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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors ACT/SCENE: 2.1 SPEAKER: Dromio of Ephesus CONTEXT: DROMIO OF EPHESUS
Am I so round with you as you with me,
That like a football you do spurn me thus?
You spurn me hence, and he will spurn me hither.
If I last in this service, you must case me in leather.
LUCIANA
Fie, how impatience loureth in your face. DUTCH: Zeide ik goedrond de waarheid, ben ik dáárom
Te schoppen als een bal van hier naar ginds?
Gij schopt mij weg, hij schopt gewis mij weder,
Als ik dat uit zal houden, zoo naai mij eerst in leder.
MORE: Round=Outspoken, plain-speaking
Spurn=Kick
Loureth=Scowl

Compleat:
To have a round delivery (clear utterance)=Glad ter taal zyn
A spurn=Een schop met de voet
To spurn=Agteruit schoppen, schoppen. To spurn away=Wegschoppen

Burgersdijk notes:
Te schoppen als een bal. Het voetbalspel is, zooals bekend is, nog zeer in zwang, en de bal er voor is met leder overtrokken. Topics: work, civility, order/society, respect

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
Because that I familiarly sometimes
Do use you for my fool and chat with you,
Your sauciness will jest upon my love
And make a common of my serious hours.
When the sun shines, let foolish gnats make sport,
But creep in crannies when he hides his beams.
If you will jest with me, know my aspect,
And fashion your demeanour to my looks,
Or I will beat this method in your sconce.
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE
“Sconce” call you it? So you would leave battering,
I had rather have it a “head.” An you use these blows long, I must get a sconce for my head and ensconce it too, or else I shall seek my wit in my shoulders. But I pray, sir, why am I beaten?

DUTCH:
Omdat ik soms gemeenzaam scherts en keuvel,
Als met een nar, misbruikt ge in overmoed
Mijn vriendlijkheid en neemt mijn ernstige uren,
Alsof ze u toebehoorden, in beslag.
Maar dans’ de mug ook in den zonneschijn,
Zij kruipt in reten, als de lucht betrekt

MORE:
Proverb: He has more wit in his head than you in both your shoulders

Jest upon= Trifle with
Sauciness=Impertinence, impudence
Make a common of my serious hours=Treat my hours of business as common property (reference to property law, where racts of ground were allocated to common use and known as “commons”)
Aspect=Look, glance; possible reference to astrology, with the aspect being the position of one planet in relation to others and its potential to exert influence
Sconce=(1) Head; (2) Fortification, bulwark
Fashion your demeanour to my looks=Check my mood and act accordingly

Compleat:
To jest=Boerten, schertsen, jokken, gekscheeren
Sconce=(Sconse) Een bolwerk of blokhuis
To sconce (university word to signify the setting up so much in the buttery-book, upon one’s head, to be paid as a punishment for a duty neglected or an offence committed)=In de boete beslaan, eene boete opleggen, straffen
Sconsing=Beboeting, beboetende
To fashion=Een gestalte geeven, vormen, fatzoeneeren

Burgersdijk notes:
Op mijn bol? In ‘t Engelsch een woordspeling met sconce, dat „bol” of „hoofd” beteekent, en ook, schans”, waarom ook het woord ensconce, ,,verschansen” volgt. Bij het maken der aanteekeningen komt het mij voor, dat het woord bolwerk had kunnen dienen om het origineel nauwkeuriger terug te geven: „Mijn bol noemt gij dit, heer? als gij het slaan wildet laten, zou ik het liever voor een hoofd houden, maar als gij met dat ranselen voortgaat, moet ik een bolwerk voor mijn hoofd zien te krijgen en het goed dekken (of versterken), of mijn verstand in mijn rug gaan zoeken.”

Topics: respect, misunderstanding, punishment, emotion and mood

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
God pardon thee. Yet let me wonder, Harry,
At thy affections, which do hold a wing
Quite from the flight of all thy ancestors.
Thy place in council thou hast rudely lost,
Which by thy younger brother is supplied,
And art almost an alien to the hearts
Of all the court and princes of my blood.
The hope and expectation of thy time
Is ruined, and the soul of every man
Prophetically doth forethink thy fall.
Had I so lavish of my presence been,
So common-hackneyed in the eyes of men,
So stale and cheap to vulgar company,
Opinion, that did help me to the crown,
Had still kept loyal to possession
And left me in reputeless banishment,
A fellow of no mark nor likelihood.

DUTCH:
Had mij een roemloos balling laten blijven,
Als een, die niets was, niets verwachten liet.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Hold a wing quite from=flight contrary to, away from (possibly borrowed from falconry language)
Hope and expectation of thy time=the promise of youth
Forethink= Anticipate
Common-hackneyed, vulgarized
Vulgar company=mixing with common people
Opinion=Public opinion
Reputeless=Obscure, inglorious
Mark=Notice taken, observance, note
Likelihood=Probability, chance
Possession=Opinion had still kept loyal (to the actual occupant/possessor of the crown)

Topics: reputation, punishment, dignity, failure, respect

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
We have strict statutes and most biting laws.
The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds,
Which for this nineteen years we have let slip;
Even like an o’ergrown lion in a cave,
That goes not out to prey. Now, as fond fathers,
Having bound up the threatening twigs of birch,
Only to stick it in their children’s sight
For terror, not to use, in time the rod
Becomes more mock’d than fear’d; so our decrees,
Dead to infliction, to themselves are dead;
And liberty plucks justice by the nose;
The baby beats the nurse, and quite athwart
Goes all decorum.

DUTCH:
Nu, gelijk
Een zwakke vader berkenrijsjes bindt,
Alleen om ‘t oog der kind’ren te verschrikken,
Niet voor gebruik, zoodat de roede dra
Meer spot dan vreeze wekt, zoo is de wet,
Die dood voor straf is, in zichzelf ook dood;
De vrijheid trekt alsdan gerechtigheid
Driest bij den neus; de zuig’ling slaat de min,
En alle ontzag is weg .

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, value, respect, justice

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
GREEN
Besides, our nearness to the king in love
Is near the hate of those love not the king.
BAGOT
And that’s the wavering commons: for their love
Lies in their purses, and whoso empties them
By so much fills their hearts with deadly hate.
BUSHY
Wherein the king stands generally condemn’d.
BAGOT
If judgement lie in them, then so do we,
Because we ever have been near the king.

DUTCH:
De wank’lende gemeenten! hare liefde
Ligt in haar buidels, en wie deze leêgt,
Vult wis haar hart met doodelijken haat.

MORE:

Wavering=Fickle
Commons=The common people, commoners

Compleat:
Wavering=Waggeling; wapperende, twyffelachtig, ongestadig
The common (vulgar) people=Het gemeene Volk

Topics: love, money, respect, judgment

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Antipholus of Syracuse
CONTEXT:
Teach me, dear creature, how to think and speak.
Lay open to my earthy gross conceit,
Smothered in errors, feeble, shallow, weak,
The folded meaning of your words’ deceit.
Against my soul’s pure truth why labour you
To make it wander in an unknown field?
Are you a god? would you create me new?
Transform me, then, and to your power I’ll yield.

DUTCH:
Zijt ge een godin, die mij vervormen wil?
Vervorm mij dan! ik geef mij in uw hand.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Conceit= Conceptions, ideas
Folded=Concealed

Compleat:
To conceit=Zich verbeelden, achten
Conceit=Waan, bevatting, opvatting, meening

Topics: understanding, error, intellect, learning/education, respect

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
For God’s sake, let us sit upon the ground
And tell sad stories of the death of kings;
How some have been deposed; some slain in war,
Some haunted by the ghosts they have deposed;
Some poison’d by their wives: some sleeping kill’d;
All murder’d: for within the hollow crown
That rounds the mortal temples of a king
Keeps Death his court and there the antic sits,
Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp,
Allowing him a breath, a little scene,
To monarchize, be fear’d and kill with looks,
Infusing him with self and vain conceit,
As if this flesh which walls about our life,
Were brass impregnable, and humour’d thus
Comes at the last and with a little pin
Bores through his castle wall, and farewell king!
Cover your heads and mock not flesh and blood
With solemn reverence: throw away respect,
Tradition, form and ceremonious duty,
For you have but mistook me all this while:
I live with bread like you, feel want,
Taste grief, need friends: subjected thus,
How can you say to me, I am a king?

DUTCH:
Bedekt uw hoofd, drijft niet door huldebrenging
Den spot met vleesch en bloed; verzaakt den eerbied,
Gebruik en vorm en statig plichtbetoon

MORE:

Antic=Buffoon, practising odd gesticulations (a fool in old farces, whose main purpose was to disrupt the more serious actors)
Tradition=Traditional practices, established or customary homage (‘state’ and ‘pomp’)
Humoured=Indulged
Mock=Treat with exaggerated respect (hence solemn reverence)
Subjected=(a) turned into a subject under the dominion of the king; (b) subjugated, exposed
Monarchize=Play at being King (OED cites this from Nashe (1592) suggesting a mockery that is not so evident in this use of the term)

Compleat:
To humour=Involgen, believen, opvolgen, naar den mond spreeken
Tradition=Overleevering van leerstukken of gevoelens
Mock=Bespotting, beschimping
Subject=Onderworpen; onderdaan

Topics: equality, status, order/society, respect, custom

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Second officer
CONTEXT:
FIRST OFFICER
That’s a brave fellow, but he’s vengeance proud and loves not the common people.
SECOND OFFICER
Faith, there had been many great men that have
flattered the people, who ne’er loved them; and there
be many that they have loved, they know not
wherefore: so that, if they love they know not why,
they hate upon no better a ground: therefore, for
Coriolanus neither to care whether they love or hate
him manifests the true knowledge he has in their
disposition; and out of his noble carelessness lets
them plainly see’t.

DUTCH:
Nu, er zijn vele groote mannen geweest, . die het volk gevleid hebben en het toch nooit mochten lijden; en er zijn er velen, waar het volk van hield, zonder dat het wist waarom.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Manifest=Make obvious, evident, not doubtful
Disposition=Natural constitution of the mind, temper, character, sentiments
Carelessness=Lack of concern, indifference

Compleat:
To manifest=Openbaaren, openbaar maaken
Carelessness=Zorgeloosheid, kommerloosheid, onachtzaamheid, achteloosheid

Topics: truth, flattery, deception, love, respect

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Young Clifford
CONTEXT:
Shame and confusion! All is on the rout;
Fear frames disorder, and disorder wounds
Where it should guard. O war, thou son of hell,
Whom angry heavens do make their minister
Throw in the frozen bosoms of our part
Hot coals of vengeance! Let no soldier fly.
He that is truly dedicate to war
Hath no self-love, nor he that loves himself
Hath not essentially but by circumstance
The name of valour.

DUTCH:
Schande en verwarring! Alles wijkt en vlucht.
Door vrees wordt orde wanorde, en verwondt
Wat zij moest hoeden

MORE:

Frames=Creates, produces
Rout=In a disorderly retreat
Guard=Protect
Circumstance=Occurrence, accident

Compleat:
To frame=Een gestalte geeven, maaken, ontwerpen, schikken
Rout (defeat)=Nederlaag
Rout (squabble, noise)=Geraas, getier
Circumstance=Omstandigheid

Topics: respect, courage, revenge

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Thus do I ever make my fool my purse.
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well.
The better shall my purpose work on him.
Cassio’s a proper man. Let me see now,

DUTCH:
Zoo moet mijn nar mij steeds als buidel dienen.
Want voor mijn groote ervaring ware ‘t schande,
Als ik met zulk een eend mijn tijd verspilde,
Zoo niet tot scherts en voordeel

MORE:

Snipe=Bird, also ‘worthless’ fellow, simpleton
Gained knowledge=Practical experience
In that kind=In that regard
‘Twixt=Betwixt (between)
Surety=Certainty
Holds me well=Respects, has a good opinion of
Purpose=Plan

Compleat:
Snipe=Snip, snep
Betwixt=Tusschen, tusschenbeide
Betwixt the devil and the red sea=Tusschen hangen en worgen
Purpose (design, resolution, project)=Voorneemen, besluit, ontwerp

Topics: money, skill/talent, age/experience, respect, suspicion

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: Portia
CONTEXT:
PORTIA
You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand
Such as I am. Though for myself alone
I would not be ambitious in my wish
To wish myself much better, yet for you
I would be trebled twenty times myself—
A thousand times more fair, ten thousand times more
rich—
That only to stand high in your account
I might in virtue, beauties, livings, friends
Exceed account. But the full sum of me
Is sum of something which, to term in gross,
Is an unlessoned girl, unschooled, unpracticèd;
Happy in this—she is not yet so old
But she may learn. Happier than this—
She is not bred so dull but she can learn.
Happiest of all is that her gentle spirit
Commits itself to yours to be directed
As from her lord, her governor, her king.
Myself and what is mine to you and yours
Is now converted. But now I was the lord
Of this fair mansion, master of my servants,
Queen o’er myself. And even now, but now,
This house, these servants, and this same myself
Are yours, my lord’s. I give them with this ring,
Which when you part from, lose, or give away,
Let it presage the ruin of your love
And be my vantage to exclaim on you.

DUTCH:
Een meisjen, zonder kennis of ervaring,
Die zich gelukkig rekent, dat zij niet
Voor leeren te oud is; nog gelukkiger,
Dat zij voor ‘t leeren niet te stomp zich acht

MORE:
In gross=Frankly speaking
Dull [Welsh, Saxon]=Stupid, doltish, blockish, unapprehensive, indocile, slow of understanding. (Samuel Johnson)
Dulbrained=Stupid, doltish, foolish
Converted=Transferred
Happy=Lucky
Account=Estimate
But now=Just now
Vantage=Opportunity
Exclaim on=Accuse
Compleat:
To tell in general terms=In ‘t gros vertellen
Dull=Bot, stomp, dof, dom, loom, vadsig, doodsch
Dull-witted=Dom van verstand
Dull-pated=Haardhoofdig, dom
It dulls my brains=Het maakt myn verstand stomp

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
Therefore omit him not; blunt not his love,
Nor lose the good advantage of his grace
By seeming cold or careless of his will.
For he is gracious if he be observed;
He hath a tear for pity and a hand
Open as day for melting charity;
Yet notwithstanding, being incensed he is flint,
As humorous as winter, and as sudden
As flaws congealed in the spring of day.
His temper therefore must be well observed.

DUTCH:
Den traan van ‘t meêlij heeft hij, en een hand
Voor weeke goedheid open als de dag;

MORE:

He is gracious if he be observed=If he is shown respect
Humorous=Changeable (as the weather in winter)
Omit=Disregard, ignore
Careless=Heedless, having no regard to, indifferent to
Flint=Proverbial hard, source of fire
Melting=Feeling pity

Compleat:
Careless=Zorgeloos, kommerloos, achteloos, onachtzaam
Omit=Nalaaten, overslaan, voorbygaan, verzuimen
Flint=Een keisteen, vuursteen, keizel, flint
Humoursom (humerous)=Eigenzinnig, koppig, styfhoofdig, eenzinnig

Topics: pity, emotion and mood, respect, flaw/fault

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: Romeo
CONTEXT:
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.

DUTCH:
Wie nooit een wonde voelde, lacht om pijn

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
U.S. v. Pastor, 557 F.2d 930, 942 (2d Cir. 1977)(Van Graafeiland, J.)( dissenting).

Topics: cited in law, courage, value, respect

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Falstaff
CONTEXT:
The juvenal, the Prince your master, whose chin is not yet
fledge—I will sooner have a beard grow in the palm
of my hand than he shall get one off his cheek,
and yet he will not stick to say his face is a face royal.
God may finish it when He will.
’Tis not a hair amiss yet.
He may keep it still at a face royal, for a barber
shall never earn sixpence out of it,
and yet he’ll be crowing as if he had writ man
ever since his father was a bachelor.
He may keep his own grace, but he’s
almost out of mine, I can assure him.

DUTCH:
Een prinselijke genade kan hij zijn en
blijven, maar bij mij is hij bijna uit de genade, dat kan
ik hem verzekeren

MORE:

Juvenal=Youth
Amiss=Out of time and order, wrong
Not a hair amiss=Not a hair out of place
Fledge=Covered with down
Stick=Hesitate
Face royal=Majestic face
Writ man=Having reached maturity, manhood
Barber shall never earn a sixpence=Barber would have nothing to shave

Compleat:
Stick=Schroomen
To stick at a thing (to make a conscience or a scruple)=Geweetenswerk ergens van maaken
He sticks at nothing for lucre’s sake=Hij ontziet niets om voordeels wille
Grace (agreeableness)=Bevalligheid
Grace=Genade
Fledged=Met veeren voorzien

Topics: insult, patience, pity, respect, age/experience

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 5.5
SPEAKER: Prince Edward
CONTEXT:
KING EDWARD IV
Bring forth the gallant, let us hear him speak.
What! Can so young a thorn begin to prick?
Edward, what satisfaction canst thou make
For bearing arms, for stirring up my subjects,
And all the trouble thou hast turn’d me to?
PRINCE EDWARD
Speak like a subject, proud ambitious York!
Suppose that I am now my father’s mouth;
Resign thy chair, and where I stand kneel thou,
Whilst I propose the selfsame words to thee,
Which traitor, thou wouldst have me answer to.
QUEEN MARGARET
Ah, that thy father had been so resolved!
GLOUCESTER
That you might still have worn the petticoat,
And ne’er have stol’n the breech from Lancaster.
PRINCE EDWARD
Let Aesop fable in a winter’s night;
His currish riddles sort not with this place.

DUTCH:
Aesopus moge in winternachten faab’len;
Hier passen zulke hondsche raadsels niet.

MORE:

Gallant=Person of rank
Prick=Incite
Satisfaction=Amends
Turned me to=Caused me
Suppose=Consider, remember
Breech=Trousers
Currish=Malicious

Compleat:
Gallant=Salet jonker
To prick=Prikken, steeken, prikkelen
Satisfaction= (amends) Vergoeding, voldoening
Suppose=Vermoeden, denken, onderstellen
Currish=Hondsch, kwaadaardig

Burgersdijk notes:
V. 5. 25. Aesopus moge in winternachten faab’len. De Prins vergelijkt Richard met den mismaakten
fabeldichter Aesopus.

Topics: remedy, truth, respect, status, order/society, marriage

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.1
SPEAKER: Roderigo
CONTEXT:
RODERIGO
Tush! Never tell me. I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.
IAGO
‘Sblood, but you’ll not hear me! If ever I did dream of such a matter, abhor me.
RODERIGO
Thou told’st me
Thou didst hold him in thy hate.
IAGO
Despise me
If I do not. Three great ones of the city
(In personal suit to make me his lieutenant)
Off-capped to him, and by the faith of man
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place.

DUTCH:
Ik neem je kwalijk, Jago,
dat jij die zo goed weg wist in mijn beurs
alsof dat ding van jou was, hiervan wist.

MORE:

Schmidt:
Unkindly=In a harsh and ungentle manner
Abhor=To detest to extremity, to loathe; with an accusation
Personal=Done or experienced in one’s own person, not by a representative or other indirect means
Suit=Petition, address of entreaty

Compleat:
Unkindly: To take a thing unkindly=Iets onvriendelyk opvatten
Abhor=Verfooijen, een afschrik hebben
Personal=In eigen hoofde
Suit=Een verzoek, rechtsgeding

Burgersdijk notes:
Geen praatjens, Jago. In ‘t Engelsch: Never tell me. Wij vallen hier midden in een gesprek; deze woorden
slaan op iets, dat Jago gezegd heeft; men mag aannemen, dat hij verklaard heeft, niets van de betrekking tasschen Othello en Desdemona geweten te hebben. — Daarop slaat ook Rodrigo’s gezegde in reg. 6: Gij haat hem innig; gij zult hem dus wel gade geslagen en er dus wel van geweten hebben; waarop Jago hem van zijn onderwerp af wil brengen door de redenen van zijn haat uiteen te zetten.

Topics: money, friendship, loyalty, respect

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 1.9
SPEAKER: Cominius
CONTEXT:
If I should tell thee o’er this thy day’s work,
Thou’ldst not believe thy deeds: but I’ll report it
Where senators shall mingle tears with smiles,
Where great patricians shall attend and shrug,
I’ the end admire, where ladies shall be frighted,
And, gladly quaked, hear more; where the dull tribunes,
That, with the fusty plebeians, hate thine honours,
Shall say against their hearts ‘We thank the gods
Our Rome hath such a soldier.’
Yet camest thou to a morsel of this feast,
Having fully dined before.

DUTCH:
Verhaalde ik u, wat gij op heden deedt,
Gelooven zoudt ge uw daden niet. Ik meld het,
Waar Senatoren lachend tranen storten,
Patriciërs luist’ren zullen, eerst de schouders
Optrekkend, maar in ‘t eind bewond’rend.

MORE:

Against their hearts=Unwillingly
Gladly quaked=Enjoy being frightened, thrown into grateful trepidation

Schmidt:
Fusty=Smelling of mould

Compleat:
Fusty=Muffig, muf, vermuft.
To have a fusty smell=Een vunze lucht hebben

Topics: achievement, courage, respect

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
…one that converses more with the buttock of the night than with the forehead of the morning: What I think I utter, and spend my malice in my breath. Meeting two such wealsmen as you are—I cannot call you Lycurguses—if the drink you give me touch my palate adversely I make a crooked face at it.

DUTCH:
Als ik twee zulke staatslieden als gij zijt, — Lycurgussen kan ik u niet noemen, — ontmoet, en gij mij een dronk aanbiedt, die mijn gehemelte onaangenaam aandoet, dan trek ik er een scheef gezicht bij.

MORE:
Spend my malice in my breath=Vent my anger in words

Schmidt:
Wealsmen=Legislators
Converses more=Is more conversant with
Weal=(1) Welfare, prosperity, happiness; (2) Commonwealth, body politic

Compleat:
The common-weal=’t Welvaaren van ‘t algemeen
A common-wealths man=Een republyks gezinde
Crooked=Krom, geboogen, scheef

Topics: respect, authority, intellect, value, adversity

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Adriana
CONTEXT:
His company must do his minions grace,
Whilst I at home starve for a merry look.
Hath homely age th’ alluring beauty took
From my poor cheek? Then he hath wasted it.
Are my discourses dull? Barren my wit?
If voluble and sharp discourse be marred,
Unkindness blunts it more than marble hard.
Do their gay vestments his affections bait?
That’s not my fault; he’s master of my state.
What ruins are in me that can be found
By him not ruined? Then is he the ground
Of my defeatures. My decayèd fair
A sunny look of his would soon repair.
But, too unruly deer, he breaks the pale
And feeds from home. Poor I am but his stale.

DUTCH:
Ontnam reeds rimp’lige ouderdom mijn wang
Haar boeiend schoon? Wie heeft het mij geroofd,
Dan hij? Is geest en scherts in mij verdoofd?
Neemt iets aan vlug en lucht gekout den moed,
‘t Is barschheid, ruw en hard als steen, die ‘t doet.
Lokt and’rer fraai gewaad hem van mijn zij,
‘t Is mijn schuld niet, want hij koopt mij kleedij.
Wat is in mij vervallen en is ‘t niet
Door hem? Ja, zoo hij mij vervallen ziet,
Hij ziet zijn eigen werk; één zonnestraal
Van hem, mijn schoon herleeft in morgenpraal.

MORE:
Proverb: As hard as a stone (flint, rock)

Voluble=Fluent, articulate
Sharp=Subtle, witty
Voluble and sharp discourse=Articulate and witty conversation
To blunt=Dull the edge of, repress, impair, i.e. blunt the natural edge
Ground of=Reason for
Defeatures=Disfigurements
Stale= Laughing-stock, dupe; decoy or bait set up as a lure
Pale=Enclosure

Compleat:
A voluble tongue=Een vloeijende tong, een gladde tong, een tong die wel gehangen is
Court minion=Een gunsteling van den Vorst; Troetelkind
To pale in=Met paalen afperken, afpaalen. Paled in=Rondom met paalen bezet, afgepaald
To make on a stale (property or stalking-horse) to one’s design=Iemand gebruiken om ons oogmerk te bereiken

Topics: language, intellect, respect, marriage, relationship, loyalty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
KING
My honour’s at the stake; which to defeat,
I must produce my power. Here, take her hand,
Proud scornful boy, unworthy this good gift;
That dost in vile misprision shackle up
My love and her desert; that canst not dream,
We, poising us in her defective scale,
Shall weigh thee to the beam; that wilt not know,
It is in us to plant thine honour where
We please to have it grow. Check thy contempt:
Obey our will, which travails in thy good:
Believe not thy disdain, but presently
Do thine own fortunes that obedient right
Which both thy duty owes and our power claims;
Or I will throw thee from my care for ever
Into the staggers and the careless lapse
Of youth and ignorance; both my revenge and hate
Loosing upon thee, in the name of justice,
Without all terms of pity. Speak; thine answer.
BERTRAM
Pardon, my gracious lord; for I submit
My fancy to your eyes: when I consider
What great creation and what dole of honour
Flies where you bid it, I find that she, which late
Was in my nobler thoughts most base, is now
The praised of the king; who, so ennobled,
Is as ’twere born so.

DUTCH:
Gij, die en mijne gunst en haar verdienste
Minachtend boeien aanlegt, niet begrijpt,
Dat mijn gewicht, op haar te lichte schaal
Geworpen, haar den doorslag geeft, niet inziet,
Dat onze macht uw adel planten kan,
Waar wij zijn groei begeeren.

MORE:
Misprision=1) Contempt; 2) Mistake, wrong or false imprisonment
Desert=Something deserved, either a reward or punishment
Defective=Lighter end (of the scale)
To the beam=Outweigh (raising the lighter end to the crossbeam)
Dropsied=Swollen
Plant=(Figuratively)= To give rise, to create
Check=Control
Staggers=Bewilderment, giddy confusion (a horse disease)
Careless=Reckless
Fancy=Love
Compleat:
Misprision=Verwaarloozing, verzuyming, verachteloozing
Desert=Verdienste
Defective=Gebreklyk, onvolkomen
Dropsy or dropsie=Waterzucht
The staggers=De duyzeling van een paard
Careless=Zorgeloos, kommerloos, achteloos, onachtzaam

Topics: respect, ingratitude, value, authority

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Aufidius
CONTEXT:
But we will drink together; and you shall bear
A better witness back than words, which we,
On like conditions, will have counter-seal’d.
Come, enter with us. Ladies, you deserve
To have a temple built you: all the swords
In Italy, and her confederate arms,
Could not have made this peace.

DUTCH:
Gij verdient, o vrouwen!
Dat u ter eer een tempel word’ gesticht.
Want Rome had met al zijn bondgenooten
Door ‘t zwaard dien vrede niet erlangd!

MORE:
Schmidt:
Witness=Testimony, attestation
Counterseal=To seal with another
Like=Similar

Compleat:
To bear witness=Getuigen, getuigenis geeven

Topics: conflict, resolution, respect

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
God-den to your worships: more of your conversation would infect my brain, being the herdsmen of the beastly
plebeians: I will be bold to take my leave of you.

DUTCH:
Nu, ik wensch uw’ edelbeden goeden avond; mij meer met u in te laten, mocht mijn hersens besmetten.

MORE:
God-den=Good evening (God give you good even.)

Schmidt:
Beastly=Coarse, bestial
Plebeians=The common people of ancient Rome

Compleat:
Beastly=Onbeschoft, morsig

Topics: insult, intellect, respect

PLAY: As you Like It
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Orlando
CONTEXT:
CELIA
Gentle cousin,
Let us go thank him and encourage him.
My father’s rough and envious disposition
Sticks me at heart. Sir, you have well deserved.
If you do keep your promises in love
But justly, as you have exceeded all promise,
Your mistress shall be happy.
ROSALIND
Gentleman,
Wear this for me—one out of suits with fortune
That could give more but that her hand lacks means.
Shall we go, coz?
CELIA
Ay. Fare you well, fair gentleman.
ORLANDO
Can I not say “I thank you”? My better parts
Are all thrown down, and that which here stands up
Is but a quintain, a mere lifeless block.

DUTCH:
Mijn beter deel
Ligt neergeveld, en wat nog overeind staat,
Is als een pop bij ‘t steekspel, roerloos, dood.

MORE:
Schmidt:
Quintain=a post or figure set up for beginners in tilting to run at.

Burgersdijk notes:
Een pop bij ‘t steekspel. A quintain: een houten figuur, die vooral bij oefeningen in het toernooirijden als doel voor de lans diende. Volgens Douce was dit doel, in zijn meest volkomen vorm, een afgezaagde boomstam, waarop een menschelijke figuur geplaatst was, die aan den linkerarm een schild, in de rechterhand een zak met zand vasthield. De toernooiruiters poogden in galop met hun lans den kop of het lijf van de pop te treffen; mislukte dit en raakten zij het schild, dan draaide de pop snel om en gaf hun, tot groot vermaak der toeschouwers, een slag met den zandzak.

Topics: emotion and mood, civility, merit, promise, respect

PLAY: Richard II
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: King Richard II
CONTEXT:
NORTHUMBERLAND
My lord, in the base court he doth attend
To speak with you; may it please you to come down.
KING RICHARD II
Down, down I come; like glistering Phaethon,
Wanting the manage of unruly jades.
In the base court? Base court, where kings grow base,
To come at traitors’ calls and do them grace.
In the base court? Come down? Down, court!
down, king!
For night-owls shriek where mounting larks
should sing.

DUTCH:
De nachtuil krijscht, dan zwijgt de nachtegaal.

MORE:

Phaethon: In Greek mythology, Phaethon, a son of Helios the sun god, begged Helios to be allowed to drive his chariot and lost control (as Richard is losing control).

Base court=Lower courtyard of the castle
Base=Mean, vile
Jade=A term of contempt or pity for a worthless or maltreated horse

Compleat:
A base fellow=Een slechte vent, oolyke boef
Base=Ondergeschikt
Base (or inferior) court=Een ondergeschikt Hof, een minder Rechtbank
Jade=Een lompig paerd, knol, jakhals

Topics: respect

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
First note that he is near you in descent,
And should you fall, he as the next will mount.
Meseemeth then it is no policy,
Respecting what a rancorous mind he bears
And his advantage following your decease,
That he should come about your royal person
Or be admitted to your highness’ council.
By flattery hath he won the commons’ hearts,
And when he please to make commotion,
‘Tis to be fear’d they all will follow him.
Now ’tis the spring, and weeds are shallow-rooted;
Suffer them now, and they’ll o’ergrow the garden
And choke the herbs for want of husbandry.
The reverent care I bear unto my lord
Made me collect these dangers in the duke.
If it be fond, call it a woman’s fear;
Which fear if better reasons can supplant,
I will subscribe and say I wrong’d the duke.
My Lord of Suffolk, Buckingham, and York,
Reprove my allegation, if you can;
Or else conclude my words effectual.

DUTCH:
t Is voorjaar nog en ‘t onkruid vlak van wortels;
Verschoont gij ‘t nu, het overgroeit den hof
En bij verzuim verstikt het al ‘t gezaaide.

MORE:

Meseemeth=It seems to me
No policy=Not wise
Respecting=Considering
Commotion=Rebellion
Husbandry=Care, cultivation, tillage
Collect=Conclude, gather
Fond=Foolish
Subscribe=Admit, confess to being in the wrong
Reprove=Disprove, confute

Compleat:
It seems to me=Heet schynt my toe
Respect=Achting, inzigt
Commotion=Beweeging, beroerte, oproer, oploop
Husbandry=Landbouw
Fond (foolish)=Dwaas
Subscribe (submit or consent)=Iet toestaan, zich ergens aan onderwerpen
To reprove=Bestraffen, berispen

Topics: respect, reputation, trust, gullibility, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Chief Justice
CONTEXT:
FALSTAFF
It hath it original from much grief, from study, and perturbation of the brain. I have read the cause of his effects in Galen. It is a kind of deafness.
CHIEF JUSTICE
I think you are fallen into the disease, for you hear not what
I say to you.
FALSTAFF
Very well, my lord, very well. Rather, an ’t please you, it is
the disease of not listening, the malady of not marking, that
I am troubled withal.
CHIEF JUSTICE
To punish you by the heels would amend the attention of
your ears, and I care not if I do become your physician.

DUTCH:
Een tuchtiging op uw voetzolen zou de oplettendheid van uw ooren beter maken; en ik zou er niet tegen opzien, uw arts te worden.

MORE:

It original=Its cause, origins
Galen=Second century Greek physician regarded as a medical authority
“To punish you by the heels” is another reference to the punishment of baffling. This was formally a punishment of infamy inflicted on recreant nights, which included hanging them up by the heels.

Schmidt:
Perturbation=Disturbance, disorder, disquiet

Compleat:
To lay one by the heels (send to prison)=Iemand gevangen zetten
Perturbation=Ontroering, beroering, verstooring
To mark=Opletten

Burgersdijk notes:
Een tuchtiging op uwe voetzolen. In ‘t Engelsch staat eigenlijk aan de hielen; de straf met het voetblok is bedoeld, welke aan landloopers werd opgelegd. In Koning Lear wordt Kent zoo gestraft.

Topics: respect, punishment

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
Small curs are not regarded when they grin;
But great men tremble when the lion roars;
And Humphrey is no little man in England.
First note that he is near you in descent,
And should you fall, he as the next will mount.
Meseemeth then it is no policy,
Respecting what a rancorous mind he bears
And his advantage following your decease,
That he should come about your royal person
Or be admitted to your highness’ council.
By flattery hath he won the commons’ hearts,
And when he please to make commotion,
‘Tis to be fear’d they all will follow him.

DUTCH:
Wie let er op, als kleine hondjens keffen?
Doch brult de leeuw, dan sidd’ren groote mannen;

MORE:

Small curs=Small dogs
Meseemeth=It seems to me
No policy=Not wise
Respecting=Considering
Commotion=Rebellion

Compleat:
Cur (curr)=Hond
It seems to me=Heet schynt my toe
Respect=Achting, inzigt
Commotion=Beweeging, beroerte, oproer, oploop

Topics: respect, reputation, trust, gullibility, wisdom

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 4.1
SPEAKER: Suffolk
CONTEXT:
O, that I were a god, to shoot forth thunder
Upon these paltry, servile, abject drudges!
Small things make base men proud.
This villain here,
Being captain of a pinnace, threatens more
Than Bargulus, the strong Illyrian pirate.
Drones suck not eagles’ blood, but rob beehives.
It is impossible that I should die
By such a lowly vassal as thyself.
Thy words move rage and not remorse in me.
I go of message from the Queen to France.
I charge thee waft me safely cross the Channel.

DUTCH:
O ware ik thans een god, die bliksems schoot,
Op deze lage, slaafsche, vuile knechten!
‘t Gepeupel wordt door kleine dingen trotsch

MORE:

CITED IN US LAW:
Jenkins v. Jenkins, 11 Ohio App. 135, 136, 187 N.E.2d [?9, 60 (1962)(Radcliff, J.)

In Shakespeare’s time it was believed that drone bees sucked the blood of eagles and stole honey from other beehives.

Drudge=Slave, peasant
Pinnace=Small vessel
Bargulus=Pirate (ref to Cicero’s Bardulis)
Waft=Transport, convey

Compleat:
Drudge=Iemand die het vuilste en slobbigste werk doet
Pinnace=Een pynas scheepje, pynasje
To waft over=Overvoeren

Topics: cited in law, nature, respect

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Iago
CONTEXT:
Thus do I ever make my fool my purse.
For I mine own gained knowledge should profane
If I would time expend with such a snipe
But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
But I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety. He holds me well.
The better shall my purpose work on him.
Cassio’s a proper man. Let me see now,To get his place and to plume up my will
In double knavery. How? How? Let’s see.
After some time, to abuse Othello’s ear
That he is too familiar with his wife.
He hath a person and a smooth dispose
To be suspected, framed to make women false.
The Moor is of a free and open nature
That thinks men honest that but seem to be so,
And will as tenderly be led by th’ nose
As asses are.
I have ’t. It is engendered! Hell and night
Must bring this monstrous birth to the world’s light.

DUTCH:
De Moor is gul en open van natuur,
Waant ieder eerlijk, die slechts eerlijk schijnt,
En laat zoo zachtkens bij den neus zich leiden,
Als ezels ‘t laten doen.

MORE:

Snipe=Bird, also ‘worthless’ fellow, simpleton
Gained knowledge=Practical experience
In that kind=In that regard
‘Twixt=Betwixt (between)
Surety=Certainty
Holds me well=Respects, has a good opinion of
Purpose=Plan

Compleat:
Snipe=Snip, snep
Betwixt=Tusschen, tusschenbeide
Betwixt the devil and the red sea=Tusschen hangen en worgen
Purpose (design, resolution, project)=Voorneemen, besluit, ontwerp

Topics: honesty, gullibility, trust, suspicion, respect, learning/education, age/experience, conspiracy

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
Fare you well, my lord; and
believe this of me, there can be no kernel in this
light nut; the soul of this man is his clothes.
Trust him not in matter of heavy consequence;
I have kept of them tame, and know their natures.
Farewell, monsieur: I have spoken better
of you than you have or will to deserve at my
hand; but we must do good against evil.

DUTCH:
Vaarwel, mijn heer, en geloof mij, in deze vooze noot kan geen pit schuilen; de ziel van dezen mensch zit in zijn kleederen.

MORE:
Light nut=Lightweight
Consequence=Influence, importance
Compleat:
Consequence=Belang

Topics: status, merit, respect, good and bad, appearance

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE:
SPEAKER: Mortimer
CONTEXT:
WORCESTER
In faith, my lord, you are too wilful-blame,
And, since your coming hither, have done enough
To put him quite beside his patience.
You must needs learn, lord, to amend this fault.
Though sometimes it show greatness, courage, blood—
And that’s the dearest grace it renders you—
Yet oftentimes it doth present harsh rage,
Defect of manners, want of government,
Pride, haughtiness, opinion, and disdain,
The least of which, haunting a nobleman,
Loseth men’s hearts and leaves behind a stain
Upon the beauty of all parts besides,
Beguiling them of commendation.
HOTSPUR
Well, I am schooled. Good manners be your speed!
Here come our wives, and let us take our leave.
MORTIMER
This is the deadly spite that angers me:
My wife can speak no English, I no Welsh.

DUTCH:
Dit is voor mij een dood’lijk grievend leed:
Mijn vrouw verstaat geen Engelsch, ik geen Welsch.

MORE:
Wilful-blame=Blameable on purpose, on principle; indulging faults, though conscious that they are faults. (Arden: blameworthy in the obstinacy or rashness of your behaviour. (…) Others explain as “
wilfully blameworthy” or “wilfully to blame,” comparing “wilful-negligent” in Winter’s Tale, i. ii. 255,)
Haunting=Affecting
Blood=Mettle, spirit
Want of government=Lack of self-control
Opinion= Conceit
Boiling them of commendation=Making them lose respect
I am schooled=I have learned my lesson
Compleat:
Commendation=Pryzing, aanpryzing, aanbeveling
Opinion=Waan
A man of government=Een gemaatigt Man
He hath not the government of his tongue=Hy kan zyn tong niet beteugelen

Topics: learning/education, civility, order/society, respect, language, blame

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Cromwell
CONTEXT:
CROMWELL
My Lord of Winchester, you are a little,
By your good favour, too sharp; men so noble,
However faulty, yet should find respect
For what they have been: ’tis a cruelty
To load a falling man.

DUTCH:
Mylord van Winchester, gij zijt een weinig, —
Vergun mij, — al te scherp. Een man, zoo edel,
Moest, hoe hij dwaal’, toch immer achting vinden
Om wat hij is geweest; ‘t is wreed, een last
Op hem, die valt, te leggen.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
The Florida Bar v. Silverman, 196 So.2d 442, 444 (Fla. 1967)(Ervin, J;)(dissent).

By your good favour=With your permission
Load=Burden
Sharp=Harsh
Compleat:
Favour=Begunstigen, gunste toedraagen
Load=Laading, last, vracht
Sharp=Scherp, spits, bits, streng, scherpzinnig

Topics: cited in law, haste, respect, ruin

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Queen Margaret
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VI
I muse my Lord of Gloucester is not come:
‘Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man,
Whate’er occasion keeps him from us now.
QUEEN MARGARET
Can you not see? Or will ye not observe
The strangeness of his alter’d countenance?
With what a majesty he bears himself,
How insolent of late he is become,
How proud, how peremptory, and unlike himself?
We know the time since he was mild and affable,
And if we did but glance a far-off look,
Immediately he was upon his knee,
That all the court admired him for submission:
But meet him now, and, be it in the morn,
When every one will give the time of day,
He knits his brow and shows an angry eye,
And passeth by with stiff unbowed knee,
Disdaining duty that to us belongs.

DUTCH:
t Verbaast mij, dat lord Gloster nog ontbreekt,
Die anders nooit de laatste pleegt te wezen, —
Wat ook de reden zij, dat hij niet kwam.

MORE:

Muse=Wonder
Hindmost=Last in line
Wont=Habit
Strangeness=Aloofness, reserve
Knits his brow=Frown

Compleat:
Muse=Bepeinzen
Hindmost (hindermost)=De agterste, de alleragterste
Strangeness=Vreemdheid
To knit the brows=Het voorhoofd in rimpels trekken

Topics: respect, risk, caution, preparation, ambition, duty

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: Clown
CONTEXT:
CLOWN
So that you had her wrinkles and I her money,
I would she did as you say.
PAROLLES
Why, I say nothing.
CLOWN
Marry, you are the wiser man; for many a man’s
tongue shakes out his master’s undoing: to say
nothing, to do nothing, to know nothing, and to have
nothing, is to be a great part of your title; which
is within a very little of nothing.
PAROLLES
Away! thou’rt a knave.

DUTCH:
Het wijste, wat gij doen kunt, want menigen dienaar’s
tong praat zijn meester in het verderf. Niets zeggen,
niets doen, niets weten en niets hebben, maakt een
groot deel van uw waardigheid uit, die uit een zeer
klein deel van niets bestaat.

MORE:
Title=Intrinsic value, position
Undoing=Ruin
Compleat:
Undoing=Losmaaking, bederving
That was the undoing of him=Dat was zyn verderf

Topics: respect, order/society, ruin

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Northumberland
CONTEXT:
FALSTAFF
Why, what a wasp-stung and impatient fool
Art thou to break into this woman’s mood,
Tying thine ear to no tongue but thine own!
HOTSPUR
Why, look you, I am whipped and scourged with rods,
Nettled and stung with pismires, when I hear
Of this vile politician, Bolingbroke.
In Richard’s time—what do you call the place?
A plague upon it! It is in Gloucestershire.
‘Twas where the madcap duke his uncle kept,
His uncle York; where I first bowed my knee
Unto this king of smiles, this Bolingbroke.
‘Sblood, when you and he came back from Ravenspurgh.

DUTCH:
Wat wesp heeft u, onstuim’ge dwaas, gestoken,
Dat ge in een vlaag van vrouwenwoede losbreekt,
En ’t oor aan geene tong dan de uwe leent?

MORE:
Tying thine ear=Listening
King of smiles=Hypocrite
Schmidt:
Wasp-stung=Stung by a wasp, highly irritated (Ff wasp-tongued)
Scourge=A whip, a lash; used as the symbol of punishment and vindictive affliction
Rod=The instrument of chastisement for children (or men compared with children)
Pismire=The ant, emmet
Compleat:
Pismire=Mier
Waspish=Kribbig, knyzig, snaauwachtig

Topics: respect, language

PLAY: The Comedy of Errors
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Dromio
CONTEXT:
We came into the world like brother and brother,
And now let’s go hand in hand, not one before another

DUTCH:
Neen, dan zij ‘t zoo:
Wij sprongen samen de wereld in, als broeders, met elkander;
Zoo gaan wij nu samen hand aan hand, en de een niet na den ander

MORE:

Topics: relationship, love, respect, resolution, equality

PLAY: Measure for Measure
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: Duke Vincentio
CONTEXT:
We have strict statutes and most biting laws.
The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds,
Which for this nineteen years we have let slip;
Even like an o’ergrown lion in a cave,
That goes not out to prey. Now, as fond fathers,
Having bound up the threatening twigs of birch,
Only to stick it in their children’s sight
For terror, not to use, in time the rod
Becomes more mock’d than fear’d; so our decrees,
Dead to infliction, to themselves are dead;
And liberty plucks justice by the nose;
The baby beats the nurse, and quite athwart
Goes all decorum.

DUTCH:
Wij hebben stipte wetten, strenge straffen,
Vereischte breidels voor halsstarr’ge paarden

MORE:
Cited in Shakespeare’s Legal Maxims (William Lowes Rushton)

Topics: law/legal, authority, value, respect, justice

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 2.1
SPEAKER: Menenius
CONTEXT:
BRUTUS
Come, come, you are well understood to be a
perfecter giber for the table than a necessary
bencher in the Capitol.
MENENIUS
Our very priests must become mockers, if they shall
encounter such ridiculous subjects as you are. When
you speak best unto the purpose, it is not worth the
wagging of your beards; and your beards deserve not
so honourable a grave as to stuff a botcher’s
cushion, or to be entombed in an ass’s pack-
saddle. Yet you must be saying, Martius is proud;
who in a cheap estimation, is worth predecessors
since Deucalion, though peradventure some of the
best of ’em were hereditary hangmen.

DUTCH:
Als gij het best ter zake spreekt, is het niet eens het schudden
van uw baarden waard;

MORE:
The wagging of your beards=The effort of speaking
Cheap estimation=Lowest possible valuation

Schmidt:
Peradventure=Perhaps
Mocker=Scoffer
Botcher=One who mends and patches old clothes (See Twelfth Night, 1.5)

Compleat:
Mocker=Bespotter, schimper, spotvogel
Wagging=Schudding, waggeling
Botcher=Een lapper, knoeijer, boetelaar, broddelaar
Peradventure=Bygeval, misschien

Topics: insult, intellect, status, respect

PLAY: Romeo and Juliet
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Friar Lawrence
CONTEXT:
If e’er thou wast thyself and these woes thine,
Thou and these woes were all for Rosaline.
And art thou changed? Pronounce this sentence then:
Women may fall when there’s no strength in men.

DUTCH:
Een vrouw zij zwak, want krachtloos is de man.

MORE:
Woes = Calamity, grief
Strength = moral or intellectual force

Topics: respect, loyalty, strength

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 3.2
SPEAKER: King Henry VIII
CONTEXT:
KING HENRY VIII
Good my lord,
You are full of heavenly stuff, and bear the inventory
Of your best graces in your mind; the which
You were now running o’er: you have scarce time
To steal from spiritual leisure a brief span
To keep your earthly audit: sure, in that
I deem you an ill husband, and am glad
To have you therein my companion.

DUTCH:
Mijn waarde lord,
Vol heil’ge schatten zijt ge, en de’ inventaris
Van uw genadegaven draagt ge in ‘t hart;
Dien liept gij juist eens door.

MORE:
Stuff=Characteristics, substance
Grace=Virtue, best qualities
Audit=Reckoning
Husband=Manager (ref. husbandry)
Compleat:
Stuff=Stof, stoff
Grace=Gunst, bevalligheid
Husbandman=Akkerman, landman
Husband of a ship=Iemand die zorg draaft voor het aangeeven, lossen, en zolderen van een scheeps laading, een boekhouder van een schip

Topics: value, merit, respect, marriage

PLAY: All’s Well that Ends Well
ACT/SCENE: 2.3
SPEAKER: Lafew
CONTEXT:
LAFEW
Go to, sir; you were beaten in Italy for picking a
kernel out of a pomegranate; you are a vagabond and
no true traveller: you are more saucy with lords
and honourable personages than the commission of your
birth and virtue gives you heraldry. You are not
worth another word, else I’d call you knave. I leave
you.

DUTCH:
Gij zijt geen woord verder waard; anders zou ik u een schurk noemen.

MORE:
True traveller=Traveller with a government licence
Vagabond=Tramp
Commission=A warrant by which any trust is held, or power exercised
Heraldry=Rank and accomplishments
Knave=Rascal, villain
Compleat:
Vagabond=Een landlooper, schooijer, zwerver
Commission=Last, volmagt, lastbrief, provisie

Topics: insult, order/society, status, respect

PLAY: King Henry IV Part 1
ACT/SCENE: 1.3
SPEAKER: King
CONTEXT:
My blood hath been too cold and temperate,
Unapt to stir at these indignities,
And you have found me, for accordingly
You tread upon my patience. But be sure
I will from henceforth rather be myself,
Mighty and to be feared, than my condition,
Which hath been smooth as oil, soft as young down,
And therefore lost that title of respect
Which the proud soul ne’er pays but to the proud.

DUTCH:
Te koel en te gematigd was mijn bloed,
Niet vatbaar om hij zulk een hoon te koken;
En dit hebt gij ontdekt, want daarom treedt gij
Op mijn lankmoedigheid;

MORE:
Schmidt:
Temperate=moderate, calm
Found me=Found me out, have my measure
Unapt=Not propense or ready
Condition=Quality
Tread upon (in a moral sense)=To trample, to set the foot on in contempt
Indignity=Contemptuous injury, insult
Title of respect=Claim to respect, respect to which I have title
Compleat:
Unapt=Onbekwaam
Temperate=Maatig, gemaatigd
To tread upon=Optreeden, vertreeden
To tread underfoot=Met den voet treeden

Topics: identity, dignity, failure, respect, patience, authority

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