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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Lear ACT/SCENE: 5.3 SPEAKER: Edmund CONTEXT: At this time
We sweat and bleed. The friend hath lost his friend,
And the best quarrels, in the heat, are cursed
By those that feel their sharpness.
The question of Cordelia and her father
Requires a fitter place. DUTCH: En in de hitte wordt de beste strijd
Gevloekt door elk, die nog zijn vlijm gevoelt.
MORE: Schmidt:
Quarrel=Cause, occasion and motive of dispute
Sharpness=Severity, harshness
Fitter place=More appropriate location
Compleat:
Quarrel=Krakeel; twist. A quarrel-breeder=Een krakeel-veroorzaaker, twistzoeker
Sharpness (acrimony) of humours=Scherpheid der vochten
Sharpness (Keenness or point)=Scherpheid, puntigheid Topics: dispute, dignity, resolution

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Alas, the part I had in Woodstock’s blood
Doth more solicit me than your exclaims,
To stir against the butchers of his life!
But since correction lieth in those hands
Which made the fault that we cannot correct,
Put we our quarrel to the will of heaven;
Who, when they see the hours ripe on earth,
Will rain hot vengeance on offenders’ heads.

DUTCH:
Doch wijl de straf in de eigen handen rust,
Die pleegden, wat wij zelf niet kunnen straffen,
Bevelen we onze zaak den hemel aan.

MORE:

Proverb: Vengeance belongs only to God

To solicit=Entreat, petition
Stir=Act
Put we our quarrel to=Put our dispute before, submit our dispute to
See the hours ripe=The time has come
Rain hot vengeance=Divine punishent (Genesis 19:24-5)
Correction=Punishment

Compleat:
Correction=Verbetering, tuchtiging, berisping
Ripe=Ryp
When things are ripe for action=Als het tyd is om aan ‘t werk te gaan
A design ripe for execution=Een ontwerp dat ryp is om ter uitvoer te brengen
Vengeance=Wraak

Topics: dispute, offence, resolution, justice, punishment, proverbs and idioms, time

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: King Henry VI
CONTEXT:
PLANTAGENET
[Aside] Plantagenet, I see, must hold his tongue,
Lest it be said ‘Speak, sirrah, when you should;
Must your bold verdict enter talk with lords?’
Else would I have a fling at Winchester.
KING HENRY VI
Uncles of Gloucester and of Winchester,
The special watchmen of our English weal,
I would prevail, if prayers might prevail,
To join your hearts in love and amity.
O, what a scandal is it to our crown,
That two such noble peers as ye should jar!
Believe me, lords, my tender years can tell
Civil dissension is a viperous worm
That gnaws the boels of the commonwealth.

DUTCH:
Geloof mij, lords, mijn teed’re jeugd bevroedt reeds,
Dat burgertwist een giftige adder is ,
Die de ingewanden van den staat doorknaagt.

MORE:
Bold=Daring, insolent
Verdict=Judgment, opinion
Enter=Engage in, interrupt
Weal=Commonwealth
Jar=Quarrel

Compleat:
Jar=Krakkeelen, twisten, harrewarren, oneens zyn, kyven
The common-weal=’t Welvaaren van ‘t algemeen
A common-wealths man=Een republyks gezinde

Burgersdijk notes:
Mijn teed’re jeugd bevroedt reeds. Eigenlijk was Hendrik VI slechts vijf jaar oud, toen het parlement
bijeenkwam om de twisten tusschen Gloster en Winchester te beslechten.

Topics: dispute, consequence, resolution, judgment

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 1.7
SPEAKER: Imogen
CONTEXT:
You do seem to know
Something of me or what concerns me. Pray you,
Since doubting things go ill often hurts more
Than to be sure they do—for certainties
Either are past remedies, or, timely knowing,
The remedy then born—discover to me
What both you spur and stop.

DUTCH:
Want kent men ze,
Dan kan ‘t te laat zijn, ja, maar tijdig weten
Brengt vaak nog redding aan.


Doubting=Suspecting, fearing
Past remedies=Beyond resolution, beyond our ability to resolve
Timely knowing, the remedy then born=If we know in time, we can devise a solution

Compleat:
To spur (on)=Aanspooren, noopen, aandryven
To spur a question=Een onverwagte, schielyke vraag doen
Timely=Tydig, gepast

Topics: uncertainty, concern , remedy, resolution

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
Wrath-kindled gentlemen, be ruled by me.
Let’s purge this choler without letting blood.
This we prescribe, though no physician.
Deep malice makes too deep incision.
Forget, forgive; conclude and be agreed.
Our doctors say this is no month to bleed.—
Good uncle, let this end where it begun;
We’ll calm the Duke of Norfolk, you your son.

DUTCH:
Gramstorige edellieden, volgt mijn raad.
Verdrijft de galzucht zonder aderlating.
Ofschoon geen arts, schrijf ik u dit toch voor: —
Een diepe wrok snijdt al te diep, snijdt door, —
Vergeeft, vergeet, houdt op elkaar te haten;
Het is, zegt de arts, geen maand van aderlaten

MORE:

Proverb: Forgive and forget

Wrath-kindled=Furious
Be ruled=To prevail on, to persuade (used only passively)
Choler=Anger, bile
Purge=To cure, to restore to health
Month to bleed=Physicians would consult the almanac to determine best time for bloodletting

Compleat:
Wrath=Toorn, gramschap
Wrathfull=Toornig, vertoornd, vergramd, grimmig
Cholerick=Oploopend, haastig, toornig. To be in choler=Toornig zyn
Purge=Zuiveren, reinigen, den buik zuiveren, purgeeren
To purge (clear) one’s self of a crime=Zich van eene misdaad zuiveren
To bleed one=Iemand bloed aftappen, laaten; bloedlaating, bloeding

Burgersdijk notes:
Het is, zegt de arts, geen maand van aderlaten. Vroeger lieten ook gezonden zich op geregelde
tijden sferlaten om te zekerder gezond te blijven. In de almanakken van dien tijd, — er is zulk een Engelsche almanak bekend van 1386, — werd aangegeven, welke maanden er het best voor
waren.

Topics: resolution, remedy, anger, proverbs and idioms

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Othello
CONTEXT:
OTHELLO
Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them.
Good signior, you shall more command with years
Than with your weapons.
BRABANTIO
O thou foul thief, where hast thou stowed my daughter?
Damned as thou art, thou hast enchanted her!
For I’ll refer me to all things of sense,
If she in chains of magic were not bound,
Whether a maid so tender, fair, and happy,
So opposite to marriage that she shunned
The wealthy curlèd darlings of our nation,
Would ever have, t’ incur a general mock,
Run from her guardage to the sooty bosom
Of such a thing as thou—to fear, not to delight.

DUTCH:
Steekt op uw blanke klingen, want de nachtdauw
Zal die doen roesten. — Edel Heer, uw leeftijd
Dwingt eér ontzag af, dan uw zwaard het doet.

MORE:

Keep up=Put away
Stowed=Hidden away
Command with years=Respect for age and status
General mock=Public ridicule

Topics: status, respect, age/experience, dispute, resolution, relationship, marriage

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
KING RICHARD II
How high a pitch his resolution soars!
Thomas of Norfolk, what say’st thou to this?
THOMAS MOWBRAY
O, let my sovereign turn away his face
And bid his ears a little while be deaf,
Till I have told this slander of his blood,
How God and good men hate so foul a liar.
KING RICHARD II
Mowbray, impartial are our eyes and ears:
Were he my brother, nay, my kingdom’s heir,
As he is but my father’s brother’s son,
Now, by my sceptre’s awe, I make a vow,
Such neighbour nearness to our sacred blood
Should nothing privilege him, nor partialize
The unstooping firmness of my upright soul:
He is our subject, Mowbray; so art thou:
Free speech and fearless I to thee allow.

DUTCH:
Wat vlucht ten wolken neemt zijn koene geest!
Thomas van Norfolk, wat zegt gij hierop?

MORE:

Pitch=Highest point of soaring flight for a hawk or falcon
Neighbour nearness=Extremely close proximity
Partialize=Prejudice
Unstooping=Unbending (Stoop is another falcony ref. meaning to come down or pounce on the prey)
Fearless=Bold
Blood=Ancestry

Compleat:
To stoop=Buigen, bokken of bukken
A hawk that makes a stoop at a partridge=Een valk die op een Patrys valt
Fearless=Schroomeloos, onbevreesd, onvertzaagd, onbeschroomd, onverschrokken

Topics: resolution, strength, truth, relationship, honour

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Archbishop
CONTEXT:
Wherefore do I this? So the question stands.
Briefly, to this end: we are all diseased,
And with our surfeiting and wanton hours
Have brought ourselves into a burning fever,
And we must bleed for it; of which disease
Our late King Richard, being infected, died.
But, my most noble Lord of Westmoreland,
I take not on me here as a physician,
Nor do I as an enemy to peace
Troop in the throngs of military men,
But rather show awhile like fearful war
To diet rank minds sick of happiness
And purge th’ obstructions which begin to stop
Our very veins of life. Hear me more plainly.
I have in equal balance justly weighed
What wrongs our arms may do, what wrongs we suffer,
And find our griefs heavier than our offences.

DUTCH:
Ik heb op juiste schalen streng gewogen,
Wat leed onze oorlog brengt, wat leed wij lijden,
En vind de grieven zwaarder dan ‘t vergrijp.

MORE:
Surfeiting=Gluttony, self-indulgence
Bleed=Be bled
Take on me=Assume the role of
Rank=Sick, corrupted, morbid

Compleat:
To bleed one=Iemand bloed aftappen, laaten; bloedlaating, bloeding
To surfeit (satiate or glut)=Ergens zat van worden, het moede worden
Surfeiting=Overlaading van de maag

Topics: excess, judgment, remedy, resolution

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Lancaster
CONTEXT:
I like them all, and do allow them well,
And swear here by the honour of my blood,
My father’s purposes have been mistook,
And some about him have too lavishly
Wrested his meaning and authority.
My lord, these griefs shall be with speed redressed;
Upon my soul, they shall. If this may please you,
Discharge your powers unto their several counties,
As we will ours, and here, between the armies,
Let’s drink together friendly and embrace,
That all their eyes may bear those tokens home
Of our restorèd love and amity.

DUTCH:
En enk’len om hem hebben al te stout
Des konings meening en bevel verdraaid.

MORE:

Discharge=dismiss, disperse

Schmidt:
Amity=good understanding, friendship
To wrest=turn the wrong way, misinterpret
Too lavishly wrested=misinterpret to advantage, overstepped
(Ill-wresting=misinterpreting to disadvantage)

Onions:
Shakespeare first to use discharge to mean ‘letting off a firearm’; ’emission’; ‘payment’; ‘performance or execution’.

Compleat:
To wrest=verdraaijen, wringen
To wrest one’s words maliciously=Iemands woorden kwaadaardig verdraaijen
To wrest a thing from one=Iemand iets ontwringen, iemand iets afpersen

Topics: friendship, leadership, duty, resolution

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 4.7
SPEAKER: Hastings
CONTEXT:
GLOUCESTER
A wise stout captain, and soon persuaded!
HASTINGS
The good old man would fain that all were well,
So ’twere not ‘long of him; but being enter’d,
I doubt not, I, but we shall soon persuade
Both him and all his brothers unto reason.
KING EDWARD IV
So, master mayor: these gates must not be shut
But in the night or in the time of war.
What! Fear not, man, but yield me up the keys;

DUTCH:
Die oude heer ziet liefst, dat alles goed gaat,
Zoo hij slechts buiten spel blijft; doch hoe ‘t zij,
Zijn wij eens binnen, weldra zullen wij
Hem en geheel zijn raad tot vrede brengen.

MORE:

Stout=Bold
Soon=Readily
Fain=Gladly, willingly; only too pleased if… (always joined with would; followed by a clause)
But=Except

Compleat:
Stout (courageous)=Moedig, dapper
Fain=Gaern

Topics: reason, loyalty, resolution

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Clifford
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
I prithee, give no limits to my tongue:
I am a king, and privileged to speak.
CLIFFORD
My liege, the wound that bred this meeting here
Cannot be cured by words; therefore be still.
RICHARD
Then, executioner, unsheathe thy sword:
By him that made us all, I am resolved
that Clifford’s manhood lies upon his tongue.

DUTCH:
Mijn vorst, geen woorden heden ooit de wond,
Die deze ontmoeting teelde; zwijg dus stil.

MORE:

Give no limits to=Don’t stop me (from talking)
Resolved=Convinced, determined
Lies upon his tongue=Is just talk

Topics: resolution, conflict

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Westmorland
CONTEXT:
Mowbray, the Bishop Scroop, Hastings, and all
Are brought to the correction of your law.
There is not now a rebel’s sword unsheathed
But peace puts forth her olive everywhere.
The manner how this action hath been borne
Here at more leisure may your Highness read
With every course in his particular.

DUTCH:
Niet één rebellenzwaard is meer ontbloot;
De vrede doet de’ olijf alom ontspruiten.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Correction=Chastisement
Peace puts forth her olive=The olive branch of peace is extended

Topics: mercy, justice, resolution

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: John of Gaunt
CONTEXT:
Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.
You urged me as a judge; but I had rather
You would have bid me argue like a father.
O, had it been a stranger, not my child,
To smooth his fault I should have been more mild:
A partial slander sought I to avoid,
And in the sentence my own life destroy’d.
Alas, I look’d when some of you should say,
I was too strict to make mine own away;
But you gave leave to my unwilling tongue
Against my will to do myself this wrong.

DUTCH:
Wat zoet smaakt, is vaak moeilijk te verteren.

MORE:

Proverb: What is sweet in the mouth is oft sour (bitter) in the maw (stomach)

Urge=To press (here: for an opinion)
Partial slander=Accusation of bias, reproach of partiality
Strict=Severe, proceeding by exact rules

Compleat:
Partial=Eenzydig, partydig
Slander=Laster, lasterkladde

Topics: proverbs and idioms, judgment, justice, resolution, error

PLAY: The Tempest
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Alonso
CONTEXT:
ALONSO
This is as strange a maze as e’er men trod,
And there is in this business more than nature
Was ever conduct of. Some oracle
Must rectify our knowledge.
PROSPERO
Sir, my liege,
Do not infest your mind with beating on
The strangeness of this business. At picked leisure
Which shall be shortly, single I’ll resolve you—
Which to you shall seem probable—of every
These happened accidents. Till when, be cheerful
And think of each thing well.
(to Ariel)  Come hither, spirit.
Set Caliban and his companions free.
Untie the spell.

DUTCH:
t Is ‘t vreemdste doolhof, waar een mensch ooit dwaalde.

MORE:
Maze=A labyrinth: “one encompassed with a winding m.”
Conduct of=Led, guided by (directed by nature)
Single=Privately, separately, alone
Resolve=To free from uncertainty or ignorance, to satisfy, to inform
Accidents=Unforeseen events
Infest your mind=Trouble, assail your mind
Compleat:
Maze=Doolhof, bedwelming
To resolve (to untie, to decide, to determine a hard question, a difficulty)=Oplossen, ontwarren, ontknoopen
Accident=Een toeval, kwaal

Topics: nature, plans/intentions, resolution, purpose

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Dromio
CONTEXT:
We came into the world like brother and brother,
And now let’s go hand in hand, not one before another

DUTCH:
Neen, dan zij ‘t zoo:
Wij sprongen samen de wereld in, als broeders, met elkander;
Zoo gaan wij nu samen hand aan hand, en de een niet na den ander

MORE:

Topics: relationship, love, respect, resolution, equality

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: King Richard
CONTEXT:
We were not born to sue, but to command;
Which since we cannot do to make you friends,
Be ready, as your lives shall answer it,
At Coventry, upon Saint Lambert’s day:
There shall your swords and lances arbitrate
The swelling difference of your settled hate:
Since we can not atone you, we shall see
Justice design the victor’s chivalry.
Lord marshal, command our officers at arms
Be ready to direct these home alarms.

DUTCH:
Niet smeeken, maar bevelen is mijn roeping.
Zoo staat, daar geen bevel u kan verzoenen,
Strijdvaardig, als u ‘t leven dierbaar is,
Te Coventry, op Sint Lambertusdag.
Daar zij door zwaard en lans de felle twist
Van uwen haat, die immer wast, beslist.
Daar vrede onmoog’lijk blijkt, spreke in ‘t gevecht
Des overwinnaars ridderschap nu recht.

MORE:

Saint Lambert’s Day. 17 September

Atone=Reconcile
Swelling difference=Growing dispute
Design=To mark out, demonstrate, show

Compleat:
Atone=Verzoenen, bevreedigen
Difference=Verschil
Swell=Oplopen

Topics: law/legal, conflict, justice, resolution

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Sir, I hope
My words disbench’d you not.
CORIOLANUS
No, sir: yet oft,
When blows have made me stay, I fled from words.
You soothed not, therefore hurt not: but your people,
I love them as they weigh.

DUTCH:
Hield ik voor slagen stand, en vlood voor woorden.
Gij vleit niet, dus gij krenkt niet. Doch, uw burgers
Bemin ik naar zij waard zijn.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Soothed not=Did not flatter
As they weigh=According to their weight or value

Compleat:
To sooth up=Vleijen, flikflooien

Topics: resolution, remedy, value, flattery

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