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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2 ACT/SCENE: 4.7 SPEAKER: Cade CONTEXT: I feel remorse in myself with his words; but I’ll bridle it:
he shall die, an it be but for pleading so well for his life.
Away with him! He has a familiar under his tongue;
he speaks not o’ God’s name. Go, take him away,
I say, and strike off his head presently;
and then break into his son-in-law’s house,
Sir James Cromer, and strike off his head,
and bring them both upon two poles hither. DUTCH: Weg met hem! hij heeft een dienstbaren duivel onder zijn tong, hij spreekt niet in den naam van God MORE:
Bridle=Rein in, constrain
Familiar=Demon or spirit
An be it but for=If only for

Compleat:
To bridle=Intoomen, breidelen, beteugelen
Familiar=Een gemeenzaame geet, queldrommel Topics: language, deceit, truth, punishment, regret

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
Your lord and master did well to make his recantation.
PAROLLES
Recantation! My lord! My master!
LAFEW
Ay; is it not a language I speak?
PAROLLES
A most harsh one, and not to be understood without bloody succeeding. My master!

DUTCH:
Ja; is het geen verstaanbare taal, die ik spreek?

MORE:
Recantation=Disavowal or retraction
Bloody succeeding=Subsequent bloodshed
Harsh=Rough, rude, repulsive
Compleat:
Recant (Unsay) Recantation=Herroeping, Verzaaking
Harsh=Schor, ruuw, wrang, streng

Topics: regret, language

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither. I’ll smell thee on the tree.
Oh, balmy breath, that dost almost persuade
Justice to break her sword! One more, one more.
Be thus when thou art dead and I will kill thee
And love thee after.

DUTCH:
Als jij zo dood zult zijn, zal ik je doden,
en liefhebben erna. Nog eens, voor ’t laatst…
nooit zag men dodelijker schoonheid.

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Barkauskas v. Lane, 78 F.2d 1031, 1032 (7th Cir. 1989)(Posner, J.); See also Hornstein v. Hornstein, 195 Md. 627, 75 A.2d 103 (Md. Ct. App. 1950)(husband reading from Othello and threatening to treat her as Othello treated Desdemona).

Schmidt:
Balmy=Fragrant
Sword=Emblem of power and authority

Compleat:

Topics: life, strength, regret, death, cited in law

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ANTONIO
But little. I am armed and well prepared.—
Give me your hand, Bassanio. Fare you well
Grieve not that I am fall’n to this for you,
For herein Fortune shows herself more kind
Than is her custom. It is still her use
To let the wretched man outlive his wealth,
To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow
An age of poverty—from which lingering penance
Of such misery doth she cut me off.
Commend me to your honourable wife.
Tell her the process of Antonio’s end.
Say how I loved you. Speak me fair in death.
And when the tale is told, bid her be judge
Whether Bassanio had not once a love.
Repent but you that you shall lose your friend,
And he repents not that he pays your debt.
For if the Jew do cut but deep enough,
I’ll pay it presently with all my heart.

DUTCH:
Slechts luttel; ‘k ben bereid en welgewapend! —
Geef mij de hand, Bassanio, vaar gij wel!

MORE:
But little=Just a little
Use=Habit
Process=Tale
Repent but you=Only regret

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Earl of Salisbury
CONTEXT:
Nor near nor farther off, my gracious lord,
Than this weak arm: discomfort guides my tongue
And bids me speak of nothing but despair.
One day too late, I fear me, noble lord,
Hath clouded all thy happy days on earth:
O, call back yesterday, bid time return,
And thou shalt have twelve thousand fighting men!
To-day, to-day, unhappy day, too late,
O’erthrows thy joys, friends, fortune and thy state:
For all the Welshmen, hearing thou wert dead.
Are gone to Bolingbroke, dispersed and fled.

DUTCH:
Ontroostbaarheid
Bestuurt mijn tong en slechts van wanhoop spreekt zij.

MORE:

Proverb: It is too late to call again yesterday

Discomfort=Want of hope, discouragement
State=Rank, position

Compleat:
Discomfort=Mistroostigheid, mismoedigheid

Topics: proverbs and idioms, time, regret

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
He looks well on’t.
KING
I am not a day of season,
For thou mayst see a sunshine and a hail
In me at once: but to the brightest beams
Distracted clouds give way; so stand thou forth;
The time is fair again.
BERTRAM
My high-repented blames,
Dear sovereign, pardon to me.

DUTCH:
Ik ben geen dag van dit seizoen,
Want tegelijk zijn zonneschijn en hagel
In mij te zien; doch held’re stralen banen
Een weg zich door de wolken; treed dus voor;
Het weder is weer schoon.

MORE:
Proverb: After black clouds clear weather
Proverb: After rain (showers) comes air weather (the sun)
Proverb: After a storm comes a calm
Day of season=Seasonable day, sunshine and showers
Distracted=Agitated, divided
High-repented=Much repented
Compleat:
Distracted=Van een gescheurd, ontroerd
Distracted with one thing or another=Door de eene of de andere zaak weggeerukt, of verrukt
Repentant=Boetvaerdig

Topics: proverbs and idioms, emotion and mood, regret, optimism

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
LIEUTENANT
I do not know what witchcraft’s in him, but
Your soldiers use him as the grace ’fore meat,
Their talk at table, and their thanks at end;
And you are darken’d in this action, sir,
Even by your own.
AUFIDIUS
I cannot help it now,
Unless, by using means, I lame the foot
Of our design. He bears himself more proudlier,
Even to my person, than I thought he would
When first I did embrace him: yet his nature
In that’s no changeling; and I must excuse
What cannot be amended.

DUTCH:
Doch zijn wezen
Verzaakt hij hierin niet; ik moet verschoonen,
Wat ik niet beet’ren kan.

MORE:
Proverb: What cannot be altered must be borne not blamed
Proverb: To be no changeling

Changeling=Sense shifter, inconstant, turncoat, fickle (Arden)
Darken’d=Eclipsed, put into the shade
For your particular=For you personally

Topics: remedy, understanding, regret, plans/intentions, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.6
SPEAKER: George
CONTEXT:
WARWICK
I think his understanding is bereft.
Speak, Clifford, dost thou know who speaks to thee?
Dark cloudy death o’ershades his beams of life,
And he nor sees nor hears us what we say.
RICHARD
O, would he did! And so perhaps he doth:
‘Tis but his policy to counterfeit,
Because he would avoid such bitter taunts
Which in the time of death he gave our father.
GEORGE
If so thou think’st, vex him with eager words.
RICHARD
Clifford, ask mercy and obtain no grace.
EDWARD
Clifford, repent in bootless penitence.
WARWICK
Clifford, devise excuses for thy faults.
GEORGE
While we devise fell tortures for thy faults.

DUTCH:
Terg, denkt gij dit, hem eens met scherpe woorden.

MORE:

Understanding is bereft=Not conscious (of surroundings)
Overshade=Overshadow
Beam=Ray of light, sunbeam
Policy=Strategy, tactic
Counterfeit=Pretend, feign
Vex=Taunt, torment
Eager=Bitter
Bootless=Hopeless, futile, wasted
Penitence=Repentance
Fell=strong; cruel, vicious, intense, savage.

Compleat:
Fell=(cruel) Wreed, fel
Bootless=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos
To overshadow=Overschaduwen, omschaduwen, beschaduwen, belommeren
A beam of the sun=Een straal der Zonne
To call forth bright beams=Heldere straalen uitschieten, uitstraalen
To counterfeit (feign)=(Zich) Veinzen
A counterfeit friendship=Een gemaakte of geveinsde vriendschap
To vex=Quellen, plaagen
Eager=Graag, happig, greetig; heftig, vuurig, vinnig
Penitence=Boetvaardigheid, berouw, leedweezen

Topics: regret, flaw, fault

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
Like a dull actor now,
I have forgot my part, and I am out,
Even to a full disgrace. Best of my flesh,
Forgive my tyranny; but do not say
For that ‘Forgive our Romans.’ O, a kiss
Long as my exile, sweet as my revenge!
Now, by the jealous queen of heaven, that kiss
I carried from thee, dear; and my true lip
Hath virgin’d it e’er since. You gods! I prate,
And the most noble mother of the world
Leave unsaluted: sink, my knee, i’ the earth;

DUTCH:
Als een verbijsterd speler
Ken ik mijn rol niet meer, blijf steken, sta hier
Tot ieders spot.

MORE:
Proverb: Revenge is sweet

Schmidt:
Disgrace=A state of being abashed, of being exposed to contempt; discredit
Tyranny=Cruelty
Dull=Not bright, dim, clouded; awkward, stupid

Compleat:
Disgrace (discredit, dishonour or reproach)=Smaadheid, schande, hoon
Tyranny=Geweldenary, tyranny, dwingelandy
Dull=Lui, traag; lomp, ongevoelig
A dull wit=Een dof verstand

Topics: regret, language, revenge, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
JAILER
You shall not now be stol’n; you have locks upon you.
So graze as you find pasture
SECOND JAILER
Ay, or a stomach
POSTHUMUS
Most welcome, bondage, for thou art a way,
I think, to liberty. Yet am I better
Than one that’s sick o’ th’ gout, since he had rather
Groan so in perpetuity than be cured
By th’ sure physician, Death, who is the key
T’ unbar these locks. My conscience, thou art fettered
More than my shanks and wrists.
You good gods, give me
The penitent instrument to pick that bolt,
Then free forever. Is ’t enough I am sorry?
So children temporal fathers do appease;
Gods are more full of mercy.

DUTCH:
Verlangt gij
Berouw? toon ik dit meer ooit dan in keet’nen,
Gewenscht, niet opgedrongen


You shall not now be stolen=Alluding to the custom of puting a lock on a horse’s leg when it is put out to pasture (Johnson)
Penitent instrument=A means of freeing conscience of its guilt (Rolfe)
Schmidt:
Groan=To utter a mournful voice in pain or sorrow
Temporal=Pertaining to this life or this world, not spiritual, not eternal

Compleat:
Penitent=Boetvaardig, berouw toonend
Temporal (secular, not spiritual)=Waereldlyk

Burgersdijk notes:
“Nu steelt u niemand, met dat blok aan ‘t been; Graas nu zoover gij weide hebt”. Zooals men wel een paard in de weide met een ketting en slot bevestigt opdat het niet gestolen worde of wegloope.

Topics: regret, guilt, remedy, death, conscience

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Posthumus
CONTEXT:
(…) Must I repent,
I cannot do it better than in gyves,
Desired more than constrained. To satisfy,
If of my freedom ’tis the main part, take
No stricter render of me than my all.
I know you are more clement than vile men,
Who of their broken debtors take a third,
A sixth, a tenth, letting them thrive again
On their abatement. I know you are more clement than vile men,
Who of their broken debtors take a third,
A sixth, a tenth, letting them thrive again
On their abatement: that’s not my desire:
For Imogen’s dear life take mine; and though
‘Tis not so dear, yet ’tis a life; you coin’d it:
‘Tween man and man they weigh not every stamp;
Though light, take pieces for the figure’s sake:
You rather mine, being yours: and so, great powers,
If you will take this audit, take this life,
And cancel these cold bonds. O Imogen!
I’ll speak to thee in silence.

DUTCH:
Mijn geweten,
Gij draagt meer kluisters dan mijn pols en enkels;
O, goden, moog’ mijn boete ‘t werktuig zijn,
Die kluisters te oop nen; dan, voor eeuwig Vrij!


Gyves=fetters
Render=A surrender, a giving up
Stricter=More rigorous
Stamp=Coin with the sovereign’s head impressed
Though light, take pieces…=It was common practice for forgers lighten the weight of coins in order to conserve material.
Take this audit=Accept this settlement of accounts
Clement=Disposed to kindness, mild

Compleat:
Gyves=Boeijen, kluisters
Constrained=Bedwongen, gedrongen, gepraamd
Strict=Gestreng
Clement=Goedertieren, zachtzinnig
Audit=Het nazien der Rekeningen

Topics: regret, guilt, remedy, conscience, debt/obligation

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
SICINIUS
He’s a disease that must be cut away.
MENENIUS
O, he’s a limb that has but a disease;
Mortal, to cut it off; to cure it, easy.
What has he done to Rome that’s worthy death?
Killing our enemies, the blood he hath lost—
Which, I dare vouch, is more than that he hath,
By many an ounce—he dropp’d it for his country;
And what is left, to lose it by his country,
Were to us all, that do’t and suffer it,
A brand to the end o’ the world.
SICINIUS
This is clean kam.

DUTCH:
Hij is een edel lid, met een gezwel;
Wegsnijding brengt den dood; en ‘t is genees’lijk.

MORE:
Proverb: To go clean cam (awry)

Schmidt:
Mortal=Fatal, deadly
Brand=Mark of infamy, stigma
To the end of the world=Eternal
Kam=Awry, twisted. Crooked. Topsy turvy. Perverse or extraordinary (Irish and Welsh cam)

Compleat:
To cast a brand upon one=Iemands eer brandmerken
Mortal=Sterflyk, doodlyk
Horizon=Kim

Burgersdijk notes:
Gebazel! Het Engelsch heeft This is clean kam. “Dit is geheel verkeerd”, tegen den draad in, à contrepoil.

Topics: remedy, understanding, regret, plans/intentions, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
O, that this too, too sullied flesh would melt,
Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew,
Or that the Everlasting had not fixed
His canon ‘gainst self-slaughter! O God, God!
How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses of this world!
Fie on ’t, ah fie! ‘Tis an unweeded garden
That grows to seed.

DUTCH:
O, mocht dit te té aangevochten vleesch wegsmelten /
O, dat dit te té vaste vleesch wou smelten

MORE:
Other versions:solid flesh or sallied flesh.
Unprofitable=Futile, pointless.
Stale=vapid, tasteless
Compleat:
Sullied=Bemorst, vuil gemaakt, bezoedeld.

Topics: regret, emotion and mood

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
Put out the light, and then put out the light.
If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
I can again thy former light restore
Should I repent me. But once put out thy light,
Thou cunning’st pattern of excelling nature,
I know not where is that Promethean heat
That can thy light relume. When I have plucked thy rose
I cannot give it vital growth again,
It must needs wither.

DUTCH:
Doe uit het licht en doe dan uit het licht:
als ik u doof, gedienstige flambouw,
en mij dat spijt, kan ik uw vroeger licht;
opnieuw ontsteken.

MORE:

Put out the light, and then put out the light = Extinguish the candle and kill Desdemona
Relume = re-illuminate, rekindle
Flaming=Carrying a light (Cf. Psalms 104.4; ‘Which maketh he spirits his messengers, and a flaming fire his ministers’.)
Cunning=Dexterously wrought or devised

Onions:
Fire stolen by the demigod Prometheus from Olympus and conveyed to men, to whom he taught its use; allusively applied to that which inspires or infuses life

Compleat:
Cunning=Behendig, Schrander, Naarstig
A cunning fellow=Een doortrapte vent, een looze gast
To cast a cunning look=Iemand snaaks aanzien

Topics: life, strength, regret, death

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Witches
CONTEXT:
Show his eyes and grieve his heart.
Come like shadows; so depart!

DUTCH:
Wenscht zijn hart zich leed, verschijnt!
Komt als schimmen, en verdwijnt!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Grieve his heart=make him sorry

Topics: fate/destiny, disappointment, truth, regret

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: First Witch
CONTEXT:
Sleep shall neither night nor day
Hang upon his penthouse lid.
He shall live a man forbid.
Weary sev’nnights nine times nine
Shall he dwindle, peak and pine.

DUTCH:
De slaap zal nacht noch dag aan het deksel van zijn penthouse hangen/
En geen slaap zijn oogen sluit; Dag noch nacht, te geener uur

MORE:
Schmidt:
Penthouse lid=Eyelid
A man forbid=A man cursed
Sevennight (or sennight)=Week
Dwindle, peak and pine=Shrink, grow lean and wear away, languish
Compleat:
Penthouse=Luyfel
Sevennight (Sennyt)=Week
Dwindle away=Verdwynen, te niet loopen
Peaking=Ziekelyk, quynende
To pine=Quynen, hartzeer ztten, een teering zetten
Pine away=Uytteeren, de teering zetten

Topics: guilt, conscience, regret

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Henry Bolingbroke
CONTEXT:
O let no noble eye profane a tear
For me, if I be gored with Mowbray’s spear:
As confident as is the falcon’s flight
Against a bird, do I with Mowbray fight.
My loving lord, I take my leave of you;
Of you, my noble cousin, Lord Aumerle;
Not sick, although I have to do with death,
But lusty, young, and cheerly drawing breath.
Lo, as at English feasts, so I regreet
The daintiest last, to make the end most sweet:
O thou, the earthly author of my blood,
Whose youthful spirit, in me regenerate,
Doth with a twofold vigour lift me up
To reach at victory above my head,
Add proof unto mine armour with thy prayers;
And with thy blessings steel my lance’s point,
That it may enter Mowbray’s waxen coat,
And furbish new the name of John a Gaunt,
Even in the lusty havior of his son.

DUTCH:
Zie, als tot nagerecht naar eisch, begroet
Ik ‘t liefst het laatst, en zoo is ‘t einde zoet.

MORE:

Profane=To desecrate, to pollute (by crying)
Regreet=Salute
Regenerate=Reborn
Proof=A state of having been tried and having stood the test, especially defensive arms found to be impenetrable
Steel=To harden
Furbish=Polish, burnish
Haviour=Behaviour

Compleat:
To be come regenerated=Wedergebooren worden
Musquet proof=Daar een musket-kogel op afstuiten kan
To steel (or harden)=Hardmaaken, verharden
To furbish=Polysten, bruineeren, glad maaken

Topics: regret, conflict

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Prospero
CONTEXT:
And mine shall.
Hast thou, which art but air, a touch, a feeling
Of their afflictions, and shall not myself,
One of their kind, that relish all as sharply
Passion as they, be kindlier moved than thou art?
Though with their high wrongs I am struck to th’ quick,
Yet with my nobler reason ‘gainst my fury
Do I take part. The rarer action is
In virtue than in vengeance. They being penitent,
The sole drift of my purpose doth extend
Not a frown further. Go release them, Ariel.
My charms I’ll break, their senses I’ll restore,
And they shall be themselves.

DUTCH:
Mijn rede is eed’ler dan mijn wrok, en neemt
Partij er tegen. Een verheev’ner doen
Is deugd dan wraak. Nu zij berouwvol zijn,
Ben ik aan ‘t doel en reikt mijn streven thans
Geen fronsblik verder. Ga, bevrijd hen, Ariel.
Ik breek mijn tooverboei, herstel hun geest;
Zij mogen weer zichzelf zijn.

MORE:
Proverb: To be able to do harm and not to do it is noble
Proverb: Touched to the quick
See also LLL:
“Of all that virtue love for virtue loved: Most power to do most harm, least knowing ill;”
High wrongs=Serious offences such as treason and attempted murder
Rarer=Unusual, exceptional
Virtue=Forgiveness, mercy
Compleat:
Rare (that happens but seldom)=Zeldzaam; (or scarce)=Schaars, raar; (excellent)=Uitmuntend
Virtue (an habit of the soul, whereby a man is inclined to do good and to shun evil)=Deugd

Topics: mercy, virtue, regret

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
BERTRAM
Yes, my lord, and of very valiant approof.
LAFEW
You have it from his own deliverance.
BERTRAM
And by other warranted testimony.
LAFEW
Then my dial goes not true: I took this lark for a bunting.
BERTRAM
I do assure you, my lord, he is very great in knowledge, and accordingly valiant.
LAFEW
I have then sinned against his experience and transgressed against his valour; and my state that way is dangerous, since I cannot yet find in my heart to repent. Here he comes ; I pray you, make us friends ; I will pursue the amity.

DUTCH:
Dan gaat mijn uurwerk niet goed. Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors.

MORE:
Proverb: To take a bunting for a lark
“The bunting is, in feather, size, and form, so like the skylark, as to require nice attention to discover the one from the other; it also ascends and sinks in the air nearly in the same manner; but it has little or no song, which gives estimation to the skylark.” (Johnson).
Approof=Proven (valour)
Deliverance=Account
Accordingly=Correspondingly
Dangerous=At risk (of damnation)
Amity=Friendship

Burgersdijk notes:
Ik hield dezen leeuwrik voor een gors. De bedoelde gors, in het Engelsch bunting, is de grauwe gors, ook wel gierstvogel genoemd. Terwijl de leeuwrik zich hoog in de lucht verheft en aangenaam zingt, zet de gors zich op steenen palen, struiken of lage boomen en laat daar vaak zijn schor, bijna knarsend geluid hooren, dat nauwelijks een zang te noemen is. Het zeggen van Lafeu doet zien, hoe goed Sh. de vogels kende, want de gors en Ieeuwrik gelijken in kleur van gevederte veel op elkaar, en de gorzen, die in den herfst en den winter in troepen bijeen leven, worden, omdat zij dan zeer vet zijn, in Engeland en elders vaak gevangen en, onder den naam van leeuwriken, voor de tafel verkocht.

Topics: gullibility, appearance, offence, error, regret, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Henry Bolingbroke
CONTEXT:
EXTON
Great king, within this coffin I present
Thy buried fear: herein all breathless lies
The mightiest of thy greatest enemies,
Richard of Bordeaux, by me hither brought.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Exton, I thank thee not; for thou hast wrought
A deed of slander with thy fatal hand
Upon my head and all this famous land.
EXTON
From your own mouth, my lord, did I this deed.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
They love not poison that do poison need,
Nor do I thee: though I did wish him dead,
I hate the murderer, love him murdered.
The guilt of conscience take thou for thy labour,
But neither my good word nor princely favour:
With Cain go wander through shades of night,
And never show thy head by day nor light.

DUTCH:
Exton, ik dank u niet; voorwaar, ik gruw
Van zulk een daad, waardoor uw booze hand
Vloek brengt op mij en heel dit roemrijk land.

MORE:

Deed of slander=Reproach, disgrace, scandal

Compleat:
Slander=Laster, lasterkladde

Topics: regret, conscience, guilt

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
Would I had never trod this English earth,
Or felt the flatteries that grow upon it!
Ye have angels’ faces, but heaven knows your hearts.
What will become of me now, wretched lady!
I am the most unhappy woman living.
Alas, poor wenches, where are now your fortunes!
Shipwreck’d upon a kingdom, where no pity,
No friend, no hope; no kindred weep for me;
Almost no grave allow’d me: like the lily,
That once was mistress of the field and flourish’d,
I’ll hang my head and perish.

DUTCH:
Ja, eng’len schijnt gij, doch God kent uw hart.

MORE:
Would=I wish
Flatteries=Deception, manipulation
Compleat:
Would=’t was te wenschen dat; it zou ‘t wel willen
Flattery=Vleyery

Topics: appearance, plans/intentions, deceit, manipulation, regret

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
Poor naked wretches, whereso’er you are,
That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you
From seasons such as these?
Oh, I have ta’en
Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp.
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,
That thou mayst shake the superflux to them
And show the heavens more just.

DUTCH:
O naakte stakkers, waar u ook maar bent,
die ’t neerslaan van dit woest, wreed ontij duldt,
hoe kunt u zich, dakloos, met lege magen,
in lompen vol met gaten, weren tegen
zulk weer als dit?

MORE:
Looped and windowed raggedness = tattered clothes, full of holes. Loopholes were small apertures in thick walls, e.g. arrowslit (through which small bodies could escape, one explanation for the current definition of loophole as a means of escape or avoidance).
Schmidt:
Shake=Lay aside, get rid of, discard
Superflux=the superfluous, their abundance of wealth
Compleat:
Ragged=Aan flenteren (fladderen) gescheurd, versleeten, haaveloos

Topics: poverty and wealth, value, regret, adversity, equality, excess

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