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Shakespeare quotes page

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 2 ACT/SCENE: 5.2 SPEAKER: Young Clifford CONTEXT: Shame and confusion! All is on the rout;
Fear frames disorder, and disorder wounds
Where it should guard. O war, thou son of hell,
Whom angry heavens do make their minister
Throw in the frozen bosoms of our part
Hot coals of vengeance! Let no soldier fly.
He that is truly dedicate to war
Hath no self-love, nor he that loves himself
Hath not essentially but by circumstance
The name of valour. DUTCH: Schande en verwarring! Alles wijkt en vlucht.
Door vrees wordt orde wanorde, en verwondt
Wat zij moest hoeden
MORE:
Frames=Creates, produces
Rout=In a disorderly retreat
Guard=Protect
Circumstance=Occurrence, accident

Compleat:
To frame=Een gestalte geeven, maaken, ontwerpen, schikken
Rout (defeat)=Nederlaag
Rout (squabble, noise)=Geraas, getier
Circumstance=Omstandigheid Topics: respect, courage, revenge

PLAY: Cymbeline
ACT/SCENE: 2.5
SPEAKER: Posthumus Leonatus
CONTEXT:
The woman’s part in me—for there’s no motion
That tends to vice in man but I affirm
It is the woman’s part: be it lying, note it,
The woman’s; flattering, hers; deceiving, hers;
Lust and rank thoughts, hers, hers; revenges, hers;
Ambitions, covetings, change of prides, disdain,
Nice longing, slanders, mutability,
All faults that may be named, nay, that hell knows,
Why, hers, in part or all, but rather all.
For even to vice
They are not constant, but are changing still
One vice but of a minute old for one
Not half so old as that. I’ll write against them,
Detest them, curse them. Yet ’tis greater skill
In a true hate to pray they have their will;
The very devils cannot plague them better.

DUTCH:
O, vond ik slechts
Wat vrouwlijk is in mij! want ied’re neiging
Tot ondeugd in den man, voorwaar, zij is
Zijn vrouwlijk erfdeel; liegen, ja, het is zoo,
Komt van de vrouw; van haar ‘t gevlei, ‘t bedriegen;
Onkuische lust, van haar; van haar, de wraakzucht;
Van haar de zucht naar grootheid, hoovaardij,
Inbeelding, dwaze lusten, lasterzucht,
Laatdunkendheid en wuftheid, alle kwaad,
Wat maar een naam heeft, wat de hel maar kent,
Van haar, gedeelt’lijk of geheel; of ja, geheel;


May be named=That man can name (See Richard III, 1.2 “tongue may name”)
Motion=Impulse
Nice=Fastidious

Compleat:
Motion (instigation)=Aanporring, aandryving
To plague=Plaagen, quellen

Topics: honesty, truth, flattery, deceit, revenge

PLAY: King Henry V
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: King Henry
CONTEXT:
Yea, strike the Dauphin blind to look on us.
And tell the pleasant prince this mock of his
Hath turned his balls to gun-stones, and his soul
Shall stand sore chargèd for the wasteful vengeance
That shall fly with them; for many a thousand widows
Shall this his mock mock out of their dear husbands,
Mock mothers from their sons, mock castles down,
And some are yet ungotten and unborn
That shall have cause to curse the Dauphin’s scorn.
But this lies all within the will of God,
To whom I do appeal, and in whose name
Tell you the Dauphin I am coming on,
To venge me as I may and to put forth
My rightful hand in a well-hallowed cause.
So get you hence in peace. And tell the Dauphin
His jest will savour but of shallow wit
When thousands weep more than did laugh at it.
—Convey them with safe conduct.—Fare you well.

DUTCH:
Gaat thans in vrede heen, en zegt den prins,
Dat niemand meer zijn scherts een scherts zal achten,
Als duizenden dra weenen, die nu lachten. —
Bezorgt hun vrijgeleide. — Vaart gij wel!

MORE:
Balls=Tennis balls
Gunstones=Cannonballs
Hallowed=Consecrated
Rightful=Lawful, legitimate
Savour=Have a particular smell; be of a particular nature (metaphorically)

Compleat:
Hallowed=Geheiligd, gewyd
Rightfull=Rechtmaatig, gerechtig
Savour=(smell) ruiken; (taste) smaaken

Topics: revenge, intellect, value, understanding

PLAY: King Henry VIII
ACT/SCENE: 1.2
SPEAKER: Cardinal Wolsey
CONTEXT:
CARDINAL WOLSEY
Please your highness, note
This dangerous conception in this point.
Not friended by his wish, to your high person
His will is most malignant; and it stretches
Beyond you, to your friends.
QUEEN KATHARINE
My learn’d lord cardinal,
Deliver all with charity.
KING HENRY VIII
Speak on:
How grounded he his title to the crown,
Upon our fail? to this point hast thou heard him
At any time speak aught?

DUTCH:
Hoe grondde hij zijn aanspraak op de kroon
Na ons verscheiden? Heeft hij hieromtrent
Zich uitgelaten ?

MORE:
Conception=Plan, idea
Friended=Supported
Deliver=Speak
Grounded=Based
Fail=Death (heirless)
Point=Matter, question
Compleat:
Conception=Bevatting
To deliver a message=Een boodschap afleggen
To deliver a speech handsomly=Een reeden gevoeglyk voortbrengen
To ground upon=Op steunen, op bouwen, grondeeren, vast staat op maaken
Point=Punt, zaak
The matter is come to this point=De zaak is hier toe gekomen

Topics: revenge, plans/intentions, betrayal

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 1.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
A babe to honor her. If she must teem,
Create her child of spleen, that it may live
And be a thwart disnatured torment to her.
Let it stamp wrinkles in her brow of youth,
With cadent tears fret channels in her cheeks,
Turn all her mother’s pains and benefits
To laughter and contempt, that she may feel—
That she may feel
How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is
To have a thankless child.—Away, away!

DUTCH:
Hoe scherper dan een slangentand is het om een ​​ondankbaar kind te hebben!

MORE:
Phrase “Sharper than a serpent’s tooth” said to be invented by Shakespeare. It has even been used as a title for an episode of Star Trek.
CITED IN US LAW:
Mileski v. Locker, 14 Misc.2d 252,257, 178 N.Y.S.2d 911, 917 (N.Y.Civ.Ct. 1958)(Pette, J.); Maas v. Maas, 29 Md. App. 521, 349 A.2d 6.55 (1975).
Schmidt:
Compleat:

Topics: still in use, ingratitude, revenge

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 3.3
SPEAKER: Warwick
CONTEXT:
I came from Edward as ambassador,
But I return his sworn and mortal foe:
Matter of marriage was the charge he gave me,
But dreadful war shall answer his demand.
Had he none else to make a stale but me?
Then none but I shall turn his jest to sorrow.
I was the chief that raised him to the crown,
And I’ll be chief to bring him down again:
Not that I pity Henry’s misery,
But seek revenge on Edward’s mockery.

DUTCH:
Ik was de man, die hem ten troon verhief;
Ik wil de man zijn, die hem vallen doet.

MORE:

Charge he gave me=My order, commission
Stale=Dupe, laughing stock
Chief=Principal

Compleat:
Charge=Belasten, bevelen, opleggen, te laste leggen,
This shall be your charge=Dat zal uw post zyn

Topics: marriage, conflict, revenge

PLAY: King Lear
ACT/SCENE: 2.4
SPEAKER: King Lear
CONTEXT:
I will have such revenges on you both
That all the world shall—I will do such things—
What they are yet I know not, but they shall be
The terrors of the earth. You think I’ll weep?
No, I’ll not weep.

DUTCH:
k oefen zulk een wraak,
Hoe, weet ik zelf nog niet, maar ‘t zal de schrik
Der aarde zijn.

MORE:
CITED IN EU LAW:
Opinion of Advocate General Hogan, 12 May 2021. Case C-124/20. ECLI:EU:C:2021:386.
“In these circumstances, the threat of ‘dissuasive’ sanctions in the laws of the Member States envisaged by Article 9 of that statute would likely be a hollow one and the Union and its Member States would be reduced, like Shakespeare’s King Lear, to protesting that they would ‘do such things … I know not [what], but they shall be the terrors of the earth’.”

Topics: revenge, cited in law, law/legal

PLAY: The Merchant of Venice
ACT/SCENE: 3.1
SPEAKER: Shylock
CONTEXT:
SALERIO
Why, I am sure, if he forfeit thou wilt not take his flesh.
What’s that good for?
SHYLOCK
To bait fish withal. If it will feed nothing else, it
will feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me and hindered
me half a million, laughed at my losses, mocked at my
gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled
my friends, heated mine enemies—and what’s his reason? I
am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands,
organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed
with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject
to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed
and cooled by the same winter and summer as a Christian
is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us,
do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if
you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you
in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew
wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a
Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by
Christian example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach
me I will execute—and it shall go hard but I will better
the instruction.

DUTCH:
Om er visch mee te vangen; en als niets anders er mee gediend is, dan is mijn wraak er mee gediend

MORE:
Scorn=Be contemptuous of
Hinder=To stop, obstruct, keep back (caused loss of)
Thwart=Counteract, interfere with, hinder
Compleat:
Scorn=Versmaading, verachting, bespotting
Hinder=Hinderen, verhinderen, beletten, weerhouden
To hinder one’s time (to make one lose one’s time)=Iemand verletten, zyn tyd beneemen.
To thwart (or traverse)=Dwarsboomen, beletten, verhinderen

Topics: emotion and mood, misquoted

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
Be this the whetstone of your sword. Let grief convert to anger; blunt not the heart, avenge it

DUTCH:
Dit zij de wetsteen van uw zwaard! Uw leed
Verkeere in toorn! Verstomp uw hart niet, neen,
Ontvlam het!

MORE:
Compleat:
To whet a knife=een Mes wetten (of slypen)
Whet-stone=een Wetsteen, Slypsteen
Whetted=Gewet, gesleepen, scherp gemaakt.

Topics: revenge, emotion and mood

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 5.1
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
Hear you, sir.
What is the reason that you use me thus?
I loved you ever. But it is no matter.
Let Hercules himself do what he may,
The cat will mew and dog will have his day.

DUTCH:
Of Hercules al raast en tiert, of treurt, De poes miauwt, een hond, die krijgt zijn beurt. /
Al deed hier Hercules al wat hij kan, De kat zou mauwen en de bond ging an.

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
City of Columbus v. Becher, 115 Ohio App. 239, 240, 184 N.E.2d 617,618. In a case involving a dog control ordinance (1961)(McLaughlin, J.);

Topics: invented or popularised, still in use, cited in law, revenge

PLAY: Macbeth
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Malcolm
CONTEXT:
Be comforted.
Let’s make us med’cines of our great revenge,
To cure this deadly grief.

DUTCH:
Zoek troost; dat onze felle wraak u heeling
Van deze doodwond breng’!

MORE:
Allusion to the proverb: “A desperate disease must have a desperate cure” (1539, Tilley)

Topics: revenge, grief, remedy

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Coriolanus
CONTEXT:
Like a dull actor now,
I have forgot my part, and I am out,
Even to a full disgrace. Best of my flesh,
Forgive my tyranny; but do not say
For that ‘Forgive our Romans.’ O, a kiss
Long as my exile, sweet as my revenge!
Now, by the jealous queen of heaven, that kiss
I carried from thee, dear; and my true lip
Hath virgin’d it e’er since. You gods! I prate,
And the most noble mother of the world
Leave unsaluted: sink, my knee, i’ the earth;

DUTCH:
Als een verbijsterd speler
Ken ik mijn rol niet meer, blijf steken, sta hier
Tot ieders spot.

MORE:
Proverb: Revenge is sweet

Schmidt:
Disgrace=A state of being abashed, of being exposed to contempt; discredit
Tyranny=Cruelty
Dull=Not bright, dim, clouded; awkward, stupid

Compleat:
Disgrace (discredit, dishonour or reproach)=Smaadheid, schande, hoon
Tyranny=Geweldenary, tyranny, dwingelandy
Dull=Lui, traag; lomp, ongevoelig
A dull wit=Een dof verstand

Topics: regret, language, revenge, proverbs and idioms, still in use, invented or popularised

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 1.5
SPEAKER: Ghost
CONTEXT:
GHOST
Pity me not, but lend thy serious hearing
To what I shall unfold.
HAMLET
Speak. I am bound to hear.
GHOST
So art thou to revenge when thou shalt hear.

DUTCH:
Erbarm u niet, maar leen uw ernstig hooren
Aan ‘t geen ik ga ontvouwen .

MORE:
CITED IN US LAW:
Stambovsky v. Ackley, 169 A.D.2d 254, 257, 572 N.Y.S.2d 672 (1991)

Topics: cited in law, pity, revenge

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 4.3
SPEAKER: Emilia
CONTEXT:
Yes, a dozen, and as many to th’ vantage as
would store the world they played for.
But I do think it is their husbands’ faults
If wives do fall. Say that they slack their duties
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
And pour our treasures into foreign laps,
Or else break out in peevish jealousies,
Throwing restraint upon us. Or say they strike us,
Or scant our former having in despite.
Why, we have galls, and though we have some grace,
Yet have we some revenge. Let husbands know
Their wives have sense like them. They see and smell
And have their palates both for sweet and sour,
As husbands have. What is it that they do
When they change us for others? Is it sport?
I think it is. And doth affection breed it?
I think it doth. Is ’t frailty that thus errs?
It is so too. And have not we affections,
Desires for sport, and frailty, as men have?
Then let them use us well, else let them know,
The ills we do, their ills instruct us so.

DUTCH:
Dus, dat ze ons goed behand’len of bedenken,
Dat, zoo ze ons krenken, zij ons leeren krenken.

MORE:

In despite=Out of spite
Peevish=Silly, spiteful
Galls=Tempers or spirits to cause resentment
Affection=Passion

Compleat:
Peevish=Kribbig, gemelyk

Topics: marriage, trust, betrayal, revenge, age/experience, equality, respect

PLAY: Coriolanus
ACT/SCENE: 5.3
SPEAKER: Volumnia
CONTEXT:
The end of war’s uncertain, but this certain,
That, if thou conquer Rome, the benefit
Which thou shalt thereby reap is such a name,
Whose repetition will be dogg’d with curses;
Whose chronicle thus writ: ‘The man was noble,
But with his last attempt he wiped it out;
Destroy’d his country, and his name remains
To the ensuing age abhorr’d.’ Speak to me, son:
Thou hast affected the fine strains of honour,
To imitate the graces of the gods;
To tear with thunder the wide cheeks o’ the air,
And yet to charge thy sulphur with a bolt
That should but rive an oak. Why dost not speak?
Think’st thou it honourable for a noble man
Still to remember wrongs? Daughter, speak you:
He cares not for your weeping. Speak thou, boy:
Perhaps thy childishness will move him more
Than can our reasons. There’s no man in the world
More bound to ’s mother; yet here he lets me prate
Like one i’ the stocks. Thou hast never in thy life
Show’d thy dear mother any courtesy,
When she, poor hen, fond of no second brood,
Has cluck’d thee to the wars and safely home,
Loaden with honour. Say my request’s unjust,
And spurn me back: but if it be not so,
Thou art not honest; and the gods will plague thee,
That thou restrain’st from me the duty which
To a mother’s part belongs. He turns away:
Down, ladies; let us shame him with our knees.
To his surname Coriolanus ’longs more pride
Than pity to our prayers. Down: an end;
This is the last: so we will home to Rome,
And die among our neighbours. Nay, behold ’s:
This boy, that cannot tell what he would have
But kneels and holds up hands for fellowship,
Does reason our petition with more strength
Than thou hast to deny ’t. Come, let us go:
This fellow had a Volscian to his mother;
His wife is in Corioli and his child
Like him by chance. Yet give us our dispatch:
I am hush’d until our city be a-fire,
And then I’ll speak a little.

DUTCH:
Die knaap, die niet kan zeggen wat hij wenscht,
Maar met ons meeknielt en de handen heft,
Bepleit ons smeekgebed met meerder kracht,
Dan gij tot weig’ren hebt!

MORE:
Proverb: The chance of war is uncertain
Proverb: To forget a wrong is best revenge (remedy)

Restrain’st=Legal use: keep back, withhold. Among examples in the New Eng. Dict, is: “The rents, issues, and profites thereof [they] have wrongfully restreyned, perceyved, and taken to their owne use.”
‘Longs=Belongs
An end=Let that be an end to it
Reason=Argue for, plead for
Dispatch=Decisive answer

Compleat:
Restrain (sting, limit or confine)=Bepaalen, kort houden
Restrain (repress or curb)=Fnuiken, beteugelen
To restrain one from a thing=Zich ergens van onthouden
To restrain a word to a signification=Een woord tot eene betekenis bekorten
Dispatch=Afvaardiging, verrichting, beschikking, vervaardiging
He is a man of quick dispatch=Het is een vaardig man

Topics: proverbs and idioms, conflict, reason, revenge, risk

PLAY: Othello
ACT/SCENE: 5.2
SPEAKER: Emila
CONTEXT:
Peace, you were best.
Thou hast not half that power to do me harm
As I have to be hurt. O gull! O dolt!
As ignorant as dirt! Thou hast done a deed—
I care not for thy sword, I’ll make thee known
Though I lost twenty lives.

DUTCH:
Je kunt
mij nog niet half het kwaad aandoen dat ik
verdragen kan. Jij dom en gedupeerd,
onwetend hoopje vuil, hebt iets gedaan…

MORE:

Schmidt:
Gull=A person easily deceived, a dupe, a fool

Compleat:
Gull=Bedrieger
To gull=Bedriegen, verschalken. You look as if you had a mind to gull me=Hete schynt of gy voorneemens waart om my te foppen

Topics: insult, gullibility, intellect, revenge

PLAY: King Henry VI Part 3
ACT/SCENE: 2.2
SPEAKER: George
CONTEXT:
GEORGE
But when we saw our sunshine made thy spring,
And that thy summer bred us no increase,
We set the axe to thy usurping root;
And though the edge hath something hit ourselves,
Yet know thou, since we have begun to strike,
We’ll never leave till we have hewn thee down
Or bathed thy growing with our heated bloods.
EDWARD
And, in this resolution, I defy thee;
Not willing any longer conference,
Since thou deniest the gentle king to speak.
Sound trumpets! Let our bloody colours wave!
And either victory, or else a grave.

DUTCH:
Maar onze zonneschijn schonk u een lente,
En nooit bracht ons uw zomer een’gen groei;
Dies legden we aan den vreemden stam onze aks

MORE:

Sunshine=Beneficial influence
Spring=Rise, thriving
Bred us no increase=We haven’t gained from
Usurping=Encroaching, seizing (esp. of royal rights)

Compleat:
To spring=(forth, out or up)=Uitspruiten, uitschieten, opschieten; (raise or proceed) Ontstaan
To breed=(ill blood) Kwaad bloed zetten; (mischief) Kwaad berokkenen; (quarrels) Krakkeel verwekken
To usurp=’t Onrecht aanmaatigen, met geweld in ‘t bezit dringen, overweldigen
Usurpation=Een onrechtmaatige bezitneeming, of indrang, dwinggebruik, overweldiging
Usurping=Een onrechtmaatige bezitting; ‘t onrecht aanmaatigende

Topics: revenge, ruin, conflict

PLAY: Hamlet
ACT/SCENE: 4.4
SPEAKER: Hamlet
CONTEXT:
How all occasions do inform against me,
And spur my dull revenge! What is a man
If his chief good and market of his time
Be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more.

DUTCH:
Wat is een mensch, Wiens hoogste goed en markt zijns levens gaat Om slaap en voedsel slechts? /
Wat man is dat, Wiens hoogste goed en tijdsbesteding enkel Maar slapen is en eten?

MORE:
Schmidt:
To inform against=to communicate by way of accusation, to denounce
To spur (figurative)=to incite, to impel
Compleat:
To inform against=Iemand verklikken, of beklappen
to spur on=Aanspooren, noopen, aandryven
To spur one a question ( to start him a question in haste)=Een onverwagte, schielyke vraag doen

Topics: life, satisfaction, revenge

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