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PLAY: Measure for Measure ACT/SCENE: 4.2 SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio CONTEXT: Not so, not so; his life is parallel’d
Even with the stroke and line of his great justice:
He doth with holy abstinence subdue
That in himself which he spurs on his power
To qualify in others: were he meal’d with that
Which he corrects, then were he tyrannous;
But this being so, he’s just. DUTCH: Doortrok ook hem de deesem,
Door hem gewraakt, dan waar’ hij tyranniek;
Maar nu is hij rechtvaardig.
MORE: Schmidt:
Stroke=Line (as made with a pen)
Mealed=Sprinkled, tainted
Compleat:
Meal=Meel
Mealed=Tot poejer gemaakt Topics: justice, good and bad, honour, reputation, temptation, respect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
Lay thy finger thus, and let thy soul be instructed.
Mark me with what violence she first loved the Moor, but
for bragging and telling her fantastical lies. To love
him still for prating? Let not thy discreet heart think
it. Her eye must be fed, and what delight shall she have
to look on the devil? When the blood is made dull with
the act of sport, there should be a game to inflame it
and to give satiety a fresh appetite, loveliness in
favour, sympathy in years, manners and beauties. All
which the Moor is defective in. Now for want of these
required conveniences, her delicate tenderness will find
itself abused, begin to heave the gorge, disrelish and
abhor the Moor. Very nature will instruct her in it and
compel her to some second choice. Now sir, this
granted—as it is a most pregnant and unforced
position—who stands so eminent in the degree of this
fortune as Cassio does? A knave very voluble, no further
conscionable than in putting on the mere form of civil
and humane seeming, for the better compassing of his
salt and most hidden loose affection. Why, none, why,
none! A slipper and subtle knave, a finder of occasions
that has an eye, can stamp and counterfeit advantages,
though true advantage never present itself. A devilish
knave. Besides, the knave is handsome, young, and hath
all those requisites in him that folly and green minds
look after. A pestilent complete knave, and the woman
hath found him already.

DUTCH:
Een geslepen, gladde schelm; een gelegenheidsnajager, met een oog om voordeeltjens te stempelen en na te bootsen, al bood geen echt voordeel zich ooit aan; een verduivelde schelm!

MORE:
Slipper=Deceitful, slippery
Voluble=Plausible, glib
Conscionable=Conscientious
Humane=Polite, civil
Seeming=Appearance
Salt=Lecherous, lewd
Occasion=Opportunity
Advantages=Opportunities
Pregnant=Evident
Civil and humane=Polite and mannerly
Stamp=Coin, manufacture
Folly=Wantonness
Compleat:
A slippery (or dangerous) business=Een gevaarlyke bezigheid
A voluble tongue=Een vloeijende tong, een gladde tong, een tong die wel gehangen is
Conscionable=Naauw op zichzelven lettende; Gemoedelyk, billyk
Humane=Menschelyk, beleefd, heusch
Seeming=Schynende
Salt=(sault) Hitsig, ritsig, heet
Occasion=Gelegenheyd, voorval, oorzaak, nood
Advantage=Voordeel, voorrecht, winst, gewin, toegift
Pregnant=Krachtig, dringend, naadrukkelyk
Stamp=Stempelen, stampen
Folly=Ondeugd, buitenspoorigheid, onvolmaaktheid

Topics: deceit, appearance, relationship, reputation, manipulation

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Agamemnon
CONTEXT:
AGAMEMNON
Hear you, Patroclus:
We are too well acquainted with these answers:
But his evasion, winged thus swift with scorn,
Cannot outfly our apprehensions.
Much attribute he hath, and much the reason
Why we ascribe it to him; yet all his virtues,
Not virtuously on his own part beheld,
Do in our eyes begin to lose their gloss,
Yea, like fair fruit in an unwholesome dish,
Are like to rot untasted. Go and tell him,
We come to speak with him; and you shall not sin,
If you do say we think him over-proud
And under-honest, in self-assumption greater
Than in the note of judgement; and worthier than himself
Here tend the savage strangeness he puts on,
Disguise the holy strength of their command,
And underwrite in an observing kind
His humorous predominance; yea, watch
His pettish lunes, his ebbs, his flows, as if
The passage and whole carriage of this action
Rode on his tide. Go tell him this, and add,
That if he overhold his price so much,
We’ll none of him; but let him, like an engine
Not portable, lie under this report:
‘Bring action hither, this cannot go to war:
A stirring dwarf we do allowance give
Before a sleeping giant.’ Tell him so.

DUTCH:
Een dwerg, die goed zich roert, is meer ons waard
Dan eenig reus, die slaapt; ga, meld hem dit.

MORE:
Apprehensions=Comprehension, grasp
Attribute=Reputation
Unwholesome=Unhealthy
Like=Likely
Self-assumption=Self-regard, arrogance
Note=Observation
Tend=Attend, wait on
Savage=Uncivilised
Strangeness=Aloofness
Underwrite=Subscribe to
Observing=Compliant
Predominance=Superior power, influence
Humorous=Capricious
Pettish=Petulant
Lunes=Fits of madness (relating to the changing moons)
Action=Military campaign
Overhold=Overestimate
Stirring=Active
Compleat:
Apprehension=Bevatting, begryping; jaloezy, achterdogt
Attribute=Eigenschap
Unwholesom=Ongezond
Assumption=Aanmaatiging, aanneeming
To note=Merken, aanteykenen, aanmerken
To attend=Opwachten, verzellen
Savage=Woest, wild, wreed, ruuw
Strangeness=Vreemdheid
To underwrite=Onderschryven
Observant=Gedienstig, opmerkend, waarneemend, eerbiedig
Predominancy=Overheersching
Humoursom (humerous)=Eigenzinnig, koppig, styfhoofdig, eenzinnig
Pettish=Kribbig, korzel
Action=Een daad, handeling, rechtzaak, gevecht
Stirring=Beweeging, verroering

Topics: reputation, merit, pride, honesty, vanity

PLAY: Twelfth Night
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Sir Toby
CONTEXT:
SIR TOBY BELCH
[reads] “Fare thee well, and God have mercy upon one
of our souls. He may have mercy upon mine, but my hope
is better, and so look to thyself. Thy friend, as thou
usest him, and thy sworn enemy,
Andrew Aguecheek”
If this letter move him not, his legs cannot. I’ll give
’t him.
MARIA
You may have very fit occasion for ’t. He is now in
some commerce with my lady and will by and by depart.
SIR TOBY BELCH
Go, Sir Andrew. Scout me for him at the corner the
orchard like a bum-baily. So soon as ever thou seest
him, draw, and as thou drawest, swear horrible, for it
comes to pass oft that a terrible oath, with a
swaggering accent sharply twanged off, gives manhood
more approbation than ever proof itself would have
earned him. Away!

DUTCH:
Zoodra gij hem ontwaart, trek dan; en als gij trekt, vloek dan ontzettend; want het komt dikwijls voor, dat een verschrikkelijke vloek, op een snoevenden toon snijdend uitgekrijscht, aan de manhaftigheid meer bijval bezorgt, dan het beste proefstuk zou hebben ingeoogst.

MORE:
Hope=Hope of surviving
Usest=Treats
Commerce=Transaction, conversation
Scout=Look out for
Bum-bailie=Derogratory term for a bailiff who collected debts or arrested debtors, often from behind (also bum-baily, bum-bailiff)
Horrible=Horribly
Swaggering accent=Arrogant tone
Twanged=Uttered shrilly
Approbation=Credit
Proof=Trial
Compleat:
He was out of hope of life=Hy hoopte iniet langer te leeven
To use (treat)=Behandelen
Commerce=Gemeenschap, onderhandeling, ommegang
To scout up and down=Gins en weer gaan spieden
A bum-baiily=Een diender, luizevanger
Horribly=Op een schrikkelyke wyze, schroomelyk
To swagger=Snoeven, pochgen, snorken
Twang=Een schor geluid
Approbation=Goedkeuring
Proof=Beproeving

Topics: hope/optimism, fate/destiny, reputation, courage, appearance

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Good my lord, will you see the players
well bestowed? Do you hear, let them be well used, for they are the abstract and brief chronicles of the time. After your death you were better have a bad epitaph than their ill report while you live.

DUTCH:
Na uw dood waart gij er met een leelijk grafschrift beter aan toe, dan wanneer zij bij uw leven kwaad van u spraken./
Het ware u beter een slecht grafschrift te hebben na uw dood, dan hun slechte getuigenis bij uw leven.

MORE:
“You were better have”= you would be better to have.
Schmidt:
Bestow= to stow, to lodge, to place

Topics: reputation, legacy

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
God pardon thee. Yet let me wonder, Harry,
At thy affections, which do hold a wing
Quite from the flight of all thy ancestors.
Thy place in council thou hast rudely lost,
Which by thy younger brother is supplied,
And art almost an alien to the hearts
Of all the court and princes of my blood.
The hope and expectation of thy time
Is ruined, and the soul of every man
Prophetically doth forethink thy fall.
Had I so lavish of my presence been,
So common-hackneyed in the eyes of men,
So stale and cheap to vulgar company,
Opinion, that did help me to the crown,
Had still kept loyal to possession
And left me in reputeless banishment,
A fellow of no mark nor likelihood.

DUTCH:
Had mij een roemloos balling laten blijven,
Als een, die niets was, niets verwachten liet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Hold a wing quite from=flight contrary to, away from (possibly borrowed from falconry language)
Hope and expectation of thy time=the promise of youth
Forethink= Anticipate
Common-hackneyed, vulgarized
Vulgar company=mixing with common people
Opinion=Public opinion
Reputeless=Obscure, inglorious
Mark=Notice taken, observance, note
Likelihood=Probability, chance
Possession=Opinion had still kept loyal (to the actual occupant/possessor of the crown)

Topics: reputation, punishment, dignity, failure, respect

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Aaron
CONTEXT:
AARON
O Lord, sir, ’tis a deed of policy:
Shall she live to betray this guilt of ours,
A long-tongued babbling gossip? no, lords, no:
And now be it known to you my full intent.
Not far, one Muli lives, my countryman;
His wife but yesternight was brought to bed;
His child is like to her, fair as you are:
Go pack with him, and give the mother gold,
And tell them both the circumstance of all;
And how by this their child shall be advanced,
And be received for the emperor’s heir,
And substituted in the place of mine,
To calm this tempest whirling in the court;
And let the emperor dandle him for his own.
Hark ye, lords; ye see I have given her physic,
And you must needs bestow her funeral;
The fields are near, and you are gallant grooms:
This done, see that you take no longer days,
But send the midwife presently to me.
The midwife and the nurse well made away,
Then let the ladies tattle what they please.

DUTCH:
Wel man, voorzichtigheid gebood die daad.
Wat! zou zij leven, deze schuld verraden?
Dat praatziek, dat langtongig wijf? Neen, neen!
En nu zult gij geheel mijn plan vernemen.

MORE:
Policy=Cunning, expediency
Go pack=Conspire
Circumstance=Details
Bestow=Arrange
Grooms=Fellows
Tattle=Gossip
Bound=Obliged
Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
A packt business=Een doorsteken werk
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
To bestow=Besteeden, te koste hangen
Groom=Stalknecht
Tittle-tattle=Snappen, kallen, praaten
Bound=Gebonden, verbonden, verpligt, dienstbaar

Topics: secrecy, trust, reputation

PLAY: The Taming of the Shrew
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Petruchio
CONTEXT:
PETRUCHIO
No, not a whit. I find you passing gentle.
‘Twas told me you were rough and coy and sullen,
And now I find report a very liar.
For thou are pleasant, gamesome, passing courteous,
But slow in speech, yet sweet as springtime flowers.
Thou canst not frown, thou canst not look askance,
Nor bite the lip as angry wenches will,
Nor hast thou pleasure to be cross in talk.
But thou with mildness entertain’st thy wooers,
With gentle conference, soft and affable.
Why does the world report that Kate doth limp?
O slanderous world! Kate like the hazel-twig
As hazel nuts, and sweeter than the kernels.
Oh, let me see thee walk! Thou dost not halt.

DUTCH:
Volstrekt niet; ‘k vind u allerliefst. Men had
U mij geschetst als schuw en ruw en geem’lijk;
En nu vind ik ‘t Gerucht een lastertong,
Want gij zijt vroolijk, geestig, allerhoflijkst.

MORE:
Not a whit=Not at all
Passing=Exceedingly
Coy=Disdainful
Gamesome=Playful
Askance=Scornful
Entertain=Receive
Conference=Conversation
Halt=Limp
Compleat:
Not a whit displeased=Niet een zier misnoegd
A passing (or excellent) beauty=Een voortreffelyke schoonheid
Coy=Gemaakt, schuw, zedig in schyn
Gamesom=Speelziek, weeldrig, dartel
I never saw him so gamesome=Ik heb hem nooit zo kortswylig gezien
Entertain=Onthaalen, huysvesten, plaats vergunnen
Conference=Onderhandeling, t’zamenspraak, mondgemeenschap gesprekhouding
To halt=Hinken, mank gaan

Topics: nature, civility, reputation

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Widow
CONTEXT:
HELEN
If you misdoubt me that I am not she,
I know not how I shall assure you further,
But I shall lose the grounds I work upon.
WIDOW
Though my estate be fallen, I was well born,
Nothing acquainted with these businesses;
And would not put my reputation now
In any staining act.
HELEN
Nor would I wish you.
First, give me trust, the count he is my husband,
And what to your sworn counsel I have spoken
Is so from word to word; and then you cannot,
By the good aid that I of you shall borrow,
Err in bestowing it.

DUTCH:
Ik ben verarmd, maar toch van goeden huize,
En ben met zulke zaken niet vertrouwd,
En zou mijn goeden nnam niet willen smetten
Door iets oneerbaars .

MORE:
Misdoubt=Doubt
But I shall lose the grounds I work upon=Unless I disclose my plan
Though=Although
Estate be fallen=Fortunes have declined, fallen on hard times
Give me trust=Trust me (that)
Staining=To cause shame
Counsel=Secrecy
Compleat:
Misdoubt=’t Onrecht twyfelen
Estate=Bezit, middelen
Stain=Bevlekken, besmetten, bezwalken
Err=Dwaalen, doolen

Topics: suspicion, risk, reputation

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Pandarus
CONTEXT:
PANDARUS
Asses, fools, dolts! chaff and bran, chaff and bran!
porridge after meat! I could live and die i’ the
eyes of Troilus. Ne’er look, ne’er look: the eagles
are gone: crows and daws, crows and daws! I had
rather be such a man as Troilus than Agamemnon and
all Greece.
CRESSIDA
There is among the Greeks Achilles, a better man than
Troilus.
PANDARUS
Achilles! a drayman, a porter, a very camel.
CRESSIDA
Well, well.
PANDARUS
‘Well, well!’ why, have you any discretion? have
you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is not
birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood,
learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality,
and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?
CRESSIDA
Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date
in the pie, for then the man’s date’s out.
PANDARUS
You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward you
lie.

DUTCH:
Ezels, dwazen, uilskuikens! kaf en zemelen, kaf en
zemelen! soep na den maaltijd!

MORE:
Chaff and bran=Discarded after winnowing
Daws=Jackdaws (representing foolishness)
Camel=Seen as stupid, obstinate
Birth=Lineage
Discourse=Eloquence
Gentleness=Gentility, nobility
Minced=Emasculated
Compleat:
Chaff=Kaf
Jack daw=Een exter of kaauw
Discourse=Redeneering, reedenvoering, gesprek, vertoog
Gentility=Edelmanschap
To mince it=Met een gemaakten tred gaan
Mincing gait=Een trippelende gang, gemaakte tred

Burgersdijk notes:
Ja, een kruidig man enz. Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date in the pie, for then the man’s date is out. Woordspeling met date, “dadel” en date, “datum, levensduur, tijd”. Evenzoo in Eind goed, al goed”, I. 1. 172: Your date is better in your pie and your porridge than in your cheek. — Evenzoo onvertaalbaar is de volgende woordspeling met ward, “stadswijk” en ward, parade bij het schermen.

Topics: order/society, status, judgment, virtue, reputation

PLAY: Twelfth Night
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Antonio
CONTEXT:
ORSINO
Notable pirate! Thou saltwater thief,
What foolish boldness brought thee to their mercies,
Whom thou, in terms so bloody and so dear,
Hast made thine enemies?
ANTONIO
Orsino, noble sir,
Be pleased that I shake off these names you give me.
Antonio never yet was thief or pirate,
Though, I confess, on base and ground enough,
Orsino’s enemy. A witchcraft drew me hither.
That most ingrateful boy there by your side
From the rude sea’s enraged and foamy mouth
Did I redeem. A wreck past hope he was.
His life I gave him and did thereto add
My love, without retention or restraint,
All his in dedication. For his sake
Did I expose myself, pure for his love,
Into the danger of this adverse town,
Drew to defend him when he was beset,
Where being apprehended, his false cunning,
Not meaning to partake with me in danger,
Taught him to face me out of his acquaintance,
And grew a twenty-years-removed thing
While one would wink, denied me mine own purse,
Which I had recommended to his use
Not half an hour before.

DUTCH:
Vergun mij, heer,
Die namen, mij gegeven, af te schudden;
Nooit was Antonio dief of roover;

MORE:
Notable=Notorious
Shake off=Refuse to accept
Base=Foundation, synonymous with ground
Hither=Here
Retention=Reservation
Pure=Purely
Meaning=Intending
Partake=Share
Face me out of his acquaintance=Deny knowing me
Recommended=Consigned
Compleat:
Notable=Merkelyk, uitneemend, zonderling, merkwaardig, berucht, vermaard
To shake off=Afschudden
Base (basis)=De grond, grondvest
Hither=Herwaards. Hither and thither=Herwaards en derwaards
You’ll find it at the hither end of the shelf=Gy zult het op dit end van de plank vinden
Retention=Ophouding, verstopping
Meaning=Meening; opzet
To partake=Deelachtig zyn, mede deelen, deel hebben
To face out or down=(or to outface)=Iemand iets in het gezigt staande houden, of zo lang aanzien dat hy zyn oogen moet neerslaan

Topics: reputation, defence, risk, betrayal, loyalty, offence

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
If thou dost marry, I’ll give thee this plague for thy dowry. Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. Get thee to a nunnery,

DUTCH:
Wees zo kuis als ijs, zo zuiver als sneeuw, gij ontgaat toch de laster niet./
Je moogt zoo koud als ijs zijn, zoo puur als sneeuw, je ontkomt niet aan laster /
Wees zoo kuisch als ijs, zoo rein als sneeuw, aan den laster ontsnapt gij niet !

MORE:

‘Nunnery’ is translated as hoerenhuis in one Dutch translation – nunnery was Elizabethan slang for house of prostitution. OED interprets nunnery in Hamlet to have the original meaning (convent).
Compleat:
Nunnery=Vrouwen-klooster

Topics: still in use, honour, reputation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
I am not valiant neither,
But ever puny whipster gets my sword.
But why should honour outlive honesty?
Let it go all.
EMILIA
What did thy song bode, lady?
Hark, canst thou hear me? I will play the swan.
And die in music.
Willow, willow, willow —
Moor, she was chaste, she loved thee, cruel Moor.
So come my soul to bliss, as I speak true.
So speaking as I think, alas, I die.

DUTCH:
Ik werd een bloodaard,
De zwakste knaap ontweldigt mij mijn zwaard.
Waarom zou de eer de deugd ook overleven ?

MORE:

Whipster=Contemptible fellow (Arden: Whippersnapper)
Puny=Little, petty (meaning invented by Shakespeare)
Compleat:
Valiant=Dapper, kloekmoedig
Puny (a younger brother)=Een jonger broeder
A puny judge=Een jongste rechter (See Puisny. Puisne (or puisny)=a law term for younger; a name given in the house of lords to the youngest baron, and in Westminster hall to the youngest judge. De jongste Lord in ‘t hogerhuis, of de jongste Rechter in de pleitzaal van Westmunster.)

Topics: honesty, strength, honour, reputation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:

IAGO
Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls.
Who steals my purse steals trash. ’Tis something,
nothing;
’Twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to
thousands.
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him
And makes me poor indeed
OTHELLO
By heaven, I’ll know thy thoughts.
IAGO
You cannot, if my heart were in your hand,
Nor shall not, whilst ’tis in my custody.

DUTCH:
k Moet weten wat gij denkt

MORE:
Immediate=Direct, without the intervention of another; needs no other considerations to enforce its importance
Trash=Worthless matter, dross, lumber (Also a scornful term to describe money; See J.Caesar 4.3)
Filch=To steal, pilfer
Compleat:
To filch=Ontfutzelen, afhandig maaken, ontloeren, ontsteelen
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed

Topics: reputation, respect, emotion and mood, confidentiality, secrecy

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Ulysses
CONTEXT:
ULYSSES
Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back,
Wherein he puts alms for oblivion,
A great-sized monster of ingratitudes:
Those scraps are good deeds past; which are devoured
As fast as they are made, forgot as soon
As done: perseverance, dear my lord,
Keeps honour bright: to have done is to hang
Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail
In monumental mockery. Take the instant way;
For honour travels in a strait so narrow,
Where one but goes abreast: keep then the path;
For emulation hath a thousand sons
That one by one pursue: if you give way,
Or hedge aside from the direct forthright,
Like to an entered tide, they all rush by
And leave you hindmost;
Or like a gallant horse fall’n in first rank,
Lie there for pavement to the abject rear,
O’er-run and trampled on: then what they do in present,
Though less than yours in past, must o’ertop yours;
For time is like a fashionable host
That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand,
And with his arms outstretched, as he would fly,
Grasps in the comer: welcome ever smiles,
And farewell goes out sighing. O, let not virtue seek
Remuneration for the thing it was;
For beauty, wit,
High birth, vigour of bone, desert in service,
Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all
To envious and calumniating time.
One touch of nature makes the whole world kin,
That all with one consent praise new-born gawds,
Though they are made and moulded of things past,
And give to dust that is a little gilt
More laud than gilt o’er-dusted.
The present eye praises the present object.
Then marvel not, thou great and complete man,
That all the Greeks begin to worship Ajax;
Since things in motion sooner catch the eye
Than what not stirs. The cry went once on thee,
And still it might, and yet it may again,
If thou wouldst not entomb thyself alive
And case thy reputation in thy tent;
Whose glorious deeds, but in these fields of late,
Made emulous missions ‘mongst the gods themselves
And drave great Mars to faction.

DUTCH:
Dus, houd het pad,
Want roembegeerte heeft een duizend zoons,
Die, de een den ander, dringen; wijkt gij uit,
Of treedt gij zijwaarts van het rechte pad,
Dan stroomen ze allen toe als ‘t wassend tij,
Voorbij u, u vooruit;

MORE:
Time was originally personified as a money collector for Forgetfulness, based on an old saying

Wallet=Satchel, beggar’s bag
Alms=Donations
Mail=Armour
One but goes abreast=Single file
Instant=Direct
Strait=Narrow passage
Forthright=Straight path
Rank=Row
Abject=Worthless
Calumniating=Slandering
Touch of nature=Natural trait
Gawds=Trivia
Laud=Praise
Overtop=Surpass
Emulous=Envying, rivalry
Faction=Taking sides
Compleat:
Wallet=Knapzak
Alms=Een aalmoes
Mail=Een maalie-wambes, maalijen-kolder
Abreast=Naast malkander
Instant=Aanhoudende, dringende
Strait=Eng, naauw, bekrompen, strikt
Rank=Rang, waardigheid
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
To calumniate=Lasteren, schandvlekken, eerrooven
Gawd=Wisje-wasjes, beuzelingen
To laud=Looven, pryzen
Over-top=Te boven gaan, overschryden
Emulous=Naayverig, nydig
Faction=Samenrotting, saamenspanning, oproerige party, rot, aanhang, partyschap, verdeeldheid

Burgersdijk notes
Ja, Mars tot strijden dreef. Hiervan maakt Homerus gewag.

Topics: honesty, value, integrity, respect, reputation

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Abhorson
CONTEXT:
Every true man’s apparel fits your thief: if it be
too little for your thief, your true man thinks it
big enough; if it be too big for your thief, your
thief thinks it little enough: so every true man’s
apparel fits your thief.

DUTCH:
Als ze te klein zijn voor den dief, houdt de eerlijke
man ze voor ruim genoeg ; als ze te ruim zijn voor den
dief, vindt de dief ze toch klein genoeg; en dus passen
elken eerlijken mans kleeren den dief.

MORE:
Burgersdijk notes:
Hier is de verdeeling van de folio behouden; de volgende woorden Als ze te klein zijn,” enz . zijn daar, evenals hier, aan den clown, Pompejus, toegekend, en niet, zooals vele uitgevers doen, aan Abhorson (Isegrim), in wiens mond zij veel minder passen. Men denke, dat Isegrim een wijdloopig betoog wil geven, met de kleeren, – die hem na aan ‘t hart liggen, wjjl de kleeren van den gehangene voor den beul waren, – begint, en dat de levendige clown hem terstond in de rede valt . – Wil men veranderen, dan zou het best zijn, een gezegde van den beul in te lasschen en dezen b .v. te laten beginnen : Every hangman’s collar fits your thief, – waarop dan Pompejus kan invallen : Every true man’s apparel fits your thief ; if it be too little etc.

Topics: law/legal, honesty, appearance, reputation

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke Senior
CONTEXT:
CELIA
I did not then entreat to have her stay.
It was your pleasure and your own remorse.
I was too young that time to value her,
But now I know her. If she be a traitor,
Why so am I. We still have slept together,
Rose at an instant, learned, played, eat together,
And, wheresoe’er we went, like Juno’s swans
Still we went coupled and inseparable.
DUKE FREDERICK
She is too subtle for thee, and her smoothness,
Her very silence and her patience
Speak to the people, and they pity her.
Thou art a fool. She robs thee of thy name,
And thou wilt show more bright and seem more virtuous
When she is gone. Then open not thy lips.
Firm and irrevocable is my doom
Which I have passed upon her. She is banished.
CELIA
Pronounce that sentence then on me, my liege.
I cannot live out of her company.

DUTCH:
Neen, geen enkel woord;
Onwrikbaar, onherroep’lijk is het vonnis,
Dat ik daar sloeg. Zij is en blijft verbannen.

MORE:
Remorse=Compunction; compassion
Still=Always
At an instant=At the same time
Eat=Eaten
Juno=The queen of the gods in Roman mythology, whose chariot was drawn by swans
Name=Reputaiton
Show=Seem
Doom=Judgment
Out of=Without
Compleat:
Remorse=Knaaging, wroeging, berouw
Still=Steeds, gestadig, altyd
At an instant=Opstaandevoet
Name=Een goede naam, goede achting
Show=Vertooning
Doom=Vonnis, oordeel, verwyzing
A heavy doom=een zwaar vonnis

Topics: judgment, mercy, reputation

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurn at me,
And hurl the name of husband in my face,
And tear the stained skin off my harlot brow,
And from my false hand cut the wedding ring,
And break it with a deep-divorcing vow?
I know thou canst, and therefore see thou do it.
I am possessed with an adulterate blot;
My blood is mingled with the crime of lust;
For if we two be one, and thou play false,
I do digest the poison of thy flesh,
Being strumpeted by thy contagion.
Keep then fair league and truce with thy true bed,
I live unstained, thou undishonourèd.

DUTCH:
Want zijn wij tweeën één en zijt gij valsch,
Dan stroomt het gif van uw bloed in het mijn’,
En door uw smetstof word ik tot boelin.

MORE:
Possession had a stronger meaning, akin to ‘infect’
Harlot brow=Branding on the forehead with a hot iron was punishment for prostitution
Strumpeted=Turned into a strumpet, prostitute (by contamination)
Unstained=Undefiled (some editors use disstain here)

Compleat:
To enter into a league=In een verbond treeden, een verbond aangaan
Truce=Een bestand, stilstand van wapenen, treves

Topics: loyalty, ruin, reputation, marriage, love, respect

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
Well, Brutus, thou art noble. Yet I see
Thy honourable mettle may be wrought
From that it is disposed. Therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes,
For who so firm that cannot be seduced?
Caesar doth bear me hard, but he loves Brutus.
If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
He should not humour me. I will this night,
In several hands, in at his windows throw,
As if they came from several citizens,
Writings all tending to the great opinion
That Rome holds of his name, wherein obscurely
Caesar’s ambition shall be glancèd at.
And after this let Caesar seat him sure,
For we will shake him, or worse days endure.

DUTCH:
Dies sluite steeds
Een hooge geest zich zijnsgelijken aan ;
Wie is zoo vast, dat niets hem ooit verleidt?

MORE:
Mettle=Spirit (Punning on metal and wrought)
Wrought=Altered
Disposed=Natural qualities
Bear me hard=Dislike me
Humour=Influence
Keep ever with=Stay with
Likes=Equals
Tending=Leaning towards
Glanced=Hinted at
Seat him sure=Comfortable, safe
Compleat:
Full of mettle=Vol vuurs, moedig
Wrought=Gewerkt, gewrocht
Dispose=Beschikken, schikken
Like=Gelyk
To tend=Strekken
To glance upon a thing=Eventjes raaken; Ter loop iets aanroeren

Burgersdijk notes:
Nimmer leende ik aan hem het oor. In ‘t Engelsch : He should not humour me ; “hij zou mij niet winnen, niet bewerken, zijn luim niet doen dienen.” Mij dunkt, er staat duidelijk : Als ik Brutus was, en hij Cassius, dan zou hij mij niet bepraten, niet ompraten.” Er is geen reden om dit He op Caesar te laten slaan, en het zeggen op te vatten : „Dan zou Caesar, of Caesar’s liefde, mij niet bewegen, zjjn luim te dienen .” Deze verklaring komt mij gedwongen voor en past niet goed in het verband, dat naar de hier gegeven vertaling duidelijk genoeg is. “Als Cassius een hooger, edeler geest was, zooals Brutus, alzoo aan Caesar’s geest nader stond, en bovendien zich in Caesar’s liefde mocht verheugen, zou hij zich niet laten ompraten, maar zich aan Caesar houden.”

Topics: integrity, honour, reputation

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 5.11
SPEAKER: Pandarus
CONTEXT:
TROILUS
Hence, broker-lackey! ignomy and shame
Pursue thy life, and live aye with thy name!
PANDARUS
A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world!
world! world! thus is the poor agent despised!
O traitors and bawds, how earnestly are you set
a-work, and how ill requited! why should our
endeavour be so loved and the performance so loathed?
what verse for it? what instance for it? Let me see:
Full merrily the humble-bee doth sing,
Till he hath lost his honey and his sting;
And being once subdued in armed tail,
Sweet honey and sweet notes together fail.
Good traders in the flesh, set this in your painted cloths.
As many as be here of pander’s hall,
Your eyes, half out, weep out at Pandar’s fall;
Or if you cannot weep, yet give some groans,
Though not for me, yet for your aching bones.
Brethren and sisters of the hold-door trade,
Some two months hence my will shall here be made:
It should be now, but that my fear is this,
Some galled goose of Winchester would hiss:
Till then I’ll sweat and seek about for eases,
And at that time bequeathe you my diseases.

DUTCH:
Recht lustigjes gonst u het bijken in ‘t oor,
Totdat het zijn honig en angel verloor;
Maar ruk aan ‘t dier zijn wapen uit, voortaan
Is ‘t met het zoet van zeem en zang gedaan.

MORE:
Broker-lackey=Pimp, middleman
Ignomy=Ignominy
Instance=Example
Subdued=Defeated
Armed tail=Sting
Cloths=Wall hangings
Pandar=Pandarus, pander: Pimp, procurer, broker
Hold-door trade=Prostitution
Galled=Swollen
Goose=Goose of Wnchester: prostitute (brothels near The Globe were under the jurisdiction of
the Bishop of Winchester)
Compleat:
Broker=Makelaar; Uytdraager
Ignominy=Schande, smaad, naamschending, schandvlek, oneer
Instance=Een voorval, voorbeeld, exempel; aandringing, aanhouding; blyk
Subdue=Onderbrengen, overwinnen, temmen
Pander=Hoerewaard, koppelaar

Burgersdijk notes:
In Pand’rus schuit. In ‘t Engelsch: of pander’s hall. Pander is: koppelaar. — Een Winchester gansjen
beteekent een lichtekooi, en ook een kwaal, door ongebondenheid verkregen. De publieke huizen in Southwark behoorden tot het gebied van den bisschop van Winchester. Men zie 1 Kon. Hendrik
VI, I. 3. 35 en 53.

Topics: reputation, honour, respect

PLAY: Twelfth Night
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Sir Toby
CONTEXT:
SIR TOBY BELCH
Why, then, build me thy fortunes upon the basis of
valour. Challenge me the count’s youth to fight with him.
Hurt him in eleven places. My niece shall take note of
it, and assure thyself, there is no love-broker in the
world can more prevail in man’s commendation with woman
than report of valour.
FABIAN
There is no way but this, Sir Andrew.
SIR ANDREW
Will either of you bear me a challenge to him?
SIR TOBY BELCH
Go, write it in a martial hand. Be curst and brief. It
is no matter how witty, so it be eloquent and full of
invention. Taunt him with the licence of ink. If thou
“thou”-est him some thrice, it shall not be amiss; and
as many lies as will lie in thy sheet of paper, although
the sheet were big enough for the bed of Ware in
England, set ’em down. Go, about it. Let there be gall
enough in thy ink, though thou write with a goose-pen,
no matter. About it.

DUTCH:
Ga, schrijf ze met een martiale hand; wees vinnig en
kort; op geestigheid komt het niet aan, als zij maar welsprekend en vol vinding is; beleedig hem zooveel als
de inkt maar toelaat;

MORE:
Proverb: A curst cur must be tied short

Curst=Terse
Brief=Short, succinct
Invention=Originality, ideas
Licence of ink=Freedom afforded by writing
Gall=Oak-gall, used in ink
Goose-pen=Quill (the goose being regarded as cowardly)
Compleat:
Curst=Vervloekt
Brief=Kort
Invention=Vinding
Gall=Gal. (1) Bitter as gall=Zo bitter als gal (2) To gall=Benaauwen (Den vyand benaauwen…)

Burgersdijk notes:
Op uw stuk papier, al ware dit zoo groot als het laken van het familiebed te Ware in Engeland. In eene herberg te Ware, in het graafschap Hartfordshire, stond een bed, waarin tegelijk twaalf mannen en twaalf vrouwen konden liggen; liet wordt ook elders als een merkwaardigheid genoemd. In ‘t Engelsch beteekent sheet zoowel een vel papier als een beddelaken; deze woordspeling was natuur
niet over te brengen.
Gal in uw inkt. Ossegal was een hoofdbestanddeel van inkt, zie “Cymbeline” 1.1.

Topics: proverbs and idioms, clarity/precision, language, reputation

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Boy
CONTEXT:
For indeed three such antics do not amount to a man: for Bardolph, he is white-livered and red-faced, by the means whereof he faces it out but fights not; for Pistol, he hath a killing tongue and a quiet sword, by the means whereof he breaks words and keeps whole weapons; for Nym, he hath heard that men of few words are the best men, and therefore he scorns to say his prayers, lest he should be thought a coward, but his few bad words are matched with as few good deeds, for he never broke any man’s head but his own, and that was against a post when he was drunk. They will steal anything and call it purchase.

DUTCH:
Pistool, die heeft een moorddadige tong en
een vreedzaam zwaard; en daarom breekt hij woorden
den nek, maar houdt zijn wapens heel

MORE:

Antic=Buffoon, practising odd gesticulations
White-livered=Cowardly (White livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare)
Face it out=To get through one’s business by effrontery
Scorn=To disdain, to refuse or lay aside with contempt
Words=Also in the sense of promises

Compleat:
To scorn=Verachten, verfooijen
White-livered=Een die er altijd bleek uitziet; een bleek-neus, kwaadaardig, nydig
To face out=Iemand iets in ‘t gezigt staande houden

Topics: reputation, honour, language, promise

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
What dost thou mean?
IAGO
Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls.
Who steals my purse steals trash. ‘Tis something,
nothing:
‘Twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to thousands.
But he that filches from me my good name
Robs me of that which not enriches him
And makes me poor indeed.
OTHELLO
I’ll know thy thoughts.
IAGO
You cannot, if my heart were in your hand,
Nor shall not, whilst ’tis in my custody.

DUTCH:
Maar hij, die mij mijn goeden naam ontneemt,
Berooft mij van wat hem niet rijker maakt
En mij doodarm.

MORE:
CITED IN EU LAW: LINDON, OTCHAKOVSKY-LAURENS AND JULY v. FRANCE – 21279/02 [2007] ECHR 836 (22 October 2007)/46 EHRR 35, (2008) 46 EHRR 35, [2007] ECHR 836.

CITED IN US LAW:
According to William Domnarski (Shakespeare in the Law, 1993) the second most frequently cited passage in US law (27 times at that time). Some examples:
Milkovich v Lorain Journal Co., 497 US 1, 110 Supreme Court 2695, 2702, 111 L.Ed.2d 1 (1990) (Rehnquist, C.J.). Judge Renquist disregarded the fact that the speaker was Iago, who had anything but a good reputation: this was simply used to illustrate the development of deformation law.

Cited by Abraham Lincoln when he was a defence lawyer.

Immediate=Direct, without the intervention of another; needs no other considerations to enforce its importance
Filch=To steal, to pilfer
Trash=Worthless matter, dross, lumber (Also a scornful term to describe money; See J.Caesar 4.3)
Compleat:
Filch=Ontfutzelen, afhandig maaken, ontloeren, onsteelen
Trash=Lompige waar, ondeugend goed

Topics: reputation, respect, emotion and mood, secrecy, cited in law

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Cominius
CONTEXT:
COMINIUS
He would not seem to know me.
MENENIUS
Do you hear?
COMINIUS
Yet one time he did call me by my name.
I urged our old acquaintance, and the drops
That we have bled together. “Coriolanus”
He would not answer to, forbade all names.
He was a kind of nothing, titleless,
Till he had forged himself a name o’ th’ fire
Of burning Rome.

DUTCH:
Hij was een soort van niets, gansch zonder naam,
Tot hij zich uit de vlam van ‘t brandend Rome
Een naam gesmeed had.

MORE:

Schmidt:
To urge=To speak of, to mention
Yet=Only
Forge=To frame in general

Compleat:
Forge=Smeden; uitvinden

Topics: status, authority, reputation

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
THIRD CONSPIRATOR
The people will remain uncertain whilst
’Twixt you there’s difference; but the fall of either
Makes the survivor heir of all.
AUFIDIUS
I know it;
And my pretext to strike at him admits
A good construction. I raised him, and I pawn’d
Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten’d,
He water’d his new plants with dews of flattery,
Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,
He bow’d his nature, never known before
But to be rough, unswayable and free.

DUTCH:
Doch, pas verheven,
Bedauwde hij met vleierij zijn planten,
En trok mijn vrienden van mij af; hij plooide
Daartoe zijn aard, dien niemand vroeger anders
Dan ruw, onbuigzaam, eigenwillig kende.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Construction=Interpretation
A good construction=Well-founded
Pawn=Pledge
To bow=To crush, to strain

Compleat:
To bow=Buigen, neigen, bukken
Construction=Uitlegging; woordenschikking

Topics: flattery, achievement, reputation

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
Yet thus far, Griffith, give me leave to speak him,
And yet with charity. He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
Himself with princes; one that, by suggestion,
Tied all the kingdom: simony was fair-play;
His own opinion was his law: i’ the presence
He would say untruths; and be ever double
Both in his words and meaning: he was never,
But where he meant to ruin, pitiful:
His promises were, as he then was, mighty;
But his performance, as he is now, nothing:
Of his own body he was ill, and gave
The clergy in example

DUTCH:
Simonie was eerlijk doen; zijn eigen wil zijn wet;
Voor ‘s konings aanschijn sprak hij logens; dubbel
Was hij van tong en hart.

MORE:
Speak=Speak of
Stomach=Pride, greed
Tied=Ruled, subjected
Simony=Trading of ecclesiastical privileges (after Simon the Sorcerer)
Presence=In the presence of the king
Be ever double=Equivocal
Pitiful=Having pity
Compleat:
Stomach=Gramsteurigheyd
Tied=Gebonden
Simony=Geestelyke amptkooping, koophandel van geestelyke dingen (naar Simon den Toveraar)
Presence=Tegenwoordigheyd, byzyn, byweezen
The Presence Chamber=De Koninklyke voorkamer, de gehoor-zaal
Pitifull=Vol medelyden

Topics: death, legacy, reputation, law/legal, promise

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Queen Katherine
CONTEXT:
QUEEN KATHERINE
So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
Yet thus far, Griffith, give me leave to speak him,
And yet with charity. He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
Himself with princes; one that, by suggestion,
Tied all the kingdom: simony was fair-play;
His own opinion was his law: i’ the presence
He would say untruths; and be ever double
Both in his words and meaning: he was never,
But where he meant to ruin, pitiful:
His promises were, as he then was, mighty;
But his performance, as he is now, nothing:
Of his own body he was ill, and gave
The clergy in example

DUTCH:
Grootsch, als hijzelf eens, was wat hij beloofde,
Doch wat hij hield, was, als hijzelf nu, niets.
Hij zondigde in den vleesche, en ging alzoo
De geest’lijkheid slecht voor.

MORE:
Speak=Speak of
Stomach=Pride, greed
Tied=Ruled, subjected
Simony=Trading of ecclesiastical privileges (after Simon the Sorcerer)
Presence=In the presence of the king
Be ever double=Equivocal
Pitiful=Having pity
Compleat:
Stomach=Gramsteurigheyd
Tied=Gebonden
Simony=Geestelyke amptkooping, koophandel van geestelyke dingen (naar Simon den Toveraar)
Presence=Tegenwoordigheyd, byzyn, byweezen
The Presence Chamber=De Koninklyke voorkamer, de gehoor-zaal
Pitifull=Vol medelyden

Topics: death, legacy, reputation, law/legal, promise

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Silvia
CONTEXT:
VALENTINE
Welcome, dear Proteus! Mistress, I beseech you,
Confirm his welcome with some special favour.
SILVIA
His worth is warrant for his welcome hither,
If this be he you oft have wished to hear from.
VALENTINE
Mistress, it is: sweet lady, entertain him
To be my fellow-servant to your ladyship.
SILVIA
Too low a mistress for so high a servant.
PROTEUS
Not so, sweet lady: but too mean a servant
To have a look of such a worthy mistress.

DUTCH:
Zijn waarde waarborgt hem zijn welkom hier,
Als hij ‘t is, waar gij vaak bericht van wenschtet.

MORE:
Warrant=Justification
Entertain=Employ
High=Superior
Mean=Unworthy
Look of=Look from
Compleat:
To warrant=Staande houden, borg staan
Entertain=Onthaalen, huysvesten, plaats vergunnen
Mean=Gering, slecht

Topics: status, order/society, reputation, respect

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Horatio, I am dead.
Thou livest; report me and my cause aright
To the unsatisfied.

DUTCH:
Horatio, ik ga dood; jij leeft, verklaar jij mij en wat mij dreef aan de onbevredigden. /
‘k Ga dood, Horatio, Jij leeft; verklaar mij en mijn zuivre zaak Aan de onbevredigden.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Unsatisfied=Not fully informed and settled in opinion
Report me and my cause correctly to the uninformed (“unsatisfied”)

Topics: death, truth, legacy, reputation

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Cassius
CONTEXT:
CASSIUS
How many ages hence
Shall this our lofty scene be acted over,
In states unborn and accents yet unknown!
BRUTUS
How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport,
That now on Pompey’s basis lies along
No worthier than the dust!
CASSIUS
So oft as that shall be,
So often shall the knot of us be called
“The men that gave their country liberty.”

DUTCH:
In welke verre tijden
Wordt dit verheven schouwtooneel herhaald,
In ongeboren Staten, nieuwe tongen!

MORE:
Accents=Languages
In sport=Entertainment
Basis=Base of P’s statue
Along=Stretched out
Knot=Small group
Compleat:
Accent=Klankteken, bygalm, schrapken, toon, woorklank
To make sport=Lachen, speelen
Knot=Een rist of trop

Topics: langage, understanding, legacy, reputation

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: First Murderer
CONTEXT:
SECOND MURDERER
Take the devil in thy mind, and believe him not. He
would insinuate with thee but to make thee sigh.
FIRST MURDERER
I am strong-framed. He cannot prevail with me.
SECOND MURDERER
Spoke like a tall man that respects thy reputation.
Come, shall we fall to work?
FIRST MURDERER
Take him on the costard with the hilts of thy sword,
and then throw him into the malmsey butt in the next
room.
SECOND MURDERER
O excellent device— and make a sop of him.

DUTCH:
lk ben sterk van natuur ; hij krijgt mij niet onder .

MORE:
Insinuate=Ingratiate
Prevail=Gain the upper hand
Strong-framed=Of strong stock
Tall=Valiant
Costard=Head
Malmsey=Strong wine
Butt=Barrel
Sop=Bread for dipping in wine
Compleat:
Insinulate=Inboezemen, indringen, invlyen
Malmsey=Malvezy, een soort van zoete wyn komende uyt de Straat
Butt=Wynvat of wynkuyp, houdende 126 gallons
A wine sop=Een wynsopje

Topics: good and bad, independence, reputation

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Ulysses
CONTEXT:
ULYSSES
I do not strain at the position,—
It is familiar,—but at the author’s drift;
Who, in his circumstance, expressly proves
That no man is the lord of any thing,
Though in and of him there be much consisting,
Till he communicate his parts to others:
Nor doth he of himself know them for aught
Till he behold them formed in the applause
Where they’re extended; who, like an arch, reverberates
The voice again, or, like a gate of steel
Fronting the sun, receives and renders back
His figure and his heat. I was much wrapt in this;
And apprehended here immediately
The unknown Ajax.
Heavens, what a man is there! a very horse,
That has he knows not what. Nature, what things there are
Most abject in regard and dear in use!
What things again most dear in the esteem
And poor in worth! Now shall we see to-morrow—
An act that very chance doth throw upon him—
Ajax renowned. O heavens, what some men do,
While some men leave to do!
How some men creep in skittish fortune’s hall,
Whiles others play the idiots in her eyes!
How one man eats into another’s pride,
While pride is fasting in his wantonness!
To see these Grecian lords!— why, even already
They clap the lubber Ajax on the shoulder,
As if his foot were on brave Hector’s breast
And great Troy shrinking.

DUTCH:
Wat mij verbaast, is niet de stelling zelf,
Die elk wel kent, maar wel ‘t besluit des schrijvers

MORE:
Strain at=Struggle to accept
Position=Argument
Drift=Meaning, gist
Circumstance=Detail of an argument
Expressly=In full, explicitly
In and of=He and his actions
Consisting=Quality, substance
Parts=Qualities
Formed in=Reflected in
Arch=Vault
Figure=Appearance
Abject in regard=Despised
Dear in use=Useful
Dear in the esteem=Highly regarded
Poor in worth=Of little value
Lubber=Lout
Shrinking=Weakening
Compleat:
Strain hard=Alle zyne krachten inspannen; lustig zyn best doen
Position=Legging, stelling
Drift=Oogmerk, opzet, vaart
Circumstance=Omstandigheyd
Circumstanced=Met omstandigheden belegd, onder omstandigheden begreepen
Expressely or Expresly=Duidelyk; uitdrukkelyk
Consistence=Bestaanlykheid; saamenbestaanlykheid
Parts=Deelen, hoedaanigheden, begaafdheden
Form=Wyze, gedaante
Arch=Een gewelf, boog
Figure (or representation)=Afbeelding
Figure (or appearance)=Gedaante, aanzien
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
Dear=Waard, lief, dierbaar, duur
Lubber=Een sul, slokker, zwabber, een lubbert

Topics: communication, persuasion, reputation, value, appearance, merit

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Macbeth
CONTEXT:
We will proceed no further in this business.
He hath honored me of late, and I have bought
Golden opinions from all sorts of people,
Which would be worn now in their newest gloss,
Not cast aside so soon.

DUTCH:
Laat ons niet verder gaan in deze zaak;
Pas heeft hij mij in eer verhoogd; ik kocht
Me een gouden naam bij ied’ren rang en stand

MORE:
Schmidt:
To buy= To acquire, procure, gain

Topics: plans/intentions, guilt, uncertainty, reputation

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Valentine
CONTEXT:
VALENTINE
My lord, I will be thankful.
To any happy messenger from thence.
DUKE
Know ye Don Antonio, your countryman?
VALENTINE
Ay, my good lord, I know the gentleman
To be of worth and worthy estimation
And not without desert so well reputed.

DUTCH:
Ja, beste vorst, ik ken dien edelman,
Als hoog in waarde en aanzien, en die tevens
Niet onverdiend zijn schoonen naam bezit.

MORE:

Of worth=Wealthy; high-ranking
Worthy estimation=Good reputation
Without desert=Undeserved
Compleat:
A thing of great worth=Een Zaak van groote waarde
A person of worth=Een voortreffelyk persoon
Worthy=Waardig, eerwaardig, voortreffelyk, uytmuntend, deftig
Desert (from to deserve)=Verdienste, verdiende loon

Topics: news, respect, reputation

PLAY: Timon of Athens
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Alcibiades
CONTEXT:
ALCIBIADES
I never did thee harm.
TIMON
Yes, thou spokest well of me.
ALCIBIADES
Call’st thou that harm?
TIMON
Men daily find it. Get thee away, and take
Thy beagles with thee.
ALCIBIADES
We but offend him. Strike!

DUTCH:
ALCIBIADES
Ik heb u nooit gekrenkt.
TIMON
Ja, gij spraakt goed van mij.

MORE:
Beagles=Phrynia and Timandra

Topics: reputation, flattery

PLAY: The Merry Wives of Windsor
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Mistress Page
CONTEXT:
PAGE
We are come to you to do a good office, master parson.
SIR HUGH EVANS
Fery well: what is it?
PAGE
Yonder is a most reverend gentleman, who, belike
having received wrong by some person, is at most
odds with his own gravity and patience that ever you
saw.
SHALLOW
I have lived fourscore years and upward; I never
heard a man of his place, gravity and learning, so
wide of his own respect.

DUTCH:
Wij komen van een zeer waardig gentleman, die naar
het schijnt van iemand beleedigd is en daardoor het zoo
te kwaad heeft met zijn eigen waardigheid en bedaardheid,
als iemand maar ooit gezien heeft.

MORE:
Office=Service
Wide of his own respect=Acting out of character
Compleat:
Office=een Ampt, dienst
Wide of the mark=Hy is verre buyten ‘t spoor
Respect=Aanzien, opzigt, inzigt, ontzag, eerbiedigheyd

Topics: honour, abuse, reputation

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Achilles
CONTEXT:
ACHILLES
Shall Ajax fight with Hector?
PATROCLUS
Ay, and perhaps receive much honour by him.
ACHILLES
I see my reputation is at stake
My fame is shrewdly gored.
PATROCLUS
O, then, beware;
Those wounds heal ill that men do give themselves:
Omission to do what is necessary
Seals a commission to a blank of danger;
And danger, like an ague, subtly taints
Even then when we sit idly in the sun.
ACHILLES
Go call Thersites hither, sweet Patroclus:
I’ll send the fool to Ajax and desire him
To invite the Trojan lords after the combat
To see us here unarmed: I have a woman’s longing,
An appetite that I am sick withal,
To see great Hector in his weeds of peace,
To talk with him and to behold his visage,
Even to my full of view.

DUTCH:
Ik zie, mijn naam staat op het spel; mijn roem
Wordt zwaar bezoedeld.

MORE:
Shrewdly=Severely
Gored=Wounded, harmed
Commission=Warrant
Blank=Blank charter
Ague=Fever
Taint=Corrupt
Weeds=Garments
Full of view=To the satisfaction of my eyes
Compleat:
Shrewdly (very much)=Sterk
Gored=Doorsteeken, doorstooten
A blank=Een Papier in blank
Ague=Koorts die met koude komt, een verpoozende koorts
To attaint=Overtuigen van misdaad, schuldig verklaaren, betichten; bevlekken, bederf aanzetten
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad

Topics: conflict, rivalry, reputation, caution

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 4.2
SPEAKER: Chiron
CONTEXT:
AARON
O Lord, sir, ’tis a deed of policy:
Shall she live to betray this guilt of ours,
A long-tongued babbling gossip? no, lords, no:
And now be it known to you my full intent.
Not far, one Muli lives, my countryman;
His wife but yesternight was brought to bed;
His child is like to her, fair as you are:
Go pack with him, and give the mother gold,
And tell them both the circumstance of all;
And how by this their child shall be advanced,
And be received for the emperor’s heir,
And substituted in the place of mine,
To calm this tempest whirling in the court;
And let the emperor dandle him for his own.
Hark ye, lords; ye see I have given her physic,
And you must needs bestow her funeral;
The fields are near, and you are gallant grooms:
This done, see that you take no longer days,
But send the midwife presently to me.
The midwife and the nurse well made away,
Then let the ladies tattle what they please.
CHIRON
Aaron, I see thou wilt not trust the air
With secrets
DEMETRIUS
For this care of Tamora,
Herself and hers are highly bound to thee.

DUTCH:
k Zie, Aaron, aan de lucht zelfs niet vertrouwt gij geheimen toe.

MORE:
Policy=Cunning, expediency
Go pack=Conspire
Circumstance=Details
Bestow=Arrange
Grooms=Fellows
Tattle=Gossip
Bound=Obliged
Compleat:
Policy (conduct, address, cunning way)=Staatkunde, beleid, behendigheid
A packt business=Een doorsteken werk
Circumstance=Omstandigheid
To bestow=Besteeden, te koste hangen
Groom=Stalknecht
Tittle-tattle=Snappen, kallen, praaten
Bound=Gebonden, verbonden, verpligt, dienstbaar

Topics: secrecy, trust, reputation

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Earl of Salisbury
CONTEXT:
CAPTAIN
’Tis thought the king is dead; we will not stay.
The bay-trees in our country are all wither’d
And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
The pale-faced moon looks bloody on the earth
And lean-look’d prophets whisper fearful change;
Rich men look sad and ruffians dance and leap,
The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
The other to enjoy by rage and war:
These signs forerun the death or fall of kings.
Farewell: our countrymen are gone and fled,
As well assured Richard their king is dead.
EARL OF SALISBURY
Ah, Richard, with the eyes of heavy mind
I see thy glory like a shooting star
Fall to the base earth from the firmament.
Thy sun sets weeping in the lowly west,
Witnessing storms to come, woe and unrest:
Thy friends are fled to wait upon thy foes,
And crossly to thy good all fortune goes.

DUTCH:
0 Richard, met een blik vol hangen kommer
Zie ik, gelijk een sterre die verschiet,
Uw glans van ‘t firmament ter aarde ploffen.

MORE:

Lean-looked=Thin-faced
Meteor=A bright phenomenon, thought to be portentous, harbinger of doom
Fixed stars=Symbol of permanence
Forerun=Precede
Assured=Convinced, persuaded
Witness=Portend
Wait upon=Serve
Crossly=Adversely

Compleat:
To assure=Verzekeren
Portend=Voorduiden, voorzeggen

Topics: reputation, failure, betrayal, friendship, loyalty, fate/destiny

PLAY: The Merry Wives of Windsor
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
FALSTAFF
I will not lend thee a penny.
PISTOL
Why, then the world’s mine oyster.
Which I with sword will open.
I will retort the sum in equipage
FALSTAFF
Not a penny. I have been content, sir, you should
lay my countenance to pawn; I have grated upon my
good friends for three reprieves for you and your
coach-fellow Nym; or else you had looked through
the grate, like a geminy of baboons. I am damned in
hell for swearing to gentlemen my friends, you were
good soldiers and tall fellows; and when Mistress
Bridget lost the handle of her fan, I took’t upon
mine honour thou hadst it not.

DUTCH:
Falstaff.
Ik leen je zelfs geen penning.
Pistool.
Welnu, de wereld zij mijn oester dan,
Die ik wil oop’nen met mijn zwaard.

MORE:
Retort=Repay
Equipage=Accoutrements
Lay my countenance to pawn=Used my reputation (as surety)
Grated upon=Harrassed
Coach-fellow=Companion
Grate=Prison bars
Geminy=Pair
Tall=Brave
Took it=Swore
Handle of her fan=The handle of a fan was often made with costly material, like ivory.

Topics: money, debt/obligation, reputation, friendship

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Prince Hal
CONTEXT:
So please your Majesty, I would I could
Quit all offences with as clear excuse
As well as I am doubtless I can purge
Myself of many I am charged withal.
Yet such extenuation let me beg
As, in reproof of many tales devised,
Which oft the ear of greatness needs must hear,
By smiling pickthanks and base newsmongers,
I may for some things true, wherein my youth
Hath faulty wandered and irregular,
Find pardon on my true submission.

DUTCH:
Veroorloof, uwe hoogheid! ‘k Wenschte, dat ik
Van iedre smet mij zoo bevrijden kon,
Als ik mij buiten twijfel rein kan wasschen
Van meen’ge zonde, mij te last gelegd;

MORE:
I am doubtless=I doubt not
Quit=acquit, clear oneself
Purge=clear
Charged withal=Accused of now
Extenuation= Considerations, allowance
Devised= Invented, made up
Smiling pickthanks=Flatterers who think flattery will earn the King’s gratitude
True submission= Confession
Newsmongers=Gossips
Compleat:
Purge=Zuyveren, reynigen

Topics: nlame, innocence, reputation, mercy, judgment

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 5.4
SPEAKER: Rosalind
CONTEXT:
ROSALIND
It is not the fashion to see the lady the epilogue, but
it is no more unhandsome than to see the lord the
prologue. If it be true that good wine needs no bush,
’tis true that a good play needs no epilogue. Yet to
good wine they do use good bushes, and good plays prove
the better by the help of good epilogues. What a case am
I in, then, that am neither a good epilogue nor cannot
insinuate with you in the behalf of a good play. I am
not furnished like a beggar; therefore to beg will not
become me. My way is to conjure you, and I’ll begin with
the women. I charge you, O women, for the love you bear
to men, to like as much of this play as please you. And
I charge you, O men, for the love you bear to women—as
I perceive by your simpering, none of you hates
them—that between you and the women the play may please.
If I were a woman, I would kiss as many of you as had
beards that pleased me, complexions that liked me, and
breaths that I defied not. And I am sure as many as have
good beards, or good faces, or sweet breaths will, for
my kind offer, when I make curtsy, bid me farewell.

DUTCH:
Is ‘t waar, dat goede wijn geen krans behoeft, even waar is het, dat een goed stuk geen epiloog behoeft maar waar goede wijn is, hangt men fraaie kransen uit, en goede stukken doen zich beter voor met behulp van goede epilogen.

MORE:
Proverb “Good wine needs no bush”
“A good bush” here refers to Ivy, which was hung out at vintners’ doors and in windows to advertise that the hostelry had a good wine.
Also from Sir John Harington’s Epigrams (1618)
“And with this prouerbe proued it labour lost:
Good Ale doth need no signe, good Wine no bush,
Good verse of praisers, need not passse a rush.”

Unhandsome=Unbecoming
Insinuate=To ingratiate one’s self (in a bad sense); to intermeddle
Case=Situation, plight, legal dilemma or actionable state
Furnished=Dressed
Liked=Pleased
Defied=Rejected
Compleat:
Unhandsome=Niet fraai
Insinuate=Inboezemen, inflyen, indringe, inschuyven
Case=Zaak, geval
Furnished=Verzorgd, voorzien, gestoffeerd

Topics: reputation, skill/talent, value, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Cloten
CONTEXT:
CLOTEN
Leonatus? A banished rascal; and he’s another, whatsoever he be. Who told you of this stranger?
One of your Lordship’s pages.
CLOTEN
Is it fit I went to look upon him? Is there no derogation in ’t?
SECOND LORD
You cannot derogate, my lord.
CLOTEN
Not easily, I think.
SECOND LORD
You are a fool granted; therefore your issues, being foolish, do not derogate.

DUTCH:
Zou het staan, als ik eens naar hem toeging om een kijkjen van hem te nemen? Zou dat niet beneden mijn waardigheid wezen?

Derogation=Disparagement.
Derogate=Do anything derogatory to rank, lower opinion
Issues=What proceeds from you, your acts (with a play on issues to mean offspring)

Compleat:
Derogate=Onttrekken, verkorten, verminderen, benadeelen
To derogate from one’s credit=Iemands achting verkorten
To derogate from one’s self=Zich zelfs benadeelen

Topics: reputation, status, order/society

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Hotspur
CONTEXT:
You strain too far.
I rather of his absence make this use:
It lends a luster and more great opinion,
A larger dare, to our great enterprise
Than if the Earl were here, for men must think
If we without his help can make a head
To push against a kingdom, with his help
We shall o’erturn it topsy-turvy down.
Yet all goes well, yet all our joints are whole.

DUTCH:
Gij gaat te ver;
Ik zie voor ons eer voordeel in zijn afzijn:
‘t Leent hoog’ren luister en een groot’ren roem
En meerdre koenheid aan ons groote werk,
Dan zoo de graaf hier was.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Strain=Effort of thought (as if by violent stretching of the mind); to extend, to stretch (you go too far in your apprehensions).
Lustre=Brightness, splendour
Dare=Boldness

Topics: plans/intentions, ambition, hope/optimism, reputation, perception

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Thersites
CONTEXT:
THERSITES
Why, he stalks up and down like a peacock,—a stride
and a stand: ruminates like an hostess that hath no
arithmetic but her brain to set down her reckoning:
bites his lip with a politic regard, as who should
say ‘There were wit in this head, an ‘twould out;’
and so there is, but it lies as coldly in him as fire
in a flint, which will not show without knocking.
The man’s undone forever; for if Hector break not his
neck i’ the combat, he’ll break ‘t himself in
vain-glory. He knows not me: I said ‘Good morrow,
Ajax;’ and he replies ‘Thanks, Agamemnon.’ What think
you of this man that takes me for the general? He’s
grown a very land-fish, language-less, a monster.
A plague of opinion! a man may wear it on both
sides, like a leather jerkin.

DUTCH:
Het huist zoo koud in hem als vuur in een
keisteen en komt alleen door slaan voor den dag

MORE:
Proverb: In the coldest flint there is hot fire

Ruminate=To muse, to meditate, to ponder
Arithmetic=Table or other aid for multiplication
Set down=Determine
Reckoning=Bill
Politic=Judicious
Undone=Ruined
Vain-glory=Vanity
Opinion=Self-regard
Compleat:
To ruminate upon (to consider of) a thing=Eene zaak overweegen
Arithmetick=Rekenkonst
Reckoning=Rekenen
Politick (or cunning)=Slim, schrander, doorsleepen
Undone=Ontdaan, losgemaakt
Vain-glory=Ydele glorie
Opinion=Goeddunken, meening, gevoelen, waan

Topics: proverbs and idioms, pride, vanity, intellect, reputation

PLAY: Titus Andronicus
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Bassianus
CONTEXT:
BASSIANUS
My lord, what I have done, as best I may,
Answer I must and shall do with my life.
Only thus much I give your grace to know:
By all the duties that I owe to Rome,
This noble gentleman, Lord Titus here,
Is in opinion and in honour wronged;
That in the rescue of Lavinia
With his own hand did slay his youngest son,
In zeal to you and highly moved to wrath
To be controlled in that he frankly gave:
Receive him, then, to favour, Saturnine,
That hath expressed himself in all his deeds
A father and a friend to thee and Rome.
TITUS ANDRONICUS
Prince Bassianus, leave to plead my deeds:
‘Tis thou and those that have dishonoured me.
Rome and the righteous heavens be my judge,
How I have loved and honoured Saturnine!

DUTCH:
Prins Bassianus, laat mijn daden rusten;
Gij zijt het en die daar, die mij onteerd hebt.

MORE:
Give to know=To tell
Opinion=Reputation
Controlled=Hindered, opposed
Frankly=Freely
Receive=Welcome
Leave=Cease
Compleat:
Opinon=Goeddunken, meening, gevoelen, waan
To controll=Tegenspreeken
Frankly=Vryelyk, mildelyk, openhartig
Receive=Ontvangen, aanneemen
To leave=Laaten, staan laate, naalaaten, verlaaten

Topics: reputation, honour, loyalty

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Boy
CONTEXT:
For indeed three such antics do not amount to a man: for Bardolph, he is white-livered
and red-faced, by the means whereof he faces it out but fights not; for Pistol, he hath a killing tongue and a quiet sword, by the means whereof he breaks words and keeps whole weapons; for Nym, he hath heard that men of few words are the best men, and therefore he scorns to say his prayers, lest he should be thought a coward, but his few bad words are matched with as few good deeds, for he never broke any man’s head but his own, and that was against a post when he was drunk.

DUTCH:
Nym, die heeft wel eens gehoord, dat menschen van weinig woorden de besten zijn, en daarom verdraait hij het, ooit te bidden, opdat men hem niet voor een lafaard zou houden, maar naast zijn weinige en slechte woorden staan even weinige goede daden.

MORE:

Antic=Buffoon, practising odd gesticulations
White-livered=Cowardly (White livers used to signify cowardice. Hence lily-livered (Macbeth, 5.3) and milk-livered (King Lear, 4.2), both compounds coined by Shakespeare)
Face it out=To get through one’s business by effrontery
Scorn=To disdain, to refuse or lay aside with contempt
Words=Also in the sense of promises

Compleat:
To scorn=Verachten, verfooijen
White-livered=Een die er altijd bleek uitziet; een bleek-neus, kwaadaardig, nydig
To face out=Iemand iets in ‘t gezigt staande houden

Topics: reputation, honour, language, promise

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Mistress Quickly
CONTEXT:
So I told him, my lord; and I said I heard your grace say so: and, my lord, he speaks most vilely of you, like a foul-mouthed man as he is; and said he would cudgel you.

DUTCH:
My lord, he speaks most vilely of you, like a foul-mouthed man as he is

MORE:
Defined as using obscene, abusive, opporobrious language. First used by Shakespeare, though there are previous recordings of foul-spoken and foul-tongued.
Schmidt:
Vilely (O. Edd. vildly or vildely; vilely only in Henry IV)=Meanly, basely, shamefully
Foul-mouthed=Speaking ill of others, given to calumny and detraction
Compleat:
Vilely=Op een verachtelyke wyze
Foul-mouthed=Vuil van mond, die een vuilen bek heeft in ‘t spreeken.

Topics: language, insult, reputation

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
Unfeeling fools can with such wrongs dispense.
I know his eye doth homage otherwhere,
Or else what lets it but he would be here?
Sister, you know he promised me a chain.
Would that alone o’ love he would detain,
So he would keep fair quarter with his bed.
I see the jewel best enamelèd
Will lose his beauty. Yet the gold bides still
That others touch, and often touching will
Wear gold; yet no man that hath a name
By falsehood and corruption doth it shame.
Since that my beauty cannot please his eye,
I’ll weep what’s left away, and weeping die.
LUCIANA
How many fond fools serve mad jealousy!

DUTCH:
Ik zie het nu, de fijnst geslepen steen
Verliest zijn glans, en blijve goud ook goud,
Hoe vaak betast, zijn vol gewicht behoudt.
Het niet aldoor; en op den schoonsten naam
Werpt valschheid en verleiding vaak een blaam.

MORE:
The confusion about the delivery of a gold chain is a reference to a cause célèbre case in 1591 and 1592, Underwood v Manwood. This would have been appreciated by the audience in Gray’s Inn in 1594.Proverb: Iron (Gold) with often handling is worn to nothing

To let=To prevent (what lets it but=what else would prevent)
Keep fair quarter= Keep good order or keeping proper place, quarter being a military term for lodging

Compleat:
To let=Beletten, verhinderen
No quarter given=Daar was geen lyfsgenade; daar wierdt geen kwartier gegeven

Topics: reputation, honesty, corruption, integrity, law/legal

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
O God, Horatio, what a wounded name,
Things standing thus unknown, shall live behind me! If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart
Absent thee from felicity a while,
And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain
To tell my story.

DUTCH:
Horatio, ach, wat een gewonde naam, Wat ongekende dingen laat ik achter! /
Mijn God, Horatio, wat een wonde naam zal ik achterlaten, als dit niet ontvouwd wordt! /
O God, Horatio, wat geschonden naam, Als alles onbekend blijft, last ik achter!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Wound (in a moral sense) , e.g. “thou wrongest his honour, woundest his princely name”.
Name=renown, honour

Burgersdijk notes:
Zoo wijk nog niet naar zaal’ger oord, maar lijd Een poos nog ‘s werelds smart.
In ‘t Engelsch
Absent thee from felicity awhile,
And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain.
Zoo, in ‘s werelds booze lucht met moeite ademhalend, heeft Hamlet moeten leven. W}j vinden in deze weinige woorden tot Horatio weder uitgedrukt, wat Hamlet in zijne eerste alleenspraak, nog voor de geest hem verschenen was, van de wereld en al haar woeling gezegd heeft. Dit gevoel, dat de wereld boos is en de macht harer boosheid te groot, dan dat hij in staat is den stroom van het kwade te keeren, dit gevoel, zoo roerend geuit in die andere alleenspraak, waarin hij ‘s werelds ellenden en zijne machteloosheid om ze te bekampen, schildert, dit is het, wat Hamlet vervult, de oorzaak is zijner droefgeestigheid en bitterheid, hem de eenvoudige wraakoefening, die toch de boosheid der wereld niet verkeeren zou, onmogelijk maakt, en eerst in het laatste oogenblik de straf aan den gekroonden booswicht laat voltrekken. Dit is het, wat Hamlet tot eene zoo hoogst tragische figuur maakt en dit stuk van den dichter tot eene schepping, in welker geheimenissen de denkende mensch steeds dieper en dieper tracht door te dringen.

Topics: reputation, honour, legacy

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
(…) Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept.
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause.
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me.
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

DUTCH:
Wie ziet hierin een blijk van Caesar’s heerschzucht?
Als de armoe leed en kreet, dan weende Caesar;
De heerschzucht pleegt van harder stof te zijn;
Maar Brutus zegt, dat hij vol heerschzucht was,
En Brutus is een achtenswaardig man.

MORE:
REFERENCED IN SCOTTISH LAW: 2019 GWD 34-541, [2019] CSIH 52, 2019 SLT 1269, 2020 SCLR 165, [2019] ScotCS CSIH_52
“CITED IN SCOTTISH LAW: THOMAS O’LEARY v. HER MAJESTY’S ADVOCATE [2014] ScotHC HCJAC_45 (23 May 2014)/[2014] HCJAC 45, 2014 SLT 711, 2014 SCCR 421
Ironic/sarcastic to the point where the meaning has been inverted by the end of the speech and turns public against Brutus and co-conspirators.
CITED IN US LAW: Re. the definition of “”honourable””: State v Martin, 651 S.W.2d 645, 656 (Mo. Ct. App. 1983)”

Topics: cited in law, honour, reputation, legacy, ambition

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 3.4
SPEAKER: Gertrude
CONTEXT:
GERTRUDE
O, speak to me no more!
These words like daggers enter in my ears.
No more, sweet Hamlet.
HAMLET
A murderer and a villain,
A slave that is not twentieth part the tithe
Of your precedent lord, a vice of kings,
A cutpurse of the empire and the rule,
That from a shelf the precious diadem stole,
And put it in his pocket—
GERTRUDE
No more!
HAMLET
A king of shreds and patches

DUTCH:
O, zeg niets meer. Die woorden slaan als dolken in mijn oren / Uw woord dringt als een dolksteek in mijn oor. / O, spreek niet meer tot mij! Als dolken gaan je woorden in mijn ooren.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Cutpurse=thief
Tithe=Levy of a tenth part
A king of shreds and patches=Nowadays also a “thing of shreds and patches”

Topics: reputation, honour

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Dromio of Ephesus
CONTEXT:
DROMIO OF EPHESUS
O villain, thou hast stolen both mine office and my name!
The one ne’er got me credit, the other mickle blame.
If thou hadst been Dromio today in my place,
Thou wouldst have changed thy face for a name,
Or thy name for an ass.

DUTCH:
Staalt gij mijn dienst en naam, gij zult het, o schurk! u beklagen;
De een bracht mij nooit crediet en de ander dikwijls slagen.
Hadt gij den heelen dag maar voor Dromio gespeeld,
Dan waren u mijne namen en klappen toebedeeld.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Office=Job, position
Name=Reputation
Mickle=much, great

Compleat:
Mickle=Veel, een woord dat in ‘t Noorden van Engeland zeer gemeen is
Many a little makes a mickle=Veele kleintjes maaken een groot

Topics: reputation, authority, service

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Achilles
CONTEXT:
ACHILLES
Shall Ajax fight with Hector?
PATROCLUS
Ay, and perhaps receive much honour by him.
ACHILLES
I see my reputation is at stake
My fame is shrewdly gored.
PATROCLUS
O, then, beware;
Those wounds heal ill that men do give themselves:
Omission to do what is necessary
Seals a commission to a blank of danger;
And danger, like an ague, subtly taints
Even then when we sit idly in the sun.
ACHILLES
Go call Thersites hither, sweet Patroclus:
I’ll send the fool to Ajax and desire him
To invite the Trojan lords after the combat
To see us here unarmed: I have a woman’s longing,
An appetite that I am sick withal,
To see great Hector in his weeds of peace,
To talk with him and to behold his visage,
Even to my full of view.

DUTCH:
Wie onmacht toont, niet handelt als dit moet,
Geeft aan ‘t gevaar een volmacht om te schaden;

MORE:
Shrewdly=Severely
Gored=Wounded, harmed
Commission=Warrant
Blank=Blank charter
Ague=Fever
Taint=Corrupt
Weeds=Garments
Full of view=To the satisfaction of my eyes
Compleat:
Shrewdly (very much)=Sterk
Gored=Doorsteeken, doorstooten
A blank=Een Papier in blank
Ague=Koorts die met koude komt, een verpoozende koorts
To attaint=Overtuigen van misdaad, schuldig verklaaren, betichten; bevlekken, bederf aanzetten
Weeds (habit or garment)=Kleederen, gewaad

Topics: conflict, rivalry, reputation, caution

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
For I dare so far free him—made him fear’d,
So hated, and so banish’d: but he has a merit,
To choke it in the utterance. So our virtues
Lie in the interpretation of the time:
And power, unto itself most commendable,
Hath not a tomb so evident as a chair
To extol what it hath done.
One fire drives out one fire; one nail, one nail;
Rights by rights falter, strengths by strengths do fail.
Come, let’s away. When, Caius, Rome is thine,
Thou art poor’st of all; then shortly art thou mine.

DUTCH:
Voor nagels wijken nagels, gloed voor gloed;
Door rechten struik’len rechten, moed breekt moed.

MORE:
Proverb: Fire drives out fire (1592)
Proverb: One fire (or one nail or one poison) drives out another.

In the interpretation of the time=Evaluation according to prevailing standards
Unto itself most commendable=Having a very high opinion of itself

Schmidt:
Extol=Praise, magnify
Chair=A seat of public authority

Compleat:
Chair of state=Zetel
Extoll=Verheffen, pryzen, looven
To extol one, raise him up to the sky=Iemand tot den Hemel toe verheffen
Highly commendable=Ten hoogste pryselyk

Topics: proverbs and idioms, still in use, merit, virtue, reputation, ruin, remedy

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Norfolk
CONTEXT:
NORFOLK
As I belong to worship, and affect
In honour honesty, the tract of every thing
Would by a good discourser lose some life
Which action’s self was tongue to. All was royal;
To the disposing of it naught rebelled.
Order gave each thing view; the office did
Distinctly his full function.
BUCKINGHAM
Who did guide,
I mean who set the body and the limbs
Of this great sport together, as you guess?
NORFOLK
One, certes, that promises no element
In such a business.

DUTCH:
Door de orde
Kwam ieder ding schoon uit; die ‘t feest bestuurde,
Vervulde blijkbaar stipt zijn plicht.

MORE:
Affect=Value, seek to practise
Tract=Course, track
Discourser=Storyteller
Tongue to=Conveyed (by the action)
Disposing=Management, organisation
Certes=Certainly
Promises no element=One wouldn’t expect to have a part
Gave each thing view=Made everything visible
Office=Officials
Compleat:
Affect=Behartigen, trachtten, raaken, ontroeren
Tract=Een verhandeling
To discourse=Reedenvoeren, redeneeren, gesprek houden, spreeken
Dispose=Beschikken, schikken

Burgersdijk notes:
Echt koninklijk was alles, enz. In de folio-uitgave worden deze woorden tot aan: van ‘t groote feest bij een, aan Buckingham toegekend; Norfolk begint dan met de woorden: Naar gij vermoedt, of, zooals gij gist, éen man enz. De wijziging is van Theobald.

Topics: reputation, honesty, authority

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Achilles
CONTEXT:
ACHILLES
What, am I poor of late?
‘Tis certain, greatness, once fall’n out with fortune,
Must fall out with men too: what the declined is
He shall as soon read in the eyes of others
As feel in his own fall; for men, like butterflies,
Show not their mealy wings but to the summer,
And not a man, for being simply man,
Hath any honour, but honour for those honours
That are without him, as place, riches, favour,
Prizes of accident as oft as merit:
Which when they fall, as being slippery standers,
The love that leaned on them as slippery too,
Do one pluck down another and together
Die in the fall. But ’tis not so with me:
Fortune and I are friends: I do enjoy
At ample point all that I did possess,
Save these men’s looks; who do, methinks, find out
Something not worth in me such rich beholding
As they have often given. Here is Ulysses;
I’ll interrupt his reading.
How now Ulysses!

DUTCH:
Eer valt hem slechts ten deel voor eenige eer,
Die buiten hem is: rijkdom, hofgunst, rang, —
Des toevals gaaf zoo vaak als loon van kloekheid; —
En vallen deze, zij die glibb’rig staan,
Waartegen vriendschap even glibb’rig leunt,
Dan sleept de een de’ ander mede, en alles valt
En sterft te zaâm.

MORE:
Mealy=Powdery
Without=Outside
Accident=By chance
Slippery=Not on a firm footing
Beholding=Indebtedness, obligation
Compleat:
Mealy=Meelig
Without=Buyten
Accident=Een toeval, quaal, aankleefsel
Slippery=Slibberig, glipperig, glad
Beholding, beholden=Gehouden, verplicht, verschuldigt

Topics: reputation, ruin, friendship, loyalty

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my
reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation!
IAGO
As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some
bodily wound. There is more sense in that than in
reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false
imposition, oft got without merit and lost without
deserving. You have lost no reputation at all unless you
repute yourself such a loser. What, man, there are ways
to recover the general again. You are but now cast in
his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice,
even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to
affright an imperious lion. Sue to him again and he’s
yours.

DUTCH:
Een goede naam is een ijdele en hoogst bedriegelijke
begoocheling, vaak zonder verdienste verkregen
en onverdiend verloren; gij hebt in het geheel geen goeden
naam verloren, tenzij gij uzelven den naam bezorgt,
dat gij dit verlies hebt geleden

MORE:
Proverb: A man is weal or woe as he thinks himself so

Cast=Dismissed
Mood=Anger
In policy=Public demonstration
Speak parrot=Nonsense
Fustian=Bombastic, high-sounding nonsense
Imposition=Cheat, imposture
Repute (yourself)=To think, to account, to hold
Compleat:
To cast off=Afwerpen, verwerpen, achterlaaten
To cast his adversary at the bar=Zyn party in rechte verwinnen
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben
Mood=Luym, aardt, wyze
Fustian (or bombast)-Gezwets, snorkery
Fustian language=Grootspreeking, opsnyery
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting, bedrog
Repute=Achten

Topics: reputation, merit, honesty, value, integrity, wellbeing

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Cassio
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my
reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation!
IAGO
As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some
bodily wound. There is more sense in that than in
reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false
imposition, oft got without merit and lost without
deserving. You have lost no reputation at all unless you
repute yourself such a loser. What, man, there are ways
to recover the general again. You are but now cast in
his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice,
even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to
affright an imperious lion. Sue to him again and he’s
yours.

DUTCH:
Mijn goede naam, mijn goede naam, niijn goede naam!
0 ik heb mijn goeden naam verloren! Ik heb mijn onsterflijk
deel verloren, en wat mij rest is dierlijk! — Mijn
goeden naam, Jago, mijn goeden naam!

MORE:
Proverb: A man is weal or woe as he thinks himself so

Cast=Dismissed
Mood=Anger
In policy=Public demonstration
Speak parrot=Nonsense
Fustian=Bombastic, high-sounding nonsense
Imposition=Cheat, imposture
Repute (yourself)=To think, to account, to hold
Compleat:
To cast off=Afwerpen, verwerpen, achterlaaten
To cast his adversary at the bar=Zyn party in rechte verwinnen
To be cast=’t Recht verlooren hebben
Mood=Luym, aardt, wyze
Fustian (or bombast)-Gezwets, snorkery
Fustian language=Grootspreeking, opsnyery
Imposition=Oplegging, opdringing, belasting, bedrog
Repute=Achten

Topics: reputation, merit, honesty, value, integrity, wellbeing, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Balthazar
CONTEXT:
And doubt not, sir, but she will well excuse
Why at this time the doors are made against you.
Be ruled by me; depart in patience,
And let us to the Tiger all to dinner,
And about evening come yourself alone
To know the reason of this strange restraint.
If by strong hand you offer to break in
Now in the stirring passage of the day,
A vulgar comment will be made of it;
And that supposèd by the common rout
Against your yet ungallèd estimation
That may with foul intrusion enter in
And dwell upon your grave when you are dead;
For slander lives upon succession,
Forever housèd where it gets possession.

DUTCH:
Want laster, eens gezaaid, is schielijk groot,
En blijft aan ‘t groeien, waar zij wortel schoot.

MORE:
Proverb: Envy never dies

Doors made against you=Doors closed to you
Possession had a strong meaning, akin to ‘infect’
Ungallèd=unsullied, untarnished
Estimation=Reputation
Vulgar=Public
Foul=Forced

Compleat:
Vulgar= (common) Gemeen
To gall (vex)=Tergen, verbitteren

Topics: proverbs and idioms, envy, patience, caution, reputation

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Troilus
CONTEXT:
TROILUS
Why, there you touched the life of our design:
Were it not glory that we more affected
Than the performance of our heaving spleens,
I would not wish a drop of Trojan blood
Spent more in her defence. But, worthy Hector,
She is a theme of honour and renown,
A spur to valiant and magnanimous deeds,
Whose present courage may beat down our foes,
And fame in time to come canonize us;
For, I presume, brave Hector would not lose
So rich advantage of a promised glory
As smiles upon the forehead of this action
For the wide world’s revenue.

DUTCH:
Want, wis, de dapp’re Hector geeft een oogst,
Zoo rijk, niet prijs van toegezegde glorie,
Als op het voorhoofd dezes strijds hem wenkt,
Voor alle wereldsch goud.

MORE:
Life=Essence, substance
Design=A work in hand, enterprise, cause
Affected=Desired
Performance=Outward display
Heaving spleens=Spite and resentment
Magnanimous=Ambitous, courageous
Canonize=Glorify
Forehead=(Fig.) Countenance
Compleat:
Design=Opzet, voorneemen, oogmerk, aanslag, toeleg, ontwerp
Affect=Liefde toedragen, ter harte gaan, beminnen
Performance=Volbrenging, betrachting
Magnanimous=Grootmoedig, groothartig, kloekmoedig
To canonise=Heiligen, inwyen
Fore-head=Aangezigt

Topics: evidence, achievement, reputation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
IAGO
And what’s he then that says I play the villain?
When this advice is free I give and honest,
Probal to thinking and indeed the course
To win the Moor again? For ’tis most easy
Th’ inclining Desdemona to subdue
In any honest suit. She’s framed as fruitful
As the free elements. And then for her
To win the Moor, were to renounce his baptism,
All seals and symbols of redeemèd sin,
His soul is so enfettered to her love,
That she may make, unmake, do what she list,
Even as her appetite shall play the god
With his weak function. How am I then a villain
To counsel Cassio to this parallel course,
Directly to his good? Divinity of hell!
When devils will the blackest sins put on
They do suggest at first with heavenly shows
As I do now. For whiles this honest fool
Plies Desdemona to repair his fortune
And she for him pleads strongly to the Moor,
I’ll pour this pestilence into his ear:
That she repeals him for her body’s lust.
And by how much she strives to do him good
She shall undo her credit with the Moor.
So will I turn her virtue into pitch
And out of her own goodness make the net
That shall enmesh them all.

DUTCH:
Zoo wil ik hare deugd in pik verand’ren,
En uit haar eigen goedheid weef ik ‘t net,
Dat allen zal omstrikken.

MORE:
Proverb: The devil can transform himself into an angel of light.

Put on=Incite
Repeal=Recall from exile
Credit=A good opinion entertained of a p. and influence derived from it: Reputation
Pitch=1) Something odious; 2) blackness; 3) with power to ensnare
Compleat:
Pitch=Pik
Credit=Geloof, achting, aanzien, goede naam
Repeal=Herroepen, afschaffen, weer intrekken

Topics: deceit, appearance, manipulation, , reputation, virtue, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Ulysses
CONTEXT:
ULYSSES
Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back,
Wherein he puts alms for oblivion,
A great-sized monster of ingratitudes:
Those scraps are good deeds past; which are devoured
As fast as they are made, forgot as soon
As done: perseverance, dear my lord,
Keeps honour bright: to have done is to hang
Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail
In monumental mockery. Take the instant way;
For honour travels in a strait so narrow,
Where one but goes abreast: keep then the path;
For emulation hath a thousand sons
That one by one pursue: if you give way,
Or hedge aside from the direct forthright,
Like to an entered tide, they all rush by
And leave you hindmost;
Or like a gallant horse fall’n in first rank,
Lie there for pavement to the abject rear,
O’er-run and trampled on: then what they do in present,
Though less than yours in past, must o’ertop yours;
For time is like a fashionable host
That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand,
And with his arms outstretched, as he would fly,
Grasps in the comer: welcome ever smiles,
And farewell goes out sighing. O, let not virtue seek
Remuneration for the thing it was; (…)

DUTCH:
Treed immer voort, terstond,
Want de eere wandelt op een pad, welks smalte
Voor  en slechts ruimte heeft.

MORE:
Time was originally personified as a money collector for Forgetfulness, based on an old saying

Wallet=Satchel, beggar’s bag
Alms=Donations
Mail=Armour
One but goes abreast=Single file
Instant=Direct
Strait=Narrow passage
Forthright=Straight path
Rank=Row
Abject=Worthless
Calumniating=Slandering
Touch of nature=Natural trait
Gawds=Trivia
Laud=Praise
Overtop=Surpass
Emulous=Envying, rivalry
Faction=Taking sides
Compleat:
Wallet=Knapzak
Alms=Een aalmoes
Mail=Een maalie-wambes, maalijen-kolder
Abreast=Naast malkander
Instant=Aanhoudende, dringende
Strait=Eng, naauw, bekrompen, strikt
Rank=Rang, waardigheid
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
To calumniate=Lasteren, schandvlekken, eerrooven
Gawd=Wisje-wasjes, beuzelingen
To laud=Looven, pryzen
Over-top=Te boven gaan, overschryden
Emulous=Naayverig, nydig
Faction=Samenrotting, saamenspanning, oproerige party, rot, aanhang, partyschap, verdeeldheid

Burgersdijk notes
Ja, Mars tot strijden dreef. Hiervan maakt Homerus gewag.

Topics: honesty, value, integrity, respect, reputation

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Ulysses
CONTEXT:
ULYSSES
I do not strain at the position,—
It is familiar,—but at the author’s drift;
Who, in his circumstance, expressly proves
That no man is the lord of any thing,
Though in and of him there be much consisting,
Till he communicate his parts to others:
Nor doth he of himself know them for aught
Till he behold them formed in the applause
Where they’re extended; who, like an arch, reverberates
The voice again, or, like a gate of steel
Fronting the sun, receives and renders back
His figure and his heat. I was much wrapt in this;
And apprehended here immediately
The unknown Ajax.
Heavens, what a man is there! a very horse,
That has he knows not what. Nature, what things there are
Most abject in regard and dear in use!
What things again most dear in the esteem
And poor in worth! Now shall we see to-morrow—
An act that very chance doth throw upon him—
Ajax renowned. O heavens, what some men do,
While some men leave to do!
How some men creep in skittish fortune’s hall,
Whiles others play the idiots in her eyes!
How one man eats into another’s pride,
While pride is fasting in his wantonness!
To see these Grecian lords!— why, even already
They clap the lubber Ajax on the shoulder,
As if his foot were on brave Hector’s breast
And great Troy shrieking.

DUTCH:
Die, dit ontwikk’lend, hier uitdrukk’lijk leert,
Dat niemand heer en meester is van iets, —
Hoe veel hij ook bezitte en in zich hebbe, —
Eer hij zijn gaven and’ren mededeelt;

MORE:
Strain at=Struggle to accept
Position=Argument
Drift=Meaning, gist
Circumstance=Detail of an argument
Expressly=In full, explicitly
In and of=He and his actions
Consisting=Quality, substance
Parts=Qualities
Formed in=Reflected in
Arch=Vault
Figure=Appearance
Abject in regard=Despised
Dear in use=Useful
Dear in the esteem=Highly regarded
Poor in worth=Of little value
Lubber=Lout
Shrinking=Weakening
Compleat:
Strain hard=Alle zyne krachten inspannen; lustig zyn best doen
Position=Legging, stelling
Drift=Oogmerk, opzet, vaart
Circumstance=Omstandigheyd
Circumstanced=Met omstandigheden belegd, onder omstandigheden begreepen
Expressely or Expresly=Duidelyk; uitdrukkelyk
Consistence=Bestaanlykheid; saamenbestaanlykheid
Parts=Deelen, hoedaanigheden, begaafdheden
Form=Wyze, gedaante
Arch=Een gewelf, boog
Figure (or representation)=Afbeelding
Figure (or appearance)=Gedaante, aanzien
Abject=Veracht, gering, snood, lafhartig, verworpen
Dear=Waard, lief, dierbaar, duur
Lubber=Een sul, slokker, zwabber, een lubbert

Topics: communication, persuasion, reputation, value, appearance, merit

PLAY: Richard III
ACT/SCENE: 3.7
SPEAKER: Buckingham
CONTEXT:
RICHARD
How now, how now? What say the citizens?
BUCKINGHAM
Now, by the holy mother of our Lord,
The citizens are mum, say not a word.
RICHARD
Touched you the bastardy of Edward’s children?
BUCKINGHAM
I did, with his contract with Lady Lucy
And his contract by deputy in France;
Th’ unsatiate greediness of his desire
And his enforcement of the city wives;
His tyranny for trifles; his own bastardy,
As being got, your father then in France,
His resemblance being not like the duke.
Withal, I did infer your lineaments,
Being the right idea of your father,
Both in your form and nobleness of mind;
Laid open all your victories in Scotland,
Your discipline in war, wisdom in peace,
Your bounty, virtue, fair humility;
Indeed, left nothing fitting for your purpose
Untouched or slightly handled in discourse.
And when mine oratory grew toward end,
I bid them that did love their country’s good
Cry “God save Richard, England’s royal king!”

DUTCH:
Nu, bij de heil’ge moeder onzes Heeren,
De burgerij is stom, zij zegt geen woord.

MORE:
Enforcement=Violation
Trifles=Minor offences
Lineaments=Features
Resemblance=Appearance
Right idea=Spitting image
Slightly handled=Touched on briefly
Compleat:
To enforce=Dwingen, opdwingen
Trifle=Beuzeling, kleynigheyd
Lineament=Een trek
To bear resemblance=Gelyken
To handle=Handelen, verhandelen, behandelen

Topics: reputation, rivalry

PLAY: Julius Caesar
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antony
CONTEXT:
ANTONY
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interrèd with their bones.
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men—
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. (….)

DUTCH:
Het kwaad, dat menschen doen, leeft na hen voort;
Het goed wordt vaak met hun gebeent’ begraven ;
Zoo moge ‘t zijn met Caesar.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Kiser v. Huge, 517 F.2d 12.37, 1262, n. l (D.C.Cir. 1974);
Maritote v. Desilu Productions, Inc., 345 F.2d 418, 420 (7th Cir. 1965)(administratrix of Estate of Al Capone);
MacDonald v. Bolton, 51 Cal.3d 262, 281, 794 P.2d 911, 924 (1990);
Turner v. Consumers Power Company, 376 Mich. 188, 192, 136 N.W.2d l, 3 (1965);
Taylor v. Auditor Genera), 360 Mich. 146, 103 N.W.2d 769, 774 (1960).
US District Court in Bostom Marathon Bomber case

Topics: cited in law, honour, reputation, legacy, ambition

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
No, fair princess. He is the general challenger. I come
but in as others do, to try with him the strength of my
youth.
CELIA
Young gentleman, your spirits are too bold for your
years. You have seen cruel proof of this man’s strength.
If you saw yourself with your eyes or knew yourself
with your judgment, the fear of your adventure would
counsel you to a more equal enterprise. We pray you for
your own sake to embrace your own safety and give over
this attempt.
ROSALIND
Do, young sir. Your reputation shall not therefore be
misprized. We will make it our suit to the duke that the
wrestling might not go forward.
ORLANDO
I beseech you, punish me not with your hard thoughts,
wherein I confess me much guilty to deny so fair and
excellent ladies anything. But let your fair eyes and
gentle wishes go with me to my trial, wherein, if I be
foiled, there is but one shamed that was never gracious;
if killed, but one dead that was willing to be so. I
shall do my friends no wrong, for I have none to lament
me; the world no injury, for in it I have nothing. Only
in the world I fill up a place which may be better
supplied when I have made it empty.

DUTCH:
Kondt gij uzelven met uw eigen oordeel zien, of met uw eigen oordeel goed toetsen, dan zou de beduchtheid voor dit waagstuk u een meer gelijken wedstrijd aanraden.

MORE:
Try=Test
Fear=Formidable nature
Counsel you to=Sway you towards
Equal=Equal to you, suitable
Embrace=Cherish
Misprize=(misprise) Undervalue, despise, slight
Compleat:
To try=Beproeven
Fear=Vreeze, bevreesdheid, vervaerdheid
Counsel=Raad, onderrechting
Equal=Wedergade
His strength equalled his courage=Zyne kracht kwam met zynen moet overeen
Embrace=(to receive or embrace an opinion): Een gevoelen omhelzen
Misprision=Verwaarloozing, verzuyming, verachteloozing

Topics: advice, age/experience, courage, caution, reputation

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
It grieves many:
The gentleman is learn’d, and a most rare speaker;
To nature none more bound; his training such,
That he may furnish and instruct great teachers,
And never seek for aid out of himself. Yet see,
When these so noble benefits shall prove
Not well disposed, the mind growing once corrupt,
They turn to vicious forms, ten times more ugly
Than ever they were fair. This man so complete,
Who was enroll’d ‘mongst wonders, and when we,
Almost with ravish’d listening, could not find
His hour of speech a minute; he, my lady,
Hath into monstrous habits put the graces
That once were his, and is become as black
As if besmear’d in hell. Sit by us; you shall hear—
This was his gentleman in trust—of him
Things to strike honour sad. Bid him recount
The fore-recited practices; whereof
We cannot feel too little, hear too much.

DUTCH:
Velen smart het;
Hij is geleerd en een voortreff lijk reed’naar,
Groot gunst’ling van natuur, zoo opgevoed,
Dat hij zelfs groote leeraars op kon leiden
Uit zich, met niemands hulp

MORE:
Rare=Extraordinary, excellent
Benefits=Qualities
Disposed=Applied
Enrolled=Recorded
Habits=Behaviour
Grace=Good qualities
Practice=Artifice, stratagem, insidious device
Compleat:
Dispose=Beschikken, schikken
Enroll=In ‘t Stads boek aanteykenen
Habit=Heblykheyd, gewoonte, gesteltenis
Grace=Genade, gunst, fraajigheid
Practice=(underhand dealing, intrigue, plot) Praktyk, bedekten handel, list

Topics: intellect, learning/education, value, reputation

PLAY: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Duke
CONTEXT:
PROTEUS
A little time, my lord, will kill that grief.
DUKE
So I believe; but Turio thinks not so.
Proteus, the good conceit I hold of thee—
For thou hast shown some sign of good desert—
Makes me the better to confer with thee.
PROTEUS
Longer than I prove loyal to your grace
Let me not live to look upon your grace.

DUTCH:
Dit wacht ik ook, maar Thurio denkt van neen.
Proteus, ik heb een goeden dunk van u;
En dit, — gij gaaft mij proeven van uw ijver, —
Is oorzaak dat ik verder u vertrouw.

MORE:
Conceit=Impression
Desert=Deserving
Compleat:
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening
Desert (from to deserve)=Verdienste, verdiende loon

Topics: time, remedy, loyallty, reputation

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.6
SPEAKER: Third Conspirator
CONTEXT:
THIRD CONSPIRATOR
The people will remain uncertain whilst
’Twixt you there’s difference; but the fall of either
Makes the survivor heir of all.
AUFIDIUS
I know it;
And my pretext to strike at him admits
A good construction. I raised him, and I pawn’d
Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten’d,
He water’d his new plants with dews of flattery,
Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,
He bow’d his nature, never known before
But to be rough, unswayable and free.

DUTCH:
Steeds wankel blijft het volk, zoolang er strijd
Is tusschen u en hem, maar de ondergang
Van de’ een doet de’ ander alles erven.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Construction=Interpretation
A good construction=Well-founded
Pawn=Pledge
To bow=To crush, to strain

Compleat:
To bow=Buigen, neigen, bukken
Construction=Uitlegging; woordenschikking

Topics: reputation, uncertainty, conflict, rivalry

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Thomas Mowbray
CONTEXT:
THOMAS MOWBRAY
Myself I throw, dread sovereign, at thy foot.
My life thou shalt command, but not my shame:
The one my duty owes; but my fair name,
Despite of death that lives upon my grave,
To dark dishonour’s use thou shalt not have.
I am disgraced, impeach’d and baffled here,
Pierced to the soul with slander’s venom’d spear,
The which no balm can cure but his heart-blood
Which breathed this poison.
KING RICHARD II
Rage must be withstood:
Give me his gage: lions make leopards tame.
THOMAS MOWBRAY
Yea, but not change his spots: take but my shame.
And I resign my gage. My dear dear lord,
The purest treasure mortal times afford
Is spotless reputation: that away,
Men are but gilded loam or painted clay.
A jewel in a ten-times-barr’d-up chest
Is a bold spirit in a loyal breast.

DUTCH:
De vlekken blijven. ‘k Gaav’ dit pand u, nam
Uw macht mij eerst den smaad af. Hoor mij, heer;
De reinste schat des levens is onze eer,
Die vlekk’loos blijven moet; want ja, ontneem
Den man zijn eer, hij is geschilderd leem.

MORE:

Proverb: A leopard (panther) cannot change his spots

No boot=No point, profit, advantage
Impeached=Accused of an offence
Baffle=Originally a punishment of infamy, inflicted on recreant knights, one part of which was hanging them up by the heels” (Nares).
Gage=Pledge, pawn pledge (usu. a glove thrown on the ground) of a person’s appearance to do battle in support of his assertions, challenge
Gilded loam or painted clay=Mere earth with a decorative coating

Compleat:
No boot=Te vergeefs, vruchteloos
To impeach=Betichten, beschuldigen, aanklagen
To impeach (or oppose) the truth of a thing=Zich tegen de waarheid van een zaak aankanten
Gage=Pand, onderpand
To baffle=Beschaamd maaken

Burgersdijk notes:
De leeuw maakt panthers tam. De koningen van Engeland voeren den leeuw, de Norfolks gouden
panthers in hun wapen.

Topics: reputation, honour, appearance, integrity, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Troilus and Cressida
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Aeneas
CONTEXT:
AENEAS
Ay;
I ask, that I might waken reverence,
And bid the cheek be ready with a blush
Modest as morning when she coldly eyes
The youthful Phoebus:
Which is that god in office, guiding men?
Which is the high and mighty Agamemnon?
AGAMEMNON
This Trojan scorns us; or the men of Troy
Are ceremonious courtiers.
AENEAS
Courtiers as free, as debonair, unarmed,
As bending angels; that’s their fame in peace:
But when they would seem soldiers, they have galls,
Good arms, strong joints, true swords; and,
Jove’s accord,
Nothing so full of heart. But peace, Aeneas,
Peace, Trojan; lay thy finger on thy lips!
The worthiness of praise distains his worth,
If that the praised himself bring the praise forth:
But what the repining enemy commends,
That breath fame blows; that praise, sole sure,
transcends.

DUTCH:
Wees stil, Trojaan! den vinger op den mond!
De lof verliest de waarde, die hij heeft,
Zoo de gepreez’ne zelf den lof zich geeft;
Doch zoo de vijand prijzen moet, diens woord
Verbreidt de faam; ‘t leeft, vlekk’loos rein, steeds voort.

MORE:
Proverb: Lay thy finger on thy lips

Phoebus=Apollo, the sun God
Free=Generous
Bending=Ministering
Would seem=Wish to appear
Galls=Spirit to resist
Action=Military action
Distains=Stains
Repining=Grudging
Compleat:
Free=Vry, openhartig
To gall=’t Vel afschuuren, smarten
To gall the enemy=Den vyand benaauwen
Action=Een daad, handeling, rechtzaak, gevecht
Distain=Bevlekken, besmetten, bezwalken
To repine=Moeijelyk zyn, misnoegd weezen, berouw hebben; benyden

Topics: proverbs and idioms, civility, respect, reputation

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
HAMLET
Denmark’s a prison.
ROSENCRANTZ
Then is the world one.
HAMLET
A goodly one, in which there are many confines, wards, and dungeons, Denmark being one o’ th’ worst.
ROSENCRANTZ
We think not so, my lord.
HAMLET
Why, then, ’tis none to you, for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. To me it is a prison.
ROSENCRANTZ
Why then, your ambition makes it one. ‘Tis too narrow for your mind.

DUTCH:
Er is geen goed of slecht, maar het denken maakt het ervan/
Niets is op zichzelf goed of kwaad, maar onze gedachten maken het zo./
Er is goed noch kwaad, dat niet door het denken wordt tot stand gebracht.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Emle Industries, Inc. v. Glen Raven Mills, 478 F.2d 562, 57 (2d Cir. 1973)(Kaufman, J.);
First Wisconsin Mortgage Trust v. First Wisconsin Corporation, 584 F.2d 201, 220 (7th Cir. 1978);
In Re Taylor Coal Company, 401 So.2d 1, 9 (Ala. 1981);
Brown v. District of Columbia Board of Zoning Adjustment, 413 A.2d 1276 (D.C. 1980);
State v. Clinton Falls Nursery Company, 181 Minn. 427, 2.32 N.W.2d 737 (1930).

Topics: cited in law, good and bad, reputation, still in use

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Angelo
CONTEXT:
ANGELO
You wrong me more, sir, in denying it.
Consider how it stands upon my credit.
SECOND MERCHANT
Well, officer, arrest him at my suit.
OFFICER
I do, (to ANGELO) and charge you in the Duke’s name to obey me.
ANGELO
This touches me in reputation.
Either consent to pay this sum for me,
Or I attach you by this officer.
ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
Consent to pay thee that I never had?—
Arrest me, foolish fellow, if thou dar’st.

DUTCH:
Dit komt mijn goeden naam te na. —
Kies dus: betaal die som voor mij aan hem,
Of volg voor mij dien dienaar naar de gijz’ling.

MORE:
Stands upon my credit=Affects my reputation
Suit=Petition or entreaty

Topics: reputation, claim, debt, law/legal

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Fluellen
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY
It may be his enemy is a gentleman of great sort, quite from the answer of his degree.
FLUELLEN
Though he be as good a gentleman as the devil is, as Lucifer and Beelzebub himself, it is necessary, look your Grace, that he keep his vow and his oath. If he be perjured, see you now, his reputation is as arrant a villain and a Jack Sauce as ever his black shoe trod upon God’s ground and His earth, in my conscience, la.

DUTCH:
Al was hij een zoo goede edelman, als de tuifel het
is, als Lucifer en Pelzepup zelf, toch is het noodig, versta
uwe genade, dat hij zijn gelofte houdt en zijn eed.

MORE:

Proverb: As good a man as ever trod on shoe (neat’s) leather (as ever went on legs)
The answer of his degree=A question of rank (knights were only bound to fight with one of equal rank)

Arrant=Arch
Good=important

Compleat:
An arrant knave=Een overgegeven guit

Topics: status, promise, debt/obligation, reputation, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER:
CONTEXT:
MENENIUS
You know neither me, yourselves nor any thing. You are ambitious for poor knaves’ caps and legs: you wear out a good wholesome forenoon in hearing a cause between an orange wife and a fosset-seller; and then rejourn the controversy of three pence to a second day of audience. When you are hearing a matter between party and party, if you chance to be pinched with the colic, you make faces like mummers; set up the bloody flag against all patience; and, in roaring for a chamber-pot, dismiss the controversy bleeding the more entangled by your hearing: all the peace you make in their cause is calling both the parties knaves. You are a pair of strange ones.
BRUTUS
Come, come, you are well understood to be a
perfecter giber for the table than a necessary
bencher in the Capitol.

DUTCH:
Kom, kom, het is overbekend, dat gij veeleer een onverbeterlijk grappenmaker aan tafel zijt, dan een onontbeerlijk bijzitter op het Kapitool.

MORE:
Proverb: Know thyself

Ambitious for caps and legs=Wanting people to bow and doff caps
Bencher=member of a court or council
Set up the bloody flag=Declare war on (patience)

Schmidt:
Fosset, forset, faucet=Kind of tap for drawing liquor from a barrel; only in “faucet-seller”
Giber=entertainer, (aftr-dinner) jester
Mummer=Someone wearing a mask
The more entangled=To make (the dispute) more confused and intricate

Compleat:
To gibe=Boerten, gekscheeren
Bencher=Een byzitter, Raad, een Rechtsgeleerde van den eersten rang in ‘t Genootschap
Mummer=Een vermomde
Faucet (or peg)=Zwikje, pennetje tot een vat

Topics: language, intellect, reputation, judgment, dispute

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
This, and all else
This talking lord can lay upon my credit,
I answer is most false. The duke by law
Found his deserts: how innocent I was
From any private malice in his end,
His noble jury and foul cause can witness.
If I loved many words, lord, I should tell you
You have as little honesty as honour,
That in the way of loyalty and truth
Toward the king, my ever royal master,
Dare mate a sounder man than Surrey can be,
And all that love his follies.

DUTCH:
Hield ik van vele woorden,
Dan, graaf, zou ik u zeggen: even luttel
Bezit gij eerlijkheid als eer.

MORE:
Credit=Reputation
From=Of
Noble=Composed of nobles and noble-minded
Cause=Case, crime
Mate=Match
Compleat:
Credit=Geloof, achting, aanzien, goede naam
Noble=Edel, adelyk
Cause=Oorzaak, reden, zaak
Mate=Koppelen, gelykmaaken

Topics: honour, honesty, reputation

PLAY: As You Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Celia
CONTEXT:
ORLANDO
No, fair princess. He is the general challenger. I come
but in as others do, to try with him the strength of my
youth.
CELIA
Young gentleman, your spirits are too bold for your
years. You have seen cruel proof of this man’s strength.
If you saw yourself with your eyes or knew yourself
with your judgement, the fear of your adventure would
counsel you to a more equal enterprise. We pray you for
your own sake to embrace your own safety and give over
this attempt.
ROSALIND
Do, young sir. Your reputation shall not therefore be
misprized. We will make it our suit to the duke that the
wrestling might not go forward.
ORLANDO
I beseech you, punish me not with your hard thoughts,
wherein I confess me much guilty to deny so fair and
excellent ladies anything. But let your fair eyes and
gentle wishes go with me to my trial, wherein, if I be
foiled, there is but one shamed that was never gracious;
if killed, but one dead that was willing to be so. I
shall do my friends no wrong, for I have none to lament
me; the world no injury, for in it I have nothing. Only
in the world I fill up a place which may be better
supplied when I have made it empty.

DUTCH:
Jonkman, uw moed is te stout voor uwe jaren. Gij hebt wreede bewijzen gezien van de kracht van dezen mensch.

MORE:
Try=Test
Fear=Formidable nature
Counsel you to=Sway you towards
Equal=Equal to you, suitable
Embrace=Cherish
Misprize=(misprise) Undervalue, despise, slight
Compleat:
To try=Beproeven
Fear=Vreeze, bevreesdheid, vervaerdheid
Counsel=Raad, onderrechting
Equal=Wedergade
His strength equalled his courage=Zyne kracht kwam met zynen moet overeen
Embrace=(to receive or embrace an opinion): Een gevoelen omhelzen
Misprision=Verwaarloozing, verzuyming, verachteloozing

Topics: advice, age/experience, courage, caution, reputation

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
CASSIO
I pray you pardon me, I cannot speak.
OTHELLO
Worthy Montano, you were wont be civil.
The gravity and stillness of your youth
The world hath noted, and your name is great
In mouths of wisest censure. What’s the matter
That you unlace your reputation thus
And spend your rich opinion for the name
Of a night-brawler? Give me answer to it.
MONTANO
Worthy Othello, I am hurt to danger.
Your officer Iago can inform you,
While I spare speech, which something now offends me,
Of all that I do know. Nor know I aught
By me that’s said or done amiss this night,
Unless self-charity be sometimes a vice,
And to defend ourselves it be a sin
When violence assails us.

DUTCH:
Steeds, vriend Montano, toondet ge u bezadigd;
Den ernst, de kalmte van uw jonglingschap
Erkent de wereld, en der wijsten oordeel
Schonk u hun Iof.

MORE:
Wont be=Usually
Gravity and stillness=Discipline and restraint
Censure=Judgement
Unlace=Disgrace, throw away
Spend=Throw away
Rich opinion=Hard-earned reputation
Compleat:
Wont=Gewoonte
Gravity=Deftigheyd, Stemmigheyd, Ernsthaftigheyd, staataigheyd
Censure=Bestraffing, berisping, oordeel, toets
To unlace=Ontrygen, los rygen
To spend=Besteeden, uytgeeven, koste doen, verquisten, doorbrengen, verspillen

Topics: reputation, civility, conflict

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