak
Abject=Veragt, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
Bore=Booren, doorbooren
Trick=Een looze trek, greep, gril
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn

Burgersdijk notes:
Zijn oog verlaagde mij als zijn lage prooi. Het Engelsch heeft: His eye reviled me as his abject object, een woordspeling, die niet te vertalen is. De kardinaal wist zeer goed, met welk een oog Buckingham hem beschouwde en nam zijn maatregelen. Des hertogs schoonzoon, den graaf van Surrey, zoon van den hertog van Norfolk, deed hij, in plaats van lord Kildare, tot stadhouder van Ierland benoemen, opdat Buckingham, als hij beschuldigd werd, den steun zijns schoonzoons missen zou, en koos verder
het werktuig van zijn haat maar al te goed. De hertog van Buckingham had kort te voren, op aandringen zijner pachters, zijn rentmeester of inspecteur Charles Knevet uit zijn dienst ontslagen. Deze man werd beschuldiger van zijn voormaligen heer. Hij verklaarde in een door Wolsey uitgelokt verhoor, dat de hertog, met zijn schoonzoon George Nevil, lord Abergavenny, sprekende, meer dan eens gewaagd had van zijn plan om de kroon te erlangen in geval de koning kinderloos mocht sterven, en alsdan zijn doodvijand, den kardinaal, te straffen. De kardinaal spoorde nu den rentmeester aan, zonder vrees alles te zeggen, wat hij omtrent deze zaak kon mededeelen, en Knevet, ‘t zij door wraakzucht, ‘t zij door hoop op belooning gedreven, openbaarde weldra zaken, die voor den hertog zeer bezwarend waren. Een zekere Nikolaas Hopkins, een monnik uit het Karthuizerklooster Henton bij Bristol, vroeger biechtvader van den hertog, zou dezen voorspeld hebben, dat hij eens den troon zou bestijgen; de hertog zou, door dit vooruitzicht verblind, eens het plan hebben opgevat den koning uit den weg te ruimen, en Knevet verzekerde, zelf uit ‘s hertogs mond, in een huis te Londen, onder den naam van de Roos bekend en in het kerspel St. Laurentius Pultnie gelegen, duidelijke toespelingen op dit plan vernomen te hebben. — Ten gevolge dezer beschuldigingen werd Buckingham gevat en in den Tower gehuisvest; tegelijk werden Lord Abergavenny, de monnik Hopkins, John de la Car, biechtvader en de priester Gilbert Peck of Perke, kanselier des hertogs, in hechtenis genomen. — De Tudors hadden reden om kroon pretendenten als Buckingham te duchten, want Buckingham stamde in rechte mannelijke lijn van Thomas van Woodstock, hertog van Gloster, den jongsten zoon van koning Edward III af, terwijl de Tudors wel een ouderen zoon, Jan van Gent, hertog van Lancaster, tot stamvader hadden, maar uit den minder echten tak der Beauforts sproten.

Topics: caution, patience, anger, reason

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
His good remembrance, sir,
Lies richer in your thoughts than on his tomb;
So in approof lives not his epitaph
As in your royal speech.
KING
Would I were with him! He would always say—
Methinks I hear him now: his plausive words
He scatterd not in ears, but grafted them,
To grow there and to bear ;—” Let me not live,”
Thus his good melancholy oft began,
On the catastrophe and heel of pastime.
When it was out,—” Let me not live,” quoth he,
“After my flame lacks oil, to be the snuff
Of younger spirits, whose apprehensive senses
All but new things disdain; whose judgments are
Mere fathers of their garments; whose constancies
Expire before their fashions. This he wish’d;
I after him do after him wish too,
Since I nor wax nor honey can bring home,
I quickly were dissolved from my hive,
To give some labourers room.

DUTCH:
O, dat ik bij hem waar! Hij zeide steeds:
Mij is ‘t, als hoor ik hem; hij strooide niet
Zijn gulden taal in ‘t oor, maar entte er die,
Zoodat ze er vruchten droeg,

MORE:
Approof=Testimony
Plausive=Pleasing, specious, plausible
Catastrophe, Heel=Both meaning end
Scattered not but grafted=Not thrown carelessly but carefully planted
Snuff=The burning wick of a candle, as darkening the flame or remaining after it.
Apprehensive=Imaginative
Compleat:
Plausible=Op een schoonschynende wyze
To snuff out a candle=Een kaars uitsnuiten
Apprehensive (sensible of)=Een ding gewaar worden

Topics: fashion/trends, language, reason, understanding, memory, legacy

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Edward
CONTEXT:
RICHARD
Brother, though I be youngest, give me leave.
EDWARD
No, I can better play the orator.
MONTAGUE
But I have reasons strong and forcible.
YORK
Why, how now, sons and brother! At a strife?
What is your quarrel? How began it first?
EDWARD
No quarrel, but a slight contention.
YORK
About what?
RICHARD
About that which concerns your grace and us;
The crown of England, father, which is yours.
YORK
Mine boy? not till King Henry be dead.

DUTCH:
Geen twist, alleen een kleine woordenstrijd.

MORE:

Give me leave=Permit me
At a strife=In a fight, dispute
Slight contention=Debate, dispute

Compleat:
To give leave=Verlof geeven, veroorloven
Give me leave to do it=Vergun het my te doen
Strife=Twist, tweedragt, krakkeel, pooging
Contention=Twist, krakkeel, geharrewar

Topics: reason, justification, dispute, persuasion

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Why, cousin! Why, Rosalind! Cupid have mercy, not a word?
ROSALIND
Not one to throw at a dog.
CELIA
No, thy words are too precious to be cast away upon curs.
Throw some of them at me. Come, lame me with reasons.

DUTCH:
Geen enkel; woorden zouden paarlen voor de honden
zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cast away=to throw away, waste or lavish
Lame=Disable me with reasons
Compleat:
To cast away care=Werp de zorg weg
Lame=Verlammen, lam maaken

Topics: language, value, reason

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
O, reason not the need! Our basest beggars
Are in the poorest thing superfluous.
Allow not nature more than nature needs,
Man’s life’s as cheap as beast’s. Thou art a lady.
If only to go warm were gorgeous,
Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear’st,
Which scarcely keeps thee warm. But, for true need—
You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need.

DUTCH:
Spreek niet van nodig! De armste bedelaar
heeft aan een vod nog meer dan nodig is./
0, zwijgt van noodig! De armste beed’laar zelfs
Heeft iets, hoe min ook, nog in overvloed;

MORE:

Schmidt:
Reason not= Don’t argue or debate (the need)
Basest = poorest, lowest.
True need=Non-material needs

Topics: reason, life, justification, poverty and wealth, patience

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
I remember a mass of things, but nothing distinctly. A quarrel, but nothing wherefore. Oh, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains! That we should, with joy, pleasance, revel and applause, transform ourselves into beasts!

DUTCH:
O god, dat mensen een vijand in hun
mond nemen om hun hersens te stelen!

MORE:

CITED IN EU LAW:
Ahokainen and Leppik (Free movement of goods) [2006] EUECJ C-434/04 (28 September 2006) Opinion of A-G Poiares Maduro delivered on 13 July 2006

Nothing wherefore=Not the reason

Schmidt:
Pleasance=Gaiety, merriment

Compleat:
Befallen=Gebeurd, overgekomen

Topics: cited in law, dispute, reason

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
When as a lion’s whelp shall, to himself unknown,
without seeking find, and be embraced by a piece of
tender air; and when from a stately cedar shall be
lopped branches, which, being dead many years,
shall after revive, be jointed to the old stock and
freshly grow; then shall Posthumus end his miseries,
Britain be fortunate and flourish in peace and plenty.’
‘Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen
Tongue and brain not; either both or nothing;
Or senseless speaking or a speaking such
As sense cannot untie. Be what it is,
The action of my life is like it, which
I’ll keep, if but for sympathy.

DUTCH:
t Is nog een droom, of wel het zinn’loos kallen
Van hersenlooze onnooz’len; dit of niets;
Of zinnelooze taal, of taal waarvan
‘t Verstand den zin niet vat


Such stuff as madmen tongue=The nonsensical, irrational talk of madmen
Or=Either (as in Dutch ‘óf dit, of dat’)
Jointed=Grafted
Sympathy=Any conformity, correspondence, resemblance.

Compleat:
Sympathy (natural agreement of things)=Natuurlyke overeenstemming of trek der dingen

Topics: madness, nature, language, reason

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners. So that if we will plant nettles or sow lettuce, set hyssop and weed up thyme, supply it with one gender of herbs or distract it with many—either to have it sterile with idleness, or manured with industry—why, the power and corrigible authority of this lies in our wills.

DUTCH:
Ons lichaam is onze tuin, waarvan onze wil de tuiman is.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Corrigible=Corrective
Sterile=Barren, not fertile
Gender of herbs=Race, kind, sort
Compleat:
Corrigible=Verbeterlyk

Topics: free will, independence, authority, emotion and mood, reason, intellect

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Stay:
Where’s your commission, lords? words cannot carry
Authority so weighty.
SUFFOLK
Who dare cross ’em,
Bearing the king’s will from his mouth expressly?
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Till I find more than will or words to do it,
I mean your malice, know, officious lords,
I dare and must deny it. Now I feel
Of what coarse metal ye are moulded, envy:
How eagerly ye follow my disgraces,
As if it fed ye! and how sleek and wanton
Ye appear in every thing may bring my ruin!
Follow your envious courses, men of malice;
You have Christian warrant for ’em, and, no doubt,
In time will find their fit rewards. That seal,
You ask with such a violence, the king,
Mine and your master, with his own hand gave me;
Bade me enjoy it, with the place and honours,
During my life; and, to confirm his goodness,
Tied it by letters-patents: now, who’ll take it?

DUTCH:
t Zegel, dat gij
Zoo heftig van mij vordert, gaf de koning,
Mijn heer en de uwe, mij met eigen hand,
Verleende ‘t mij, met ambt en rang, genadig
Voor levenslang, en gaf zijn schenking kracht
Bij open brief; wie wil ‘t mij nu ontnemen?

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton).
Commission=Warrant, authority
Cross=Disobey
Coarse=Inferior, base
Wanton=Loose, unprincipled
Rewards=Punishments
Tied=Ratified
Letters patents=Official documents
Compleat:
Wanton=Onrein, vuil, ontuchtig
To cross=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, draaibomen, wederstreeven, kruysen
Coarse=Grof
Wanton=Dartel, weeldrig, brooddronken
Rewards=Punishments
Tied=Gebonden
Letters patents=Opene Brieven, brieven van vergunninge, gunstbrief

Topics: authority, language, reason

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
The duke cannot deny the course of law.
For the commodity that strangers have
With us in Venice, if it be denied,
Will much impeach the justice of his state,
Since that the trade and profit of the city
Consisteth of all nations. Therefore go.
These griefs and losses have so bated me,
That I shall hardly spare a pound of flesh
Tomorrow to my bloody creditor.—
Well, jailer, on.—Pray God Bassanio come
To see me pay his debt, and then I care not.

DUTCH:

De Doge kan den loop van ‘t recht niet stuiten

MORE:
Commodity=Wares, merchandise, convenience
Impeach=Call into question, discredit, disparage
Justice=Operation of laws
Bated=Weakened, diminished
Compleat:
Commodity=Koopmanschap.
Impeach=Zich aankanten
Justice=Recht, gerechtigheid

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Hastings
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
A wise stout captain, and soon persuaded!
HASTINGS
The good old man would fain that all were well,
So ’twere not ‘long of him; but being enter’d,
I doubt not, I, but we shall soon persuade
Both him and all his brothers unto reason.
KING EDWARD IV
So, master mayor: these gates must not be shut
But in the night or in the time of war.
What! Fear not, man, but yield me up the keys;

DUTCH:
Die oude heer ziet liefst, dat alles goed gaat,
Zoo hij slechts buiten spel blijft; doch hoe ‘t zij,
Zijn wij eens binnen, weldra zullen wij
Hem en geheel zijn raad tot vrede brengen.

MORE:

Stout=Bold
Soon=Readily
Fain=Gladly, willingly; only too pleased if… (always joined with would; followed by a clause)
But=Except

Compleat:
Stout (courageous)=Moedig, dapper
Fain=Gaern

Topics: reason, loyalty, resolution

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Ely
CONTEXT:

ELY
The strawberry grows underneath the nettle,
And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best
Neighbored by fruit of baser quality;
And so the Prince obscured his contemplation
Under the veil of wildness, which, no doubt,
Grew like the summer grass, fastest by night,
Unseen yet crescive in his faculty.
CANTERBURY
It must be so, for miracles are ceased,
And therefore we must needs admit the means
How things are perfected.

DUTCH:
De aardbezie ziet men onder netels groeien,
En onder vruchten van geringer aard
Heilzame beziën best tot rijpheid komen.

MORE:

Note: It was commonly thought that plants imbibed the virtues and faults from neighbouring plants. Sweet flowers were planted close to fruit trees to improve the flavour, but the (probably wild) strawberry – symbol of perfect righteousness in religious emblems – was considered to be the exception and would thrive in the midst of ‘evil’ neighbours without being affected.

Crescive=Growing, increasing
Faculty=Inherent power
Means=Causes
Perfected=Brought about

Compleat:
Faculty (power or virtue)=Vermogen, deugd
To perfect=Volmaaken, voltoooijen; tot volmaaktheid brengen

Topics: deceit, appearance, reason

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
Most cruelly
Didst thou, Alonso, use me and my daughter.
Thy brother was a furtherer in the act.—
(to Sebastian) Thou art pinched for ’t now, Sebastian.—
(to Antonio)Flesh and blood,
You brother mine, that entertained ambition,
Expelled remorse and nature, whom, with Sebastian,
Whose inward pinches therefore are most strong,
Would here have killed your king—I do forgive thee,
Unnatural though thou art.
Their understanding
Begins to swell, and the approaching tide
Will shortly fill the reasonable shore
That now lies foul and muddy. Not one of them
That yet looks on me, or would know me.— Ariel,
Fetch me the hat and rapier in my cell.
I will discase me, and myself present
As I was sometime Milan. Quickly, spirit.
Thou shalt ere long be free.

DUTCH:
Hun verstand
Verheft zich, en het naad’rend tij zal dra
Der rede boorden weder vullen, thans
Nog drabbig, donker. Onder hen niet een,
Die mij reeds ziet of zou herkennen.

MORE:
Pinched=Hurt, tormented e.g. pinch of conscience
Expelled=Rejected (pity and natural compassion)
Discase=Undress
Reasonable shore=Shore of reason
Compleat:
Pinched=Geneepen, gekneepen, gekneld, gepraamd
He has not pinched (or cramped) the controversy, but rather wrought it up with many incidentals=Wel verre van het geschil te verkorten (of in te korten) heeft hy hetzelfde veel eer uitgebreid met een menigte van ongepaste aanmerkingen.

Topics: reason, understanding, ambition

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Thou art sure of me. Go, make money. I have told thee often, and I re-tell thee again and again, I hate the Moor. My cause is hearted. Thine hath no less reason. Let us be conjunctive in our revenge against him. If thou canst cuckold him, thou dost thyself a pleasure, me a sport. There are many events in the womb of time which will be delivered. Traverse, go, provide thy money. We will have more of this tomorrow. Adieu.

DUTCH:
De tijd gaat groot van allerlei voorvallen, die in de geboorte zijn. Opgerukt, ga, zorg voor geld.

MORE:

Be conjunctive=Join forces
Hearted=Seated in the heart
Cuckold=To make a cuckold

Topics: time, money, reason, dispute, trust, unity/collaboration, revenge, conspiracy

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
The end of war’s uncertain, but this certain,
That, if thou conquer Rome, the benefit
Which thou shalt thereby reap is such a name,
Whose repetition will be dogg’d with curses;
Whose chronicle thus writ: ‘The man was noble,
But with his last attempt he wiped it out;
Destroy’d his country, and his name remains
To the ensuing age abhorr’d.’ Speak to me, son:
Thou hast affected the fine strains of honour,
To imitate the graces of the gods;
To tear with thunder the wide cheeks o’ the air,
And yet to charge thy sulphur with a bolt
That should but rive an oak. Why dost not speak?
Think’st thou it honourable for a noble man
Still to remember wrongs? Daughter, speak you:
He cares not for your weeping. Speak thou, boy:
Perhaps thy childishness will move him more
Than can our reasons. There’s no man in the world
More bound to ’s mother; yet here he lets me prate
Like one i’ the stocks. Thou hast never in thy life
Show’d thy dear mother any courtesy,
When she, poor hen, fond of no second brood,
Has cluck’d thee to the wars and safely home,
Loaden with honour. Say my request’s unjust,
And spurn me back: but if it be not so,
Thou art not honest; and the gods will plague thee,
That thou restrain’st from me the duty which
To a mother’s part belongs. He turns away:
Down, ladies; let us shame him with our knees.
To his surname Coriolanus ’longs more pride
Than pity to our prayers. Down: an end;
This is the last: so we will home to Rome,
And die among our neighbours. Nay, behold ’s:
This boy, that cannot tell what he would have
But kneels and holds up hands for fellowship,
Does reason our petition with more strength
Than thou hast to deny ’t. Come, let us go:
This fellow had a Volscian to his mother;
His wife is in Corioli and his child
Like him by chance. Yet give us our dispatch:
I am hush’d until our city be a-fire,
And then I’ll speak a little.

DUTCH:
Die knaap, die niet kan zeggen wat hij wenscht,
Maar met ons meeknielt en de handen heft,
Bepleit ons smeekgebed met meerder kracht,
Dan gij tot weig’ren hebt!

MORE:
Proverb: The chance of war is uncertain
Proverb: To forget a wrong is best revenge (remedy)

Restrain’st=Legal use: keep back, withhold. Among examples in the New Eng. Dict, is: “The rents, issues, and profites thereof [they] have wrongfully restreyned, perceyved, and taken to their owne use.”
‘Longs=Belongs
An end=Let that be an end to it
Reason=Argue for, plead for
Dispatch=Decisive answer

Compleat:
Restrain (sting, limit or confine)=Bepaalen, kort houden
Restrain (repress or curb)=Fnuiken, beteugelen
To restrain one from a thing=Zich ergens van onthouden
To restrain a word to a signification=Een woord tot eene betekenis bekorten
Dispatch=Afvaardiging, verrichting, beschikking, vervaardiging
He is a man of quick dispatch=Het is een vaardig man

Topics: proverbs and idioms, conflict, reason, revenge, risk

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
Thou sayest well, and it holds well too, for the fortune of us that are the moon’s men doth ebb and flow like the sea, being governed, as the sea is, by the moon. As for proof now: a purse of gold most resolutely snatched on Monday night and most dissolutely spent on Tuesday morning, got with swearing “Lay by” and spent with crying “Bring in”; now in as low an ebb as the foot of the ladder, and by and by in as high a flow as the ridge of the gallows

DUTCH:

Zeer goed gezegd, en zeer juist bovendien; want het geluk van ons, die dienaars zijn der maan, heeft zijn eb en vloed als de zee, en wordt, evenals de zee, door de maan bestuurd.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Holds=to be fit, to be consistent: “thou sayest well, and it –s well too
Ridge=The top of a long and narrow elevation
Compleat:
Hold (bear up)=Ondersteunen

Topics: language, understanding, money, reason

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Horatio
CONTEXT:
HAMLET
To what base uses we may return, Horatio.
Why may not imagination trace the noble dust of Alexander till he find it stopping a bunghole?
HORATIO
‘Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.

DUTCH:
t Zou al te fijn uitgesponnen zijn het zoo uit te spinnen /
Het lijkt me al te spitsvondig, de dingen zo te beschouwen. /
‘t Ware al te weetgierig beschouwen, het te beschouwen zóó.

MORE:

Uses=Habitual practice, custom
Curiously=Fastidioulsy, delicately, minutely

Compleat:
Curious=Aardig, keurlyk, keurig, nieuwsgierig, weetgierig, net, kurieus
Curious meat=Keurlyke spyze
He is too curious=Hy is al te nieuwsgierig, hy is al te naauwkeurig
Curiously=Keuriglyk, netjes

Topics: reason, imagination

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Gravedigger
CONTEXT:
HAMLET
Ay, marry, why was he sent into England?
GRAVEDIGGER
Why, because he was mad. He shall recover his wits there, or, if he do not, it’s no great matter there.
HAMLET
Why?
GRAVEDIGGER
‘Twill not be seen in him there. There the men are as mad as he.

DUTCH:
Het zal niet in hem opvallen daar; daar zijn de menschen even gek als hij. /
Hij mot daar z’n verstand terugkrijgen, en krijgt ie ’t niet terug, dan komp ’t er daar nog niet veel op an.

MORE:
Kin = kindred, family
Kind = generous AND nature, class.
Hamlet’s first words in the play. Claudius is “more than kin” because he is both uncle and stepfather. “Less than kind” can either be taken at face value or “kind” can be taken to mean both generous

Topics: cited in law, still in use, madness, reason

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
I have of late—but wherefore I know not—lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air—look you, this brave o’erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire—why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapors. What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world. The paragon of animals. And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me. No, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so.

DUTCH:
Welk een werkstuk is de mensch! Hoe edel in rede! /
Wat een werkstuk is de mens! Hoe edel van geest, hoe oneindig rijk aan vermogens

MORE:
Schmidt:
Faculty= Power, ability
Compleat:
Faculty (power or virtue)=Vermogen, deugd
Faculty (or talent)=Begaaftheid, talent

Topics: reason, intellect

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
Unreasonable creatures feed their young;
And though man’s face be fearful to their eyes,
Yet, in protection of their tender ones,
Who hath not seen them, even with those wings
Which sometime they have used with fearful flight,
Make war with him that climb’d unto their nest,
Offer their own lives in their young’s defence?
For shame, my liege, make them your precedent!
Were it not pity that this goodly boy
Should lose his birthright by his father’s fault,
And long hereafter say unto his child,
‘What my great-grandfather and grandsire got
My careless father fondly gave away’?
Ah, what a shame were this! Look on the boy;
And let his manly face, which promiseth
Successful fortune, steel thy melting heart
To hold thine own and leave thine own with him.

DUTCH:
Waar’ ‘t niet een jammer, dat die wakk’re knaap
Zijn erfdeel door zijns vaders schuld zou derven,
En tot zijn zoon in later tijd moest zeggen: —
„Wat groot- en oudgrootvader eens verwierven,
Dat gaf mijn zwakke vader zorgloos weg!”

MORE:

Unreasonable=Without the power of reason (unreasonable creatures=animals)
Fearful=(1)Frightening; (2) Terrified
Sometime=On occasion
Fondly=Foolishly
Steel=To harden

Compleat:
To steel (or harden)=Hardmaaken, verharden
Fond=Zot, dwaas, ongerymt

Topics: reason, courage, value, fate/destiny

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SHYLOCK
Hates any man the thing he would not kill?
BASSANIO
Every offence is not a hate at first.
SHYLOCK
What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?

DUTCH:
Laat gij u tweemaal bijten van een slang?

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital v. Great West Life & Annuity Insurance Company, 38 F. Supp. 497, 509 and n. 28 (1999)
Offence=displeasure, mortification (affront)

A hate=cause of hatred (not pre-Shakespearean)
Compleat:
Offence=Affront, belédiging. Proverb: Good breeding is shewn, rather in never giving offence, than in doing obliging things=Een goede opvoeding word beter getoond met niemand te belédigen als met verplichtende dingen te doen.

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Dromio of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Shall I tell you why?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Ay, sir, and wherefore, for they say every why hath a wherefore.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
“Why” first: for flouting me; and then “wherefore”: for urging it the second time to me.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Was there ever any man thus beaten out of season,
When in the “why” and the “wherefore” is neither rhyme nor reason?
Well, sir, I thank you.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
Thank me, sir, for what?
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
Marry, sir, for this something that you gave me for nothing.
ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE
I’ll make you amends next, to give you nothing for something. But say, sir, is it dinnertime?

DUTCH:
In geen van deze twee daaroms is rijm noch slot noch zin.
Toch, heer, dank ik u.

MORE:
Proverb: Neither rhyme nor reason
Proverb: Every why has a wherefore/There is never a why but there is a wherefore
Proverb: My stomach has struck dinnertime/twelve (rung noon)

Out of season= Unfairly, unseasonably
Dinnertime: shortly before noon

Compleat:
Why and wherefore both translated as waarom
Out of season=Uit de tyd
To make amends=Vergoeding doen, vergoeden
To flout=Bespotten, beschimpen

Topics: invented or popularised, still in use, reason, proverbs and idioms, remedy

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Cymbeline
CONTEXT:
When shall I hear all through?
This fierce abridgement
Hath to it circumstantial branches which
Distinction should be rich in. Where, how lived you?
And when came you to serve our Roman captive?
How parted with your brothers ? How first met them?
Why fled you from the court? And whither? These,
And your three motives to the battle, with
I know not how much more, should be demanded,
And all the other by-dependences
From chance to chance; but nor the time nor place
Will serve our long interrogatories. See,
Posthumus anchors upon Imogen;
And she, like harmless lightning, throws her eye
On him, her brothers, me, her master, hitting
Each object with a joy; the counterchange
Is severally in all. Let’s quit this ground,
And smoke the temple with our sacrifices.
Thou art my brother, so we’ll hold thee ever.

DUTCH:
O, wond’re neiging!
Wanneer verneem ik alles nog? Deez’ schets,
Zoo haastig, duidt het overrijke takwerk
Nauw aan, dat ik nog volgen, kennen moet.
Waar leefdet gij, en hoe?


Fierce=Savagely cut (abstract)
Abridgement=Summary, abstract
Circumstantial branches which distinction should be rich in=Providing ample narrative for consideration of parts and details
Your three motives=The motives of you three
By-dependences=Side issues
Interrogatories [Intergatories]=Examination, question
Chance to chance=Describing every event

Schmidt:
Counterchange=Reciprocation
Severally=Every one in his particular way and manner
Smoke=Perfume with smoke

Topics: intellect, nature, justification, reason, reply

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Stay:
Where’s your commission, lords? words cannot carry
Authority so weighty.
SUFFOLK
Who dare cross ’em,
Bearing the king’s will from his mouth expressly?
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Till I find more than will or words to do it,
I mean your malice, know, officious lords,
I dare and must deny it. Now I feel
Of what coarse metal ye are moulded, envy:
How eagerly ye follow my disgraces,
As if it fed ye! and how sleek and wanton
Ye appear in every thing may bring my ruin!
Follow your envious courses, men of malice;
You have Christian warrant for ’em, and, no doubt,
In time will find their fit rewards. That seal,
You ask with such a violence, the king,
Mine and your master, with his own hand gave me;
Bade me enjoy it, with the place and honours,
During my life; and, to confirm his goodness,
Tied it by letters-patents: now, who’ll take it?

DUTCH:
Wacht, lords!
Waar is uw volmacht? enkel woorden dragen
Een last, zoo wichtig, niet.

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton).
Commission=Warrant, authority
Cross=Disobey
Coarse=Inferior, base
Wanton=Loose, unprincipled
Rewards=Punishments
Tied=Ratified
Letters patents=Official documents
Compleat:
Wanton=Onrein, vuil, ontuchtig
To cross=Tegenstreeven, dwars voor de boeg komen, draaibomen, wederstreeven, kruysen
Coarse=Grof
Wanton=Dartel, weeldrig, brooddronken
Rewards=Punishments
Tied=Gebonden
Letters patents=Opene Brieven, brieven van vergunninge, gunstbrief

Topics: authority, language, reason

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
Who can be wise, amazed, temp’rate, and furious,
Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man.
Th’ expedition of my violent love
Outrun the pauser, reason.

DUTCH:
Wie is ontzet en wijs, bedaard en woedend,
Vol liefde en koud, in ‘t eigen oogenblik?

MORE:
Schmidt:
Amaze= To put in confusion, to put in a state where one does not know what to do or to say or to think
Temperate= Moderate, calm
Pauser= One who deliberates much
Compleat:
Temperate=Maatig, gemaatigd

Topics: reason, caution, haste, loyalty, uncertainty

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Jaques
CONTEXT:
You are full of pretty answers. Have you not been acquainted with goldsmiths’ wives and conned them out of rings?

DUTCH:
Gij zit vol puntige antwoorden; hebt gij soms goede
kennissen gehad onder goudsmidsvrouwen en ze van
ringen van buiten geleerd?

MORE:
Gold rings were inscribed with religious or inspirational messages or lines from poems (poesy rings). “Goldsmiths’ wives” indicates courtiers’ scorn for citizen taste.
Schmidt:
Pretty=Pleasing, neat, fine
Compleat:
Pretty (pleasant or agreable)=Aangenaam

Topics: reply, justification, reason

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
Why, this bond is forfeit!
And lawfully by this the Jew may claim
A pound of flesh to be by him cut off
Nearest the merchant’s heart.— Be merciful.
Take thrice thy money. Bid me tear the bond.
SHYLOCK
When it is paid according to the tenor.
It doth appear you are a worthy judge.
You know the law. Your exposition
Hath been most sound. I charge you by the law,
Whereof you are a well-deserving pillar,
Proceed to judgment. By my soul I swear
There is no power in the tongue of man
To alter me. I stay here on my bond.

DUTCH:
Gij kent de wet, en uw betoog was juist
En bondig; ik bezweer u bij de wet,
Waarvan ge een hechte steunpilaar u toont,
Sla ‘t vonnis nu.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
State of South Dakota v. Allison, 607 N.W. 2d 1, 20, n.4 (S.D. Sup. Ct., 2000) (The court’s position being that the most appropriate course of action was a civil remedy): “Even Shakespeare’s creditor in The Merchant of Venice was denied his pound of flesh nearest the heart.”

According to the tenor=To the letter
Bond=A deed by which one binds oneself to another to make a payment or fulfil a contract
Tenor=Conditions
Exposition=Interpretation, explanation
Compleat:
According to the tenor=Naar uitwyzen des briefs
Enter into a bond=In een verband treeden, zich verbinden

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

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